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Hall of Merit
— A Look at Baseball's All-Time Best

Monday, March 12, 2007

The Baseball Hall of Merit Plaque Room: A-F

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Hank Aaron – 1982 – RF/LF/CF/1B/DH
20.8 seasons with: Milwaukee/Atlanta (NL) 1954-74; Milwaukee (AL) 1975-76
Cap: Milwaukee Braves (NL)
Our twelfth unanimous selection! The major league’s all-time holder of its most hallowed record, “Hammerin’ Hank’s” 755 homers were achieved through a combination of great skill, agelessness, and tenacity. Not just a power hitter (8 times with at least 40), the right-handed Aaron hit for average (14 seasons over .300 and.304 lifetime), retired with the NL records of 2,107 runs and 3,771 hits, and left the game with major league records for RBI (2,297), TB (6,856), G (3,298), XBH (1,477), AB (12, 364), IBB (293), and Sac. Flies (121). Graceful and speedy (a 76% SB rate), “Bad Henry” was a fine defender (leading NL right fielders 5 times in games, 4 times in double plays, 3 times in putouts, and once in assists).  Member of one division champ (1969), and two pennant-winners (1958 and the World Champions of 1957). NL MVP (1957). Three-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1958-60). Fifteen-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1956-69, 1973). Four-time Win Shares NL MVP (1957, 1959, 1961, 1963). Four-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1957, 1959, 1961, 1963). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1961). Twenty-time All-Star (1955-75). NL leader for BA (1956, 1959), SLG (1959, 1963, 1967, 1971), OPS (1959, 1963, 1971), G (1961), Runs (1957, 1963, 1967), H (1956, 1959), TB (1956-57, 1959-61, 1963, 1967, 1969), 2B (1955-56, 1961, 1965), HR (1957, 1963, 1966-67), RBI (1957, 1960, 1963, 1966), Adj. OPS+ (1959, 1963, 1971), XBH (1959, 1961, 1963, 1967, 1969), Times on Base (1959, 1963), Sac. Flies (1960), Power/Speed Number (1963, 1966, 1968), and AB per HR (1971-73). Retired with the Braves’ franchise single-season record for SLG (.669 in 1971), Runs (127 in 1962: modern record), TB (400 in 1959), HR (47 in 1971), XBH (92 in 1959), Sac. Flies (12 in 1960), IBB (23 in 1968), Power/Speed Number (36.4 in 1963), and AB per HR (9.8 in 1973), as well as the career records for SLG (.567), OPS (.944), 2B (600), SB (240: modern record), 1B (2,171), Adj. OPS+ (158), Times on Base (4,928),  Power/Speed Number (361.6), and AB per HR (15.9).

Pete Alexander - 1936 – P
Philadelphia (NL) 1911-17, 1930; Chicago (NL) 1918-26; St. Louis (NL) 1926-29                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
Cap: Philadelphia Phillies      
The star NL hurler of his time, Grover Cleveland “Pete” Alexander led his league in every important pitching statistic at least once. The gifted righty tamed his opponents with a very active fastball and a sharp breaking curveball, while exhibiting extraordinary control of his pitches. “Alex the Great’s” biggest baseball moment was striking out Tony Lazzeri with the bases full in Game Seven to help the Cards beat the Yanks in ’26. Retired with the major league records for shutouts (16 in 1916), 1-hitters (4 in 1915) in a season and (tied) fielding percentage (1.000 in 1913), the NL career records for wins (373), shutouts (90), and most starts (600), as well as the NL single-season record for most strikeouts for a rookie (227 in 1911). Member of three pennant winners (1915, 1928 and the above mentioned World Champions of 1926). Three-time NL Pitching Triple Crown (1915-16, 1920). STATS, Inc. NL Rookie of the Year (1911).  Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1911, 1915-17, 1920). Eight-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1911, 1914-17, 1920, 1923, 1927). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL MVP (1915-16). Four-time Win Shares NL MVP (1911, 1915-17). Six-time Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1911, 1915-17, 1920, 1927). NL leader for ERA (1915-16, 1919-20), Adj. ERA+ (1915-16, 1919-20), Wins (1911, 1914-17, 1920), W-L % (1915), WHIP (1915-16, 1923, 1926-27), Hits Allowed/9IP (1911, 1915, 1919), BB/9IP (1917, 1923, 1925, 1927-28), K/9IP (1912, 1915), IP (1911-12, 1914-17, 1920), K (1912, 1914-17, 1920), GS (1916-17, 1920), CG (1911, 1914-17, 1920), and SHO (1911, 1913, 1915-17, 1919, 1921). Retired with the Phillies’ franchise single-season records set in 1915 for ERA (1.22), WHIP (.842), Hits Allowed/9IP (6.05), K (241), SO to Walk (3.77), and Adj. ERA+ (225), as well as the career records for Wins (190), W-L% (.676), Games (338), Saves (15), IP (2,513.7) K (1,409), CG (219), SO (61), and ERA+ (140).

Dick Allen – 1983 – 3B/1B/LF
10.7 seasons with: Philadelphia (NL) 1963-69, 1975-76; St. Louis (NL) 1970; Los Angeles (1971); Chicago (AL) 1972-74; Oakland (AL) 1977
Cap: Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
A truly outstanding batter, Allen was strong in all areas offensively. Capable of launching baseballs out of sight, the right-handed Allen (early in his career he was known as Richie) possessed monstrous strength (6 times with at least 30 home runs), quality contact skills (7 seasons with a .300 or more batting average), and patience at the plate. With his great speed, he was an exciting and daring baserunner. Allen led his leagues once in 3B games, 3B double plays, and 1B fielding average. Member of one division leader (1976). AL MVP (1972). NL Rookie of the Year Award (1964). STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1966). STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1968). Two-time STATS, Inc AL First Baseman (1972, 1974). Win Shares NL MVP (1964). Win Shares AL MVP (1972). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1964). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1972). Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award (1972). Seven-time All-Star (1965-67, 1970, 1972-74). NL leader for OBP (1967), SLG (1966), OPS (1966-67), Runs (1964), TB (1964), 3B (1964), Adj. OPS+ (1966-67), XBH (1964, 1966) and AB per HR (1966). AL leader for OBP (1967), SLG (1972, 1974), OPS (1972, 1974), HR (1972, 1974), RBI (1972), BB (1972), Adj. OPS+ (1972), XBH (1972), Times on Base (1972), Power/Speed Number (1972), and AB/HR (1972, 1974). Retired with the Phillies’ franchise single-season records for G (162 in 1964), OPS+ (modern record: 181 in 1966), and AB per HR (13.1 in 1966); the Phillies’ career records for IBB (81) and AB per HR (19.3); as well as the White Sox records for HR (37 in 1972) and Adj. OPS+ (200 in 1972).

Roberto Alomar  - 2010 – 2B
15.1 seasons with: San Diego (NL) 1988-90; Toronto (AL) 1991-95; Baltimore (AL) 1996-98; Cleveland (AL) 1999-2001; New York (NL) 2002-03; Chicago (AL) 2003-04; Arizona (NL) 2004
Cap: Toronto Blue Jays (AL)
The best all-around second baseman in the major leagues during the 1990s, Alomar also has the distinction of being the Blue Jays’ greatest player at the keystone sack. One of the most outstanding hitters for his position, the switch-hitter had a career .300 batting average and a 116 OPS+. Alomar also hit .at least 300 9 times, scored 100 or more runs 6 times, had an OBP of .400 or more 5 times and drove in 100 or more runs twice. Quick on the basepaths, he stole 474 bases (30 or more seasons 8 times) and had an excellent 81% success rate. Flashy on defense with a strong arm, he led all AL second basemen in games played and games started 5 times, fielding average 4 times, assists twice, and range factor and putouts once. AL-ALCS MVP (1992 – he had a batting line of .423/.464/.692). ML-AS MVP (1998). Ten-time (most for a second baseman) AL Gold Glove Award winner (1991-96; 1998-2001). Four-time (a 2B record) AL Silver Slugger Award-2B (1992, 1996, 1998-99). Twelve-time All-Star (1990-2001). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Second Baseman (1992-93). Win Shares AL MVP (1999). Three-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1996-97, 1999). Member of one wild card winner (1996), four division-winners (1991, 1997, 1999 and 2001) and the World Champions of 1992 and 1993 (Alomar’s postseason battling line: .313/.381/.448; he also hit .480/.519/.640 in the ’93 Fall Classic). NL leader for PA (1989). AL leader for R (1999) and SF (1999).

Cap Anson - 1903 - 1B/3B/C
25.2 seasons with: Rockford (NA) 1871; Philadelphia A’s (NA) 1872-75; Chicago (NL) 1876-97
Cap: Chicago White Stockings (NL)
Possibly the single most important person who played an on-field part in the formation of the National League, Anson was baseball’s first superstar. Large and powerfully built, the right-handed “Pop” was as durable as they come. Anson hit .333/.393/.445 vs. leagues that were .277/.326/.369 over a career that spanned 27 seasons, earning 567 WS (does not count 5 seasons in the NA) and peak season WS of 42 (1881), 39 (1881) and 38 (1880). The first man to hit 3,000 hits and once hit a record five homers in two days, he hit .300 24 times (20 in a row). A fine fielder, he led all first basemen in his league 4 times in putouts, 8 times in assists, 5 times in double plays and 4 times in fielding percentage; he also led third basemen twice in putouts and double plays and once in assists, plus once in OF double plays. At his induction, “The Grand Old Man of Baseball”  holds numerous career records (combined NA and NL), including runs (1,996), RBI (2,076), total bases (4,574), hits (3,418), doubles (581), games played (2,523), and putouts (22,568). Key contributor to 6 pennant winners (1876, 80-82, 85-86). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL MVP (1881, 1888). STATS, Inc. Third Baseman (1876-77). STATS, Inc. Outfielder (1878). Six-time STATS, Inc. First Baseman (1880-81, 1886, 1888, 1890-91). Win Shares Silver Slugger Award (1881). Four-time Win Shares Gold Glove winner (1880-81, 1887,1888, 1889). Career OWP .698. NA leader in OBP (1872) and 2B (1871). NL leader in BA (1881, 1888), OBP (1881, 1888, 1890), G (1890), H (1881), TB (1881), 2B (1877, 1885), RBI (1880-82, 1884-86, 1888, 1891), BB (1890), OPS (1881, 1888), Adj. OPS+ (1881), 1B (1880-81, 1888), XBH (1884), and Times on Base (1881, 1890). Retired with the Cubs’ single-season records for G (146 in 1892), RBI (147 in 1886), BB (113 in 1890), and Times on Base (276 in 1890), as well as the career records for G (2,276), AB (9,101), R (1,719), H (2,995), TB (4,062), 1B (2,598), 2B (528), 3B (124), HR (97), RBI (1,879), BB (952), 1B (2,246), XBH (749), and Times on Base (3,979).

Luke Appling - 1956 – SS
15.7 seasons with: Chicago (AL) 1930-43, 1945-50
Cap: Chicago White Sox (AL)
A stellar shortstop throughout most of his twenty seasons as a player, “Luscious Luke” was a pitcher’s nightmare without having to a homer. The right-handed Appling had the uncanny ability to wear down hurlers by fouling off pitch after pitch, while his keen eye allowed him to take his base either by walk (helping him with his career .399 OBP) or a solid hit (he hit .300 13 times and his career number was .310). A hard worker, he became a fine fielder who possessed a powerful arm (he led the league in putouts twice, assists 7 times, and double plays 3 times). In his later years, he was known as “Old Aches and Pains” for his grumblings concerning his infirmities, yet Appling was still one of the more most durable shortstops ever (retiring with the major league career records for most games (2,218) and double plays (1,424) at his position, as well as the AL career records for putouts (4,398) and assists (7,218)). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Shortstop (1935-36, 1943). Win Shares AL MVP (1943). Two-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1937, 1943). Seven-time All-Star (1936, 1939-41, 1943, 1946-47). AL leader for BA (1936, 1943), Times on Base (1943), OBP (1943), and Games (1943). Retired with the White Sox single-season records for BA (.388 in 1936) and OBP (.474 in 1936); as well as the vast majority of the White Sox career records such as Games (2,422), AB (8,856), Runs (1,319), Hits (2,749), Total Bases (3,528), 2B (440), RBI (1,116), BB (1,302), Singles (2,162), XBH (587), and Times on Base (4,062).

Richie Ashburn – 1968 – CF
14.2 seasons with: Philadelphia (NL) 1948-59; Chicago (NL) 1960-61; New York (NL) 1962
Cap: Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
One of the most outstanding leadoff men of all-time and the king of the single during the fifties, “Whitey” was a model for all players who strive to get on base. A spray hitter with triples power, his ability to single the opposing pitcher to death and take first base via a walk (4 times with over 100 BB) helped him to accomplish a .300 batting average (.308 lifetime) and 100 runs 9 times. A scintillating fielder, he led the NL in games 4 times, assists 3 times, double plays 3 times, and a ML record 9 times for total chances and putouts; he made 400 putouts a major league record 9 times and 500 putouts a ML record 4 times during his career. Member of one pennant-winner (the “Whiz Kinds” of 1950 – Ashburn threw out Brooklyn’s Cal Abrams in the 9th inning of the season-ending game, setting up the Phillies’ eventual win and pennant that year). STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1958). Eight-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1949-55, 1957). Five-time All-Star (1948, 1951, 1953, 1958, 1962). NL leader for BA (1955, 1958), OBP (1954-55, 1958, 1960), Games (1952, 1957), AB (1949), Hits (1951, 1953, 1958), Triples (1950, 1958), BB (1954, 1957-58, 1960), SB (1948), 1B (1951, 1953, 1957-58), and Times on Base (1954-55, 1957-58, 1960). Retired with the Phillies’ franchise season records for AB (662 in 1949) and 1B (181 in 1951), as well as the career record for Games (1,794), AB (7,122), Hits (2,217), BB (946), 1B (1,811), and Times on Base (3,202). Retired with the rookie single-season record for consecutive games hitting safely (23 games in 1948).

Earl Averill – 1961 – CF/LF
10.8 seasons with: Cleveland (AL) 1929-39; Detroit (AL) 1939-40; Boston (NL) 1941
Cap: Cleveland Indians (AL)
The best AL centerfielder of the thirties, “The Earl of Snohomish” was a durable, outstanding contributor for the Indians. A dead pull hitter, the left-handed Averill had excellent power and made fine contact. Equally strong as a defender, “Rock” led the league twice in putouts, once in total chances, and once in double plays. The first ML to hit four homers in a double header, he was also the first AL player to hit a home run in his first at bat. Member of one pennant-winner (1940). Six-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1931-32, 1934, 1936-38). Four-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1931-34). Six-time All-Star (1933-38). AL leader for Games (1934), AB (1931), Hits (1936), Triples (1936), and HBP (1932). Retired with the Indians’ franchise single-season records for Runs (140 in 1931), as well as the career records for Runs (1,154), Triples (121), Home Runs (226), RBI (1,084), XBH (724), Total Bases (3,200), and Power/Speed Number (102.2).

Jeff Bagwell - 2011 - 1B
13.6 seasons with: Houston (NL) 1991-2005
Cap: Houston Astros (NL)
The greatest player in the history of the Houston franchise, Bagwell was consistently the best all-around first baseman during the 1990s. ‘Bags’ combined exceptional plate discipline (.408 career OBP) with great power (.540 lifetime SLG) to be one of the most dangerous hitters in his era (149 career OPS+). His 1994 MVP season was sublime, as he led the league in R (104), RBI (116), SLG (.750), OPS+ (213), and TB (300). Besides being a masher, Bagwell could run (202 career SB, including two seasons of at least 30) and was considered a plus defensive 1B (winning the Gold Glove in 1994). The 1991 NL Rookie of the Year came to the Astros fully formed as the return in one of history’s most lopsided trades, acquired from the Boston Red Sox in exchange for 22 innings out of the bullpen for Larry Andersen. An integral member of the “Killer Bs” along with long-time teammate Craig Biggio, Bagwell was part of four division winners (1997-1999, 2001) and two wild-card winners (2004-2005) making the World Series in 2005 (the first Houston team to win a pennant). A four-time NL All-Star (1994, 1996, 1997, 1999) and three-time Silver Slugger award winner (1994, 1997, 1999). NL leader in games played four times (1992, 1996, 1997, 1999), Runs three times (1994, 1999, 2000) 2B (1996), BB (1999), and HBP (1991). He holds career franchise records for most HR (449), RBI (1,529), BB (1,401), and OPS+ (149).

Frank Baker - 1928 - 3B
10.5 seasons with: Philadelphia (AL) 1908-14; New York (AL) 1916-19, 1921-22                                                                                 
Cap: Philadelphia Athletics (AL)
Manning the “hot corner” as part of the Philadelphia A’s “$100,000 Infield,” Baker was its mightiest slugger. Though nicknamed “Home Run” Baker for two game-winning clouts against the Giants in the 1911 World Series (his postseason offensive line reads .363/.392/.560), the lefty batter also made many more of them during the “Deadball Era.” Besides his bat work (including a .307 career BA), he also was one of the best defensive third basemen of his time (he led the AL in putouts and chances seven times, assists twice, double plays three times, and fielding percentage twice; he left the game with the AL record for most putouts in a season (233 in 1913)) and speedy on the basepaths. Member of six pennant winners (1914, 1921-22 and the three World Series championship teams of 1910-11 and 1913). Eight-time STATS, Inc. AL Third Baseman (1909-14, 1917-18). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1913). Four-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1909-11, 1917). Retired with the Philadelphia Athletics franchise records for most triples in a season (21 in 1912). AL leader for Games (1919), Triples (1909), Home Runs (1911-14), RBI (1912-13), and Power/Speed Number (1911, 1913-14). Retired with the Athletics’ single-season records for Triples (21 in 1912) and RBI (130 in 1912), as well as the career record for SLG (.471).

Ernie Banks – 1977 – SS/1B
16.0 seasons with: Chicago (NL) 1953-71
Cap: Chicago Cubs (NL)
The “Windy City’s” most popular player in the NL (not to mention the Cubs’ first African-American player), “Mr. Cub” was the greatest ML shortstop of the ‘50’s and beloved for his cheery personality and love of the game (Let’s play two!). A quick-wristed power hitter, the right-handed slugger left the major leagues with the season record for home runs as a shortstop (44 in 1958); hit 40 or more clouts five times, and was the first player who played a considerable number of games at short to hit 500 home runs (finishing up with 512 and a record 277 of them as a shortstop). He also drove in 100 or more runs in eight times and a NL record for grand slams in a season (5 in 1955). Respected as a fielder at short (he led NL players at the position 5 times in games, 3 times in fielding percentage, 2 times in total chances and assists, and once in putouts and double plays; he also achieved the fewest errors there (12) and fielding percentage (.985) in 1958), he was also fine as a first baseman and actually played more games there (leading the league at that position in total chances and putouts 5 times, assists 3 times, and games, fielding percentage, and double plays once. Two-time NL MVP (1958-59). NL Gold Glove (1960). Seven-time STATS, Inc. NL Shortstop (1955-61). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1959). Eleven-time All-Star (1955-62, 1965, 1967, 1969). NL leader for SLG (1958), Games (1954-55, 1957-60), AB (1958), TB (1958), HR (1958, 1960), RBI (1958-59), XBH (1955, 1957-58, 1960), IBB (1959-60), and AB per HR (1958). Retired with the Cubs’ franchise career records for Games (2,528), AB (9,421) Runs (modern record: 1,305), Hits (modern record: 2,583), TB (4,706), 2B (modern record: 407), RBI (modern record: 1,636), XBH (1,009), Times on Base (modern record: 3,416), Sac. Flies (96), and IBB (198).

Ross Barnes - 1898 - 2B/SS
10.8 seasons with: Rockford 1868-70, Boston (NA: 1871-75; NL 1881); Chicago (NL) 1876-77; Cincinnati (NL) 1879
Cap: Boston Red Stockings (NA)
The hitting star of the National Association (he hit over .400 four times and owns many of the major offensive records for that league) and the inaugural season of the NL (highlighted by his .429 BA and the first home run credited for that league), the right-handed Barnes excelled at utilizing the fair-foul hit and scientific hitting as a major part of his offensive attack. The best player in the game from 1871-76, his run through 1876 was a peak achieved by only the greatest players in the history of the game. An outstanding and graceful defensive second baseman as well (Barnes led the NA in putouts once, fielding percentage twice, assists 4 times, and double plays 3 times, as well as once in fielding percentage in the NL), he was a member of baseball’s first great keystone combination due to his speed, range, accuracy, and smarts. A starter for 5 consecutive pennant winners (1872-76), he was a member of Boston’s “Big Four” from the early 1870’s. STATS, Inc. NL MVP 1876. STATS, Inc. Second Baseman (1876). Win Shares Silver Slugger Award (1876). NA leader in BA (1872-73), OBP (1873, 1875), SLG (1872-73), Games (1873), Runs (1871, 1873, 1875), Hits (1872-73, 1875), TB (1871-73), 2B (1872-73), BB (1873), SB (1873), Singles (1875), OPS,  Adj. OPS+ (1872-73), XBH (1872-73) and Times on Base (1871-73, 1875). NL leader for BA, OBP, SLG, Runs, Hits, TB, 2B, 3B, BB, Singles, OPS, Adj. OPS+, XBH, and Times on Base in 1876. Retired with the single-season record for runs per game (1.91 in 1876).

Jake Beckley  - 1998 – 1B
16.8 seasons with: Pittsburgh (NL) 1888-89, 1891-1896; Pittsburgh (PL) 1890; New York (NL) 1896-97; Cincinnati (NL) 1897-1903; St. Louis (NL) 1904-07
Cap: Pittsburgh Pirates
His era’s finest long-career first baseman, “Eagle Eye” (named for his talent at reading pitches) focused on and grasped many of the National League’s most impressive records when he left the game (including the career records for G (2,386), AB (9,526), PA (10,470), TB (4,147), 3B (237) and XBH (802)). A .308 lifetime hitter, the left-handed slugger had 13 seasons with a batting average over .300, five seasons scoring over 100 runs and four times topping the century mark in RBIs while compiling career totals of 2,930 hits, 315 stolen bases, 1,600 runs and 1,575 RBI in his 20 seasons as an active player. A star fielder, he held the ML career records for chances (25,000), putouts (23,709) and games (2,377) at first base when he finally hung up his spikes (he also led NL first baseman 6 times in putouts, 4 times in assists, and twice in both games and double plays). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1899-1900, 1902). Five-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1893-95, 1899-1900). PL leader for 3B (1890) and XBH (1890). Retired with the Pirates’ franchise single-season record for HBP (21 in 1895), as well as the career records for AB (4,311), PA (4,737), 3B (134), HR (52), RBI (781) and HBP (106); he also retired with the Reds’ franchise single-season record for 1B (152).

John Beckwith - 1957 – 3B/SS/C/OF, 1B
Havana Stars (1917); Chicago Giants (1918-21, 1925);  Chicago American Giants (1922-23); Baltimore Black Sox (1924-26, 1930-31); Harrisburg Giants (1926-27); Homestead Grays (1924, 1928-29, 1935); New York Lincoln Giants (1929-30); Atlantic City Bacharach Giants (1931-32); Newark Browns (1931-32); New York Black Yankees (1933-34); Newark Dodgers (1934)
Cap: Baltimore Black Sox
One of the greatest Negro League hitters of all-time, “The Black Bomber” knocked the stuffin’ out of baseballs during the twenties and early thirties. A terrific hitter for average with impressive power (some of his clouts went for legendary distances), the right-handed Beckwith pulled everything to left (despite defensive alignments set up to counter this, he still maintained his status as one of the best batmen for his era). Highly versatile in the field, he played every position at least once during his career. Despite his size, the tough and fiery Beckwith manned the important defensive positions of third base and shortstop for most of his career. Member of one Western winner (1922). Member of one Eastern winner (1928). Fleet Walker Award (1925). Seven-time Holway All-Star (1924-27, 1929-31). Western leader for Doubles (1923).  Eastern leader for BA (1924), HR (1925, 1931), and HR/550 AB (1924-25, 1931).

Cool Papa Bell – 1973 – CF/LF/P
St. Louis Stars (1922-31); Detroit Wolves (1932); Kansas City Monarchs (1932, 1934); Homestead Grays (1932, 1943-46); Pittsburgh Crawfords (1933-38); Santo Domingo (1937); Mexican League (1938-41); Chicago American Giants (1942); Memphis Red Sox (1942)
Cap: St, Louis Stars
Considered by many to be the fastest man ever to wear spikes, Bell probably has more anecdotes about his speed than any other player. A fine hitter, his legs helped the switch-hitter turn outs into hits and hits into extra bases. They also helped Cool Papa (he was given that nickname as a teenager for his equanimity under pressure) as he patrolled the outfield, allowing him to play a very shallow center field. One of the longest careers ever to be seen in professional baseball, he played for three of the most fabled teams in Negro League history. Member of two Western pennant-winners (1928, 1930). Member of two East-West pennant-winners (1934-35). Member of three Eastern pennant-winners (1943-45). Six-time Holway All-Star (1925-26, 1929-32). Seven-time All-Star (the inaugural year of 1933, 1934-36, 1942-44). Holway MVP (1928 Western playoff). East-West leader for SB (1934-35). Western leader for Doubles (1925) and Stolen Bases (1925-26).

Johnny Bench – 1989 – C/3B/1B
13.5 seasons with: Cincinnati (NL) 1967-83
Cap: Cincinnati Reds
Considered by many to be the best all-around catcher in major league history, Bench may be the best defensive catcher of all-time. Behind the plate, he was excellent calling pitches for the “Big Red Machine”, throwing out runners with his rocket arm, and blocking the plate (he led NL backstops 4 times in pickoffs, twice in putouts and games, and once in double plays and fielding percentage). With a bat, the right-handed Bench left the game with the most home runs for a catcher (327), the single-season catching records for doubles (40 in his rookie season) and homeruns (45 in 1970), 2 seasons with at least 40 clouts, and six seasons of 100 or more runs driven in. Durable, he had 9 seasons with at least 140 games as a catcher and retired with the records for most consecutive seasons of at least 100 games as that position from the start of his career (13). Member of two division champs (1973 and 1979) and four pennant-winners (1970, 1972, the World Champions of 1975-76); a great postseason clutch-hitter (.530 SLG), he batted .533, and slugged 1.133 in the 1976 World Series. NL Rookie of the Year (1967). Two-time NL MVP (1970 and 1972). ML-WS MVP (1976). Ten-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1968-77). Six-time STATS, Inc. NL Catcher (1968-70, 1972, 1974-75). Win Shares NL MVP (1970). Five-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1968, 1970, 1973-74, 1976). Fourteen-time All-Star (1968-80, 1983).  NL leader for TB (1974), HR (1970, 1972), RBI (1970, 1972, 1974), XBH (1970, 1974), Sac. Flies (1970, 1972-73), and IBB (1972). Retired with the Reds’ career records for HR (389), RBI (1,376), IBB (135), and Sac. Flies (90).

Charlie Bennett - 1921 - C
9.8 seasons with: Milwaukee (NL) 1878; Worcester (NL) 1880; Detroit (NL) 1881-1888; Boston (NL) 1889-1893
Cap: Detroit Wolverines (NL)
His era’s most durable catcher, he was also its greatest backstop due to his terrific play behind the plate and handling of pitchers. Besides fielding, the right-handed Bennett was second only to Buck Ewing as a hitter for his position during the 1880’s. Member of the Detroit Wolverines’ only pennant winner (and World Series championship) in 1887; the popular Bennett was also part of the great Boston dynasty of 1891-93.  He led the NL in putouts and double plays 3 times, plus many times in total chances per game. Led the NL seven times in fielding percentage. Retired with the career records for most games as a catcher (954), putouts (5,123), double plays (114), and fielding percentage (.942). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Catcher (1881-82). Win Shares NL Gold Glove winner (1881-82; 1886; 1890). Playing every season of the Detroit Wolverines’ existence, he owns the team career records for doubles (141), triples (57), homers (37), RBI (353), and XBH (235).

Yogi Berra – 1969 – C/LF/RF
13.7 seasons with: New York (AL) 1946-63; New York (NL) 1965
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
Certainly the greatest all-around catcher of the 1950’s in the AL and arguably the greatest major league backstop of all-time, Yogi was an elite among the elite at his position and one of the most beloved players ever. A notorious bad-ball hitter who could find hits from the most unlikely of pitches, the left-handed Berra had impressive power (385 homers) and rarely ever struck out (only 12 times in 1950). A much respected clutch-hitter (he had 5 100-plus RBI seasons), Berra ended his career with the World Series records for games (75), at-bats (259), hits (71), doubles (10), singles (49), games caught (63), and catcher putouts (457). As a fielder, he was truly outstanding - quick, mobile, and a great handler of the Yankees’ pitchers (he led the AL 8 times in games caught and chances accepted, a ML record 6 times in double plays, 8 times in putouts, 3 times in assists, and 2 times in fielding percentage; he left the game with the AL records for catcher putouts (8,723) and chances accepted (9,520)). One of only a handful of catchers to field 1.000 for a season in 1958, he caught two no-hitters (one in 1951 and most notably Don Larsen’s perfect game in the 1956 World Series). He retired with the ML records for catching in consecutive games without an error (148 games during 1957-59) and most consecutive chances without an error as a catcher (950 also during 1957-59), as well as the AL backstop records for single-season homers (30 in 1952 and 1956) and career homers (306). Member of a record fourteen pennant-winners (1955, 1957, 1960, 1963, and a record 10 World Series-winners in 1947, 1949-53, 1956, 1958, 1961-62). Three-time AL MVP (1951, 1954-55). Nine-time STATS, Inc. AL Catcher (1949-57). Five-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award (1951-52, 1956-58). Fifteen-time All-Star (1948-62). AL leader for AB per SO (1950). Retired with the Yankees’ franchise career record for Sac. Flies (44).

Craig Biggio - 2013 - 2B/C/CF
18.0 seasons with Houston (NL) 1988-2007
Cap: Houston Astros (NL)
A gritty player known for doing whatever it took to help the team, from getting hit by pitches (he led the league five times and has the second-most all-time with 285) to changing positions (he moved from C to 2B to CF to LF back to 2B over his long career), Craig Biggio’s impact on the field was undeniable. In 1992 the Astros moved Biggio from C to 2B in an effort to maximize his odds of being able to play every day and the gamble worked out as he quickly became the best 2B in the National League, a position he would hold throughout the 1990s. A sparkplug at the top of the lineup (one of only eight players with both 3,000 hits and 400 stolen bases), Biggio led the league in games played three times (1992, 1996-1997), PA five times (1992, 1995, 1997-1999), Runs twice (1995, 1997), 2B three times (1994, 1998, 1999) and SB once (1994). An integral member of the “Killer Bs” along with long-time teammate Jeff Bagwell, Biggio spent his entire career with the Astros and was part of four division winners (1997-1999, 2001) and two wild-card winners (2004-2005) making the World Series in 2005 (the first Houston team to win a pennant). At his induction, Biggio ranked in the top 25 all-time in G (16th—2,850), PA (10th—12,504), R (15th—1,844), H (21st—3,060), 2B (5th—668) and times on base (18th—4,505). Seven-time All-Star (1991-1992, 1994-1998) who won five Silver Slugger awards (1989, 1994-1995, 1997-1998) and four Gold Gloves (1994-1997). He holds the franchise record for most G, PA, R, H, TB (4,711), 2B, XBH (1,014), HBP, and times on base.

Bert Blyleven – 1998 – P
Minnesota (AL) 1970-76, 1985-88; Texas (AL) 1976-77; Pittsburgh (NL) 1978-80; Cleveland (AL) 1981-85; California (AL) 1989-90, 1992
Cap: Minnesota Twins (AL)
Considered the master curveballer of his generation and one of the greatest in the history of the game (equipped with two different breaking balls – an “overhand drop” and a “roundhouse”), the Netherlands-born “Dutchman” had a long career of high, sustained value for his teams. A noted prankster, the right-hander’s pitching demanded respect as he racked up nearly 300 victories (287), with a 118 ERA+, an awe-inspiring 60 shutouts while striking out 3,701 opposing batters during his career (including 8 seasons of over 200). His best season may have been 1973 when he won 20 games and fanned 258 with an excellent 158 ERA+ in 325 IP. Member of one division-champ (1970) and the World Champions of 1979 and 1987 (his postseason pitching line was an outstanding 5-1 with a 2.47 ERA in 47.3 IP). No-hitter (1977). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1973, 1984, 1989). Two-time All-Star (1973, 1985). AL leader in WHIP (1977), IP (1985-86), K (1985), GS (1985), CG (1985), SHO (1973, 1985, 1989), SO to Walk (1971, 1973, 1986) and Adj. ERA+ (1973). Retired with the Angels’ franchise single-season records for W-L% (.773 in 1989) and WHIP (1.23 in 1989).

Wade Boggs – 2005 – 3B/DH
14.2 seasons with: Boston (AL) 1982-92; New York (AL) 1993-97; Tampa Bay (AL) 1998-99
Cap: Boston Red Sox (AL)
The American League’s premier contact hitter of the 1980s, “Chicken Man” (as he was famous for having a chicken sandwich before every game throughout his career) is among the finest all-around AL third basemen of all-time. The only ML batter from the 20th century with 7 consecutive 200-hit seasons (3,010 hits lifetime), the left-handed hitter with incredible command of the strike zone (he reached base safely in 80% of his games) batted over .300 15 times (.328 career), had an OBP over .400 11 times (.415 career), hit at least 40 doubles 8 times (including a high of 51 and 578 for his career), scored 100 or more runs 7 times, walked over 100 times for 4 consecutive seasons (1,412 career) and had an impressive career OPS+ of 130 (mostly from the leadoff spot). He left the game with the AL single-season records for most singles (187 in 1985) and highest BA as a rookie (.349 in 1982), as well as the ML records for consecutive seasons with 40 or more doubles (7, from 1985-1991), most batting titles as a third baseman (5) and most intentional walks in a 9-inning game (3 in 1990). Manning the hot corner, he developed into an above average fielder (leading AL third basemen 4 times in double plays, 3 times in putouts, twice each in games and fielding percentage and once in assists). Member of two wild card winners (1995, 1997), two division championships (1988, 1990) and two pennant-winners (1986 and the World Champions of 1996; in the latter series, he won Game 4 with his bases-loaded walk). Eight-time AL Silver Slugger-3B (1983, 1986-89, 1991, 1993-94). Two-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1994-95). Six-time STATS, Inc. AL Third Baseman (1975-77, 1979-80, 1985). STATS, Inc. AL First Baseman (1988). Win Shares AL MVP (1986). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1986). Two-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1984, 1993). Twelve-time All-Star (1985-96). AL leader for BA (1983, 1985-88), OBP (1983, 1985-89), OPS (1987-88), PA (1985, 1988-89), R (1988-89), H (1985), 1B (1983-85), 2B (1988-89), BB (1986, 1988), Adj. OPS+ (1987), Times on Base (1983-90) and IBB (1987-92). Retired with the Red Sox’s franchise single-season records for PA (758 in 1985) and H (240 in 1985).

Barry Bonds - 2013 - LF
18.8 seasons with Pittsburgh (NL) 1986-1992; San Francisco (NL) 1993-2007
Cap: San Francisco Giants (NL)
Like his godfather Willie Mays, Barry Bonds’ impact on baseball left many in awe. Widely considered as one of the best players of all-time, he was unanimously placed first on every Hall of Merit ballot in his first year of consideration. A great all-around player early in his career who evolved into the most intimidating hitter ever (he has each of the top three and six of the top ten seasons of accumulated intentional walks), Bonds’ name is everywhere in the record books. He led the league in Runs (1992), HR (1993 and 2001, when he established a new single-season record 73), RBI (1993) BB (1992, 1994-1997, 2000-2004, 2006-2007), IBB (1992-1998, 2002-2004, 2006-2007), TB (1993), BA (2002, 2004), OBP (1991-1993, 1995, 2001-2004, 2006-2007, with 2004’s .609 and 2002’s .582 being the top two seasonal OBPs in baseball history) SLG (1990, 1992-1993, 2001-2004, which includes the MLB record of .863, set in 2001), OPS (1990-1993, 1995, 2001-2004, including the top two marks in history in 2004’s 1.422 and 2002’s 1.381), and OPS+ (1990-1993, 2000-2004, including the top three marks in MLB history, in 2002’s 268, 2004’s 263, and 2001’s 259). His 2004 season was also noteworthy in that he became the first player to have a season with more times on base than at bats (376 vs. 373). Bonds’ individual season dominance added up, as at the time of his induction he ranked in the top ten all-time in PA (9th – 12,606), Runs (3rd – 2,207), TB (4th – 5,796), HR (1st – 762), RBI (4th – 1,996), BB (1st – 2,558), IBB (1st – 688), XBH (2nd – 1,440), AB/HR (3rd – 12.9), times on-base (2nd – 5,599), OBP (6th - .444), SLG (6th - .607), OPS (4th – 1.051), and OPS+ (3rd – 182). Bonds is also the only player in the history of the game to reach the 500 marks in both career HR and career SB. He played on six division winning teams (1990-1992 with Pittsburgh and 1997, 2000, 2003 with San Francisco) and with the wild-card winning Giants in 2002 submitted a World Series performance for the ages, hitting .471/.700/1.294 with 4 HR in a losing effort. He holds the all-time Giants records in BB (1,947), IBB (575) OBP (.447), SLG (.666), OPS (1.143), and OPS+ (199). Fourteen-time All-Star (1990, 1992-1998, 2000-2004, 2007) who won 12 Silver Slugger awards (1990-1994, 1996-1997, 2000-2004), eight Gold Gloves (1990-1994, 1996-1998), and a record seven MVP awards (1990, 1992-1993, 2001-2004).

Lou Boudreau - 1958 – SS
10.7 seasons with: Cleveland (AL) 1938-50; Boston (AL) 1951-52
Cap: Cleveland Indians (AL)
Arguably the most productive shortstop of the Forties, the slick fielder was also talented at the plate (in 1946, he became one of only handful a players to hit 4 doubles in a game). Rarely striking out, the right-handed Boudreau’s greatest moment as a hitter was his four-for-four performance (including two homers) against Boston to help win the one-game playoff for the Indians in 1948. An excellent fielding shortstop, he was skilled in the art of fine positioning, while his sure hands helped him lead the AL in fielding percentage eight times (he also led the league in putouts four times, assists twice, and double plays five times at his position). He retired with the ML records for most double plays in a season for a shortstop (134 in 1944) and the shortstop career record for fielding percentage (.973). AL MVP (1948). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Shortstop (1947-48). Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1940). Eight-time All-Star (1940-45, 1947-48). Member of the World Champion Indians of 1948. AL leader for BA (1944), Games (1940), Doubles (1941, 1944, 1947), Sacrifice Hits (1941, 1946), and At Bats per Strikeout (1946-48).

Ken Boyer – 1991 – 3B/CF
12.8 seasons with: St. Louis (NL) 1955-65; New York (NL) 1966-67; Chicago (AL) 1967-68; Los Angeles (NL) 1968-69
Cap: St. Louis Cardinals (NL)
The greatest all-around third baseman in the history of the Cardinal franchise, Boyer was also considered by many to be the best NL fielder at that position for most of his years with the Redbirds. Exemplary at third, he tied the ML record for most times leading a league in 3B double plays with 5 (he also led the NL 3 times in games, twice in assists and fielding percentage, and once in putouts, not to mention once for fielding percentage as a center fielder). A powerful right-handed slugger, Boyer banged 30 or more homers twice (he was the second third baseman to hit 250 for a career), drove in 100 or more runs twice (he left the game tied for the ML record for most consecutive 90+ RBI seasons with 7 at the “hot corner”), and scored 100 or more runs 3 times (he hit for the cycle once in 1961 and again in his MVP season). Member of one pennant-winner (the World Champions of 1964 – during that series, his grand slam in Game 4 was the deciding factor, while his 7th–inning shot in Game 7 gave the Cardinals the win and the trophy). NL MVP (1964). Five-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1958-61, 1963). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1958, 1961). Seven-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1955-56, 1958-62).  Seven-time All-Star (1956, 1959-64). NL leader for RBI (1964). Retired with the Cardinals’ franchise single-season record for G (162 in 1964).

Roger Bresnahan – 2004 – C/CF
9.7 seasons with: Washington (NL) 1897; Chicago (NL) 1900, 1913-15; Baltimore (AL) 1901-02; New York (NL) 1902-08; St. Louis (NL) 1909-12
Cap: New York Giants
One of the most versatile players in major league history (playing all nine positions at some point during his career), “The Duke of Tralee” is remembered as being the best all-around catcher of his generation. An on-field leader and an unapologetic brawler, the right-handed leadoff hitter was easily the top offensive catcher of his era. He twice batted over .300 in a full season, had 5 seasons with an OBP topping over .400 and retired with an excellent 126 OPS+ for a catcher. One of the most dangerous baserunners to ever don shin guards and a catcher’s mask (he is said to have invented the former, while he is credited with implementing substantial improvements in the latter), Bresnahan stole 212 bases during his career (he left the game with the post-19th century catcher stolen base records for a single-season (25 in 1906) and for a career (147)). With a mask on, the Duke made a defensive impact by introducing the slide step for blocking home plate and the snap throws for picking off runners at first base (he led NL catchers in both putouts and fielding percentage once each). Member of one pennant winner (1904) and the World Champions of 1905 (in that Fall Classic, he dominated both teams offensively by hitting .313 and getting on base in half of his plate appearances.) STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1903). Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Catcher (1905-08). NL leader for BB (1908) and HBP (1906). Retired with the Giants’ single-season record for OBP (post-19th century record: .443 in 1903), as well as their career records for OBP (.403), OPS (post-19th century record: .796) and OPS+ (140).

George Brett – 1999 – 3B/DH/1B
17.0 seasons with: Kansas City (AL) 1973-93
Cap: Kansas City Royals (AL)
The greatest player in Royals franchise history and acclaimed by many as the AL’s best ever third baseman, the passionate Brett put up the most serious challenge to hitting .400 (.390 in 1980) in the AL in over 60 years. Noted as an extremely well-balanced offensive player who finished his career with an outstanding 135 OPS+, the left-handed line-drive hitter batted over .300 11 times, slugged over .500 8 times, with four seasons each of driving in and/or scoring at least 100 runs plus two seasons with over 200-hits and three with an OBP topping .400. A quality base stealer (201 career SB), he also was respected defensively at the hot corner (led the AL twice in assists and once each in putouts and games). A member of five division-champs (1976-78, 1981, 1984) and two pennant-winners (1980 and the World Champions of 1985), Brett was phenomenal in postseason play, with a sparkling batting line of .337/.397/.627 while compiling the LCS career records for homers (9) and SLG (.728). AL MVP (1980). ALCS MVP (1985). Two-time AL Silver Slugger-3B (1980, 1985). AL Silver Slugger-1B (1988). AL Gold Glove Award winner (1985). Six-time STATS, Inc. AL Third Baseman (1975-77, 1979-80, 1985). STATS, Inc. AL First Baseman (1988). Two-time Win Shares AL MVP (1976, 1980). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1980). Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1977). Thirteen-time All-Star (1976-88). AL leader in BA (1976, 1980, 1990 – the first and currently only player with batting titles in three separate decades), OBP (1980), SLG (1980, 1983, 1985), OPS (1980, 1983, 1985), AB (1975-76), H (1975-76, 1979), TB (1976), 2B (1978, 1990), 3B (1975-76, 1979), 1B (1976), Adj. OPS+ (1980, 1983, 1985), XBH (1979), IBB (1985-86) and AB/K (1976-77, 1979). Retired with the Royals’ franchise single-season records for OBP (.454 in 1980), SLG (.664 in 1980), OPS (1.118 in 1980), TB (363 in 1980), OPS+ (202 in 1980), TOB (290 in 1980), IBB (31 in 1985) and AB/K (23.5 in 1977), as well as the career records for BA (.305), G (2,707), AB (10,349), PA (11,624), R (1,583), H (3,154), 1B (2,035), 2B (665), 3B (137), HR (317), RBI (1,595), BB (1,096), TB (5,044), XBH (1,119), TOB (4,283), Sac. Flies (120) and IBB (229 – also the AL record).

Dan Brouthers - 1902 - 1B
13.8 seasons with: Troy (NL) 1879-80; Buffalo (NL) 1881-85; Detroit (NL) 1886-88; Boston (NL) 1889; Boston (PL: 1890; AA: 1891); Brooklyn (NL) 1892-93; Baltimore (NL) 1894-95; Louisville (NL) 1895; Philadelphia (NL) 1896
Cap: Buffalo Bisons (NL)
An incredible offensive player and his era’s best hitter, “Big Dan” was the batting force for the Bisons’ and Wolverines’ “Big Four” teams of the 1880’s. A terrific power hitter for his time (205 triples), the left-handed Brouthers retired with the highest career SLG (.519), OPS (.943), and Adj. OPS+ (170) of any player. A patient hitter with good strike zone judgment, he hardly whiffed for a slugger of the 19th century. He led first basemen in his leagues once in fielding percentage, putouts and double plays. Starred for pennant winners in 1887, 1890-91, 1894. Three-time STATS, Inc. NL MVP 1882, 1892; AA MVP 1891. STATS, Inc. Outfielder (1881). Eight-time STATS, Inc. First Baseman (1882-84, 1887, 1889, 1891-92, 1894). Six-time Win Shares Silver Slugger Award (1882-83, 1889-92). Three-time Win Shares Gold Glove Award winner (1882-83, 1892). Career .342/.423/.519 compared to leagues that were .270/.328/.369. Career OWP .772. NL leader for OPS (1882-87, 1892), Adj. OPS+ (1882-87, 1892), BA (1882-83, 1889, 1892), SLG (1881-86), OBP (1882-83, 1887), Runs (1887-88), Hits (1882-83, 1892), TB (1882-83, 1886, 1892), 2B (1886-88), 3B (1883), HR (1881-86), RBI (1883, 1892), XBH (1881, 1883, 1885-87), Times on Bases (1882-83, 1887-88), AB per Strikeouts (1888-89), and HBP (1889). PL leader for OBP and Times on Base for 1890. AA leader in 1891 in BA, OBP, SLG, OPS, and Adj. OPS+. Retired with numerous offensive club records for the Bisons and Wolverines.

Kevin Brown - 2011 - P
Texas (AL) 1986; 1988-1994; Baltimore (AL) 1995; Florida (NL) 1996-1997; San Diego (NL) 1998; Los Angeles (NL) 1999-2003; New York (AL) 2004-2005
Cap: Los Angeles Dodgers (NL)
Brown played on six different teams, but not because of a lack of results; he pitched well for each team he played for and had an excellent overall career. Possessing a nasty sinker, Brown was able to get players out both via strikeouts (2,397, 39th all-time) and weakly-hit ground balls. Brown was an All-Star with four different teams (Texas, Florida, San Diego, and Los Angeles) racking up a total of six appearances in the Mid-Summer Classic overall (1992, 1996-1998, 2000, 2003). He was the ace of two different teams pitching in back-to-back World Series (winning in 1997 with Florida, losing in 1998 with San Diego). Besides the wild-card winning Marlins and division-winning Padres, Brown also pitched for the division-winning 2004 Yankees. Led the AL in wins (21) and IP (265.2) in 1992. Led the NL in ERA twice (1996 and 2000), ERA+ (1996), WHIP twice (1996 and 2000), and SO/BB (2000).

Mordecai Brown - 1925 - P
St. Louis (NL) 1903; Chicago (NL) 1904-13, 1916; St. Louis (FL) 1914; Brooklyn (FL) 1914; Chicago (FL) 1915
Cap: Chicago Cubs (NL) 
Losing the use of two digits from your hand may be viewed as a negative by the vast majority of us, but Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown would definitely disagree. His childhood accident helped transform the right-hander’s fastball into a quasi-split-finger, while creating a curve very similar to a screwball. His deformed hand didn’t hurt “Miner’s” (he worked some odd jobs in his community’s coal mines) fielding either (which was very good). Despite his somewhat late start in the majors, he was still able to compile fine career stats due to his durability and won 20 games 6 times. Besides starting, he was able to pitch many games in relief (he left the game with the ML single-season record for saves with 13 in 1911). First major leaguer to pitch four consecutive shutouts in 1908. He left the game with the major league career records for saves (49) and (tied) fielding percentage (1.000 in 1908), the NL record for ERA with at least 1,500 IP (2.06), not to mention the NL post-19th century record for ERA (1.04 in 1906). Member of four pennant winners (1906, 1910, plus back-to-back champion World Series teams in 1907-08). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1906-10). STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1906). Three-time Win Shares NL Pitcher of the Year (1906, 1909-10). NL leader for ERA (1906), Adjusted ERA+ (1906), Wins (1909), WHIP (1906-07, 1910), Hits Allowed/9IP (1904, 1908), Games (1909, 1911), Saves (1908-11), Innings (1909), Complete Games (1909-10), and Shutouts (1906, 1910). Retired with the Cubs’ single-season records for WHIP (.842 in 1908), and Adj. ERA+ (253 in 1906), as well as the career records for Wins (188), WHIP (.998), Saves (39), SHO (48), and Adj. ERA+ (152).

Raymond Brown - 1955 – P
Dayton Marcos (1930); Indianapolis ABC’s (1931); Detroit Wolves (1932); Homestead Grays (1932-45); Mexican League (1939, 1946-49)
Cap: Homestead Grays
The ace of the legendary Homestead Gray teams of the thirties and forties, Brown had a long career of excellence on the mound. A workhorse, the right-hander’s arsenal consisted of a quality fastball, slider, sinker, and his best pitch – a curveball (later on in his career saw the development of a decent knuckleball). Pitching a perfect game in 1945, he also won 28 games straight during 1936-37 and had a career .705 winning percentage. Member of ten Eastern winners (1937-45, 1948); in postseason play, he had a 1.43 ERA in 56.7 innings and threw a one-hitter in the 1944 Negro League World Series. Two-time Fleet Walker Award (1938). Two-time George Stovey Award (1938, 1940). Rube Foster Award (1943). East-West leader for Total Run Avg. (1933). Eastern leader for Victories (1938, 1940), Win Percentage (1938, 1943), Strikeouts (1940), and Total Run Avg. (1938, 1940, 1944).  Five-time All-Star (1935, 1937-38, 1940, 1942).

Willard Brown – 1976 – CF/LF/SS/3B/2B
Kansas City Monarchs (1935-43, 1946-50); Nuevo Laredo (1940); Puerto Rico (1941-42, 1946-50); St. Louis (AL) 1947
Cap: Kansas City Monarchs
During the Forties, “Home Run” Brown was the king of the four-bagger in the Negro Leagues. Known as a clutch performer who enjoyed putting on a show for his fans, the right-handed “bad-ball” slugger had the ability to hit tape measure homers to all fields using his 40-ounce bat. As a winter ball player, “Ese Hombre” (That Man) won two Triple Crowns, three consecutive batting titles, and three HR titles (he retired with the Puerto Rican season record with 27, which was set during 1947-48) between 1946-50. Blessed with excellent speed, he was a fine baserunner and a marvelous fielder with a strong arm in the infield and later in the outfield. Brown hit the first AL home run by an African-American player in 1947. In the first NeL World Series in ’42, the Monarchs were able to sweep the Grays with the help of Brown’s .412 batting average and home run. Member of seven Western pennant-winners (1936-38, 1941-42, 1946, 1948). Three-time Fleet Walker Award (1938, 1946, 1948). Nine-time NeL All-Star (1936-39, 1942-43, 1946-48). NeL Western leader for HR (1937-38, 1941-43, 1946, 1948), HR/550 AB (1937-38, 1941-43, 1946, 1948), SB (1938-39, 1942), 3B (1937), and 2B (1937, 1939, 1941).

Pete Browning – 2005 – CF/LF/3B/2B
9.5 seasons with: Louisville (AA/NL) 1882-89, 1892-93; Cleveland (PL) 1890; Pittsburgh (NL) 1891; Cincinnati (NL) 1891-92; St. Louis (NL) 1894; Brooklyn (NL) 1894
Cap: Louisville Colonels (AA)
Recognized as the finest hitter ever produced by the old American Association, “The Gladiator” seemed to crush the ball as if it were his only salvation. Compiling a career line of .341/..403/.467, the right handed hitter batted over .300 10 times, slugged over .500 4 times, finished two seasons with an OBP above .450 and had a career OPS+ of 166. One of the first batters to use a custom-made bat, “The Louisville Slugger” was ultimately honored with the famous bat that bears his sobriquet. STATS, Inc. AA MVP (1882). STATS, Inc. AA Rookie of the Year (1882). Five-time STATS, Inc. AA Outfielder (1883, 1885-88). STATS, Inc. PL Outfielder (1990). STATS, Inc. AA Second Baseman (1882). STATS, Inc. AA Third Baseman (1884). Win Shares AA Silver Slugger Award (1882). Win Shares PL Silver Slugger Award (1890). Two-time Win Shares AA Gold Glove Award winner (1885, 1887). AA leader in BA (1882, 1885), OBP (1882, 1885), SLG (1882), OPS (1882, 1885), G (1885) H (1885), TB (1885), 1B (1885, 1887), Adj. Ops+ (1882) and Times on Base (1882, 1885, 1887). PL leader for BA, 2B and Adj. OPS+ in 1890. Retired with the Colonels’ franchise season records (all from 1887, unless otherwise noted) for BA (.402), OBP (.464), SLG (.547), OPS (1.011), R (137), H (220), 1B (165), 2B (35), HR (9 in 1885), TB (299), RBI (118), SB (103), OPS+ (190 in 1885), XBH (55), TOB (283) and AB/HR (53.4 in 1885), as well as the career records for BA (.341), OBP (.397), SLG (.470), OPS (.867), 2B (219), HR (34), BB (299), SB (199), Adj. OPS+ (166), Power Speed # (58.1) and AB/HR (105.6).

Jim Bunning – 1977 – P
Detroit (AL) 1955-63; Philadelphia (NL) 1964-67, 1970-71; Pittsburgh (NL) 1968-69; Los Angeles (NL) 1969
Cap: Detroit Tigers (AL)
One of the founding fathers of the Players’ Association, his great claim to fame, however, was as a star hurler in both leagues (winning 100 games, striking out 1,000, and earning a no-hitter in both the NL and AL).. A sidearmer with a good fastball and ace of the Tigers and later the Phillies, he left the majors second only behind Walter Johnson for strikeouts (2,885) and was one of his era’s most durable (Bunning pitched numerous times in relief between starts) and intimidating performers. STATS, Inc. AL Pitcher of the Year (1957). No-Hit Games (1958 and the first 20th century perfect game in 1964). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1957, 1961). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1964, 1966-67). Two-time AL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1957, 1960). NL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1967). Seven-time All-Star (1957, 1959, 1961-64, 1966). AL leader for Wins (1957), K/9IP (1960), Innings (1957), K (1959-60), and SO to Walk (1960). NL leader in BB/9IP (1964), IP (1967), K (1967), GS (1966-67), SHO (1966-67), and SO to Walk (1964).  Retired with the Phillies’ franchise single-season record for 9/IP (8.29 in 1965), K (268 in 1965), and SO to Walk (4.76 in 1964), as well as the career records for K/9IP (7.08) and SO to Walk (3.64). Struck out the side with 9 pitches in a game in 1959.

Jesse Burkett - 1912 - LF/RF
14.6 seasons with: New York (NL) 1890; Cleveland (NL) 1891-98; St. Louis (NL) 1899-1901; St. Louis (AL) 1902-04; Boston (AL) 1905
Cap: Cleveland Spiders (NL)
Originally a pitcher with the New York Giants, Burkett showed the baseball world that offense was his forte as Big Ed Delahanty’s chief rival in left field during the nineties. The first NL player to hit .400 two times, he scored 100-plus runs nine times and batted .338 lifetime with an OBP of .415. The left-handed leadoff hitter was an impressive line-drive hitter (he left the game with the single-season record for hits with 240 in 1896) who was equally proficient as a bunter and as a baserunner. Speedy as a player, he was able to leg out many a hit (he had 200-plus seasons six times). He led outfielders in his league once in putouts. Retired with the ML career records for most OF games (2,053), LF games (1,935), and putouts (3,961). Significant contributor for the Temple Cup winner of 1895. Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1895-96, 1899-1901). Two-time Win Shares Silver Slugger Award (1895, 1901). Led NL in OBP (1901), Adjusted OPS+ (1901), Total Bases (1896, 1901), Hits (1895, 1896, 1901), Runs (1896, 1901), Times on Base (1893, 1895, 1901), 1B (1895-96, 1901), G (1896, 1901), AB (1896, 1901), and BA (1895, 1896, 1901). Led AL in Times on Base (1902). Career OWP .710. Retired with the Spiders’ single-season records for BA (.410 in 1896), OBP (.486 in 1895), SLG (.541 in 1896), OPS (1.009), AB (624 in 1898), Runs (160 in 1896), Hits (240 in 1896), TB (317 in 1896), 1B (191 in 1896), Adj. OPS+ (157), and Times on Base (307 in 1895), as well as the career records for BA (.356), OBP (.436), SLG (.466), OPS (.902), and Adj. OPS+ (139).

Roy Campanella – 1963 – C
Baltimore Elite Giants (1937-42, 1944-45); Mexican League (1943); Brooklyn (NL) 1948-57
Cap: Brooklyn Dodgers
One of the greatest catchers, offensively and defensively, of all-time, the popular “Campy” was a standout player for both the Negro Leagues and the major leagues. The greatest NL slugging catcher of his time (242 home runs), the right-handed Campanella set new ML marks at his position with his 142 RBI (he also retired with this as the Dodger single-season record) and 41 homers in 1953. Three no-hitters credited to him, not many (if any) could match his combination of throwing out runners, handling the pitching staff, blocking the plate, and catching pop-ups. He led NL catchers in total chances and putouts 6 times (a league record at his retirement), assists once, double plays twice, and fielding average twice. In the minors because of his race and not his play, he was a two-time MVP of the International Association for 1946 and 1947. Campy is also the only catcher in the NL to win the MVP Award 3 times. Retired with the NL record for consecutive seasons with 100 games caught (9). Member of six pennant-winners (in the NeL: 1939; in the ML: 1949, 1952, 1953, 1956, and the World Series champions of 1955). NL MVP (1951, 1953, 1955).  Six-time STATS, Inc. NL Catcher (1949-53, 1955). Five-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1949, 1951, 1953, 1955, 1957). Eight-time ML All-Star (1949-56). NeL All-Star (1941, 1945). NL leader for RBI (1953). NeL Eastern leader for HR/550 AB (1940).

Rod Carew  - 1991 – 2B/1B
15.6 seasons with: Minnesota (AL) 1967-78; California (AL) 1979-85
Cap: Minnesota Twins (AL)
The greatest contact hitter of his generation (with a lifetime BA of .328, 15 consecutive seasons of at least .300), Carew had the knack of almost always meeting the ball with his bat. His era’s finest bunter, the left-handed bat-control wizard (a career Adj. OPS+ of 131, 3,053 hits and 4 times over 200 hits) with the variety of different batting stances was an outstanding on-base man (.393 OBP, with 8 times over .400). One of the game’s best baserunners (348 stolen bases), Carew stole home 7 times in 1969 (he stole 2nd, 3rd, and home in a game of that same year) and 17 times for his career. Glove-wise, he led all AL first basemen 2 times in double plays and once in assists. All-Star record: 2 triples in a game (1978). Member of four division-winners (1969-70, 1979, and 1982). AL MVP (1977). AL Rookie of the Year (1967). Five-time STATS, Inc. AL Second Baseman (1969, 1972-75). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL First Baseman (1976-77). Win Shares AL MVP (1977). Two-time Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1976-77). Eighteen-time All-Star (1967-84). AL leader for BA (1969, 1972-75, 1977-78), OBP (1974-75, 1977-78), OPS (1977), R (1977), H (1973-74, 1977), 3B (1973, 1977), 1B (1972-74, 1977), Adj. OPS+ (1977), Times on Base (1973-74, 1976-77), and IBB (1975, 1977-78). Retired with the Twins’ franchise single-season records for BA (.388 in 1977, one of the finest averages in the post-WWII era), R (128 in 1977), and H (239 in 1977); the Twins’ career records for BA (.334) and OBP (.393); the Angels’ single-season record for BA (.339 in 1983); as well as the Angels’ career records for BA (.314), OBP (.393), and IBB (45).

Max Carey - 1939 – CF/LF/RF
16.2 seasons with: Pittsburgh (NL) 1910-26; Brooklyn (NL) 1926-29                                                                               
Cap: Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
The leading ball hawk for his time, “Scoops” had outstanding range, instincts, and a terrific arm (he led NL outfielders four times in assists, five times in double plays, seven times in most fielding chances per game and nine times in total chances and putouts, the latter fielding stat a ML record). Not just a defensive specialist, he was his era’s most remarkable base stealer due to his high success rate (in 1922, he stole a

Oscar Charleston - 1943 – CF/1B
Indianapolis ABC’s (1915-18, 1920, 1922-23); New York Lincoln Stars (1915-16); Bowser’s ABC’s (1916); Chicago American Giants (1919); St. Louis Giants (1921); Harrisburg Giants (1924-27); Hilldale Daisies (1928-29); Homestead Grays (1930-31); Pittsburgh Crawfords (1932-38); Toledo Crawfords (1939); Indianapolis Crawfords (1940); Philadelphia Stars (1941)
Cap: Indianapolis ABC’s
One of the most complete players ever to play the game, “The Hoosier Comet” had no major weaknesses, was extremely durable and a fan favorite for decades. An intriguing combination of raw power and blinding speed, the left-handed Charleston was a marvel at the plate and could pick up extra bases on the basepaths. He was an excellent drag bunter who could leg out a hit when needed. On defense, his instincts, good hands, great range, and an accurate cannon of an arm propelled him to the top ranks of centerfielders all-time. Member of two Western winners (1919, 1931). Member of three Eastern winners (1930, 1934-35). All-Star (1933). Four-time Fleet Walker Award (1918-19, 1921, 1933). Twelve-time Holway Western All-Star (1917-22, 1924-25, 1927-29, 1931). Western leader for BA (.429 in 1918), HR (1921-22, 1932), HR/550 AB (1921-22), Stolen Bases (1921-22, 1932-33), Doubles (1919, 1931, 1933), and Triples (1915, 1919, 1932-33). Eastern leader for HR (1924, 1927) and HR/550 AB (1924).

Cupid Childs – 1988 – 2B
10.5 seasons with: Philadelphia (NL) 1888; Syracuse (AA) 1890; Cleveland (NL) 1891-98; St. Louis (NL) 1899; Chicago (NL) 1900-01
Cap: Cleveland Spiders (NL)
The greatest major league second baseman of the 1890’s, the tempestuous and spirited Cupid impressed both offensively and defensively. One of the great leadoff hitters (7 times with 100 runs), the left-handed Childs was a master of contact and plate discipline (.306 BA, .416 OBP, 6 seasons with at least a .300 BA and .400 OBP, and 4 times with at least 100 BB) who rarely struck out. On the fielding front, was among the best due to his deceptive speed and range (he left the game holding the single-season record for most chances at second in a 9-inning game with 18 in 1890). Childs also led NL second basemen in games 3 times, putouts and assists twice, and once in double plays. Key participant for three Temple Cup series (1892 – in this series, he was the best offensive player among players from both teams with his batting line of .409/.519/.591; 1896; and the Temple Cup winner of 1895). STATS, Inc. AA Rookie of the Year (1890). STATS, Inc. AA Second Baseman (1890). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Second Baseman (1891-93, 1896-97). Win Shares AA Silver Slugger Award (1890). Two-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1895-96). NL leader for OBP (1892), Games (1891), Runs (1892), and Times on Base (1892). AA leader for 2B and XBH. Retired with the Spiders’ franchise season record for BB (120 in 1893), as well as the career records for BB (758) and Sac. Hits (52).

Will Clark  - 2006 – 1B
12.6 seasons with: San Francisco (NL) 1986-93; Texas (AL) 1994-98; Baltimore (AL) 1999-00; St. Louis (NL) 2000
Cap: San Francisco Giants (NL)
Regarded by fans and peers alike as an intimidating presence in the batter’s box and a terrific clutch hitter, “Will the Thrill” captivated spectators with his batting. With a career 138 OPS+, the left-handed slugger had a .303 lifetime BA (including 9 seasons batting .300 or more), 7 seasons with a slugging percentage above .500, topped 100 RBI and reached base at a rate of .400 or better (.386 career) 4 times each, scored over 100 runs twice and reached marks of 100 walks and 30 homers once each. As a first baseman, “The Natural” led his position in double plays 5 times, putouts 4 times and once in both fielding percentage and games. A member of four division-winners (1987, 1996, 1998, 2000) and one pennant-winner (1989); in his 7 postseason series, he compiled an outstanding batting line of .333/.409/.547, including 20 runs scored, 16 RBI and 5 round trippers. NLCS MVP (1989); his bases-loaded single in Game 5 decided the NL pennant in the Giants’ favor (for the series, he had an incredible batting line of .650/.682/1,200 with 8 runs scored and RBI each, plus 13 hits and 2 home runs; his 6 RBI in Game 1 tied the postseason single-game record). Two-time NL Silver Slugger-1B (1989, 1991). NL Gold Glove Award winner (1991). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1988-89, 1991). Two-time Win Shares NL MVP (1988-89). Two-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1988-89). Six-time All-Star (1988-92, 1994). NL leader for SLG (1991), G (1988), PA (1988), R (1989), TB (1991), RBI (1988), BB (1988), TOB (1988-89) and IBB (1988).

Fred Clarke - 1917 - LF
15.3 seasons with: Louisville (NL) 1894-99; Pittsburgh Pirates (NL) 1900-11, 1913-15
Cap: Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
Though famous as a tactician for the Bucs as player-manager and then solely as their manager, “Cap” the player was steady and strong at the bat (he hit over.300 ten times and had a lifetime .312 BA, belted 220 triples, and was top-five in runs scored five times), speedy on the basepaths (506 SB), and an outstanding fielder with a terrific arm (playing a deep left field, he would rush in to perform circus catches for the fans). Fiery and fearless on the field, the left-handed Clarke felt each game was a personal battle for him. He went 5-for-5 in his first ML game, which is a major league record for a player debut. Defensively, Clarke led NL outfielders twice in fielding and once in putouts. At his retirement, Clarke was second only to the great Honus Wagner on many of the important Pirate career record lists. Retired with the ML career records for OF games (2,189), LF games (2,183), and putouts (4,790). As a player, he was a member of two pennant winners (1903 and the World Series champion of 1909). Six-time STATS, Inc. Outfielder (1897, 1902-03, 1907-09). Four-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1900-01, 1908-09). Career OWP .686. NL leader in SLG (1902), Doubles (1903), Triples (1906), BB (1909), OPS (1903), Adj. OPS+ (1897, 1903), and Times on Base (1909).

John Clarkson - 1900 - P
Worcester (NL) 1882; Chicago (NL) 1884-87; Boston (NL) 1888-92; Cleveland (NL) 1892-94
Cap: Chicago White Stockings (NL)
The best pitcher of the pre-1893 era (before the mound was moved back), the right-hander tamed his opponents with his curveball, fastball, change of pace and intimidating presence. A record of 53-16 with 165 ERA+ in 1885, he led the White Stockings to the pennant that year. Clarkson topped the NL by 131 IP over his opponents with his 623 IP (a Cubs record) that season. In 1889, the Beaneaters finished 2nd despite a middle-of-the-pack offense, as Clarkson led the way with a 49-19 record, 150 ERA+ and pitching 620 IP (2nd best pitched 420 IP that season). Clarkson has the record for most wins in a ten-year period (319) and the most NL assists in a season with 174 in 1885. He was also an integral contributor to pennant winners in 1886 and 1891. Pitching Triple Crown (1889). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL MVP Award winner (1885, 1889). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1885, 1887, 1889). Three-time Win Shares NL MVP (1885, 1887, 1889). Three-time Win Shares NL Pitcher of the Year (1885, 1887, 1889). NL leader for ERA (1889), ERA+ (1889), W (1885, 1887, 1889), W-L % (1889), WHIP (1889), K/9IP (1884), G (1885, 1887, 1889), Saves (1891), IP (1885, 1887-1889), K (1885, 1887, 1889), GS (1885, 1887, 1889), CG (1885, 1887, 1889), and SHO (1885, 1889). Retired with the Cubs’ single-season records set in 1885 for GS (70), CG (68), SHO (10), and ERA+ (165), as well as the career records for W-L% (.706), WHIP (1.053), H/9IP (7.92), K/9IP (4.99), and Adj. ERA+ (152). He also retired with the Braves’ franchise single-season records set in 1889 for W (49), G (73), IP (620), GS (72), CG (68), as well as the career records for W (149), W-L% (.645), and H/9IP (8.42).

Roger Clemens - 2013 - P
Boston (AL) 1984-1996; Toronto (AL) 1997-1998; New York (AL) 1999-2003, 2007; Houston (NL) 2004-2006
Cap: Boston Red Sox (AL)
Known as the Rocket for his fiery temperament and overpowering fastball, Roger Clemens is considered by many as the best post-WWII pitcher—if not the best in all of baseball history. A workhorse pitcher who twice struck out 20 batters in a game, Clemens dominated the pitching landscape during his career. He led the league in wins (1986-1987, 1997-1998), winning percentage (1986, 2001, 2004), CG (1987-1988, 1997), SHO (1987-1988, 1990-1992, 1997), IP (1991, 1997), SO (1988, 1991, 1996-1998), ERA (1986, 1990-1992, 1997-1998, 2005), WHIP (1986, 1992, 1997), ERA+ (1986, 1990-1992, 1994, 1997-1998, 2005), H/9 (1986, 1994, 1998, 2005), SO/9 (1988, 1996, 1998), and SO/BB (1987-1988, 1990, 1992). Clemens was on two World Series winning teams (1999 and 2000 with the Yankees) along with seven other division winners (1986, 1988, 1990, 1995 with Boston and 2001-2003 with New York) and three wild-card winners (2004-2005 with Houston and 2007 with New York). Clemens’ 199 postseason innings are the fourth most all-time and his 173 strikeouts rank third all-time at the time of his induction. In his eight World Series starts, he went 3-0 with a 2.37 ERA and 49 strikeouts. For his career, Clemens ended up with the 9th most wins (354), 16th most innings pitched (4,916.2), third in strikeouts (4,672), seventh in games started (707), and tenth in ERA+ (143). All-time Red Sox leader in wins (192), SO (2,590), and SHO (38). Eleven-time All-Star (1986, 1988, 1990-1992, 1997-1998, 2001, 2003-2005) who won seven Cy Young awards (1986-1987, 1991, 1997-1998, 2001, 2004) and an MVP award (1986).

Roberto Clemente Walker – 1978 – RF
15.4 seasons with: Pittsburgh (NL) 1955-72
Cap: Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
Recognized as the greatest major league Puerto Rican player of all-time, Clemente was a hustling player who achieved notable success offensively and defensively. At the plate, the right-handed line-drive hitter recorded 13 .300 seasons of BA (.317 career), 200 or more hits 4 times, and exactly 3,000 hits for his career (a Pirate club record). In right field, his name usually pops up first as the greatest combination of strength and accuracy of any outfield arm in baseball history (leading the league five times in assists, he was able to make 450-foot perfect throws to home plate; he also led the NL twice in DP). Brilliant beyond his rifle arm in the field and excited his fans in Pittsburgh with basket catches, he amassed a ML record 12 Golden Gloves in the outfield. Member of two division champs (1970 and 1971) and two pennant-winners (the World Champions of 1960 and 1971; in the latter series, he was the MVP due to his .414 BA, 2 HR, and marvelous OF play; he had a hit in all 14 games he played). NL MVP (1966). Twelve-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1961-72). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1966-67). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1967). Two-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1965, 1968). Twelve-time All-Star (1960-67, 1969-72). NL leader for BA (1961, 1964-65, 1967), Hits (1964, 1967), 3B (1969), TB (1958), and IBB (1968). Retired with the Pirates’ franchise season record for IBB (27 in 1968), as well as the career records for Games (2,433), AB (9,454) TB (4,492), 1B (2,154), and IBB (167).

Ty Cobb - 1934 – CF/RF
19.8 seasons with: Detroit (AL) 1905-26; Philadelphia (AL) 1927-28
Cap: Detroit Tigers (AL)
Baseball’s fiercest and fiery competitor, “The Georgia Peach” defined Deadball-style play better than anyone. Disdaining slugging even during the Lively Ball 1920’s, a combination of timely place-hitting and raw speed earned him a record twelve batting titles, 9 seasons with 200 or more hits and a 167 OPS+. A demon on the basepaths (892 career steals, a modern record), he was also an excellent fielder (he led AL outfielders four times in double plays, twice in assists, and once in putouts and fielding percentage). Retired with the ML career records for BA (.366), G (3,035), H (4,189), R (2,246), TB (5,854), RBI (1,937), XBH (1,136), times on bases (5,532), 1B (3,053), AB (11,434) and OF games (2,407); the modern ML single-season SB record (96 in 1915); the AL career record for G (3,055), inside-the-park HR (46) and SB (892); as well as the AL single-season record for inside-the park HR (9 in 1909). Member of three consecutive pennant winners (1907-09). AL MVP (1911). Chalmers Award (1910). Six-time STATS, Inc. AL MVP (1907, 1909-11, 1915, 1917). Sixteen-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1907-19, 1921-22, 1925). Five-time Win Shares AL MVP (1907, 1909, 1911, 1915, 1917). Eight-time Win Shares Silver Slugger Award (1907-11-1915, 1917-18). Three-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1910-11, 1915). Triple Crown (1909). AL leader for OPS (1907-12, 1914-15, 1917, 1925), Adj OPS+ (1907-15, 1917, 1925), H (1907-09, 1911-12, 1915, 1917, 1919),  AB (1917), R (1909-11, 1915-16), SB (1907, 1909, 1911, 1915-17), OBP (1909-10, 1913-15, 1917-18), SLG (1907-12, 1914, 1917), TB (1907-09, 1911, 1915, 1917), 2B (1908, 1911, 1917), 3B (1908, 1911, 1917-18), HR (1909), RBI (1907-09, 1911), XBH (1909, 1911, 1915, 1917), Power/Speed Number (1909-1910), Times on Bases (1909, 1911, 1915, 1917), 1B (1907, 1909, 1911-12, 1915, 1917), and BA (1907-15, 1917-19). Retired with a majority of Detroit’s team records.

Mickey Cochrane - 1943 – C
9.7 seasons with: Philadelphia (AL) 1925-33; Detroit AL (1934-37)
Cap: Philadelphia Athletics (AL)
The outstanding catcher during most of his career, “Black Mike” hated to lose and did what he could not to. Despite the position’s ability to erode offensive skills, the lefty Cochrane was a fine line-drive hitter (8 times with at least a .300 BA and 4 seasons with 100 runs) and the rare backstop that could run the bases well. He also developed his defensive skills; he led the league twice in double plays, twice in assists, six times in putouts, and two times in fielding percentage. A rugged type, he had 11 seasons of at least 100 games behind the plate. Retired with the major league catcher career records for batting average (.320) and OBP (.419); the major league catcher rookie records for batting average and games (.331 and 134 in 1925); as well as the major league catcher season records for doubles (1942 in 1930), runs (118 in 1932), bases on balls (106 in 1933), and OBP (.459 in 1933). Member of five pennant winners (1931, 1934 and the World Champions of 1929, 1930 and 1935). AL leader for OBP (1933). Two-time AL MVP (1928, 1934). Two-time AL All-Stars (1934-35). Nine-time STATS, Inc. AL Catcher (1925, 1928-35). Five-times Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1927-30, 1932).

Eddie Collins - 1935 – 2B                                                                 
18.5 seasons with: Philadelphia (AL) 1906-14, 1927-30; Chicago (AL) 1915-26
Cap: Chicago White Sox (AL)
The greatest member of the famous A’s “$100,000 Infield,” “Cocky” had a lot to be cocky about. Playing for what seemed like a baseball eternity (25 seasons, an AL record), Collins was an exceptional hitter (3,315 hits, 1,499 BB, a .333 BA, and a .424 OBP; he batted .300 16 times), expert on bunts, and a wonder on the basepaths (755 steals). The left-handed Collins was also a master at the hit-and-run, fielded his position at the highest level, and was one of the greatest World Series performers of all-time (he hit .400 in 3 different WS). He led second basemen in fielding average nine times, putouts 7 times, assists 4 times, and double plays five times. Retired with the major league career records for sacrifice hits (512) and both assists (7,630) and double plays (1,215) for a second baseman, plus the single-game stolen base record (twice he had six bases stolen in 1912). Member of six pennant winners (1914, 1919 and the World Champs of 1910, 1911, 1913, and 1917). AL MVP (1914).  Fourteen-time STATS, Inc. AL Second Baseman (1909, 1911-20, 1923-25).  Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1914). Eight-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1909-11, 1914-17, 1920). AL leader for Runs (1912-14), Walks (1915), Stolen Bases (1910, 1919, 1923-24), Singles (1913), AB/K (1923), and Times on Bases (1914). Retired with many team records for the Athletics and White Sox.

Jimmy Collins - 1921 - 3B
11.9 seasons with: Louisville (NL) 1895; Boston (NL) 1895-1900; Boston (AL) 1901-07; Philadelphia (AL) 1907-08
Cap: Boston Pilgrims (AL)
Though a fine hitter, Collins really made his mark by revolutionizing third base by moving up on bunters and then throwing them out barehanded (which wasn’t the norm before him). He also led third basemen in his league in putouts 5 times, assists 4 times, double plays thrice, and fielding percentage 2 times. Retired with the NL records for fielding chances by a third baseman in a season (601 in 1899) and tied for most 3B putouts in a season (251 in 1900); the AL single-game record for most chances in an extra-inning game (14 in a 15-inning game in 1902); as well as the major league career record for putouts (2,372). Member of three pennant winners (1897-98 and the very first World Series champions of 1903). STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1897). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Third Baseman (1901, 1905, 1907). Three-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove winner (1897, 1899, 1900). Two-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1901, 1903). NL leader for Games (1900), At Bats (1900), Total Bases (1898), and Home Runs (1898). Left the game with the Red Sox’s single-season records for Runs (108 in 1901), AB (631 in 1904), and 2B (42 in 1901) as well as the career records for BA (.296), Hits (881), and 2B (171).

David Cone - 2012 - P
Kansas City (AL) 1986, 1993-1994; New York (NL) 1987-1992, 2003; Toronto (AL) 1992, 1995; New York (AL) 1995-2000; Boston (AL) 2001
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
Known as an “ace-for-hire” for the numerous times contenders acquired him to make a playoff push, Cone was one of the most dominant pitchers of the 1990s. He was especially noteworthy for winning the AL Cy Young Award in the strike-shortened 1994 season, during which he won 16 games with a 2.94 ERA in 171.2 innings with a 1.072 WHIP. It was one of five season in which he picked up votes for the award, finishing in the top four in 1988, 1995 and 1998, as well as a sixth place finish in 1999. As great as Cone was during regular season action, he also repeatedly came up big in the postseason. A member of five World Series winning teams (1992 with the Toronto Blue Jays as well as 1996 and 1998-2000 all with the New York Yankees) along with a division winner in 1988 (New York Mets) and two wild-card winners (1995, 1997, both the Yankees), Cone went 8-3 with a 3.80 ERA in 111.1 postseason innings pitched. Those numbers look even better when focusing on baseball’s biggest stage, as in six World Series games he went 2-0 with a 2.12 ERA in 29.2 innings pitched. Led his league in W (1998 - 20), W-L% (1988 - .870%), IP (1995 – 229.1), SO (1990-233 and 1991-241), SO/9 (1990 - 9.9 and 1991 - 9.1), and SO/BB (1990 – 3.58). Cone was also a five-time All-Star (1988, 1992, 1994, 1997, 1999).

Roger Connor - 1903 - 1B/3B
16.4 seasons with: Troy (NL) 1880-82; New York (NL) 1883-89, 91, 93-94; New York (PL) 1890; Philadelphia (NL) 1892; St. Louis (NL) 1894-97
Cap: New York Giants (NL)
A truly prodigious slugger for his era, the left-handed Connor hit line-drives galore. Considered also a smart and speedy baserunner, Connor created 488 career WS; his 1885-86 run was amazing: 91 WS, 371/.435/.495,  and .355/.405/.540 in leagues that were .246/.289/.329 and .259/.308/.354. This fine fielder (exceptional at pickups and had good range and hands) led NL first basemen 4 times in fielding percentage, 3 times in putouts, assists 3 times, and double plays four times (he also led NL third basemen in double plays once). At his induction, he holds the ML career records for triples (233), walks (1,002),  and home runs (138). Key player on pennant winners in 1888 and 1889. STATS, Inc. PL MVP (1890). STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1880). Two-time STATS, Inc. First Baseman (1885, 1893). STATS, Inc. PL First Baseman (1890). Two-time Win Share NL Silver Slugger Award (1885-86). Five-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove winner (1885-86, 1888, 1891, 1894). Win Shares PL Gold Glove winner (1890). Career OWP .714. NL leader in BA (1885), OBP (1885), SLG (1889), Games (1881, 1884, 1892-93), Hits (1885), TB (1885), 2B (1892), 3B (1882, 1886), RBI (1889), BB (1888), Singles (1885), Adj. OPS+ (1888), XBH (1882, 1889, 1892), Times on Base (1885), and AB/K (1885). PL leader in OPS, SLG, and HR in 1890. Retired with the Giants’ single-season records for BA (.371 in 1885) and Adj. OPS+ (201 in 1885), as well as the career records for OBP (.402), SLG (.488), OPS (.890), and Adj. OPS+ (162).

Stan Coveleski - 1938 – P
Philadelphia (AL) 1912; Cleveland (AL) 1916-24; Washington (AL) 1925-27; New York (AL) 1928
Cap: Cleveland Indians (AL)
One of the great spitball pitchers of all-time, “Covey” had success on the mound during both the Deadball Era and the Lively Ball Era (including five seasons of winning 20 games). Despite the erratic nature of a normal spitball, the right-handed Coveleski was one of his era’s better control pitchers. His main pitch also broke three ways – down, out and down, and out. When he wasn’t using the spitter (he was one of the few to be allowed to use the pitch after 1920), he had an effective fastball and curve. Member of two pennant winners (1925 and the World Champions of 1920 - in the latter series, he posted a microscopic .67 ERA in 27 IP). STATS, Inc. AL Pitcher of the Year (1925). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1918-20, 1925).  AL leader for ERA (1923, 1925), Adjusted ERA+ (1923, 1925), W/L % (1925), (BB + H)/9IP (1920), Hits Allowed/9IP (1917, 1920), Strikeouts (1920), and Games Started (1921). Retired with the Indians’ single-season records for hits allowed/9IP (6.09 in 1917) and shutouts (9 in 1917), as well as the Indians’ career records for wins (172), games (360), innings pitched (2,502.3), and games started (305).

Sam Crawford - 1924 - RF/CF/LF/1B
16.6 seasons with: Cincinnati (NL) 1899-02; Detroit (AL) 1903-17
Cap: Detroit Tigers (AL)
An all-around quality player during the Deadball Era, “Wahoo Sam” was the undisputed master of creating triples during his nineteen-year career. A more than accomplished hitter, the left-handed slugger compiled a lifetime Adj. OPS+ of 144 and a .309 BA, 11 seasons of at least a .300 BA, 6 seasons of 100 or more RBI, and 2,961 hits. Blessed with power and speed which aided his number of three-baggers (he hit a record 10 triples per year 17 consecutive times, not to mention 20 five times), Crawford was also a steady fielder (he led outfielders in his leagues once in double plays and fielding percentage) and a base-stealing threat. First player to lead the league in homers with two different leagues. Retired with the major league career records for triples (309), most seasons leading the league in triples (6), OF games (2,217), and inside-the-park home runs (51), plus the single season record for most inside-the-park homers (12). Major contributor for three pennant-winners (1907-09). Seven-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1903, 1905, 1907-09, 1911, 1914). Win Shares Silver Slugger Award (1905).  Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1909). AL leader for At Bats (1908, 1913), Runs (1907), Doubles (1909), Total Bases (1913), Triples (1903, 1910, 1913-15), Home Runs (1908), RBI (1910, 1914-15), Extra-Base Hits (1907, 1909, 1913, 1915), and Power/Speed Number (1908). NL leader for Total Bases (1902), Triples (1902), and Home Runs (1901). Retired with the AL career record for home runs (70) and tied the single-season record for triples (26 in 1914).

Joe Cronin - 1951 – SS
13.8 seasons with: Pittsburgh (NL) 1926-27; Washington (AL) 1928-34; Boston (AL) 1935-45
Cap: Washington Senators (AL)
One of the most outstanding shortstops of his generation, Cronin was a good-natured, but tough, opponent. A fine hitter for the position (a .302 BA , a .390 OBP, and 8 seasons of 100 or more RBI), the right-handed Cronin had doubles power, made good contact, and was patient as a hitter. As a fielder, he developed into an outstanding representative for all shortstops (leading his position in fielding percentage for the AL twice (1931-32), assists 3 times (1929-30, 1932), fielding percentage twice, and three times for putouts and double plays (1930-32)). So valuable a commodity was he that the Red Sox paid $250,000 to gain his services from the Senators in 1934 (a record for the time). Member of one pennant winner (1933). Eight-time STATS, Inc. AL Shortstop (1930-33, 1937-40). Two-time Win Shares AL MVP (1925, 1929). Four-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1930-32, 1938). Seven-time All-Star (1933-35, 1937-39, 1941). AL leader for 2B (1933, 1938), 3B (1932), Sac. Hits (1941), and G (1930-31). Retired with the Senators’ single-season records for most runs (127 in 1930) and doubles (45 in 1933); as well as the major league single-season records for pinch homers (5) and pinch RBI (25) in 1943.

Bill Dahlen - 1915 - SS/3B
17.0 seasons with: Chicago (NL) 1891-98; Brooklyn (NL) 1899-1903, 1910-11; New York (NL) 1904-07; Boston (NL) 1908-09
Cap: Chicago Colts (NL)
Pugnacious with umpires and opposing players alike, “Bad Bill” helped win many a game offensively and (even more so) defensively. A fine hitting infielder with a knack for getting on base (100 runs 6 times) via a walk (1,064) or getting hit with a pitch, he was also an aggressive baserunner and a fine slider. However, he made his real mark with his exceptional range, arm, and quickness at short. He led shortstops in his league in assists 4 times, double plays 3 times and fielding percentage once. Retired with the shortstop major league career records for games (2,132), putouts (4,850), assists (7,500), chances (13,430), chances accepted (12,350), and double plays (881); he also holds the shortstop hitting streak with 42 established in 1894. 2,457 career hits, 1,589 runs scored. Member of back-to-back pennant winners (1899-1900) with Brooklyn and two more (1904, 1905) with New York (plus winning the World Series in the latter year). NL leader for RBI (1904). STATS, Inc. NL Rookie of the Year (1891). Three-time STATS, Inc. Shortstop (1892, 1894, 1902). Three-time Win Shares Gold Glove winner (1895, 1901, 1903). Career OWP .577. Retired with Cubs’ franchise single-season record for HBP (23 in 1898).

George Davis - 1915 - SS/3B/CF
16.3 seasons with: Cleveland (NL) 1890-92; New York (NL) 1893-1901, 1903; Chicago (AL) 1902, 1904-1909
Cap: New York Giants (NL)
Not many have earned the respect on the field that George Davis did in his long career. The game’s greatest switch-hitting shortstop, he was a fine basestealer (616 steals) who developed into one of the better fielders at his position. Player-manager for the 1898, 1900 and 1901 Giants. Holds the season (26) and career (167) records for triples for a switch-hitter. Totaled 2660 hits, 1539 runs scored and 1437 RBI. Career OPS+ 121 in over 10,000 plate appearances (Davis also batted .300 9 times), he was an amazing hitter when considering his defensive value. He led shortstops in his league in fielding percentage four times, putouts twice, double plays four times, and assists once, while leading all outfielders in assists once and third basemen in double plays once. Star player for the champion “Hitless Wonders” team of 1906. STATS, Inc. NL MVP (1897). Win Shares Gold Glove winner (1905). NL leader for RBI (1897). Career OWP .641.

Andre Dawson  - 2005 – CF/RF/DH
16.0 seasons with: Montreal (NL) 1976-86; Chicago (NL) 1987-92; Boston (AL) 1993-94; Florida (NL) 1995-96
Cap: Montreal Expos (NL)
A star in Montreal and later in Chicago, the five-tool “Hawk” was a perennial MVP candidate for most of that decade (in 1987, he became the first MVP from a last place team). Smashing 438 home runs for his career (he belted 30 or more 3 times, including a high of 49), the right-handed slugger hit .300 or more five times, drove in 1,591 runs (including 4 seasons with at least 100 RBI) and scored 100 or more runs twice. In 1990, he set the ML record for most IBB in a single game with 5. Speedy on the bases and a good base stealer (314 SB with a 74% success rate), Dawson excelled on the field defensively (he led NL center fielders 5 times in putouts, 2 times each in games and assists and once in double plays; he also led NL right fielders once in games and fielding percentage each). A member of two division winners (1981 and 1989). NL MVP (1987). NL Rookie of the Year Award (1976). Four-time NL Silver Slugger Award-OF (1980-81, 1983, 1987). Eight-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1980-85, 1987-88). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1980-81, 1983). Eight-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1978-79, 1981-83). Eight-time All-Star (1981-83, 1987-91). NL leader for H (1983), TB (1983, 1987), HR (1987), RBI (1987), XBH (1982-83), HBP (1978, 1980-81, 1983), Sac. Flies (1983), IBB (1990) and Power/Speed Number (1978, 1981-82). Retired with the Expos’ franchise single-season records for TB (341 in 1983), Sac. Flies (18 in 1983) and Power/Speed Number (29.2 in 1979), as well as the career records for HR (225), Sac. Flies (71) and Power/Speed Number (238.2).

Ed Delahanty - 1909 - LF/1B/CF/2B
13.3 seasons with: Philadelphia (NL) 1888-89, 1891-1901; Cleveland (PL) 1890; Washington (AL) 1902-03
Cap: Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
“Big Ed” was the top slugger for his era (with an exceptional 152 OPS+ and a batting line of .346/411/505) and the biggest offensive threat for the great Phillies outfield of the “Gay Nineties.” A notorious “bad ball” hitter, his line drives (or “Delahanty bunts”) were feared by the opposing infielders (he hit at least .300 11 times and .400 thrice). One of the few players to hit four home runs in a game (1896), he also went 6 for 6 in a contest twice (1890 and 1894). Delahanty was also a capable fielder with a strong and accurate arm. Retired with the NL record for most consecutive hits (10 in 1897) and the single-season record for most doubles (55 in 1899). Three-time STATS, Inc. MVP (1893, 1899, 1902); STATS, Inc. AL MVP (1902). NL leader in OPS (1895-96, 1899, 1901), OPS+ (1895-96, 1899), RBI (1893, 1896, 1899),  Hits (1899),  Total Bases (1893, 1899),  Doubles (1895-96, 1899, 1901), Triples (1892),  Home Runs (1893, 1896), SLG (1892-93, 1896, 1899), OBP (1895),  SB (1898), AVG (1899), and Extra-Base Hits (1893, 1896, 1899, 1901); AL leader for 1902 in OPS, OPS+, Doubles, OBP, and SLG. Career OWP .701.

Bill Dickey - 1953 – C
11.6 seasons with: New York (AL) 1928-43, 1946
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
The American League’s finest catcher from the mid-thirties to the early forties, Dickey was won games with his offense as well as his defense. Extremely durable, he set a major league record for catchers for most consecutive seasons of at least 100 games played (13 from 1929 to 1941).  A fine contact hitter (he hit .313 lifetime and hit .300 10 times), the left-handed Dickey began to hit many homers (212 for his career) later in his career. A remarkable defensive player, he led the AL four times in fielding percentage, six times in putouts, assists three times, and double plays once. He holds the World Series record for most games played as a catcher (38). The first receiver to go a whole season (at least 130 games) without a passed ball (1931). Retired with the season record for BA as a catcher (.362 in 1936). Member of eight pennant winners (1942 and the World Champs of 1932, 1936-39, 1941 and 1943). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL Catcher (1936-37, 1939, 1942). Five-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1931, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1941). Eleven-time All-Star (1933-34, 1936-43, 1946).  AL leader for At Bats per Strikeout (1935).

Martín Dihigo - 1950 – P/2B/OF/1B/3B/SS/C
Cuban Stars (East) (1923-27, 1930); Homestead Grays (1928); Hilldale Daisies (1929-31); Baltimore Black Sox (1931); Venezualan League (1932-34);, New York Cubans (1935-36, 1945);, Santo Domingo (1937);  Mexican League Teams: Aguila de Veracruz (1937-38), Azules de Veracruz (1940), Union Laguna (1942); Cuban Teams: Habana Reds (1926—29, 1940-44), Almendares
(1930), Santa Clara (1935-36), Marianao (1936-37), Cienfuegos (1945-46)

Cap: Habana Reds
Maybe the most multi-talented (certainly the most versatile) man ever to play professionally, “El Maestro” was almost a one-man team. If his teams needed a bat, they had a right-handed one who could make fine contact and with power. If his teams need pitching, they had a hurler with an impressive speedball. If his teams needed defense, they had a man who owned a great arm (possibly the greatest in NeL history) and covered a great swath of territory. If his teams needed speed, they had one with the speed to help them there on the bases. If his teams needed a player to fill a position, they had one who could adapt himself to any of the nine positions. Dihigo also played winter baseball for 22 years in the Cuban League, where he holds the all-time records for career wins and complete games. He led the Cuban League in many hitting and pitching categories many times,  received 4 MVP awards (he received the first one in Cuban baseball history for 1927-28; he also won one for 1935-36, 1936-37 and 1941-42), and a member of nine championship teams. He also led the Mexican League in both batting average and pitching percentage in 1938 (he performed the same feat in Cuba in 1935-36); a member of four MeL pennant winners. Member of one Eastern winner (1928). All-Star (1936). Eastern leader for Homers (1926), HR/550 AB (1926) and Doubles (1936). Four-time Holway All-Star (1926-27, 1929-30).

Joe DiMaggio - 1957 – CF
11.3 seasons with: New York (AL) 1936-42, 1946-51
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
The HoM’s seventh unanimous inductee! The epitome of combined grace and talent, “The Yankee Clipper” excelled in all areas and helped steer his teams to many a victory. Possessing powerful wrists and a picture-perfect swing, the right-handed DiMaggio was able to exhibit extraordinary power despite playing in cavernous Yankee Stadium throughout his career (.325/.398/.579; 155 OPS+). A great contact hitter who rarely struck out despite his many home runs, his record of hitting safely in 56 straight games stands out as one of baseball’s most fabled achievements. Not known as “Joltin’ Joe” for nothing, he parlayed his speed legging out doubles and triples on the basepaths, as well as patrolling centerfield (he led AL outfielders once in fielding percentage, putouts, assists, and double plays). Fans and teammates marveled at his instincts as he glided to where the ball was landing or using his strong, accurate arm to nail a baserunner while making it look easy. Member of ten pennant winners (1942 and the World Champs of 1936-39, 1941, 1947, 1949-51). Three-time AL MVP (1939, 1941, 1947). STATS Inc. Rookie of the Year (1936). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1936-42, 1947-48, 1950). Two-time Win Shares AL MVP (1937, 1939). Eight-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1936-39, 1941, 1946, 1948, 1950). Thirteen-time All-Star (1936-42, 1946-51). AL leader for BA (1939-40), SLG (1937, 1950), Runs (1937), Total Bases (1937, 1941, 1948), Triples (1936), Home Runs (1937, 1948), RBI (1941, 1948), Adj. OPS+ (1940), XBH (1941, 1950) and Hit by Pitch (1948).

Larry Doby – 1965 – CF/2B/RF/3B
Newark Eagles (1942-43, 1946-47); Cleveland (AL) 1947-55, 1958; Brooklyn (NL) 1956-57, 1959; Detroit (AL) 1959
Cap: Cleveland Indians (AL)
Like Jackie Robinson, his standing as a great player is somewhat obscured by his pioneer status. But there was a reason why he was selected as the first African-American player in the American League: he was an outstanding talent. A power hitter who feasted on fastballs and who knocked in over a hundred runs five times, the left-handed Doby was also more than adept at drawing a walk. A speedy player, he served his teams well out in the field (he led the league once in double plays and fielding percentage among outfielders). One of only four players to participate in a world series in both the Negro Leagues and the major leagues. Member of three pennant-winners (1954, the NeL champions of 1946, and the World Series champions of 1948). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1950, 1952). Win Shares AL MVP (1952). Two-time Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1950, 1952). Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1954). Seven-time ML All-Star (1949-55). NeL All-Star (1942, 1946). AL leader for OBP (1950), SLG (1952), OPS (1950), Runs (1952), HR (1952, 1954), RBI (1954), Adj. OPS+ (1950), HBP (1949), and Power/Speed Number (1949-50). NeL Eastern leader for BA (1942), HR (1947), HR/550 AB (1947), and Triples (1946).

Bobby Doerr – 1972 – 2B
12.1 seasons with: Boston (AL) 1937-44, 1946-51
Cap: Boston Red Sox (AL)
The greatest second baseman in Red Sox history, he was arguably the finest at the “keystone” position during the 1940s. A fine-hitting infielder, the right-handed Doerr had good power (223 homers) and contact skills (driving in 100-plus RBI six times during his career). But as good as his offense was, he really shone on defense. Possessing excellent range, sure hands, and was truly outstanding on the double play, he led AL second basemen four times in that department, as well as three times in total chances, four times in putouts, four times in assists, four times in fielding percentage, and two times in games. He left the game tied for the single-game record for most walks in an inning (2 in 1948) and the AL record for consecutive chances at second without an error (414 in 1947-48). Member of one pennant-winner (1946), Doerr hit an impressive .409, not mention an OBP of .458 and a SLG of .591, against the Cardinals with one home run and 3 runs batted in. Five-time STATS, Inc. AL Second Baseman (1944, 1946, 1948-50). Three-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award (1946-47, 1949). Nine-time All-Star (1941-44, 1946-48, 1950-51). AL leader for SLG (1944), Games (1943), Triples (1950), and Sac. Hits (1938). First Red Sox player to hit for the cycle twice (1944 and 1947).

Don Drysdale – 1975 – P
Brooklyn/Los Angeles (NL) 1956-69
Cap: Los Angeles Dodgers (NL)
Part of the most dominating pitching tandem of the 1960s, “Double D” brought out the fear in most batters with his quality mound work (2.95 ERA) and refusal to give up an inch of home plate to them with his “high, hard one.”  A sidearmer with an excellent fastball, the righty Drysdale had fine control of his best pitch and liked to take the mound as often as possible by never missing a start. His most notable pitching achievement was his record 58.2 scoreless innings in 1968 (including 6 shutouts). He left the game with the All-Star game career records for most games pitched (8), innings (19.1), starts (5), and strikeouts (19). A fine slugger, he led NL hurlers in home runs 4 times and tied the record for most homers for a pitcher in a season (7) twice.(1958 and 1965). Member of five pennant-winners (1956, 1966 and the World Champions of 1959, 1963, and 1965). Cy Young Award (1962). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1957, 1962, 1965). NL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1964). Seven-time All-Star (1959, 1961-65, 1967-68).  NL leader for Wins (1962), WHIP (1960), K/9IP (1959), Innings (1962, 1964), K (1959-60, 1962), GS (1962-65), and SHO (1959). Retired with the Dodgers’ franchise 19th century single-season record for GS (42 in 1963 and 1965), as well as the career records for Wins (209), Games (518), IP (3,432), K (2,486), GS (465), and SHO (49).

Dennis Eckersley – 2004 – RP/SP
Cleveland (AL) 1975-77; Boston (AL) 1978-84, 1998; Chicago (NL) 1984-86; Oakland (AL) 1987-95, St. Louis (NL) 1996-97
Cap: Oakland A’s (AL)
Although he earned 151 victories as a starting pitcher (including 3 years with an ERA below 3.00 and one 20 win season), “Eck” left a larger imprint on the game as the first great modern “closer” (with 390 saves over his career, including 4 seasons over 40). The only pitcher in ML history with at least 100 complete games and 200 saves, the right-handed sidearmer threw a scorching fastball coupled with an intimidating slider, both with pinpoint control. From 1988 to 1993, Eckersley fanned 458 batters, while walking only 51 (he posted a minute ERA of 0.61 in 1990). He left the game with the ML record for most game appearances as a pitcher (1,071) and with the AL record for most career saves (324). A member of four division leaders (1984, 1992, 1996, and 1998) and three pennant-winners (1988, 1990 and the World Champions of 1989); he owns the ML record for saves in LCS play with 11. AL MVP (1992). AL Cy Young Award (1992). ALCS MVP (1988). Two-time AL Rolaids Relief Award winner (1988, 1992). No-hit game (1977). Two-time AL STATS, Inc. Staff Pitcher (1978-1979). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL Relief Pitcher (1988-90, 1992). Six-time All-Star (1977, 1982, 1988, 1990-92). AL leader for S (1988, 1992), SO to Walk (1977, 1982) GF (1992) and Adj. ERA+ (1979). NL leader for BB/9IP (1986) and SO to Walk (1985). Retired with the A’s’ franchise single-season records for S (51 in 1992) and GF (65 in 1992), as well as the A’s career records for WHIP (0.953), BB/9IP (1.30), K/9IP (9.30), G (525), S (320), SO to Walk (7.15) and GF (456).

Darrell Evans – 1995 – 3B/1B/DH
17.0 seasons with: Atlanta (NL) 1969-76, 1989; San Francisco (NL) 1976-83; Detroit (AL) 1984-88
Cap: San Francisco Giants (NL)
A star on three different ball clubs, “Doody” helped pull the strings for his teams’ success. A hitter of diverse skills, the left-handed Evans had excellent power to left field (414 homers, with four times over 30) and terrific patience at the plate (5 times with at least 100 walks), The first player to hit 40 home runs in both leagues, he was part of the only trio that achieved that numerical mark each in 1973 (he’s also credited as the oldest player to both hit 40 and lead the league in the junior circuit in 1985 (age 38)). With 4 times over .500 in SLG and twice with at least .400 in OBP, Evans set a NL record with at least one walk in 15 straight games in 1975. A more than capable fielder, he led all third basemen 4 times in putouts, 3 times in assists, 2 times in double plays and once in games. Member of one division leader (1987) and the World Champions of 1984. STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1973). STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1983).  Three-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1973, 1975, 1978).  Two-time All-Star (1973, 1983). NL leader for BB (1973-74). AL leader for HR (1985) and AB/HR (1985). Retired with the Braves’ franchise single-season record for PA (733 in 1973).

Dwight Evans – 1997 – RF/DH/1B
16.5 seasons with: Boston (AL) 1972-90, Baltimore Orioles (AL) 1991
Cap: Boston Red Sox (AL)
The most valuable right fielder in Boston Red Sox franchise history, “Dewey” excited Fenway denizens with both bat and glove. A quality power hitter (3 seasons with over 30 home runs, 4 seasons with at least 100 RBI and 5 seasons with a SLG over .500,), the right-handed slugger knew how to take a walk (3 100+ seasons) and finish what he started (scoring more than 100 runs on 4 occasions.) Guarding right field, Evans had a laser for a throwing arm, which was considered by many to be the best of his era for both strength and accuracy, and was smooth in all other facets of defensive play (leading all AL right fielders 5 times in games, 4 times in putouts, and 3 times each in assists, double plays and fielding percentage). Member of two division-winners (1988 and 1990) and two pennant-winners (1975 (putting up a batting line of .292/.393/.542 with 5 RBI, as well as receiving accolades in Game 6 as he robbed Joe Morgan of a homer and set up a double play in the 11th inning of the Boston win) and 1986 (arguably the offensive star of the World Series hitting .308/.400/.615 with 9 RBI)). Two-time AL Silver Slugger-OF (1981, 1987). Eight-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1976, 1978-79, 1981-85). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1981-82, 1984). Three-time All-Star (1978, 1981, 1987). AL leader for OBP (1982), OPS (1981, 1984), G (1982, 1984), PA (1981, 1984), R (1984), TB (1981), HR (1981), BB (1981, 1985, 1987), XBH (1984) and Times on Base (1981-82).

Buck Ewing - 1902 - C/1B/RF/3B
11.0 seasons with: Troy (NL) 1880-82; New York (NL) 1883-89, 91-92; New York (PL) 1890; Cleveland (NL) 1893-94; Cincinnati (NL) 1895-97
Cap: New York Giants (NL)
One of the stars of the Giants team that won the pennant in 1888 and 1889. Great combination of offense and defense. Four-time Win Shares Gold Glove winner (1884-85, 88-89) as a catcher. A great hitter (he hit 300 ten times) considering his defensive contribution, batting .303/.351/.456 in leagues that averaged .272/.329/.371. An outstanding defender, he led NL catchers in fielding percentage and putouts once, assists three times, and double plays twice. Career OWP .650. NL leader in Triples (1884) and HR (1883).

Red Faber - 1939 – P
Chicago (AL) 1914-33                                                                                                                         
Cap: Chicago White Sox (AL)
Even though many of the teams that he pitched for were of inferior quality, Red still made his mark with the White Sox (winning 20 games 4 times). A right-handed spitballer (he was the last to use that pitch legally in the AL), he used that particular pitch sparingly, but to great effect. A very fine control pitcher, he was stingy giving up homers during his career (averaging only 1 every 36 innings). Member of two pennant winners (1919 and the pitching star for the World Champions of 1917). STATS, Inc. AL Pitcher of the Year (1921). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1921-22). Win Shares AL MVP (1922). Two-time AL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1921-22).  AL leader for ERA (1921-22), Adjusted ERA+ (1921, 1922), Innings (1922), (BB + H)/9IP (1921, 1922), Hits Allowed/9IP (1921), Games (1915), Saves (1914), Games Started (1920) and Complete Games (1921, 1922). Retired with the Chicago White Sox career records for most wins (254), games (669), innings (4,086.7), games started (483), and complete games (273).

Bob Feller – 1962 – P
Cleveland (AL) 1936-56
Cap: Cleveland Indians (AL)
A teenage strikeout phenom in 1936, “Rapid Robert” was the best ML pitcher by the beginning of the 1940’s. Regarded as the fastest hurler in his prime, the right-handed workhorse also used a curve and slider to aid him in frequently fanning the opposition (he twice struck out over 300 batters in a season). His greatest season occurred in 1940 when he won 27 games and pitched an Opening Day no-hitter. Despite losing four seasons due to military service, he was still able to win 266 games during his career (other highlights: three no-hitters, 12 one-hitters, six 20-plus win seasons, and 2,581 strikeouts). Retired with the modern ML record for most strikeouts in a game (18 in 1939) and the AL record for most seasons leading the league in wins (6). Member of the World Series champions of 1948. AL MVP (1940). AL Pitching Triple Crown (1940). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL Pitcher of the Year (1939-41, 1947). Seven-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1938-41, 1946-48). Two-time Win Shares AL Pitcher of the Year (1939-40). Eight-time All-Star (1938-41, 1946-48, 1950). AL leader for ERA (1940), Wins (1939-41, 1946-47, 1951), WHIP (1940, 1947), Hits Allowed/9IP (1938-40), K/9IP (1938-41, 1947), Games (1940-41, 1946), IP (1939-41, 1946-47), K (1938-41, 1946-48), GS (1940-41, 1946-48), CG (1939-40, 1946), SHO (1940-41, 1946-47) and SO to Walk (1940). Retired with the Indians’ franchise single-season records for IP (371.3), K (348), CG (36), and SHO (10) that were established in 1946, as well as the career records for Wins (266), K/9IP (6.07), IP (3,827), K (2,581), GS (484), and CG (279).

Wes Ferrell – 1964 – P
Cleveland (AL) 1927-33; Boston (AL) 1934-37; Washington (AL) 1937-38; New York (AL) 1938-39; Brooklyn (NL) 1940; Boston (NL) 1941
Cap: Cleveland Indians (AL)
One of the games most marvelous and tempestuous competitors, Ferrell hated to lose. An outstanding speedball pitcher who later became a curveball and off-speed specialist, the righty had just the right tools that led him to victory more often than not (he earned a .601 winning percentage during his career and won 20 games 6 times). He’s also the only man to win twenty games his first four seasons (a modern record; he had 6 in all). A rarity among hurlers, Ferrell could hit (he retired with the major league single-season record for homers from a pitcher (9 in 1931), the AL pitcher single-game record for RBI (6 in 1936), and the major league career home run record for pitchers (38); he also hit .280 lifetime). STATS, Inc. AL Pitcher of the Year (1935). Five-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1929-32, 1935). Win Shares MVP (1935). Win Shares AL Pitcher of the Year (1935). Two-time All-Star (1933, 1937). No-hit game (1931). AL leader for Wins (1935), BB/9IP (1934), IP (1935-37), GS (1935-36), and CG (1931, 1935-37).

Rollie Fingers – 2000 – RP/SP
Oakland (AL) 1968-76; San Diego (NL) 1977-80; Milwaukee (AL) 1981-82, 1984-85
Cap: Oakland A’s (AL)
Easily recognizable by his handlebar mustache, Fingers ranks as one of the top relievers of all-time, having left the game holding the record for most career saves with 341. Blessed with fine control and durability, the right-hander’s best pitches were his slider and sinking fastball (he later developed a forkball), helping him to notch 10 seasons of 20 or more saves (twice over 30) as well as three seasons with sub-2.00 ERA’s. Fingers was also noted as an above average fielder at his position. A member of three division leaders (1971, 1975, 1981), one pennant-winner (1982) and a three-time World Champion, tasting glory in 1972-74 (in Fall Classics, he appeared in 16 games, winning two and saving six.) AL MVP (1981). AL Cy Young Award (1981). ML-WS MVP (1974). No-hitter contributor (1975 – he pitched 2 scoreless innings). Three-time NL Rolaids Relief Award winner (1977-78, 1980). AL Rolaids Relief Award winner (1981). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Relief Pitcher (1976, 1981). STATS, Inc. NL Relief Pitcher (1978). Seven-time All-Star (1973-76, 1978, 1981-82). AL leader for G (1974-75), S (1981) and GF (1975). NL leader for G (1977), S (1977-78) and GF (1977). Retired with the A’s’ franchise single-season record for GF (62 in 1976); the A’s’ career records for S (136) and GF (338); the Padres’ single-season records for G (78 in 1977), S (37 in 1978) and GF (69 in 1977); the Padres’ career records for G (265), S (108) and GF (218); as well as the Brewer’s career record for S (97).

Carlton Fisk – 1999 – C/DH
13.5 seasons with: Boston (AL) 1969, 1971-80; Chicago (AL) 1981-93
Cap: Boston Red Sox
Played in more seasons than any other catcher (24), the durable and well-respected Fisk was a staunch defender of baseball tradition and honor, remaining an All-Star caliber catcher well into his forties. Arguably the finest all-around AL backstop through the Seventies and Eighties (he smacked 20 or more homers 8 times, with over 100 RBI twice while compiling a very uncatcher-like 128 SB over his career), the right-handed Fisk left the game holding the MLB career marks for catchers in home runs (351), total bases (3,999) and games played (2,226). A world-class defender behind the plate and a fine handler of his pitching staffs, “Pudge” led all AL catchers 5 times in putouts, twice each in games and double plays and once each in assists and fielding percentage. A member of one division champ (1983) and one pennant-winner (1975); he is often remembered for his dramatic 12th inning home run that won the 6th game of the ’75 World Series for his Red Sox as he seemed to will the ball fair with body language. AL Rookie of the Year (1972 - the first to win the award unanimously). Three-time AL Silver Slugger Award-C (1981, 1985, 1988). AL Gold Glove Award winner (1972). Six-time STATS, Inc. AL Catcher (1972, 1977-78, 1983, 1985, 1990). Eleven-time All-Star (1972-74, 1976-78, 1980-82, 1985, 1991). AL leader for 3B (1972) and HBP (1980). Retired with the White Sox’s career record for HR (214) and IBB (73).


Elmer Flick - 1918 - RF/CF
10.0 seasons with: Philadelphia (NL) 1898-1901; Philadelphia (AL) 1902; Cleveland (AL) 1902-10
Cap: Cleveland Naps (AL)
Though a stomach ailment ended his career prematurely, “The Demon of the Stick’s” numbers were still hard to ignore (including a 149 OPS+ and a .389 OBP). Power, speed and defense (he led outfielders in his leagues once in assists) propelled him to the ranks of the very best. Using a large-handled bat, the left-handed Flick was able to chop balls down into the dirt or spray line drives all over the field (he batted .313 for his career and had 8 seasons of at least .300). He was so highly regarded as a player that a potential trade for the young Ty Cobb was cancelled because of Flick’s popularity in Cleveland. First man to lead a league in triples three times in a row. STATS, Inc. NL Rookie of the Year (1898). Win Shares NL Gold Glove winner (1901). NL leader for RBI (1900) and Power/Speed Number (1900). AL leader for SLG (1905), Runs (1906), Triples (1905-07), OPS (1905), OPS+ (1905), Stolen Bases (1904, 1906) and BA (1905). Retired with the Indians’ single-season records for AB (624 in 1906) and 3B (22 in 1906), as well as the career records for 3B (106), BB (355) and SB (207).

Whitey Ford – 1973 – P
New York (AL) 1950, 1953-67
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
The pitching ace for the greatest team of his era (or maybe any era), “The Chairman of the Board” tended to outsmart his opponents rather than overpower them. Exhibiting pinpoint control, the lefthander used an assortment of changeups, curveballs, and a fine fastball to bedazzle hitters. The greatest winning percentage among pitchers with at least 200 victories (.690), “Slick” had the lowest ERA among starting pitchers of his generation (2.75 ERA/132 Adj. ERA+). Capable of performing under pressure, Ford left the game still holding the World Series record for most consecutive innings without giving up a run (33 during 1961 and 1962) and the career records for W (10), series pitched in (11), G (22), GS (22), K (94) and IP (146). Member of eleven pennant-winners (1955, 1957, 1960, 1963-64 and the World Champions of 1950, 1953, 1956, 1958, 1961, and 1962). Cy Young Award (1961). STATS, Inc AL Pitcher of the Year Award (1955). Seven-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1955-56, 1958, 1961-64). AL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1961). Eight-time All-Star (1954-56, 1958-61, 1964). AL leader for ERA (1956, 1958), W (1955, 1961, 1963), W-L% (1956, 1961, 1963), WHIP (1958), IP (1961-63), GS (1961, 1963), and Adj. ERA+ (1958). Retired with the Yankees’ franchise single-season record for W-L % (.862 in 1961), as well as the career records for Wins (236), Games (498), IP (3,170.3), K (1,956), GS (438), SHO (45), and Adj. ERA+ (132).

Rube Foster - 1932 - P/1B/OF
Chicago Union Giants (1902), Cuban X-Giants (1903), Philadelphia Giants (1904-06), Leland Giants (1907-10), Chicago American Giants (1911-26)
Cap: Philadelphia Giants
Though better known as the man who put the Negro Leagues on the map, he enters the Hall of Merit at this time for his terrific work as a pitcher. The hulking righty dazzled his opponents with an array of different pitches, but his finest was his screwball. Major league greats such as Three Finger Brown and Honus Wagner raved about Foster at the peak of his powers, while John McGraw was said to have tried to obtain him for his New York Giants.  “Jock” also toted a potent bat to compliment his mound work. Member of eight Western winners (1902, 1907-08, 1910-11, 1913, 1915, 1917) and four Eastern winners (1903-06) as a player. Holway Western All-Star (1913). Two-time George Stovey Award winner (1906 and 1913). MVP for the 1906 Western title playoff. Eastern wins leader (1906). Western wins leader (1912).

Willie Foster - 1945 – P
Memphis Red Sox (1923-24, 1938); Chicago American Giants (1923-30, 1937); Birmingham Black Barons (1925); Homestead Grays (1931); Kansas City Monarchs (1931); Cole’s American Giants (1932-35); Pittsburgh Crawford (1936)
Cap: Chicago American Giants
Possibly the greatest lefthander in Negro League history, “Big Bill” had the reputation as a premier “money” pitcher. An excellent control pitcher, he reaped maximum benefits for his teams from a stupendous fastball, a changeup, a slider, a sidearm curve and a fast-breaking drop. An extremely intelligent hurler, he led his team to victory three times in championship series. Member of two Western winners (1926-27). Member of one Eastern winner (1931). Member of one Southern winner (1932). Three-time George Stovey Award (1927, 1931-32).Three-time Rube Foster Award (1926-27, 1931). Two-time All-Star (1933 - the biggest vote getter and winner of the game; 1934). Western leader for Wins (1927, 1932), Winning % (1927), Strikeouts (1926-28, 1930) and Total Run Avg. (1926). Three-time Holway Western All-Star (1925-27). Holway Eastern All-Star (1931). Holway Southern All-Star (1932). Eastern leader for Wins (1931), Winning % (1931) and Strikeouts (1931). Southern leader for Wins (1932), Winning % (1932) and Strikeouts (1932).

Nellie Fox – 1996 – 2B
15.1 seasons with: Philadelphia (AL) 1947-49; Chicago (AL) 1950-63; Houston (NL) 1964-65
Cap: Chicago White Sox (AL)
The best second baseman of the Fifties, Fox excelled in several dimensions, most noted in his prime with the famed “Go-Go” Sox. His most heralded asset was his skill at the keystone as he was recognized as the best AL second sacker of his time (led all second basemen 8 times in games, 6 times each in assists and fielding percentage, 5 times in double plays and a ML record 10 times in putouts). He also received plaudits for his exceptional bat control as the left-handed swinger made remarkable contact (6 .300+ seasons and 4 times with 100 or more runs scored.) He also holds the record for all second baseman and as well as for any post-WWII player with an incredible AB/K ratio of 42.74; he struck out only 216 times in over 9,000 career at bats, also establishing an AL record for consecutive games between strike outs with a stretch of 98 games in 1958). Finally, the scrappy, tobacco-chewing Fox is remembered for his incredible durability at the demanding position, setting the ML record for consecutive games played at the second base (798 between 1956 to 1960). Member of one pennant-winner (1959). AL MVP (1959). Three-time Gold Glove Award winner (1957, 1959-60). Five-time STATS, Inc. AL Second Baseman (1951, 1955-57, 1959). Win Shares AL co-MVP (1959). Six-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award (1952, 1955-59). Twelve-time All-Star (1951-61, 1963). AL leader for G (1954-55, 1957-59), AB (1952, 1955-56, 1959-60), H (1952, 1954, 1957-58), 3B (1960), 1B (1952, 1954-60), HBP (1955), Sac. Hits (1961, 1964), and AB/K (1951, 1954-64). Retired with the White Sox franchise single-season record for AB (649 in 1956), as well as the career records for 3B (104) and AB/K (44.2).

Jimmie Foxx - 1951 – 1B/3B/C
14.1 seasons with: Philadelphia (AL) 1925-35; Boston (AL) 1936-42; Chicago (NL) 1942, 1944; Philadelphia (NL) 1945
Cap: Philadelphia Athletics (AL)
One of the greatest power hitters of all-time (12 times over 30 homers, including 3 seasons of 40 and 2 of 50), “The Beast” hit them as long as anyone has ever hit them (his 534 homers were the most for a right-handed hitter when he retired). Foxx was also a fine contact hitter (.325/.428/.609; 11 seasons of over .300 BA) who was very patient at the plate (7 times topping 100 walks and 12 times with at least a .400 OBP). With a career 163 OPS+, he left the game tied with the most 100 RBI seasons (13). A fine-fielding first baseman (he led the AL in putouts once and fielding percentage and assists 3 times) , “Double X” was surprisingly mobile for a big man and had a great arm. Member of three pennant winners (1931 and the World Champs of 1929 and 1930). Three-time AL MVP (1932-33, 1938). AL Triple Crown (1933). STATS, Inc. AL MVP (1929). Six-time STATS, Inc. AL First Baseman (1929, 1932-33, 1938-39, 1941). STATS, Inc. AL Third Baseman (1928). Four-time Win Shares AL MVP (1929, 1932-33, 1938). Three-time Win Shares AL Silver Slugger winner (1932-33, 1938). Five-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1929-30, 1932-33, 1937). Nine-time All-Star (1933-41). AL leader for OBP (1929, 1938-39), SLG (1932-33, 1935, 1938-39), OPS+ (1932-33, 1935, 1938-39), Games (1936), Runs (1932), RBI (1932-33, 1938), BB (1934, 1938), Total Bases (1932-33, 1938), HR (1932-33, 1935, 1939), XBH (1932-33, 1938), Times on Base (1932-33, 1938), Power/Speed Number (1936) and BA (1933, 1938). Retired with the Athletics’ season records (all set in ’32) for OBP (.469), SLG (.749), TB (438), HR (58), Adj. OPS+ (205), XBH (100), Times on Base (329) and RBI (169); as well as the Athletics’ career records for OBP (.440), SLG (.640), HR (302) and Adj. OPS+ (174). He also retired with the Red Sox franchise single-season records (all set in ’38) for (398), HR (50), RBI (175) and XBH (92); as well as the Red Sox career records for HR (222) and RBI (788).

Bill Freehan – 1985 – C/1B
11.0 seasons with: Detroit (AL) 1961, 1963-76
Cap: Detroit Tigers
The greatest all-around backstop of the Sixties in the AL and the best full-timer at that position in the major leagues, Freehan had it all together as a defensive player. A gra

John (You Can Call Me Grandma) Murphy Posted: March 12, 2007 at 11:39 PM | 0 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
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