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Hall of Merit
— A Look at Baseball's All-Time Best

Monday, March 21, 2005

The Baseball Hall of Merit Plaque Room: S-Z

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For Hall of Meriters G-L, please click here.

For Hall of Meriters M-R, please click here.


Bret Saberhagen – 2008 – P
Kansas City (AL) 1984-91; New York (NL) 1992-95; Colorado (NL) 1995; Boston (AL) 1997-2001
Cap: Kansas City Royals (AL)
One of the youngest ever Cy Young Award winners, “Sabes” was the poised ace of the Royals’ staff from age 21. Credited with an impressive .588 career winning percentage and a 126 ERA+, the right-handed control pitcher with 90+ MPH fastball notched 20 wins twice and had 3 sub-2.00 ERA seasons, as well as being the only pitcher to have more wins (14) than walks (13) in a season (1994) since the inception of the Lively Ball era. A member of two division series (1995, 1998), two championship series (1984, 1999) and the World Champions of 1985 (he won two complete games, including a shutout in Game Seven, with a microscopic 0.50 ERA). Two-time AL Cy Young Award winner (1985, 1989). ML-WS MVP (1985). AL Gold Glove Award (1989). No-Hitter (1991). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1985, 1989). STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1994). Two-time Win Shares AL Pitcher of the Year (1985, 1989). Three-time All-Star (1987, 1990, 1994). AL leader in ERA (1989), W (1989), WHIP (1985, 1989), BB/9IP (1985), IP (1989), CG (1989), SO to BB (1985, 1987, 1989) and Adj. ERA+ (1989). NL leader for BB/9IP (1994) and SO to BB (1994). Retired with the Royals’ franchise single-season records for W (23 in 1989), SO to BB (4.49 in 1989) and Adj. ERA+ (180 in 1989); the Royals’ career records for WHIP (1.134) and SO to BB (3.30); the Mets’ single-season records for BB/9IP (0.66 in 1994) and SO to BB (11.00 in 1994); and the Mets’ career records for BB/9IP (1.32) and SO to BB (5.04).

Ryne Sandberg  - 2003 – 2B/3B
13.6 seasons with: Philadelphia (NL) 1981; Chicago (NL) 1982-94, 1997
Cap: Chicago Cubs (NL)
The greatest second baseman in Cub history, “Ryno” was also the finest manner of the keystone sack in the National League during the 1980s. The rare middle infielder with top-flight power, the right-handed slugger retired with the career home run record for second basemen with 277 (282 in all, with six seasons of 25 or more, including a high of 40 in 1990.) He also hit over .300 5 times, scored at least 100 runs 7 times, drove in 100 runs twice and had a slugging percentage over .500 4 times. He was also an impressive base runner, stealing 344 bases (he nabbed 54 in 1985) and left the game with a 76% success rate on the base paths. An exceptional fielder with great range, soft hands and a powerful arm, his career fielding percentage was .989 and he led the NL 7 times in assists, 4 times in both fielding percentage and total chances, 3 times in games and once in double plays. He also owns the records for most consecutive games without an error (123 during the 1989-90 seasons) and for a season (90 in 1989).  In postseason play, he had an excellent batting line of .385/.457/.641. Member of two division-winners (1984, 1989). NL MVP (1984). Seven-time NL Silver Slugger Award (1984-85, 1988-92). Nine-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1983-91). Six-time STATS, Inc. NL Second Baseman (1984-85, 1989-92). Two-time Win Shares NL MVP (1984, 1991). Three-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1984, 1991-92). Ten-time All-Star (1984-93). NL leader for R (1984, 1989-90), TB (1990), 3B (1984), HR (1990) and Power/Speed Number (1985). Retired with the Cubs’ franchise career record for Power/Speed Number (35.1 in 1985), as well as their career records for Runs (post-19th century: 1,316) and Power/Speed Number (309.9).

Ron Santo  - 1980 – 3B
14.0 seasons with: Chicago (NL) 1960-73; Chicago (AL) 1974
Cap: Chicago Cubs (NL)
The greatest NL 3B of the 1960’s and arguably the greatest in the major leagues during the decade. Many feel he is the best to ever man the “hot corner” for the Chicago NL franchise. A fine offensive player noted for his walks and power (four times with over 30 home runs), the right-handed slugger batted .300 and drove in at least 100 runs 4 times. His 342 HR were second all-time among 3B at the time of his retirement. His amazing durability (in 1966, he set the NL record for consecutive games played at third base with 390) had him ranked 3rd all-time in games played at 3B when he retired. An outstanding fielder, Santo led the NL in total chances 9 times ( a ML record), 7 times in putouts, assists (both a NL record number of times), and games, 6 times in double plays, and once in fielding percentage. He retired with the NL records for most assists (4,532) and double plays (389). He was an emotional player who always had his heart on his sleeve, and a fan favorite during his Cubbie years. Five-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1964-68). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1964, 1967-69, 1972). Win Shares NL MVP (1967). Seven-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1963-68, 1971). Nine-time All-Star (1963-66, 1968-69, 1971-73). NL leader for OBP (1964, 1966), G (1963, 1965), 3B (1964), BB (1964, 1966-68), Times on Base (1964, 1966-67), and Sac. Flies (1963, 1967, 1969). Retired with the Cubs’ franchise single-season records for G (164 in 1965) and Sac. Flies (14 in 1969).

Louis Santop - 1932 - C/LF/RF/1B/3B
Fort Worth Wonders (1909), Oklahoma Monarchs (1909), Philadelphia Giants (1909-10), New York Lincoln Giants (1911-14, 1918), Brooklyn Royal Giants (1914-19), Chicago American Giants (1915), New York Lincoln Stars (1915-16), Hilldale Daisies (1917-26)
Cap: Brooklyn Royal Giants
The outstanding all-around catcher of his time, “Big Bertha” had a howitzer for an arm and for a bat. Not just a home run hitter, “Top” is credited with multiple seasons of batting over. 400. The left-handed slugger was one of the few “Deadball Era” hitters who were capable of driving the ball 500 feet. The Negro Leagues’ top drawing card during the teens, he was often referred to as the “black Babe Ruth” for his prodigious slugging and showmanship. On defense, his powerful arm was extremely accurate, while his sturdy body was made-to-order for blocking the plate. Member of eight Eastern winners (1911-13, 1915, 1918, 1923-25). Two-time Fleet Walker Award winner (1909, 1911, 1922). Seven-time Holway Eastern All-Star (1913-14, 1917-18, 1921-22, 1924). Three-time Eastern hitter (1912, 1914, 1922). Two-time Eastern home run champ (1921-22).

Mike Schmidt – 1995 – 3B/1B
15.2 seasons with: Philadelphia (NL) 1972-89
Cap: Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
Acclaimed by a sizeable majority as the great third basemen in ML history, “Schmitty” was equally outstanding hitting (147 OPS+) and fielding. At the plate, the right-handed line-drive power hitter belted 30 or more homers and achieved a .500 SLG 13 times (thrice over 40 clouts and twice exceeding a .600 SLG), 9 times with at least 100 RBI and 7 times with over 100 BB. ML records: most 3B home runs (48 in 1980) and 4 dingers in a single game (tied) in 1976. NL record: 8 HR titles. A great defender expert on bare-handed plays, he led all NL third basemen 7 times in assists, 6 times in double plays, twice in games and once in putouts. Member of one division leader (1981), three division-champs (1976-78) and two pennant-winners (1983 (.467/.529/.800 in the NLCS) and the World Champions of 1980 (.381/.462/.714 in the WS)). Three-time NL MVP (1980-81, 1986). ML-WS MVP (1980). Six-time NL Silver Slugger-3B (1980-84, 1986). Ten-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1976-84, 1986). Twelve-time STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1974-77, 1979-84, 1986-87). STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1985).  Seven-time Win Shares NL MVP (1974, 1977, 1979-83). Four-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1980-83). Six-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1974, 1976-77, 1979-80, 1983).  Twelve-time All-Star (1974, 1976-77, 1979-84, 1986-87, 1989). NL leader for OBP (1980-82), SLG (1974, 1980-82, 1986), OPS (1980-82, 1984, 1986), R (1981), TB (1976, 1980-81), HR (1974-76, 1980-81, 1983-84, 1986), RBI (1980-81, 1984, 1986), BB (1979, 1981-83), Adj. OPS+ (1980-84, 1986), XBH (1975-76, 1980-81, 1986), Times on Base (1981), HBP (1976), Sac. Flies (1979-80), IBB (1981, 1986), Power/Speed Number (1975) and AB/HR (1974, 1980-81, 1983-84, 1986). Retired with the Phillies’ franchise single-season records for BB (128 in 1983), OPS+ (199 in 1981), Sac. Flies (13 in 1980), IBB (25 in 1986), Power/Speed Number (32.9 in 1975) and AB/HR (11.4 in 1980 & 1981), as well as the career records for G (2,404), AB (8,352), PA (10,062), R (1,506), H (2,234), TB (4,404), 2B (modern record: 408), HR (548), RBI (1,595), BB (1,507), XBH (1,015), Times on Base (3,820), HBP (modern record: 79), Sac. Flies (108), IBB (201), Power/Speed Number (264.1) and AB/HR (15.2).

Tom Seaver – 1992 – P
New York (NL) 1967-77, 1983; Cincinnati (NL) 1977-82; Chicago (AL) 1984-86; Boston (AL) 1986
Cap: New York Mets (NL)
Considered by many to be the finest hurler of his generation, “Tom Terrific’s” achievements helped transform the Mets from losers to winners. The greatest player in that team’s history, “The Franchise” was the rare power pitcher (NL records: fanned 200 or more batters 10 times and 19 times in a game in 1970) that could also paint the strike zone with little effort. The master of pitching mechanics on the mound, the durable right-hander won 311 games (a 20-game winner 5 times) and compiled the following: a 2.86 ERA, 127 ERA+, 3,640 strikeouts, a .603 winning percentage and 60 shutouts. Records he left the game with were the NL career records for K’s for a right-hander (3,272) and ERA (modern record: 2.73). Member of one division-winner (1979) and two pennant-winners (the 1973 “Ya Gotta Believe” team and the World Champion “Amazin’ Mets” of 1969). NL Rookie of the Year (1967). Three-time NL Cy Young Award winner (1969, 1973, 1975). No-hit Game (1978). Eight-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1969-73, 1975, 1977, 1981). Two-time NL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1973, 1981). Twelve-time All-Star (1967-73, 1975-78, 1981). NL leader for ERA (1970-71, 1973), Wins (1969, 1975, 1981), W-L% (1981), WHIP (1971, 1973, 1977), HA/9IP (1969, 1973, 1977), K/9IP (1970-74, 1976), K (1970-71, 1973, 1975-76), CG (1973), SHO (1977, 1979), SO to Walk (1973-74, 1977) and Adj. ERA+ (1969-71, 1973). Retired with the Mets’ franchise single-season records for W (25 in 1969), WHIP (.946 in 1971), IP (290.7 in 1970), K (289 in 1971), GS (36 in 1970), CG (21 in 1971) and SO to Walk (4.74 in 1971); the Mets’ career records for ERA (2.57), W (198), WHIP (1.076), G (401), IP (3,045.3), K (2,541), GS (395), CG (171), SHO (44), SO to Walk (3.00) and Adj. ERA+ (136); as well as the Reds’ single-season records for W-L% (.875 in 1981) and WHIP (.956 in 1977).

Joe Sewell - 1985 – SS/3B
12.4 seasons with: Cleveland (AL) 1920-30; New York (AL) 1931-33
Cap: Cleveland Indians (AL)
The outstanding all-around major league shortstop of the Roaring Twenties, Sewell appeared to have a need to make contact every time he came up to the plate lugging his famed “Black Betsy.” The hardest man to strike out in major league history (a ML season record of 167.7 AB/K in 1932, the career record of 62.56 AB/K, and the season consecutive game record of 115 games without whiffing in 1929), the right-handed line-drive hitter struck out only 114 times in 7,132 games and had three seasons where he fanned only 4 times and two seasons with 3. Batting at least .300 9 times, he was also one of a handful of players with consecutive game streaks of over 1,000 games (1,103 from 1922 to 1930). As a fielder, he also impressed in that department (leading AL shortstops 5 times in total chances and assists, 4 times in putouts, 3 times in games and fielding percentage, and 1 time in double plays, not to mention once in games among AL third basemen. Member of two pennant-winners (the World Champions of 1920 and 1932). Eight-time STATS, Inc. AL Shortstop (1921-28). Two-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1925-26, 1928-29). AL leader for G (1928), 2B (1924), Sac. Hits (1929) and AB/K (1925-33). Retired with the Indians’ season record for AB/K (152.0 in 1925), as well as the Indians’ career record for AB/K (56.8), as well as the Yankees’ season record for AB/K (167.7 in 1932).

Jimmy Sheckard - 1930 - LF/RF
14.1 seasons with: Brooklyn (NL) 1897-98, 1900-05; Baltimore (NL) 1899; Baltimore (AL) 1902; Chicago (NL) 1906-12; St. Louis (NL) 1913; Cincinnati (NL) 1913                                                                                                                                                  
Cap: Chicago Cubs (NL)
One of the games most sparkling fielders (he led all oufielders in his league in putouts once, assists three times, and double plays twice), Sheckard had great range patrolling left and right field. The left-handed slugger had impressive power, a remarkable knowledge of the strike zone (1,135 walks) and was as speedy as the best of them. A master at fundamentals, he was also skilled at the hit-and-run and bunt. Retired with the major league single-season record for most bases on balls (147 in 1911). Member of five pennant winners (1900, 1906, 1910 and two World Series champions in 1907-08). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1901, 1911). Five-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove winner (1902-03, 1906, 1910, 1912). NL leader for Triples (1901), Home Runs (1903), Bases on Balls (1911-12), Runs (1911), Stolen Bases (1899, 1903), OBP (1911), Times on Bases (1911), Sac Hits (1906, 1909), Power/Speed Number (1901, 1903) and Slugging % (1901).

Al Simmons - 1946 – LF/CF
14.1 seasons with: Philadelphia (AL) 1924-32, 1940-41, 1944; Chicago (AL) 1933-35; Detroit (AL) 1936; Washington (AL) 1937-38; Boston (NL) 1939; Cincinnati (NL) 1939; Boston (AL) 1943
Cap: Philadelphia Athletics (AL)
Thought by some that he would be handicapped by his unorthodox batting stance, “Bucketfoot Al” (the right-handed slugger’s foot would point toward third base when he was up at bat) changed their minds fairly quickly early on in his career.  A feisty and aggressive player, Simmons was a line-drive hitter that could hit to all fields and with power (.334 BA,  2,927 hits, .535 SLG, 6 200-hit seasons, and 12 seasons of 100+ RBI). Batting records that he left the game with were the AL record for consecutive 200-hit seasons (5 -‘29 to ‘33), the single-season AL record for RBI per game (1.20 in 1930), the major league record for most hits by a righty in a season (253 in 1925), and the AL record for most career hits by a righty (2,831). He was also a top-flight defender who was solid in all areas of fielding (he led outfielders in his league once in putouts). Member of four pennant winners (1931, 1939 and the World Champs of 1929 and 1930). Eight-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1925, 1927, 1929-34). Two-time Win Shares AL MVP (1925, 1929). Six-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1924-26, 1929, 1933, 1935). Three-time All-Star (1933-35). AL leader for RBI (1929), H (1925, 1932), TB (1925, 1929), SB (1930), XBH (1925, 1929), AB (1925, 1932) and BA (1930-31).  Retired with the Athletics’ season records for most R (152 in 1930), H (253 in 1925), 2B (53 in 1926) and AB (670 in 1932); as well as the Athletics’ career records for BA (.356), TB (2,998), RBI (1,178), XBH (655) and H (1,827).

Ted Simmons – 1994 – C/DH/1B
15.5 seasons with: St. Louis (NL) 1968-80; Milwaukee (AL) 1981-85; Atlanta (NL) 1986-88
Cap: St. Louis Cardinals
The greatest switch-hitting catcher in National League history and maybe ever, “Simba” was the king of the jungle amongst contact hitters at his position during the Seventies. Batting .285 for his career (7 seasons over .300), he hit 20 or more home runs 7 times, 8 times with at least 90 RBI (3 times over 100) and totaled 483 career doubles (the most ever for a backstop when he retired). With a record 2,472 career hits when he hung up his spikes and the most homers for a NL switch-hitter (182), the tough and durable Simmons also slugged over .500 four straight years (1977-80). One of only a handful of switch-hitters to have driven in more than a 100 RBI in both leagues. Dependable on defense, he led all catchers 3 times in games and twice in putouts and assists. NL Silver Slugger Award-C (1980). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Catcher (1976-80). Eight-time All-Star (1972-74, 1977-79, 1981, 1983).  Member of one division champ (1981) and one pennant-winner (1982). NL leader for IBB (1976-77). Retired with the Cardinals’ career record for IBB (151).

George Sisler – 1979 – 1B/P
13.6 seasons with: St. Louis (AL) 1915-22, 1924-27; Washington (AL) 1928; Boston (NL) 1928-30
Cap: St. Louis Browns (AL)
One of the games most smart and graceful players, “Gorgeous George” was unquestionably the Browns’ greatest player of their 52 seasons. A promising pitcher as a rookie, the lefty Sisler’s hitting prowess was too great to keep him on the mound. Speedy and a great contact hitter (6 seasons of 200 hits), he batted .400 twice (1920 and 1922) and his career mark was .340; he also retired with the AL single-season mark for hits (257 in 1920) and the AL record for consecutive games with a hit (41 in 1920). As a fielder, his reputation was excellent (he led his league 7 times in assists, 3 times in DP, and 2 times in games; he left the game with 1,528 assists, which is a ML record). AL MVP (1922). Six-time STATS, Inc. AL First Baseman (1917, 1919-22, 1925). Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award (1922). Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award (1918). AL leader for BA (1920, 1922), Games (1920), AB (1920), Runs (1922), Hits (1920, 1922), TB (1920), Triples (1921, 1922), SB (1918, 1921-22, 1927), 1B (1920, 1922), Times on Base (1922), and Power/Speed Number (1919-20). Retired with the Browns’ franchise season records for OBP (.467 in 1922), OPS (1.082 in 1920), R (137 in 1920), TB (399 in 1920), Doubles (49 in 1920), SB (51 in 1922), XBH (86 in 1920), and Times on Base (305 in 1920); as well as the career records for BA (.344), Games (1,647), AB (6,667), Runs (1,091), Hits (2,295), TB (3,207), 2B (343), 3B (145), RBI (959), SB (351), 1B (1,714), XBH (581), Times on Base (2,720), and HBP (40).

Enos Slaughter – 1965 – RF/LF
15.5 seasons with: St. Louis (NL) 1938-42, 1946-53; New York (AL) 1954-59; Kansas City (AL) 1954-55; Milwaukee (NL) 1959
Cap: St. Louis Cardinals (NL)
The best major league right fielder of the 1940’s, “Country” was the essence of hustle on the field. A line-drive hitter with extra base power to all fields and fine contact abilities (he batted .300 eight times and left the game exactly with that number for his career), the left-handed Slaughter had the reputation as a man you wanted to see up at the plate for your team in clutch situations. A marvelous corner outfielder, the WWII veteran’s outstanding speed and instincts saved the day many a time for his teams (he led all outfielders in his league twice in assists, once in total chances, once in double plays, once in putouts, and once in games in the outfield). As well as he played during the regular season, he’s most known for his “mad dash” from first base to home plate on only a double that gave the Cardinals the 1946 World Series in Game 7. Member of five pennant-winners (1957 and the World Series champions of 1942, 1946, 1956, and 1958). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1940, 1942, 1946, 1948-49). Win Shares NL MVP (1942). Four-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1939, 1942, 1946-47). Ten-time All-Star (1941-42, 1946-53). NL leader for G (1946), H (1942), TB (1942), 2B (1939), 3B (1942, 1949), RBI (1946), 1B (1942), XBH (1942), and Times on Base (1942). AL leader in PH (1955) and PH AB (1958).

Ozzie Smith  - 2002 – SS
16.5 seasons with: San Diego (NL) 1978-81; St. Louis (NL) 1982-96
Cap: St. Louis Cardinals (NL)
Without a doubt, the best defensive shortstop of his generation, and arguably the greatest defensive player at any position in the history of the game, “The Wizard of Oz’” was a magician on the field. A master at the double play with exceptional range and a great arm, he established several notable ML shortstop records including most career assists (8,375), double plays (1,590), total chances (12,624), most years with 500 or more assists (8) and most years leading the league in assists and total chances (8), as well as the single-season records for fewest errors (8 in 1991) and assists (621 in 1980). He also led the NL 8 times in fielding percentage, 5 times each in games and double plays and twice in putouts. He was also known to preview his acrobatic athleticism by performing a back flip before each Opening Day game as he ran out to his position for most of his career, Hard work helped turn the popular switch-hitter into a capable performer with the bat in his hands as well as running the basepaths (notably his 580 stolen bases and 87% success rate). A member of one division champ (1996), two pennant-winners (1985, 1987) and the World Champions of 1982; his home run in the 1985 NLCS won the pennant for St. Louis. NLCS MVP (1985). NL Silver Slugger Award-SS (1987). Thirteen-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1980-92). Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Shortstop (1982, 1984-85, 1987). Ten-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1978, 1980-82, 1984-88, 1992). Fifteen-time All-Star (1981-92, 1994-96). NL leader for G (1981), AB (1981), PA (1981), Sac. Hits (1978, 1980) and AB/K (1986, 1993). Retired with the Padres’ franchise single-season record for Sac. Hits (28 in 1978).

Reggie Smith  - 2009 – RF/CF/1B
12.4 seasons with: Boston (AL) 1966-73; St. Louis (NL) 1974-76; Los Angeles (NL) 1976-81; San Francisco (NL) 1982
Cap: Boston Red Sox (AL)
An outstanding five-tool player with a career OPS+ of 137, Smith was the second-best slugging switch hitter in ML history when he retired (having belted 314 home runs, Smith is the only man to have hit 100 homers in both major leagues; he is also the only player to hit a home run from both sides of the plate in a game twice in each league). The second and last player at the time of his enshrinement to appear in the World Series and All-Star game for both the NL and AL, he topped a .300 BA 6 times, a .500 slugging percentage 5 times, twice hit at least 30 home runs in a season, scored over 100 runs twice and drove in 100 runs once. Smith also had one season with 100 walks and once led the NL in OBP (1977 - .427.) Having one of his generation’s finest arms and plentiful speed on defense, the well respected Smith led his league in assists twice and also once each in games, putouts and double plays (all as a right fielder), as well as once each in assists, putouts and games (as a center fielder.) A member of four pennant-winners (1977, 1978, the “Impossible Dream” team of 1967 and the World Champions of 1981; in his 4 Fall Classic appearances, he hit a combined 6 homers, had 13 RBI and runs scored each and notched a .521 SLG). AL Gold Glove Award winner (1968). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1974, 1977-78). Three-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award (1967-68, 1970). Ten-time All-Star (1969, 1972, 1974-75, 1977-78, 1980). AL leader for TB (1971), 2B (1968, 1971) and XBH (1971). NL leader for OBP (1977), Adj. OPS+ (1977), OWP (1977) and Sac. Flies (1977).

Duke Snider – 1970 – CF/RF
13.8 seasons with: Brooklyn/Los Angeles (NL) 1947-62; New York (NL) 1963; San Francisco (NL) 1964
Cap: Brooklyn Dodgers (NL)
Brooklyn’s answer to the other star center fielders from New York during The Fifties, “The Silver Fox” certainly didn’t embarrass himself. A power hitter (the leading home run hitter from the 1950s; he had at least 40 dingers 5 times consecutively from 1953 to 1957, a big help for his 140 OPS+), the left-handed Snider wasn’t a hacker (he had at least 100 BB six times) and hit for average (7 times with at least .300). A graceful, speedy fielder with good hands, “The Duke of Flatbush” also had a strong arm. In the postseason, he left the game with the NL career records for homers (11) and RBI (26). The first NL player to hit four home runs in two World Series (1952 and 1955 - he’s tied for the ML record, too) and retired with the ML single-series record for TB (24 in 1952), he’s also tied for the ML WS single-series record for XBH (6 in 1952). Member of 6 pennant-winners (1949, 1952, 1953, 1956 and the World Champions of 1955 and 1959). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1953-57). Win Shares MVP Award (1956). Two-time Win Shares Silver Slugger Award (1954, 1956). Four-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1953, 1955-57). Eight-time All-Star (1950-56, 1963). NL leader for OBP (1956), SLG (1953, 1956), OPS (1953, 1956), R (1953-55), H (1950), TB (1950, 1953-54), HR (1956), RBI (1955), BB (1956), Adj. OPS+ (1956), XBH (1954-56), IBB (1956), Power/Speed (1953), and AB/HR (1957). Retired with the Dodgers’ franchise season records for HR (43 in 1956), AB/HR (12.6 in 1956), and IBB (26 in 1956), as well as the career records for HR (389), RBI (1,271), XBH (814), IBB (91), and AB/HR (17.1).

Warren Spahn – 1971 – P
Boston/Milwaukee (NL) 1942, 1946-64; New York (NL) 1965; San Francisco (NL) 1965                                                         
Cap: Milwaukee Braves (NL)
The winningest major league left-handed pitcher of all-time with 363 victories, Spahn was still an MVP and Cy Young Award candidate in his forties when most of his peers were long retired. Working with a fastball and curve (later an outstanding screwball and slider), not to mention baseball smarts, he tied the NL record for most seasons with at least 20 wins with 13 and holds the modern era NL record for career starts with 665. “Spahnie” also left the game with the NL record for strikeouts (2,583) and the ML record for most years leading the league in Wins (8) and CG (9). A hurler with some pop in his bat, he left professional baseball owning the NL record for most career home runs with 35. Member of three pennant-winners (1948, 1958, and the World Champions of 1957). Cy Young Award (1957). Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1949, 1953, 1958, 1961). Thirteen-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1947, 1949-51, 1953-61). NL Win Shares Co-MVP (1947). Five-time NL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1947, 1949, 1957-58, 1961). Fourteen-time All-Star (1947, 1949-54, 1956-59, 1961-63).  No-hitters (one each in 1960 and 1961). NL leader for ERA (1947, 1953, 1961), W (1949-50, 1953, 1957-61), W-L% (1958), WHIP (1947, 1953, 1958, 1961), HA/9IP (1953), IP (1947, 1949, 1958-59), K (1949-52), GS (1949-50), CG (1949, 1951, 1957-63), SHO (1947, 1951, 1959, 1961), and Adj. ERA+ (1947, 1953).  Retired with the Braves’ franchise single-season record for Adj. ERA+ (188 in 1953), the post-19th century single-season record for SHO (7 in four separate years), as well as the career records for Wins (356), Games (714), IP (5,046), K (2,493), GS (635), SHO (63) and the post-19th century career records for W-L % ( ,609) and CG (374).

Al Spalding - 1906 - P/1B
Rockford 1868-70, Boston (NA) 1871-75; Chicago (NL) 1876-77
Cap: Boston Red Stockings (NA)
The star pitcher of the National Association, the right-handed Spalding won at least 30 games five times (included in that group were two 40-win and 50-win seasons). His best year was 1872, where he went 38-8, with a 1.98 ERA (league 3.72), starting every game and throwing 405 innings for the champion Red Stockings. In 1875, he was 55-5 with a 1.52 ERA (league 2.36) in 575 IP, as Boston won their fourth consecutive pennant. Besides his stellar moundwork, he was also an outstanding hitter for a pitcher, career .313/.323/.382 (league .286/.299/.354). He finished his career with a 253-65 record and a 142 ERA+ in 2,891 IP, though this doesn’t include his fine work with the pre-NA Rockford team of 1868-70. Retired with the combined NA-NL career records for SHO (23), W (253), WPCT (.796) and IP (2890.70), as well as the single-season records for W (55 in 1975) and S (8 in 1975). Ace starter for five consecutive pennant winners (1872-76). STATS, Inc.  NL Pitcher of the Year (1876). NA leader in ERA (1872, 1875), ERA+ (1872), Wins (1871-75), Won-Loss % (1873-75), Saves (1873, 1875), Innings (1873-74), Games Started (1873-74), Complete Games (1874), Shutouts (1871-72, 1874-75), Games (1873-75), AB (1874), Singles (1874) and AB/K (1873). NL leader in Wins and Won-Loss % for 1876.

Tris Speaker - 1934 – CF
18.3 seasons with: Boston (AL) 1907-15; Cleveland (AL) 1916-26; Washington (AL) 1927; Philadelphia (AL) 1928
Cap: Cleveland Indians (AL)
Possibly the greatest fielding centerfielder of all-time, “The Grey Eagle” recreated outfield defense during the Deadball Era. Playing a very shallow centerfield, he was still capable of going back quickly enough to snare deep shots over his head (he led all outfielders in his league seven times in putouts (an AL record), three times in assists, two times in fielding percentage, and six times in double plays). A sizzling line-drive hitter (3,514 hits), “Spoke” was also a scary presence for opposing pitchers and made his mark the career records list throughout his long career (.345/.428/.500; 18 times over .300; 222 triples). He was also a difficult man to stop on the basepaths because of his blazing speed. Retired with the major league career records for 2B (792), CF games (2,690), OF assists (448), OF double plays (139), and OF putouts (6,706), as well as the AL season record for assists (35 in 1909 and 1912). Member of three World Series champs (1912, 1915, 1920). AL MVP (1912). STATS, Inc. AL MVP (1916). Eleven-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1909-10, 1912-18, 1920, 1923). Three-time Win Shares AL MVP (1912, 1914, 1916). Two-time Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1912, 1916). Ten-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1909-12, 1914-15, 1917-19, 1921). AL leader for OPS (1916), Adj. OPS+ (1916), H (1914, 1916),  OBP (1912, 1916, 1922, 1925), SLG (1916), TB (1914),  2B (1912, 1914, 1916, 1918, 1920-23), HR (1916), XBH (1912, 1914), G (1914), Times on Bases (1912, 1916, 1918), Power/Speed (1912), AB/K (1915, 1918, 1920) and BA (1916).

Willie Stargell  - 1988 – LF/1B
14.7 seasons with: Pittsburgh (NL) 1962-82
Cap: Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
Hitting more home runs than anyone during the Seventies (and many of the tape-measure variety), the popular Willie was intimidating at the plate (.529 SLG and 147 OPS+) and one of the great clubhouse leaders of all-time. Driving in 100 runs 5 times and scoring 100 runs twice, the strapping left-handed power hitter smacked 30 or more homers 6 times (twice over 40) and had three .300 BA seasons to his credit. Though his two best seasons were in 1971 and 1973 (both seasons with .600+ SLG), “Pop’s” most famous team was the “We Are Family” club that he led in ’79 that won it all. Fielding-wise, he led NL left fielders 4 times in assists, twice in double plays, and once in fielding percentage (he also led NL first basemen once in fielding percentage). He left the game tying the ML single-game record for XBH (5 in 1970).  Member of four division-winners (1970, 1972, 1974-75) and two pennant-winners (the World Champions of 1971 and 1979); he slugged .511 during the postseason and his ’79 WS batting line was a hefty .400/.375./.833. NL co-MVP (1979). NLCS MVP (1979). ML-WS MVP (1979).  Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1971, 1973-74). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1975, 1978). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1973). Seven-time All-Star (1964-66, 1971-73, 1978). NL leader for SLG (1973), OPS (1973-74), 2B (1973), HR (1971, 1973), RBI (1973), Adj. OPS+ (1973-74), and XBH (1971, 1973). Retired with the Pirates’ franchise single-season record for XBH (90 in 1973), as well as the career records for HR (475), RBI (1,540), BB (937), XBH (953), Sac. Flies (75), and IBB (227).

Joe Start - 1912 - 1B
Brooklyn 1862-70; 14.4 seasons with: New York (NA) 1871-75; New York (NL) 1876; Hartford (NL) 1877; Chicago (NL) 1878; Providence (NL) 1879-85; Washington (NL) 1886
Cap: Brooklyn Atlantics
“Old Reliable” was the premier first baseman for the 1860’s and ‘70’s (leading his league in first base putouts four times and assists twice). The model of excellence defensively and durability for his position, he was also a fine batsman. Star of two national champions (1864, 65) as a youngster and “elder statesman” for the World Series champs of 1884.  While a third of his career is undocumented, from 1877-82 his OWP was only below .700 once, though he was 34-39 years old during this period. Among NL first basemen, he led the league 4 times in fielding percentage (he also led the NA twice in that category). He was a star fielder when 1B was a tougher, more valuable defensive position, before the advent of gloves. Two-time STATS, Inc. First Baseman (1878-79). Two-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Awrd winner (1877, 1879). NA leader in Games (1871). NL leader for Games AB (1878), Hits (1878), TB (1878), Singles (1878, 1882) and AB/K (1877, 1882). Win Shares Gold Glove Winner (1877, 1879). Career OWP .662 (from age 33 on).

Turkey Stearnes - 1946 – CF/LF/1B
Detroit Stars (1923-31, 1933, 1937); New York Lincoln Giants (1930);  Kansas City Monarchs (1931, 1934, 1938-41); Chicago American Giants (1932-35, 1938); Philadelphia Stars (1936)
Cap: Detroit Stars
One of his generation’s great power threats who could also hit for average, Stearnes was an admired hitter for years. The lefty slugger was also an exceptional speedster who led his leagues multiple times in stolen bases and triples. Stearnes was considered an outstanding fielder who had good hands and range. Member of two Western winners (1931, 1940).  Member of one Southern winner (1932). Four-time All-Star (including 1935, 1939-40). Three-time Fleet Walker Award (1932, 1934, 1939). Western leader for BA (1939), HR (1924-25, 1928, 1931, 1936), HR/550 AB (1928, 1937), Doubles (1927, 1931), Triples (1923-24, 1927) and Stolen Bases (1931, 1939). Southern leader for HR (1932), HR/550 AB (1932), Doubles (1932), Triples (1932) and Stolen Bases (1932). Nine-time Holway All-Star (1923-29, 1931-32).

Dave Stieb – 2002 – P
Toronto (AL) 1979-92, 1998; Chicago (AL) 1993
Cap: Toronto Blue Jays (AL)
The top hurler in Blue Jays franchise history, Stieb is acknowledged by many as being the finest pitcher from the first half of the Eighties. With his impressive fastball and later on a “dead fish” slider, the popular and competitive right-hander was not afraid to brushback opposing batters when necessary. A 15-game winner 6 times, he posted an outstanding ERA+ of 122 for his career and was durable enough to pitch over 200 innings 9 times (plus 183.7 IP in the strike shortened 1981). His greatest season on the mound was 1985, when he established career highs in ERA and ERA+ while pitching 265 innings. Member of three division-champs (1985, 1989 and 1991) and the World Champions of 1992. No-hit Game (1990). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1982-85). Three-time Win Shares AL Pitcher of the Year (1982, 1984-85). Seven-time All-Star (1980-81, 1983-85, 1988, 1990). AL leader in ERA (1985), HA/9IP (1984-85), IP (1982, 1984), CG (1982), SHO (1982) and Adj. ERA+ (1984-85). Retired with the Blue Jays’ franchise single-season records for ERA (2.48 in 1985), IP (288.3 in 1982), K (198 in 1984), CG (19 in 1982), SHO (5 in 1982) and Adj. ERA+ (171 in 1985), as well as the career records for W (175), IP (2,873), K (1,658), GS (408), CG (103) and SHO (30).

Harry Stovey - 1916 - LF/1B/RF/CF
12.6 seasons with: Worcester (NL) 1880-82; Philadelphia (AA) 1883-89; Boston (PL) 1890; Boston (NL) 1891-92; Baltimore (NL) 1892-93; Brooklyn (NL) 1893
Cap: Philadelphia Athletics (AA)
There might have been better hitters and baserunners during the 19th century, but nobody combined power and speed like Stovey did during that era. The combination of prodigious strength (the greatest home run hitter of the 1880’s) and blazing speed (his introduction of the sliding pad helped him amass his many stolen bases) created a mother lode of runs for his teams during his heyday (100 or more runs 9 times). He was also highly versatile (he played four different positions) due to his dependable fielding skill (he led first basemen in his league once in assists and fielding), plus a swift and accurate arm. Contributed mightily to pennants in 1883, 1890 and 1891. Retired with the major league career records for home runs (122) and power/speed number (196.8), plus numerous AA records. STATS, Inc. AA MVP (1883). Win Shares AA Gold Glove winner (1883). NL leader for SLG (1891), TB (1891), 3B (1880, 1891), HR (1880, 1891), Power/Speed Number (1891) and XBH (1880, 1891). AA leader for SLG (1883, 1889), Games (1885), Runs (1883-85, 1889), TB (1883, 1889), 2B (1883), 3B (1884, 1888), HR (1883, 1885, 1889), RBI (1889), SB (1886), XBH (1883, 1884, 1889) and Power/Speed Number (1889). PL leader in SB and Power/Speed Number in 1890. Career OWP .680.

Mule Suttles - 1956 – 1B/LF/RF
Birmingham Black Barons (1923-25); St. Louis Stars (1926-31); Baltimore Black Sox (1930); Detroit Wolves (1932); Washington Pilots (1932); Chicago American Giants (1933-35); Newark Eagles (1936-40, 1942-44); Indianapolis ABC’s (1939); New York Black Yankees (1941-42)
Cap: St. Louis Stars
When his fans yelled “Kick Mule!” the Mule was more than happy to oblige. So prolific was he at tar-and-feathering the ball that the right-handed Suttles batted .341 lifetime and owns the Negro League record for the most career home runs (237). Using a 50-ounce bat, he was able to clear the fences with his legendary power without pulling the ball (40 HR/55 AB). The low-ball hitter hit his share of memorable tape-measure shots, but maybe his most famous shot was the first home run ever hit in the first Negro League All-Star game of 1933 (another All-Star clout off the great Martin Dihigo in the eleventh-inning with 2 men on of the 1935 competition helped win the game for his side). He totally dominated his league in 1926 with the greatest season of his career, leading in almost all of the major batting departments. Member of two Western winners (1928, 1930). Member of two East-West winners (1932-33). Fleet Walker Award (1926). Five-time Holway All-Star (1926, 1928-30, 1932); he hit .412 with a .941 SLG and 7 hits in those East-West games. Western leader for BA (1925-26, 1930), HR (1926), HR/550 AB (1926-27, 1930), Doubles (1926, 1929) and Triples (1926, 1928). East-West leader for HR/550 AB (1932, 1935). Eastern leader for HR (1938), HR/550 AB (1937-38) and SB (1940). Five-time All-Star (1933, 1935-36, 1938-39).

Don Sutton – 1994 – P
Los Angeles (NL) 1966-80, 1988; Houston (NL) 1981-82; Milwaukee (AL) 1982-84; Oakland (AL) 1985; California (AL) 1985-87
Cap: Los Angeles Dodgers (NL)
Consistent and stalwart (he never missed a start due to injury or sickness due in part to a rigorous conditioning program), Sutton had many career milestones when he said goodbye to the game. A member of the “300” club with his 324, the righty moundsman is also high on the list for Ks (3,574) and SHO (58). So reliable was he that he won at least 15 games 12 times and struck out at least 100 batters for 21 seasons. A fastball and curveball hurler, his best season was his ’72 effort when he posted a 2.08 ERA in 270 IP, won 19 games, had a 6.12 HA/9IP and threw 9 shutouts. Member of one division champ (1986) and four pennant-winners (1974, 1977-78, 1982); in league championship play, he was an impressive 4-1 with a 2.02 ERA, but his biggest game was his 10-2 win over the Orioles to clinch the AL East title in 1982. ML-AS MVP (1977). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1972-73). Four-time All-Star (1972-73, 1975, 1977). NL leader for ERA (1980), WHIP (1972, 1975, 1980-81), HA/9IP (1972), GS (1974), SHO (1972) and SO to Walk (1975, 1978, 1981). Retired with the Dodgers’ franchise career records for W (233), G (550), IP (3,816), K (2,696), GS (533) and SHO (52).

Ezra Sutton - 1908 - 3B/SS/1B
16.3 seasons with: Cleveland Forest Citys (non-league: 1870; NA: 1871-72); Philadelphia A’s (NA: 1872-75; NL: 1876); Boston (NL) 1877-88
Cap: Boston Beaneaters (NL)
Held fort at the “hot corner” for two champions (1878, 1883) and played shortstop for one other (1877). The greatest third baseman of the 19th century, Sutton was an outstanding hitter (he batted .300 7 times; in 1887, he tied the record for most runs in a game with 6) and baserunner for the position, “Uncle Ezra” was also a very good fielder with a cannon arm (he led NL third basemen in FA and double plays in 1884). Retired owning many of the career and single-season NL third base records, as well as career NL fielding records for G (677) and PO (896). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1883, 1885). Three-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove winner (1878, 1883-84). NL leader in Hits (1884) and Singles (1884). Retired with the Beaneaters’ NL franchise single-season record for BA (.346 in 1884), as well as the career records for BA (.287), 1B (897) and AB/K (23.5); he also left the game with the NA Philadelphia A’s’ single-season record for 1B (97 in 1875) and their career record for 3B (16).

Bill Terry - 1942 – 1B
11.2 seasons with: New York (NL) 1923-36
Cap: New York Giants (NL)
The greatest all-around NL first baseman of his time, “Memphis Bill” was skilled at all facets of the game. An outstanding contact hitter (with a 136 OPS+ and a batting line of .341/.393/.506, he had 200 hits 6 times, 7 100-run seasons, 6 times with at least 100 RBI and 10 .300+ seasons) with doubles and triples power, he could pull the ball into the Polo Grounds stands when needed. As of 1942, Terry is the last man to hit .400 in the NL. As for defense, he was the nonpareil player at his position during his era (leading all NL first basemen in total chances per game nine times, double plays three times, assists five times, putouts fives times, and fielding average twice). Member of three pennant-winners (1924, 1936 and the World Champs of 1933). Four-time STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1927, 1930-32). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger winner (1931). Seven-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove winner (1925, 1927, 1929-32, 1935). Three-time All-Star (1933-35). NL leader for G (1932), R (1931), H (1930), 3B (1931) and BA (1930). Retired with the NL single-season records for H (254); the Giant franchise career records for BA (.341), G (1,721), AB (6,428), H (2,193), TB (3,252) and 2B (373); as well as the Giant franchise single-season records for BA (.401 in 1930), TB (392 in 1930), 2B (43 in 1931), Times on Base (312 in 1930) and XBH (81 in 1932) .

Sam Thompson - 1929 - RF
10.6 seasons with: Detroit (NL) 1885-88; Philadelphia (NL) 1889-98; Detroit (AL) 1906
Cap: Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
One of the greatest RBI men of all-time (including eight 100-plus seasons, not to mention ten seasons of at least 100 runs), “Big Sam” pulverized the ball with the best of them (.331/.384/.505). The left-handed slugger was also more than respectable as a base stealer. Thompson was considered a fine rightfielder (he led NL outfielders twice in assists, fielding percentage, and double plays) who perfected the one-bounce throw to home plate. Member of one pennant winner (1887), he was also part of the greatest outfield of the 19th century (the 1892-95 Phillies). Retired with the major league career records for RBI per game (.923), AB/HR (47.12), and RF games (1,393), as well as the single-season record for RBI (166 in 1887) and RBI per game (1.42 in 1894). He also is tied for the record for hitting two bases-loaded triples in the same game (the first to do so in 1887). STATS, Inc. NL MVP (1887). Six-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1887, 1889-90, 1893-95). Win Shares Silver Slugger Award winner (1887). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1886). NL leader for Slugging % (1887, 1895), At Bats (1887, 1893), Hits (1887, 1890, 1893), Total Bases (1887, 1895), Doubles (1890, 1893), Triples (1887), Home Runs (1889, 1895), RBI (1887, 1895), Extra Base Hits (1895), Power/Speed Number (1895) and BA (1887).

Joe Torre – 1984 – C/1B/3B
13.7 seasons with: Milwaukee/Atlanta (NL) 1960-68; St. Louis (NL) 1969-74; New York (NL) 1975-77
Cap: Milwaukee Braves
The greatest NL catcher of the ‘60’s (and possibly the best in the majors for that decade), Torre was one of the greatest offensive forces at that position. With no real weaknesses at the bat (5 times with at least 100 RBI, 4 times of .300 batting average, and 200 or more hits twice), the right-handed slugger hit for average and had good power. A multipositional star, Torre also excelled as a first baseman and even more prominently as a third baseman (his best season was 1971 at that position). An outstanding pinch-hitter, he hit .350 with 8 home runs in 100 at bats in that role. Recognized as a dependable backstop, he led the NL once in double plays behind the plate (he also led that league once in games and putouts as a third baseman, not to mention once in first basemen double plays and assists). NL MVP (1971).  NL Gold Glove (1965). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Catcher (1964-66). STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1971). Win Shares NL MVP (1971). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1971). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1969). Nine-time All-Star (1963-67, 1970-73). NL leader for BA (1971), G (1970), H (1971), TB (1971), RBI (1971), and Times on Base (1971).

Cristóbal Torriente- 1937 – CF/LF/RF/P
Cuban Stars (1913-18); All Nations (1913, 1916-17); Chicago American Giants (1918-25); Kansas City Monarchs (1926); Detroit Stars (1927-28)
Cap: Chicago American Giants
The great slugging star of the mighty American Giant teams of the twenties, Torriente damaged opposing Negro League teams on many fronts. A notorious bad-ball hitter, the left-handed pull hitter had enough power to hit to all fields. Despite his power hitting, he was an accomplished base runner who was more than able on the hit-and-run. Defensively, he displayed great range in the outfield and was equipped with a strong, accurate arm. Member of five Western pennant winners (1919-22, 1926). Rube Foster Award (1921). Nine-time Holway Western All-Star (1913-16, 1918-20, 1923, 1926). Western leader for BA (1916) and HR/555 AB (1913). 

Alan Trammell  - 2002 – SS
14. 8 seasons with: Detroit (AL) 1977-96
Cap: Detroit Tigers (AL)
The greatest shortstop in Tigers franchise history, “Tram” was Hall of Meriter Lou Whitaker’s double play partner for a major league record 1,918 games (from 1978 to 1995). A splendid batsman, the right-handed Trammell batted .300 or more 7 times in a career noted for hitting well above the norms of his positional peers, putting up a lifetime mark of .285 (he also hit 20 or more homers twice and scored 100 or more runs 3 times). Inarguably, 1987 was his finest season when he put up the following numbers: a 155 OPS+, .402 OBP, .551 SLG, 205 hits, 28 home runs, 105 RBI, 109 runs scored and a .343 BA (including a September when he hit .416 with 6 home runs and 17 RBI). Very steady on defense, he was highly regarded for his soft hands, good range and ability to turn the double play (he led the AL once in assists). A member of one division leader (1987) as well as the World Champions of 1984 (his two home runs and .450 BA helped propel the Bengals to a 5-game series victory that October). ML-WS MVP (1984). Three-time AL Silver Slugger Award-SS (1987-90). Four-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1980-81, 1983-84).  Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Shortstop (1987-88, 1990). Win Shares AL MVP (1987). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1987). Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1981). Six-time All-Star (1980, 1984-85, 1987-88, 1990). AL leader for Sac. Hits (1981, 1983). Retired with the Tigers’ franchise career record for Power/Speed Number (207.4).

Quincy Trouppe  – 1995 – C/3B/OF
St. Louis Stars (1930-31, 1939); Detroit Wolves (1932); Homestead Grays (1932); Kansas City Monarchs (1932, 1934-36); Bismark Churchills (1933-36); Chicago American Giants (1933, 1948); Indianapolis ABC’S (1938-39); Mexican League (1939-44, 1950-51); Puerto Rico (1941-42, 1944-45, 1947-50); Cleveland Buckeyes (1944-47); Venezuela (1945-47, 1951-53); Canadian Provincial League (1949); New York Cubans (1949); Cuba (1950-51); Cleveland (AL) 1952; Colombia (1953-54)
Cap: Cleveland Buckeyes
Star backstop for the Negro Leagues, Mexican League and the Puerto Rican winter league, “Big Train” chugged along with his exceptional play for three decades. A former boxer, the big switch-hitting Trouppe was able to drive the ball from both sides of the plate while still making fine contact with the ball as he (a lifetime .300 hitter, he had a high of .352 in 1948). A curveball hitter who used a heavy bat, he didn’t mind heading to first via the walk. Trouppe was versatile enough that he could play many games at third and in the outfield. Equipped with the “tools of ignorance,” “El Toro” had a fine reputation behind the plate, a powerful arm and was known to handle his pitchers intelligently. So respected was he that he was given a belated shot at the major leagues at the advanced age of 39. Member of two Western pennant-winners (1945 - his most famous achievement was hitting .400 as his Buckeyes swept the Homestead Grays in the NeL World Series – and 1947). Rube Foster Award (1945). Five-time NeL All-Star (1938, 1945-48).

Dazzy Vance - 1942 – P
Pittsburgh (NL) 1915; New York (AL) 1915, 1918; Brooklyn (NL) 1922-1932, 1935; St. Louis (NL) 1933-34; Cincinnati (NL) 1934
Cap: Brooklyn Robins (NL)
The greatest strikeout artist of his generation, “The Dazzler” made an impact despite becoming a rookie major league starter at the age of 31. A right-hander with a high leg kick, his outstanding fastball later was supported by an impressive curve ball when he made the majors. Member of the World Champions of 1934.  NL MVP (1924). NL Pitching Triple Crown (1924). STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1924). Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1924-25, 1928, 1930). Three-time Win Shares NL Pitcher of the Year (1924, 1928, 1930). No-hit game (1925). NL leader for ERA (1924, 1928, 1930), ERA+ (1924, 1928, 1930), Wins (1924-25), (BB + H)/9IP (1924, 1928, 1930), Hits Allowed/9IP (1924, 1927-28, 1930), BB/9IP (1929), Strikeouts/9IP (1922-28, 1931), Strikeouts (1922-28), Complete Games (1924-27) and Shutouts (1922, 1925, 1928, 1930).  Retired with the NL career records for strikeouts/9IP (6.26) and consecutive strikeout titles (7), as well at the Dodger career franchise records of most wins (190), ERA+ (128) and strikeouts (1,918) (plus the Dodger season franchise records for strikeouts (262 in 1924), ERA+ (191 in 1928) and strikeouts/9IP (7.65 in 1924).

Arky Vaughan - 1954 – SS/ 3B
11.8 seasons with: Pittsburgh (NL) 1932-41; Brooklyn (NL) 1942-43, 1947-48
Cap: Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
Not since Honus Wagner had the major leagues seen a hitter of Vaughan’s caliber at the shortstop position. The left-handed Arky had exceptional plate discipline; he walked a great deal, while rarely striking out (11 seasons with a .300 BA, with a career .318 career BA and a .406 OBP). Able to hit the longball, he walloped nineteen in cavernous Forbes Field during his best season ever in 1935. Developing himself into a fine fielder, he led his league in putouts and assists three times, and once each in double plays and total chances per game. His most famous game was his 1941 All-Star appearance when he hammered two home runs for the National League. Member of one pennant winners (1947). Nine-time STATS, Inc. NL Shortstop (1933-36, 1938-41, 1943). Win Shares NL MVP (1935). Win Shares Silver Slugger Award winner (1935). Two-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove winner (1934, 1938). Nine-time All-Star (1934-42). NL leader for BA (1935), SLG (1935), OBP (1934-36), OPS (1935), Games (1936, 1940), Runs (1936, 1940, 1943), Triples (1933, 1937, 1940), BB (1934-36), Stolen Bases (1943), Adj. OPS+ (1935), Times on Base (1935-36, 1940), Power/Speed Number (1934) and AB per K (1943). Retired with the Pirates’ season records for BA (.385 in 1935), OBP (.491 in 1935) and Times on Base (313 in 1936); as well as the Pirates’ career records for OBP (.415).

Rube Waddell – 1986 – P
Louisville (NL) 1897, 1899; Pittsburgh (NL) 1900-1901; Chicago (NL) 1901; Philadelphia (AL) 1902-1907; St. Louis (AL) 1908-10
Cap: Philadelphia Athletics (AL) 
Easily the most dominating strikeout pitcher for the 20th century’s first decade, Waddell struck out 200 or more batters six times (including twice with at least 300) when 150 was considered outstanding. Utilizing his era’s best fastball, a sharp breaking curve, and amazing control, the colorful and talented left-hander left the game with the AL records for most K’s in a season (349 in 1904) and strikeouts in a single game (16 in 1908; he also struck out 17 the same year). A four-time 20 game winner and credited with 50 shutouts, he retired with the major league career record for K/9IP (7.04).  Member of two pennant winners (1902 and 1905). AL Pitching Triple Crown (1905). Five-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1902, 1904-1905). STATS, Inc. AL MVP (1905). STATS, Inc. AL Pitcher of the Year Award winner (1905). Win Shares AL Pitcher of the Year Award winner (1905). NL leader for ERA, WHIP, H/9IP, K/9IP, and Adj. ERA+ in 1900. AL leader for ERA (1905), Wins (1905), W-L% (1905), H/9IP (1905), K/9IP (1902-1908), Games (1905), K (1902-1907), CG (1903), SO to BB (1902), and Adj. ERA+ (1904-05). Retired with the Athletics’ season record for K/9IP (8.39 in 1903), IP (383 in 1904), GS (46 in 1904), GS (39 in 1904), and SO to BB (3.84 in 1904), as well as the career records for ERA (1.97), WHIP (1.062), K/9IP (7.59), K (1,576), SHO (37), SO to BB (3.18), and Adj. ERA+ (146).

Honus Wagner - 1923 - SS/RF/1B/3B
18.4 seasons with: Louisville (NL) 1897-99; Pittsburgh (NL) 1900-17
Cap: Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
The Hall of Merit’s first unanimous selection for a position player! The model for all shortstops up to this time and beyond, “The Flying Dutchman (Deutchman)” dominated the NL and his position during the Deadball Era. The barrel-chested Wagner was the greatest slugger for his time (150 OPS+), yet was also the NL’s best contact hitter (.327 BA). Despite his ungainly physique and bowlegs, he was the senior circuit’s master at base stealing (722 SB). Legendary as a fielder (he led NL shortstops twice in putouts and four times in double plays and fielding percentage), the rocket-armed “Hans” was extremely skilled at digging out grounders with his big hands. Retired with the major league career records for games (2,792), at bats (10,430), total bases (4,862), extra-base hits (993), and times on base (4,503). Retired with the NL career records for hits (3,418), singles (2,426), triples (252), and most steals of home (27). Member of four pennant winners (1901-03, and the World Champions of 1909). Seven-time STATS, Inc. NL MVP (1900-04, 1907, 1909). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1900, 1902). Eleven-time STATS, Inc. NL Shortstop (1901, 1903-12). Nine-time Win Shares NL MVP (1900, 1902, 1904-09, 1912). Six-time Win Shares Silver Slugger winner (1902, 1904, 1906-09). NL leader for OPS (1900, 1902, 1904, 1906-09, 1911), Adjusted OPS+ (1900, 1902, 1904, 1907-09),  Extra Base Hits (1900, 1902-04, 1907-09), Hits (1908, 1910), Runs (1902, 1906), Total Bases (1900, 1904, 1906-09), Doubles (1900, 1902, 1904, 1906-09), Triples (1900, 1903, 1908), RBI (1901-02, 1908-09, 1912), Stolen Bases (1901-02, 1904, 1907-08), OBP (1904, 1907-09), Slugging % (1900, 1902, 1904, 1907-09), Times on Bases (1906, 1908), Power/Speed Number (1908) and BA (1900, 1903-04, 1906-09, 1911).

Larry Walker - 2011 - RF
12.6 seasons with: Montreal (NL) 1989-1994; Colorado (NL) 1995-2004; St. Louis (NL) 2004-2005
Cap: Colorado Rockies (NL)
Walker was a great all-around OF in the 1990s whose presence in Colorado played a major role in putting them on the baseball map. One of only 17 players with 8,000 or more career PA who have a BA of at least .300, an OBP reaching .400, and a SLG of .500 or greater (.313/.400/.565, good for a 140 OPS+). His 1997 MVP season was one for the ages, as he hit .366 while leading the NL in HR (49), OBP (.452), SLG (.720), OPS (1.172), and TB (409). His 1999 season was nearly as productive, as he led the NL in BA (.379), OBP (.458), SLG (.710) and OPS (1.168). He also led the NL in BA in 1998 and 2001, led the NL in 2B in 1994, and won three Silver Slugger awards (1992, 1997, 1999). Besides his abilities with the stick, Walker added tremendous value with his legs (230 career SB) and fielding ability, as he won seven Gold Gloves while retiring with the 12th most RF assists over the course of his career with 150, leading the NL in 2002 with 14. Walker was part of two division winners (2004-2005) and one wild-card winner (1995) and made the World Series in 2004 (hitting .357/.438/.929 with two HR in a losing cause). Five-time NL All-Star (1992, 1997-1999, 2001). Has the highest career BA (.334), OBP (.426), SLG (.618), OPS (1.044), OPS+ (147), and OWP (.789) of any Rockies player.

Bobby Wallace - 1929 - SS/3B/P
16.0 seasons with: Cleveland (NL) 1894-98; St. Louis (NL) 1899-1901, 1917-18; St. Louis (AL) 1902-16
Cap: St. Louis Browns (AL)
One of the most durable players of all time, “Rhody” was an all-around player for his era. Slick fielding at short with a good arm (the latter helped him at the beginning of his career as a pitcher), he was also more than capable with the bat and had good speed. He also led all shortsops in his leagues in fielding percentage two times, assists three times, and double plays once. Retired with the AL record for most chances accepted at shortstop in a nine-inning game (17 chances in 1902). Member of the Temple Cup winner of 1895. AL leader for Games (1905). STATS, Inc. NL Shortstop (1899). Win Shares NL Gold Glove winner (1898). Three-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove winner (1902-03, 1907). Retired with the Browns’ franchise career records for G (1,569), AB (5,529), PA (6,199), R (609), H (1,424), TB (1,814), 2B (236), 3B (65), RBI (607), 1B (1,115), XBH (309) and Times on Base (1,981).

Ed Walsh - 1920 - P
Chicago (AL) 1904-16; Boston (NL) 1917
Cap: Chicago White Sox (AL)
One of the great workhorses of any era, “Big” Ed (with an awe-inspiring spitter and knuckleball-resembling fastball) was a dominant force for a few years in the majors. The last pitcher to win forty games (in 1908), the crafty righthander also owns the AL record for the highest percentage of his team’s wins (45.5%) for that same year. Retired with the major league career records for lowest career ERA (1.82) and hits allowed/9IP (7.12), the ML single-season record for most assists (227 in 1907), as well as the AL single-season records for Batters Faced (1,799), Innings Pitched (464), and Games (66) established in 1908. Pitching ace for the immortal World Champion “Hitless Wonders” of 1906. Three-time Win Shares AL Pitcher of the Year (1907-08, 1911). STATS, Inc. AL Pitcher of the Year (1908). No-hit game (1911). AL leader for ERA (1907, 1910), ERA+ (1907, 1910), Wins (1908), Won-Loss % (1908), (BB + H)/9IP (1909-10), Base on Balls/9IP (1910), Games (1907-08, 1910-12), Innings (1907-08, 1911-12), Strikeouts (1908, 1911), Games Started (1907-08, 1912), Complete Games (1907-08), Shutouts (1906, 1908-09), Hits Allowed (1908, 1912), Batters Faced (1907-08, 1911-12), Games Finished (1904, 1911-12)  and Saves (1907-08, 1910-12). Second place MVP finish (1911, 1912). 

Paul Waner - 1950 – RF
16.6 seasons with: Pittsburgh (NL) 1926-40; Brooklyn (NL) 1941, 1943-44; Boston (NL) 1941-42; New York (AL) 1944-45
Cap: Pittsburgh Pirates (NL)
The seventh player to reach three-thousand hits (with a total of 3,512), “Big Poison” was a line-drive generator par excellence. Right from the start, the lefty Waner made an impression with Buc fans with his high batting average (.333; .404 OBP), extra-base power and durability. For 20th century players, he established a NL record for collecting more than 200 hits eight times. Very quick as a player, his speed allowed him to be a fine outfielder who was capable of explosive throws from right field. He led NL outfielders in double plays twice and assists once. Retired with the ML career record for RF games (2,256). Member of one pennant winner (1927). NL MVP (1927). STATS, Inc. NL Rookie of the Year (1926). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1926-28, 1934, 1936). Two-time Win Shares NL MVP (1926, 1928). Win Shares NL Silver Sluger Award (1926). Four-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1926, 1928-29, 1931). Four-time All-Star (1933-35, 1937). NL leader for Runs (1928, 1934), RBI (1927), Doubles (1928, 1932), Triples (1926-27), Hits (1927, 1934), Total Bases (1927), Singles (1937), Times on Base (1927-28, 1934, 1937), Games (1927, 1932-33) and BA (1927, 1934, 1936).  Retired with the Pirates’ season records for most hits (237 in 1927), doubles (62 in 1932) and RBI (131 in 1927); as well as the Pirates’ career records for BA (.340), doubles (558) and HR (109).

John Ward - 1900 - SS/P/2B/CF
15.8 seasons with: Providence (NL) 1878-82; New York (NL) 1883-89, 93-94; Brooklyn (PL) 1890; Brooklyn (NL) 1891-92
Cap: New York Giants (NL)
One of the rare players to have success as a pitcher and a position player (he’s the only player to have 2,000 hits and 100 wins). The right-handed batter, but lefty moundsman Ward was a pitcher/outfielder from 1878-83, going 164-102 with a 118 ERA+ in 2,462 IP (he had a career .617 WPCT and a 2.10 ERA). He then reinvented himself as a SS, winning 5 Win Shares Gold Gloves (1885-87, 90, 1894-2B). As a hitter/fielder, Ward earned 317 WS, with a peak of 33 WS in 1890, 31 in 1887 and 27 in 1886. As a shortstop, he led his leagues three times in putouts, once in assists and once in double plays, while he led NL second basmen once in assists. STATS, Inc. NL MVP and Pitcher of the Year in 1879 for the Providence team that won the pennant. Retired with the ML career records for WHIP (1.044) and GF (1,799). Career OWP .514. Perfect game (1880). NL leader in ERA (1878), ERA+ (1878), Wins (1879), Won-Loss % (1879), Saves (1879, 1882), K (1879), Shutouts (1880), SO to Walk (1879),  Games (1881, 1887, 1893), AB (1887), SB (1887, 1892), AB/K (1891,  1893) and Singles (1887). PL leader in Singles for 1890.

Willie Wells - 1954 – SS/3B/ 2B
St. Louis Stars (1924-31); Detroit Wolves (1932); Homestead Grays (1932); Kansas City Monarchs (1932-34); Chicago American Giants (1933-35, 1944); Newark Eagles (1936-39, 1942, 1945); Mexican League (1940-41, 1943-44); Memphis Red Sox (1944, 1948); New York Black Yankees (1945-46); Baltimore Elite Giants (1946); Indianapolis Clowns (1947)
Cap: St. Louis Stars
An all-around intelligent player, “The Devil” (while playing in Mexico, he was known as “El Diablo”) was the best Negro League shortstop of his era. Exhibiting great range, good hands, and accurate arm, he positioned himself correctly depending on who was at the plate. Not just a defensive wizard, the right-handed Wells was a fine batsman who could drive the ball, as well as one who could steal bases with the best of them. He was also one of the most durable players to man an infield position from any generation. A proud member of the Newark Eagle’s famous “million-dollar infield” of the late thirties. Member of two Western winners (1928, 1930). Two-time Fleet Walker Award (1929-30). Five-time Holway All-Star (1926-30). Western leader for Homers (1927, 1930), HR/550 AB (1931) and doubles (1930). East-West leader for Triples (1934). Eastern leader for BA (1938) and SB (1939, 1942). Eight-time All-Star (including 1933, 1938, 1939, 1942).

Zack Wheat - 1933 - LF
15.9 seasons with: Brooklyn (NL) 1909-26; Philadelphia (AL) 1927
Cap: Brooklyn Robins (NL)
A long career of sustained quality, “Buck” Wheat was a line-drive menace for opposing pitchers. The left-handed cleanup hitter was murder on curveballs (John McGraw forbid his pitchers to throw him one). A fine fielder (he led NL outfielders once in putouts) and baserunner, he went his whole career without ever being thrown out of a game. Member of two pennant winners (1916 and 1920). Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1916, 1920, 1924-25). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger winner (1916). Three-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1913, 1915-16). NL leader for Slugging % (1916), Games (1910), Total Bases (1916), Extra-Base Hits (1916) and BA (1918). Retired with the major league career record for most games as a leftfielder (2,328) and the Brooklyn club record for hitting safely in consecutive games (29). He also holds the all-time Brooklyn club records for games played (2,322), at bats (8,859), hits (2,804), singles (2038), doubles (464), triples (171) total bases (4,003) and extra base hits (766).

Lou Whitaker  - 2001 – 2B
15.4 seasons with: Detroit (AL) 1977-95
Cap: Detroit Tigers (AL)
As the junior circuit’s finest second baseman of the 1980’s, “Sweet Lou” made up half of the longest running double play combination in major league history (along with Alan Trammell, their record 18-year and 1,918 game collaboration began in 1978 and concluded in 1995). An infielder with pop (he retired with the Tiger franchise records for homeruns by a second baseman for both single season and career, putting up 28 in 1989 and 244 altogether), the left-handed leadoff hitter was also renowned for his keen command of the strike zone (1,197 career walks). Manning the keystone sack, the personable Whitaker was smooth on defense, quick on the pivot and displayed a strong, accurate arm (he led all AL second basemen twice each in games and fielding percentage, as well as once each in putouts, assists and double plays). Member of one division-winner (1987) and the World Champions of 1984 (in the Fall Classic, he scored six runs and had a .409 OBP). AL Rookie of the Year (1978). Four-time AL Silver Slugger-2B (1983-85, 1987). Three-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1983-85). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Second Baseman (1984-85). Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1981). Five-time All-Star (1983-87). AL leader for G (1981).

Deacon White - 1898 - C/3B/RF/1B
20.1 seasons with: Cleveland Forest Citys (non-league: 1869-70; NA: 1871-72); Boston (NA: 1873-75; NL: 1877); Chicago (NL) 1876; Cincinnati (NL) 1878-1880; Buffalo (NL) 1881-85; Detroit (NL) 1886-88; Pittsburgh (NL) 1889; Buffalo (PL) 1890
Cap: Boston Red Stockings (NA)
43 Win Share season included batting and slugging crowns, and he led the league in RBI and OPS+. Key player on five consecutive pennant winners 1873-77, also manned 3B for the 1887 NL Champion Wolverines. Consistently outstanding performer who earned 332 WS in 13.1 NL/PL seasons, 25 per 162 game season from age 28-42. 138 WS from 1876-79. Led the NA in catcher putouts 3 times, assists once, and double plays once. STATS, Inc. NL MVP 1877 for pennant winning Red Caps. Two-time STATS, Inc. Catcher (1876, 1879). STATS, Inc. First Baseman (1877). Career OWP .612. NA leader in BA, Games, RBI and Singles in 1873. NL leader in OPS (1877), OPS+ (1877), BA (1877), SLG (1877), Hits (1877), TB (1877), 3B (1877), RBI (1876-77) and XBH (1877).

Hoyt Wilhelm – 1978 – P
New York (NL) 1952-56; St. Louis (NL) 1957; Cleveland (AL) 1957-58; Baltimore (AL) 1958-62; Chicago (AL) 1963-68; California (AL) 1969; Atlanta (NL) 1969-71; Chicago (NL) 1970; Los Angeles (NL) 1971-72
Cap: Chicago White Sox (AL)
The greatest relief pitcher of all-time at his induction, Wilhelm was a star in his forties when most of his contemporaries were long retired. Possibly the greatest practitioner of the knuckle ball, the right-hander left the game with ML records for wins in relief (124), games finished (661), games pitched in relief (1,018), innings pitched in relief (1,870), and the most appearances (1,070) by any pitcher ever (despite coming up to the majors at age 28). Recording 227 saves, he was also a standout in 1959 as a starter.  As a fielder, he set a ML record with his 319 straight games without an error in 1968. Member of one pennant-winner (the World Champion Giants of ’54). STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1959). STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1953). AL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1959). Five-time All-Star (1953, 1959, 1961-62, 1970). No-hit game (1958). AL leader for ERA (1959) and Adj. ERA+ (1959). NL leader in ERA (1952), W-L% (1954), G (1952-53), GF (1953), and Adj. ERA+ (1952).  Retired with the White Sox franchise career records for WHIP (.935), Hits Allowed/9IP (6.19), 9/IP (6.94), S (98), SO to Walk (3.12), GF (239), and ERA+ (170), the Giants’ single-season records for W-L% (.833 in 1952) and G (71 in 1952), and the Orioles’ single-season record for Adj. ERA+ (173 in 1959) and the career record for Adj. ERA+ (156).

Billy Williams – 1983 – LF/RF/DH
15.5 seasons with: Chicago (NL) 1959-74; Oakland (AL) 1975-76
Cap: Chicago Cubs (NL)
The most durable player of the Sixties (he left the game with the NL records of 1,117 consecutive games played, 9 consecutive seasons with at least 600 at bats, and the most games played as an outfielder for a season (164 in 1965), “Sweet Swingin’ Billy from Whistler” was the greatest Cub left fielder in franchise history. Batting .300 or more five times, the left-handed Williams also hammered out of the park 30 or more home runs five times and 426 for his career. He also rang up 2,711 hits and 1, 475 runs batted in. A respected fielder, the soft-spoken and admired Williams led the NL 6 times in games and one time in fielding average. Major league records that he tied are consecutive doubles in a game (4 on 9 Apr 1969) and most homers in two consecutive games (5 on 8 Sep & 10 Sep 1969). Member of one division leader (1975). NL Rookie of the Year (1961). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1965, 1970, 1972). Six-time All-Star (1962, 1964-65, 1968, 1972-73). NL leader for BA (1972), SLG (1972), OPS (1972), G (1965-66, 1968-70), Runs (1970), H (1970), TB (1968, 1970, 1972), Adj. OPS+ (1972), and XBH (1965, 1968, 1972). Retired with the Chicago franchise single-season record for G (164 in 1965), as well as the career records for R (modern record: 1,306), Times on Base (modern record: 3,462), Power/Speed Number (modern record: 141.1), and AB per HR (15.9).

Smokey Joe Williams - 1936 – P
Chicago Giants (1910); New York Lincoln Giants (1911-23); Mohawk Giants (1913); Chicago American Giants (1914); Atlantic City Bacharach Giants (1916); Hilldale Daisies (1917); Brooklyn Royal Giants (1924); Homestead Grays (1925-32); Detroit Wolves (1932)
Cap: New York Lincoln Giants
The best Negro League pitcher of his era, Williams was the standard for all other African-American hurlers at the time of his retirement. Possessing one of the outstanding fastballs in baseball history, “Cyclone Joe” was able to strike out many a batter while still avoiding many bases on balls. As his fastball lost some of its smoke as he aged, he was still cagey enough to get the job done (he struck out 24 batters in 12 innings in a 1930 one-hit shutout against the Monarchs). “Yank” helped his cause on many occasion with fine hitting mixed with good power. Member of one Western pennant winner (1910). Member of eight Eastern pennant winners (1911-13, 1915, 1917, 1919, 1922, 1928). Five-time George Stovey Award winner (1913, 1917-19, 1921). Five-time Holway Eastern All-Star (1913, 1917-1919, 1921). Western league leader for Wins (1912-13, 1916-19) and Total Run Avg. (1913, 1917-18).

Ted Williams – 1966 – LF/RF
14.9 seasons with: Boston (AL) 1939-42, 1946-60
Cap: Boston Red Sox (AL)
The HoM’s eighth unanimous choice! The greatest hitter of his time (some would argue of all-time), “The Splendid Splinter” made hitting baseball what he called “the hardest single feat in sports” look easy. Losing five years to military service, the left-handed “Thumper” still created an impression throughout the record book (“The Kid” retired with the ML single-season record for OBP (.553 in 1941), the ML career record for OBP (.482), and the AL single-season record for IBB (33 in 1957). The last man to hit .400 (.406 in 1941), “Teddy Ballgame” hit a homer in his last career at bat. Member of one pennant-winner (1946). He led AL outfielders in games 3 times and double plays once. Two-time AL MVP (1946, 1949). Two-time Triple Crown (1942, 1947). STATS, Inc. Rookie of the Year (1939). Sixteen-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1939-42, 1946-51, 1954-58, 1960). Seven-time Win Shares AL MVP (1941-42, 1946-49, 1951). Nine-time Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1939-42, 1946-49, 1951). Seventeen-time All-Star (1940-42, 1946-51, 1953-60). AL leader for BA (1941-42, 1947-48, 1957-58), OBP (1940-42, 1946-49, 1951, 1954, 1956-58), SLG (1941-42, 1946-49, 1951, 1954, 1957), OPS (1941-42, 1946-49, 1951, 1954, 1957-58), Games (1949), Runs (1940-42, 1946-47, 1949), TB (1939, 1942, 1946-47, 1949, 1951), HR (1941-42, 1947, 1949), RBI (1939, 1942, 1947, 1949), BB (1941-42, 1946-49, 1951, 1954), Adj. OPS+ (1941-42, 1946-49, 1951, 1954, 1957), XBH (1939, 1942, 1946-47, 1949), Times on Base (1940-1942, 1946-49, 1951), and IBB (1955-57).  Retired with the Red Sox single-season records for SLG (.735 in 1941), OPS (1.287 in 1941), Runs (150 in 1949), BB (162 in 1947), Adj. OPS+ (235 in 1941), and Times on Base (358 in 1949); as well as the Red Sox career records for BA (.344), SLG (.634), OPS (1.115), Games (2,292), AB (7,706), Runs (1,798), Hits (2,654), TB (4,884), 2B (525), HR (521), RBI (1,839), BB (2,021), Singles (1,537), Adj. OPS+ (190), XBH (1,117), Times on Base (4,714), and IBB (86).

Jud Wilson - 1948 – 3B/1B
Baltimore Black Sox 1922-30; Homestead Grays 1931-32, 1940-45; Pittsburgh Crawford 1932; Philadelphia Stars 1933-39
Cap: Baltimore Black Sox
Considered by many to be the greatest all-around third baseman, white or black, of his era, “Boojum” (derived from the sound his wicked line drives made as they smashed into the outfield wall) was one of the most hard-hitting offensive players at that position up to that time. Credited with the highest lifetime batting average for a Negro League player with at least 2,000 AB (.354), the intimidating left-handed hitter had good power (.507 SLG) and was acknowledged as a great clutch hitter by his peers. Despite his large physique, he was still able to generate fine speed. In the three East-West games that he played in, he hit .455. Member of seven Eastern winners (1931, 1940-45).  Member of one East-West winner (1934). All-Star (1933, 1941). Playoff MVP (1934). Eastern leader for BA (1925-26), Doubles (1927) and Triples (1943). Eight-time Holway All-Star (1923-25, 1927-30, 1932).

Dave Winfield – 2001 – RF/LF/DH/CF
17.4 seasons with: San Diego (NL) 1973-80; New York (AL) 1981-88, 1990; California (AL) 1990-91; Toronto (AL) 1992; Minnesota (AL) 1993-94; Cleveland (AL) 1995
Cap: San Diego Padres (NL)
A gifted athlete who would have been a star in any sport, “Big Dave”’s six-foot, six-inch frame was almost as impressive as his achievements on the field. A member of the 3,000-hit club (finishing with 3,110), the right-handed slugger hit over .300 four times and scored more than 100 runs 3 times over his long career. “The Wave’s” power was just as impressive as he smacked 465 career round-trippers (with 3 seasons of over 30), a 129 career OPS+ and knocked in 1,833 runs (including 8 seasons of 100 or more RBI). Stealing 223 bases during his career, “Winnie’s” speed, in tandem with his powerful and accurate arm, was put to good use as a ball hawk (he led right fielders 3 times in fielding percentage, twice in assists and once each in games, putouts and double plays; he also led left fielders once in assists). One of only a handful of players never to have played minor league ball. A member of three pennnant-winners (1981 and the World Champions of 1992 (his two-out double in the 11th inning of Game Six won it all for the Blue Jays) and 1995). AL-WS MVP (1992).  Five-time AL Silver Slugger-OF (1981-85). AL Silver Slugger-DH (1992). Two-time NL Gold Glove Award (1979-80). Five-time AL Gold Glove Award (1982-85, 1987). STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1979). STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1982-84). STATS, Inc. AL Designated Hitter (1992). Win Shares NL co-MVP (1979). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1979). Twelve-time All-Star (1977-88). NL leader for TB, RBI, Adj. OPS+ and IBB for 1979. Retired with the Padres’ franchise single-season records (all set in 1979) for G (162), TB (333), RBI (118) and XBH (71).

George Wright - 1901 - SS/2B
12.9 seasons with: Washington 1867, Morrisania 1868, Cincinnati 1869-70, Boston (NA: 1871-75; NL: 1876-78, 80-81); Providence (NL) 1879, 82
Cap: Boston Red Stockings (NA)
One of the finest all-around players in the game from 1871-76, Wright became a standout before any professional leagues were formed (many considered him the greatest player of his era even before he joined the NA). The premier defensive shortstop in the game during his prime (he led his leagues at short five times in putouts, fielding percentage and assists twice, and double plays four times) with the best arm at his position, his offensive worth can be measured by finishing 2nd in the NA in OPS+ in 1871 and 1873. Batting .302 (with 5 seasons over .300; one of those at .412) and an impressive infielder OPS+ of 125, the right-handed Wright also placed 2nd or 3rd in his league in runs scored six times. His 1876 season, below his NA standard, was still an impressive 39 Win Shares. Member of seven pennant winners (1872-75, 1877-79) during his career, he was also the Cincinnati juggernaut’s best player for the first professional team ever in 1869, swatting 49 dingers and batting .633 for that year. STATS, Inc. NL Shortstop (1879). Four-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1876-79). NA leader in AB (1873), AB/K (1872) and 3B (1874). NL leader in Games (1876-77, 1879) and AB (1876-77).

Early Wynn – 1970 – P
Washington (AL) 1939, 1941-44, 1946-48; Cleveland (AL) 1949-63
Cap: Cleveland Indians (AL)
An intimidating pitcher not afraid to “move” an opposing batter away from the plate, Wynn was the bulldog of the Indians’ famous quartet from the Fifties. At his peak, the righty “Gus” was armed with an impressive fastball, as well as a curve, slider, knuckleball, and changeup. His excellent mechanics and durability helped him become a member of the 300-wins club (retiring at that number)and winning 20 games five times and shutting out opposing teams 49 times. First ML pitcher to lead his league in strikeouts consecutively with two different teams (1957-58), he also had the most Ks of any pitcher during the ‘50s. A good hitter for a pitcher, he is among major league hurlers for career hits and was used as a pinch-hitter 90 times over his career. Member of two pennant-winners (1954 and 1959). Cy Young Award (1959). Six-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1950-51, 1954-56, 1959). Three-time Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1951, 1954, 1956). Six-time All-Star (1955-60). AL leader for ERA (1950), Wins (1954, 1959), WHIP (1950), Hits Allowed/9IP (1950), K/9IP (1950), Innings (1951, 1954, 1959), K (1957-58), GS (1943, 1951, 1954, 1957, 1959), and SHO (1960).

Jimmy Wynn  - 1996 – CF/RF/LF
11.9 seasons with: Houston (NL) 1963-73; Los Angeles (NL) 1974-75; Atlanta (NL) 1976; New York (AL) 1977; Milwaukee (AL) 1977
Cap: Houston Astros (NL)
The finest all-around centerfielder for the time that he was on the field, “The Toy Cannon” shot baseballs out of many a park despite his surprisingly small build (3 times smacking 30 or more homers). Extremely patient at the plate, the right-handed slugger walked over 100+ times 6 times (he had two seasons of at least a .400 OBP, scored over 100 runs 4 times, and drove in 100 or more runs twice). Speedy, he stole 43 out of 45 attempts in 1965. Impressive patrolling his designated area in the outfield, he led NL center fielders 3 times in double plays, twice in putouts and assists, and once in games (he also led NL left fielders twice in double plays and once in assists, not to mention once in fielding percentage among NL right fielders). His greatest season with the bat was in 1969 with his 167 OPS+, 33 home runs, and 148 bases on balls. Member of one pennant-winner (1974 – he walked 9 times during the playoffs and hit 2 clouts in the WS). Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1967, 1969, 1972, 1974). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1974). Three-time All-Star (1967, 1974-75). NL leader for BB (1969, 1976) and Power/Speed (1965). Retired with the Astros’ franchise single-season records for OBP (.436 in 1969), R (117 in 1972), HR (37 in 1967), BB (148 in 1969), Adj. OPS+ (167 in 1969), XBH (69 in 1967), Times on Base (284 in 1969), and AB per HR (15.0 in 1969), as well as the career records for G (1,426), AB (5,063), R (829), H (1,291), TB (2,252), HR (223), RBI (719), BB (847), Adj. OPS+ (131), XBH (483), Times on Base (2,164), Sac. Flies (48), IBB (76), and AB per HR (22.7).

Carl Yastrzemski – 1989 – LF/1B/DH/CF
20.7 seasons with: Boston (AL) 1961-83
Cap: Boston Red Sox (AL)
The greatest AL left fielder of the Sixties, the extremely popular “Yaz” compiled 23 seasons of standout baseball in a record 3,308 AL games. The only AL player to achieve the feat of 400 home runs and 3,000 hits, the left-handed “Captain Carl” had a lifetime 130 OPS+, walked 1,845 times, batted .300 6 times, had 3 seasons of 40+ homers, and 5 times with 100 or more RBI. An impressive, strong-armed fielder, he led all AL left fielders 7 times in assists, 5 times in games, 4 times in putouts and double plays, and once in fielding percentage; he also led AL center fielders once in assists). Member of two pennant-winners (the “Impossible Dream” team of 1967 and 1975; his postseason batting line of .369/.447/.600 includes his .400/.500/.840 of the ’67 WS). AL MVP (1967). AL Triple Crown (1967). ML-AS MVP (1970). Seven-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1963, 1965, 1967-69, 1971, 1977). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1965, 1967-68). STATS, Inc. AL First Baseman (1970). Four-time Win Shares AL MVP (1963, 1967-68, 1970). Two-time Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1967, 1970).  Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1963). Eighteen-time All-Star (1963, 1965-79, 1982-83). AL leader for BA (1963, 1967-68), OBP (1963, 1965, 1967-68, 1970), SLG (1965, 1967, 1970), OPS (1965, 1967-68, 1970), Games (1969), Runs (1967, 1970, 1974), Hits (1963, 1967), TB (1967, 1970), 2B (1963, 1965-66), HR (1967), RBI (1967), BB (1963, 1968), Adj. OPS+ (1965, 1967-68, 1970), XBH (1967), Times on Base (1963, 1967-68, 1970), and Sac. Flies (1972, 1977). Retired with the Red Sox’s single-season record for Power/Speed Number (29.2 in 1970), as well as the career records for AB (11,988), R (1,816), RBI (1,844), TB (5,539), 2B (646), 1B (2,262), XBH (1,157), Times on Base (5,304), IBB (190), Power/Speed Number (245), and Sac. Flies (105).

Cy Young - 1917 - P
Cleveland (NL) 1890-98; St. Louis (NL) 1899-1900; Boston (AL) 1901-08; Cleveland (AL) 1909-1911; Boston (NL) 1911
Cap: Cleveland Spiders (NL)
The Hall of Merit’s first unanimous selection! Nobody performed as long with sustained excellence as “The Cyclone” did (including a ML record 16 times with at least 20 wins). Owning one of the all-time great fastballs, he also had impeccable control (leading his league in BB/IP 14 times). A change of pace and two different versions of a curveball complimented his speedball. Career record W/L: 511-316 (the wins are a ML record). Ace of the Temple Cup winner Cleveland Spiders of ‘95 and the very first World Series winner - the Boston Pilgrims of 1903. Six-time STATS, Inc. Pitcher of the Year (1892-93, 1895, 1901-03). Win Shares NL MVP (1896). Two-time Win Shares AL MVP (1902-03). Win Shares NL Pitcher of the Year (1896). Three-time Win Shares AL Pitcher of the Year (1901-03). AL Pitching Triple Crown winner (1901). NL leader in ERA (1892), W (1892, 1895), W-L% (1892), WHIP (1892, 1895, 1899), BB/9IP (1890, 1893-1900), G (1897), S (1896), K (1896), CG (1899), SHO (1892, 1895-96, 1900), SO to BB (1893-94, 1896, 1898-1900), and Adj. ERA+ (1892). AL leader in ERA (1901), W (1901-03), W-L% (1903), WHIP (1901, 1904-05, 1907), HA/9IP (1901), BB/9IP (1901, 1903-06), G (1902), S (1903), IP (1902-03), K (1901), GS (1902), CG (1902-03), SHO (1901, 1903-04), SO to BB (1901, 1903-06),  and Adj. ERA+ (1901). Young retired with the 4th highest career ERA+ (138); as well as major league career records for G (906), IP (7354.7), K (2,803), GS (815), CG (749), SHO (76), and assists (2,014).  No-hit games (1897, 1904-perfect game and 1908).

Robin Yount  - 1999 – SS/CF/DH
18.0 seasons with: Milwaukee (AL) 1974-93
Cap: Milwaukee Brewers (AL)
The Brewers’ career leader in a dizzying number of offensive categories, “Rockin’ Robin” was only the third player in MLB history to win the MVP award at two different positions. Smacking line-drives to all parts of the diamond, the right-handed Yount batted over .300 6 times, scored over 100 runs 5 times, slugged at least .500 4 times and drove in more than 100 or more runs 3 times. A very good base stealer (271 career SB at a 72% success rate), he was also steady with the leather whether playing the infield or the outfield (he led AL shortstops once each in games, putouts, assists, double plays and fielding percentage, while as a center fielder, he twice led the league both in games and fielding percentage and once each in putouts, assists and double plays). A member of one division champ (1981) and one pennant-winner (1982); during the ’82 World Series, he had a marvelous batting line of .414/.452/.621 and is the only player ever to have had two 4-hit games in the Fall Classic. Two-time AL MVP (1982, 1989). Two-time AL Silver Slugger Award-SS (1980, 1982). AL Silver Slugger Award-OF (1989).  AL Gold Glove Award winner (1982). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Shortstop (1980-82). STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1989). Two-time Win Shares AL MVP (1982, 1989). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1982). Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1988). Three-time All-Star (1980, 1982-83). AL leader for SLG (1982), OPS (1982), G (1976, 1988), H (1982), TB (1982), 2B (1980, 1982), 3B (1983, 1988), Adj. OPS+ (1982), XBH (1980, 1982) and Power/Speed # (1980). Retired with the Brewers’ franchise single-season records for SLG (.588 in 1982), G (162 in 1982), TB (367 in 1982), 2B (49 in 1980), Adj. OPS (166 in 1982) and XBH (87 in 1982), as well as the career records for G (2,856), AB (11,008), PA (12,249), R (1,632), H (3,142), 1B (2,182), 2B (583), 3B (126), HR (251), RBI (1,406), BB (966), TB (4,730), XBH (960), TOB (4,156), Sac. Flies (123), IBB (95) and Power/Speed # (260.6).


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John (You Can Call Me Grandma) Murphy Posted: March 21, 2005 at 09:12 PM | 0 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
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