Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Hall of Merit > Discussion
Hall of Merit
— A Look at Baseball's All-Time Best

Tuesday, May 31, 2005

The Baseball Hall of Merit Plaque Room: M-R

For the Hall of Merit Home Page, please click here.

For Hall of Meriters A-F, please click here.

For Hall of Meriters G-L, please click here.

For Hall of Meriters S-Z, please click here.

Biz Mackey – 1975 – C/SS/3B
Indianapolis ABC’s (1920-22); New York Lincoln Giants (1920); Hilldale Daisies (1923-31); Philadelphia Royal Giants (1925); Philadelphia Stars (1933-35, 1937); Newark Dodgers (1935); Washington Elite Giants (1936-37); Baltimore Elite Giants (1938-39); Newark Eagles (1939-41, 1945-47, 1950)
Cap: Hilldale Daisies
Acclaimed as the greatest defensive backstop in the Negro Leagues and maybe of any league, he was strong in every department needed to be a superb receiver (the young Roy Campanella was helped significantly by the veteran Mackey). A big man who was deceptively agile, he was surprisingly quick, had soft hands, was an impressive handler of pitchers, durable as can be, and had a phenomenal throwing arm (extremely accurate, his snap throws from a squatting position were legendary). A potent bat as his peak, he had good power and contact skills (hitting .329), and was a smart base runner. A model citizen amongst his peers, Mackey was the rare catcher who had the athletic ability to play the infield or outfield when needed. The outstanding all-around position player of the 1925 Negro League World Series, he hit .310 in postseason play. Two-time Fleet Walker Award (1923, 1931). Eight-time Holway All-Star (1921, 1923-27, 1929-30). Five-time All-Star (including the inaugural game of 1933). Member of four Eastern pennant-winners (1923-25, 1934). Eastern leader for BA (1923, 1931) and SB (1926). Western leader for Triples (1922).

Sherry Magee - 1926 - LF/CF/1B/RF
13.7 seasons with: Philadelphia (NL) 1904-14; Boston (NL) 1915-17; Cincinnati (NL) 1917-19
Cap: Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
Fiery and aggressive, Magee was the personification of the five-tool player. Speedy (441 SB) and powerful, the right-handed slugger was both impressive offensively (137 OPS+; 5 times with at least a .300 BA; twice over 100 runs and 2 times over RBI) and defensively (led all NL left fielders twice in fielding percentage and once in games). Member of the World Champion Cincinnati Reds of 1919. STATS, Inc. NL MVP (1910). Six-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1906-08, 1910-1911, 1913). Win Shares NL MVP (1910). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger winner (1910). Two-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1905, 1907). NL leader for OPS (1910), Adjusted OPS+ (1910), Slugging % (1910, 1914), Games (1905), Runs (1910), Hits (1914), Total Bases (1910, 1914), Doubles (1914), RBI (1907, 1910, 1914, 1918), Extra-Base Hits (1906, 1910, 1914), OBP (1910), Times on Bases (1910), Power/Speed Number (1914) and BA (1910).

Mickey Mantle – 1974 – CF/1B/LF/RF
15.3 seasons with: New York (AL) 1951-68
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
Arguably the finest center fielder at his peak, “The Mick” was inarguably the greatest AL center fielder of his generation, as well as the best switch-hitter of all-time, despite many injuries during his illustrious career. A powerfully built man, Mantle was capable of belting tape-measure homers (536 career homers with two seasons of 50) any time he was up at the plate, though his excellent plate discipline gave him many walks (10 seasons with at least 100) and he hit for impressive averages (nine straight seasons of 100 runs scored and 9 seasons of at least a .300 BA). When he wasn’t hitting spheres out into space, the “Commerce Comet” may have been the fastest man to wear spikes during the 1950s. A fantastic percentage base stealer, he also was a standout ball hawk (he led the AL outfielders once in fielding average, assists, and in double plays). Member of twelve pennant-winners (1955, 1957, 1960, 1963-64, and the World Champions of 1951-53, 1956, 1958, 1961, and 1962), he holds the WS records for HR (18), Runs (42), RBI (40), BB (43), XBH (26), AB (230), and TB (123). Three-time AL MVP (1956-57, 1962). Triple Crown (1956). AL Gold Glove (1962). Twelve-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1952-62, 1964). Ten-time Win Shares AL MVP (1954-62, 1964). Ten-time Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1954-62, 1964). Five-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1955-57, 1960-61). Seventeen-time All-Star (1952-68). AL leader for BA (1956), OBP (1955, 1962, 1964), SLG (1955-56, 1962, 1964), Runs (1954, 1956-58, 1960-61), TB (1956, 1958, 1960), Triples (1955), HR (1955-56, 1958, 1960), RBI (1956), BB (1955, 1957-58, 1961-62), Adj. OPS+ (1952, 1955-56, 1958, 1960-62, 1964), XBH (1952, 1955-56), Times on Base (1956-58), IBB (1958, 1964), Power/Speed Number (1956-60), and AB per HR (1956, 1961). Retired with the Yankees’ franchise single-season record for IBB (23 in 1957), as well as the career records for Games (2,401), AB (8,102), Power/Speed Number (238), and IBB (126).

Juan Marichal – 1980 – P
San Francisco (NL) 1960-73; Boston (AL) 1974; Los Angeles (NL) 1975
Cap: San Francisco Giants (NL)
Noted for an exaggeratedly high kick as he made his windup, it’s no exaggeration to say that “The Dominican Dandy” was an elite hurler for his generation and the greatest moundsman in San Francisco history. Exhibiting masterful control of his pitches (which included a smoking fastball, curve, slider, and screwball), the right-hander averaged 20 wins between 1962 and 1971 and had six 20-win seasons for his career. Very durable, he had three season with at least 300 innings pitched. Left the game with the most wins for a Latin American player (243). In All-Star competition, Marichal compiled a miniscule 0.50 ERA and a 2-0 record. Member of one division-winner (1971) and one pennant-winner (1962). Six-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1963-66, 1968-69). Nine-time All-Star (1962-69, 1971). ML All-Star MVP (1965). No-hit Game (1963). NL leader for ERA (1969), Wins (1963, 1968), WHIP (1966, 1969), Hits Allowed/9IP (1966), BB/9IP (1965-66, 1969, 1973), Innings (1963, 1968), CG (1964, 1968), SHO (1965, 1969), SO to Walk (1966-68), and Adj. ERA+ (1965).  Retired with the Giants’ franchise single-season record for SO to Walk (6.17 in 1966), as well as the career record for SO to Walk (3.31).

Edgar Martinez  - 2010 – DH/3B
13.0 seasons with: Seattle (AL) 1987-2004
Cap: Seattle Mariners (AL)
The first DH honored by the Hall of Merit who played more games there than as a position player, “Gar” is also the finest hitter (a 147 OPS+) ever seen in Mariner history. An outstanding contact hitter (a .312 BA and 10 seasons of at least .300) with doubles power (514 for his career and 4 times over 40, including a season-high 52 in 1995), the right-handed Martinez had enough power to crack 309 home runs, too. “Papi” also scored 100 or more runs 4 times, drove in at least 100 runs 6 times and earned 100 or more bases on balls 4 times. An exceptional eye at the plate (a .418 OBP and 11 times over. 400), his slugging percentage was a worthy .515 (8 times over .500 and a personal-best .628 in 1995). His most famous moment was his double to win the 1995 ALDS and propel the Mariners to the ALCS for the very first time (Martinez’s batting line: .571/.667/1.000 and a 1.667 OPS). Five-time AL Silver Slugger Award-2B (1992, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2003). Seven-time All-Star (1992, 1995-97, 2000-01, 2003). STATS, Inc. AL Third Baseman (1992). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Designated Hitter (1995-97). Win Shares AL MVP (1995). Member of three division-winners (1995, 1997, 2001). AL leader for BA (1992, 1995), OBP (1995, 1998-99), OPS (1995), GP (1995), R (1995), 2B (1992, 1995), RBI (2000), Adj. OPS+ (1995), RC (1995), Adj. Batting runs (1995), Adj. Batting Wins (1995), TOB (1995, 1997-98) and OWP (1995). Retired with the Mariners’ franchise single-season records for OBP (.479 in 1995), OPS (1.107 in 1995), BB (123 in 1996), Adj. OPS+ (185 in 1995), Adj. Batting Runs (74 in 1995), Adj. Batting Wins (6.7 in 1995) and OWP (.830 in 1995), as well as their career records for OBP (.418), GP (2,055), AB (7,213), PA (8,672), RS (1,219), H (2,247), TB (3,718), 2B (514), RBI (1,261), BB (1,283), 1B (1,409), Adj. OPS+ (147), RC (1,631), Adj. Batting Runs (566), Adj. Batting Wins (52.0), XBH (838), TOB (3,619), HBP (89) and SF (77).

Eddie Mathews – 1974 – 3B1B
15.2 seasons with: Boston/Milwaukee/Atlanta (NL) 1952-66; Houston (NL) 1967; Detroit (AL) 1967-68
Cap: Milwaukee Braves (NL)
The most dominating third baseman ever seen when he left the game, Mathews was also the “hot corner’s” most fearsome slugger during the fifties and early sixties. A left-handed hitter blessed with impressive power and a beautiful swing, he was the first third baseman to break the 200, 300, 400, and 500 marks for home runs (retiring with 512). At his induction, he owns the single-season record for most homers (47 in 1953) for a third baseman; he also hit at least 40 homers 4 times, 30 or more homers nine straight years (10 in all), and drove in at least 100 runs 5 times, Not just a terrific offensive player, he was also known as a very good fielder (he left the game holding the ML record for most 3B assists with 4,322 and the NL record for most 3B double plays with 369) with an excellent arm (he led the NL in games 3 times, assists 3 times, putouts 2 times, fielding average 1 time, and double plays 1 time) and was immensely durable (the first to break 2,000 games at his position), The only player to play for all three Brave franchise cities (Boston, Milwaukee, and Atlanta). Member of three pennant-winners (1958 and the World Champions of 1957 and 1968); topping even his Game 4 game-ending homer, he made a great defensive play that saved a run from scoring in the 9th inning of Game 7 of the 1957 World Series, ending the game and securing the Braves’ only championship of the Milwaukee era. Nine-time STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1953-57, 1959-60, 1962-63). Two-time Win Shares NL MVP (1953, 1960). Two-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1953, 1960).  Nine-time All-Star (1953, 1955-62). NL leader for OBP (1963), HR (1953, 1959), BB (1955, 1961-63), Adj. OPS+ (1953), Power/Speed Number (1953, 1959-60), and AB per HR (1953, 1959-60). Retired with the Braves’ franchise single-season record for HR (47 in 1953), RBI (135 in 1953 – 20th century record), and AB per HR (11.9 in 1954), as well as the career record for BB (1,376).

Christy Mathewson - 1922 - P
New York (NL) 1900-16; Cincinnati (NL) 1916
Cap: New York Giants (NL)
The greatest pitcher who played his whole career during the Deadball Era, “Big Six” mixed amazing control with his best pitch called the “fadeaway” (a reverse curve that broke in on right-handed hitters). The right-handed “Matty” also had a blazing fastball and a huge breaking curve ball, plus good mechanics that enabled him to be the most durable pitcher for his generation. Retired with the major league career record for shutouts (79); the NL records for most wins (373), most 20-win seasons (13), assists (1,503) for a career, consecutive innings without a walk (68 in 1913), and strikeouts in a season (267); plus the World Series records for most career shutouts (5) and shutouts for a series (3 in 1905). Member of five pennant winners (1904, 1911, 1912, 1913 and the World Series champs of 1905). Two-time Pitching Triple Crown (1905, 1908). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL MVP (1905, 1908). Seven-time STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1903, 1905, 1908-11, 1913).  Ten-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1903-05, 1907-1913). Win Shares NL MVP (1913). No-hit games (1901 and 1905). NL leader for ERA (1905, 1908-09, 1911, 1913), Adjusted ERA+ (1905, 1908-09, 1911, 1913), Wins (1905, 1907-08, 1910), Won-Loss % (1909), (BB + H)/9IP (1905, 1908-09, 1913), Hits Allowed/9IP (1909), Base on Balls/9IP (1908-09, 1911-15), Strikeouts/9IP (1903), Games (1908), Saves (1908), Innings (1908), Strikeouts (1903-05, 1907-08), Games Started (1904-1908), Complete Games (1908, 1910), and Shutouts (1902, 1905, 1907-08).

Willie Mays – 1979 – CF
18.7 seasons with: New York/San Francisco (NL) 1951-52, 1954-72; New York (NL) 1972-73
Cap: San Francisco Giants (NL)
Our eleventh unanimous selection! The quintessential player who could do it all, “The Say Hey Kid” has been proclaimed by some as the greatest of all-time. Hitting – the right-handed slugger belted 660 homers (2 times with at least 50), scored and drove in over 100 runs 8 times, and 10 seasons with a .300 BA (with a career 3,283 hits). Fielding – recognized as one of the greatest at his position and master of the “basket catch,” he owns the ML record for putouts with 7,095 (he led the NL 4 times in DP and 1 time in assists, games, total chances, and putouts). Base stealing – 338 stolen bases with a 76% success rate.  Member of one division champs (1972) and four pennant-winners (1951, 1962, 1973, and the World Champions of 1954; the latter series saw one of the greatest catches and throws (at the same time!) of all-time). Two-time NL MVP (1954, 1965). NL Rookie of the Year Award (1951). Twelve-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1957-68). Twelve-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1954-55, 1957-66). Seven-time Win Shares NL MVP (1954-55, 1958, 1960, 1962, 1965-66). Three-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1955, 1958, 1965). Ten-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1951, 1954, 1958-60, 1962, 1964-67). Twenty-time All-Star (1954-73). Two-time ML All-Star MVP (1963-68). NL leader for BA (1954), OBP (1965, 1971), SLG (1954-55, 1957, 1964-65), OPS (1954-55, 1958, 1964-65), Runs (1958, 1961), H (1960), TB (1955, 1962, 1965), 3B (1954-55,1957), HR (1955, 1962, 1964-65), BB (1971), SB (1956-59), Adj. OPS+ (1954-55, 1957-58, 1964-65), XBH (1955, 1963), Power/Speed Number (1955-60, 1962, 1964), and AB per HR (1955, 1962, 1964-65). Retired with the Giants’ franchise single-season record for SLG (.667 in 1954), 2B (43 in 1959), HR (52 in 1965), XBH (90 in 1962), and AB per HR (10.7 in 1965), as well as the career records for SLG (.564), OPS (.949), Games (2,857), AB (10,477), R (2,011), H (3,187), TB (5,907), 2B (504), 3B (139: modern record), HR (646), SB (336: modern record), 1B (1,898), Adj. OPS+ (158: modern record), XBH (1,289), Sac. Flies (90), Power/Speed Number (442.1), and AB per HR (15.4).

Willie McCovey  - 1986 – 1B/LF
16.1 seasons with: San Francisco (NL) 1959-73, 1977-80; San Diego (NL) 1974-76; Oakland (AL) 1976
Cap: San Francisco Giants (NL)
Master of the dead-pull home run (the vast majority of his 521 were of this variety), “Stretch” stretched the limits that a baseball could travel from a bat. The top left-handed four-bagger specialist from the senior circuit all-time when he hung up his spikes (including 7 seasons of 30+ clouts and two of those with more than forty), he also set the homer record for the most grand slams career in that same league (18). With 1,555 RBI (four seasons with 100+), 1,229 runs scored, 1,345 walks (three seasons of 100 or more), and 4,219 total bases, “Big Mac” left the game with a mighty OPS+ of 148 and a slugging percentage of .515. His most memorable game was the last game of the 1962 World Series, when Bobby Richardson robbed him of driving in 2 runs and a Giant championship when the Yankee second baseman speared McCovey’s tremendous smash to right Member of one division-winner (1971) and one pennant-winner (1962). NL MVP (1969). NL Rookie of the Year Award (1959). STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1963). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1965-66, 1968-70). Win Shares NL MVP (1969). Four-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1966, 1968-70). Six-time All-Star (1963, 1966, 1968-71). ML All-Star MVP (1969). NL leader for OBP (1969), SLG (1968-70), OPS (1968-70), HR (1963, 1968-69), RBI (1968-69), BB (1970), Adj. OPS+ (1968-70), Times on Base (1970), IBB (1969-71, 1973), and AB/HR (1963, 1967-70). Retired with the Giants’ franchise single-season records for OPS (1.108 in 1969), Adj. OPS+ (211 in 1969), and IBB (45 in 1969), as well as the career records for IBB (235), and AB/HR (15.4).

Joe McGinnity - 1928 - P
Baltimore (NL) 1899; Brooklyn (NL) 1900; Baltimore (AL) 1901-02; New York (NL) 1902-08
Cap: New York Giants (NL)
Though he gained the sobriquet ”Iron Man” originally due to off-season work in an iron foundry, his incredible stamina and habit of playing both games of many a doubleheader (5 times, winning both games 3 of those times) were the later reasons many a person would address him by his famous nickname. The right-hander credited his durability to alternating his delivery between overhand, sidearm, and an excellent underhanded curve that he referred to as “Old Sal.” Winning 20 games or more 8 times in a row, he retired with the career record for saves (24). Member of three pennant winners (1900, 1904 and the World Series championship team of 1905 - he didn’t allow a run in two WS starts for the latter team). Two-time STATS, Inc. Pitcher of the Year (1900, 1904). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1899-00, 1903-04, 1906).  Three-time Win Shares NL Pitcher of the Year (1900, 1903-04). NL leader for ERA (1904), Adjusted ERA+ (1904), Wins (1899, 1900, 1903-04, 1906), Won-Loss % (1900, 1904), (BB + H)/9IP (1904), Games (1903-07), Saves (1904, 1907-08), Innings (1900, 1903-4), Complete Games (1903), Shutouts (1904), Games Finished (1907), and Games Started (1903). AL leader for Games, Innings, Games Started and Complete Games in 1901.

John McGraw – 2009 – 3B/SS
8.0 seasons with: Baltimore (AA) 1891; Baltimore (NL) 1892-99; St. Louis (NL) 1900; Baltimore (AL) 1901-02; New York (NL) 1902-06
Cap: Baltimore Orioles (NL)
In addition to his status as one of the game’s legendary managers, the “Little Napoleon” was also the best third baseman of the 1890s (he retired with the hot corner record for career OPS+ with 135). Dedicated to winning at any cost, he took advantage of the rulebook at every opportunity. Holding both the 19th century (all batters) and third baseman single-season (.548) and career (.465) records for OBP, the left-handed leadoff hitter and hit-and-run specialist boasted 7 qualifying seasons with at an OBP over .400 (including twice over .500) and a BA over .300 (including a third baseman record of.334 for his career and the single-season mark of .391 established in 1899), 5 seasons of more than 100 runs and over 100 walks 3 times. One of his era’s fastest players (he stole 438 bases during his career), “Mac” was also regarded as a crack defensive player. Member of two pennant-winners (1894 and 1895) and the Temple Cup winners of 1896 and 1897. Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Third Baseman (1898-1900). NL leader for OBP (1897, 1899-1900), R (1898-99), BB (1898-99), BtWins (1898) and Times on Base (1898). AL leader for HBP (1901). Retired with the Orioles’ franchise single-season records for OBP (.547 in 1899), BB (124 in 1899), OPS+ (tied: 168 in 1899), BtWins (5.5 in 1899) and OWP (.824 in 1899) and the career records for OBP (.461), G (848), AB (3,163), PA (3,915), R (840), BB (642), SB (369), and TOB (1,793).

Mark McGwire  - 2007 – 1B
11.2 seasons with: Oakland (AL) 1986-97; St. Louis (NL) 1997-01
Cap: Oakland Athletics (AL)
The first of only two players to reach 70 home runs in a season, “Big Mac” averaged one home run every 10.61 at bats (a ML record) throughout his career. The right-handed power hitter set the rookie record for homers with 49 in 1987, while establishing along the way an NL standard for four-baggers on the road (32 in 1998) and retired with 583 clouts, a 162 OPS+, .394 OBP and .588 SLG. Other notable batting achievements include: 11 seasons with over 30 homers (including his 70 homer season, one year with 65, twice over 50 and twice over 40) more than 100 RBIs 7 times (1,414 for his career), 5 seasons over 100 walks (1,317 lifetime) and 3 seasons of over 100 runs scored (1,167 at his retirement). Defensively, “Big Red” led first basemen once each in games played and putouts. A member of one wild card winner (2001), two division leaders (1992, 2000) and three pennant-winners (1988, 1990 and the World Champions of 1989; his best postseason performance occurred during the championship year’s ALCS with a batting line of .389/.400/.611). AL Rookie of the Year (1987). AL Silver Slugger-1B (1992, 1996). NL Silver Slugger-1B (1998). AL Gold Glove Award winner (1990). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL First Baseman (1987, 1996). Win Shares NL MVP (1998). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1996). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1998). Twelve-time All-Star (1987-92, 1995-2000). AL leader for OBP (1996), SLG (1987, 1992, 1996), OPS (1996), HR (1987, 1996), BB (1990), Adj. OPS+ (1992, 1996) and AB/HR (1987, 1989, 1992, 1995-96). NL leader for OBP (1998), SLG (1998), OPS (1998), HR (1998-99), RBI (1999), BB (1998), Adj. OPS + (1998-99), XBH (1998), TOB (1998), IBB (1999) and AB/HR (1998-99). Retired with A’s’ single-season record for AB/HR (8.1 in 1995 and 1996); the A’s’ career records for HR (363), Sac. Flies (59) and AB/HR (12.3); the Cardinals’ single-season records (all established in 1998) for HR (70), BB (162), TOB (320), IBB (28) and AB/HR (7.3); and the Cardinals career records for SLG (.683), OPS (1.110), Adj. OPS+ (180) and AB/HR (7.9).

Bid McPhee - 1913 - 2B
16.4 seasons with: Cincinnati (AA: 1882-89; NL: 1890-99)
Cap: Cincinnati Reds (NL)
Acclaimed as the greatest fielding second baseman of the 19th century, “King Bid” achieved this honor while stabbing line drives bare-handed for the majority of his long career. In 1896 (finally equipped with a glove), he was the first second baseman to break the .970 barrier with his FA mark of .982. Noted for his sportsmanship and always being in fine physical condition, he retired with many of the career records for second basemen (including the major league records for most putouts for a second baseman (529) in 1886, career assists (6,905), career double plays (1,186), career putouts (6,545) and the career record for fielding average (.978)). At the bat, he scored 100 runs 10 times and 1,678 of them for his career, impressive for someone at his position. Member of the AA’s first championship team in 1882 as a rookie. Led all second basmen eight times in putouts, six times in assists, eight times in fielding average, and a record eleven times in double plays . STATS, Inc. Second Baseman (1886, 1895). Seven-time Win Shares Gold Glove winner (1886-90, 1892-93). Led the American Association in 3B (1887),  HR (1886), G (1884), and Power/Speed Number (1886). Career OWP .570.

Cal McVey - 1914 - C/1B/RF/3B                                                                                                                                                                                  
1860’s: Cincinnati Red Stockings 1869-70                                                                                                                                                   8.5 seasons with: Boston (NA) 1871-72, 1874-75; Baltimore (NA) 1873; Chicago (NL) 1876-77; Cincinnati (NL) 1878-79                                                  
Cap: Boston Red Stockings (NA)
McVey started his career in RF with the unbeaten Cincinnati Red Stockings of ’69 (the first professional team). The toughest and most consistent of Boston’s “Big Four, he played on three championship teams for that city (1872, 1874-75), plus one more with Chicago for the NL’s inaugural season of 1876. Never had a bad season for the NA or NL.  Extremely versatile, his strong arm and fielding allowed him to play all nine positions during his career (though he had his greatest years behind the plate).  Retired with the (combined NA and NL) career records for RBI (448), times on base (899), hits (869), total bases (1,122), doubles (132), as well as the single-season records for (87 in 1875) and doubles (36 in 1875). STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1876). STATS, Inc. NL Catcher (1877). STATS, Inc. NL Third Baseman (1878). NA leader in OPS (1875), RBI (1874-75), Hits (1871, 1874), Total Bases (1874, 1875), Doubles (1875), Runs (1874), Slugging % (1875), Times on Base (1874), Singles (1871) and Extra-Base Hits (1874-75). NL leader in Saves and Singles for 1877.

Joe Medwick – 1967 – LF
12.2 seasons with: St. Louis (NL) 1932-40, 1947-48; Brooklyn (NL) 1940-43, 1946; New York (NL) 1943-45; Boston (NL) 1945
Cap: St. Louis Cardinals (NL)
The last National Leaguer to win the Triple Crown, “Ducky-Wucky” was one of the most impressive hitters of his time (134 OPS+, .324 BA, 5 seasons of at least 100 runs scored, 4 200+ hit seasons and .505 SLG). A notorious bad-ball hitter, the right-handed Medwick could hit for average, power (he wasn’t known as “Muscles” for nothing – he hit line-drive doubles, triples, and homers every season), and in the clutch (he had six consecutive seasons of at least 100 RBI). Remembered for being taken out of Game Seven (for his protection) for the Cardinals in the 1934 World Series, what is not often remembered was that he was one of the offensive stars for that series (.379/.400.552). The first player to have four hits during an All-Star game (1937), he left the game with the NL single-season records for 2B (64 in 1936) and consecutive hits (10 in 1936), not to mention the ML record for consecutive seasons with at least 40 doubles with 7 (1933-39). Defensively, he led NL outfielders twice in games and once in fielding percentage. Member of two pennant-winners (1941 and the World Champions of 1934). NL MVP (1937). NL Triple Crown (1937). STATS, Inc. Rookie of the Year (1933). Six-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1935-39, 1941). Win Shares NL MVP (1937). Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1937). Ten-time All-Star (1934-42, 1944). NL leader for BA (1937), SLG (1937), G (1937), AB (1937), R (1937), H (1936-37), TB (1935-37), 2B (1936-38), 3B (1934), HR (1937), RBI (1936-38), Adj. OPS+ (1937), and XBH (1935-37). Retired with the Cardinals’ franchise season record for RBI (154 in 1937), as well as the career record for 2B (377).

José Méndez - 1985 – P/SS/3B
Brooklyn Royal Giants (1908); Almendares (1908-16, 1920-21); Cuban Stars (1909-12); Stars of Cuba (1910); All Nations (1912-17); Chicago American Giants (1918); Detroit Stars (1919); Kansas City Monarchs (1920-26); Santa Clara (1923-25); Habana (1925-26); Alacranes (1926-27)
Cap: Almendares Blues
The first great Cuban star of the Negro Leagues, “The Black Diamond” was indeed a sparkling jewel for the teams that he played on. Blessed with a wickedly speedy fastball and utilizing a then legal quick release for his pitches, the graceful right-hander also threw an excellent curve and had no problem changing speeds in order to disrupt a batter’s timing. The winningest pitcher in the Cuban League for 1908-11 (he’s also credited as the all-time Cuban League career leader in winning percentage with .731) and set that league’s record for seasons leading in winning percentage with 5 (1908, 1908-09, 1910, 1910-11, and 1913-14), he retired with a 76-28 record there. Méndez also holds the Cuban League record for most seasons leading the league with an undefeated record with 3 (1908; 1910; and 1913-14). In 1909 with the Cuban Stars, he pitched a 10-inning perfect game (he finished that season with an astounding 44-2 record). In the 1924 NeL World Series, he was credited with 2 wins (the second win was a 3-hit shutout in the deciding ninth game) and an outstanding 1.42 ERA. An exceptional fielder,  Méndez played many games in the infield when not on the mound. Member of three Western winners (1923-25). George Stovey Award (1911). Western leader for Total Run Avg. (1919, 1923). East leader for Total Run Avg. (1911). Four-time Holway All-Star (1910-11, 1919, 1923).

Minnie Minoso – 1987 – LF/3B          
New York Cubans (NeL) 1945-48; Cleveland (AL) 1949, 1951, 1958-59; Chicago (AL) 1951-57, 1960-61, 1964, 1976, 1980; St. Louis (NL) 1962; Washington (AL) 1963
Cap: Chicago White Sox (AL)
Arguably the most popular player who played for Chicago’s team in the American League, Orestes “Minnie” Minoso was that franchise’s most productive player in left field based on career. Given the sobriquet “Mr. White Sox” (he was that team’s first black player), the right-handed batter was a fine contact hitter (.298 BA with 8 times over .300 and a .389 OBA) with good power (130 OPS+, 5 times with 100 runs, and 4 times with 100 RBI) and wasn’t afraid of crowding the plate (an AL record 189 HBP when he left the game). A worthy member of the “Go-Go Sox” with over 200 stolen bases, his speed didn’t hurt his quality fielding, either (he led AL left fielders 7 times in games, 3 times in assists, and twice in putouts and double plays). In 1980, he became the second 5-decade major leaguer. In 1980, he became the second 5-decade major leaguer. Member of one NeL pennant-winner (1947), “The Cuban Comet” was the Cubans’ best hitter in the NeL World Series with his .423 BA and 11 hits (the latter more than anybody else on both teams) while manning third. Rube Foster Award (1948). Three-time Gold Glove Award winner (1957, 1959-60). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1951, 1953-54, 1956). Two-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1954, 1959). Four-time All-Star (1951-54). Two-time NeL All-Star (1947-48). AL leader for Games (1960), Hits (1960), TB (1954), 2B (1957), 3B (1951, 1954, 1956), SB, Times on Base (1954), HBP (1951-54, 1956-61), Sac. Flies (1960-61), and Power/Speed Number (1951-53). Retired with the White Sox franchise single-season records for HBP (23 in 1956) and Sac. Flies (12 in 1961), as well as the career records for HR (135), HBP (145), and Power/Speed Number (150.9).

Johnny Mize - 1959– 1B
12.2 seasons with: St. Louis (NL) 1936-41; New York (NL) 1942, 1946-49; New York (AL) 1949-53
Cap: St. Louis Cardinals (NL)
A burly, but graceful man, “The Big Cat” terrorized opponents with his slugging ways (including a 158 OPS+, a batting line of .312/.397/.562, 9 consecutive seasons of at least .300, 8 100-RBI seasons and 5 100-run seasons). A powerful (he holds the record of six 3-home run games), but patient batter, the left-handed Mize was also a remarkable contact hitter despite his many homers (in 1947, besides setting the left-handed record for most homers with 51, he became the only man to hit 50 home runs while striking out less than 50 times). A dependable fielder, “Big Jawn” led the NL in putouts, fielding percentage, and assists twice, while leading the NL in double plays once. In his tenure with the Yankees, he led all pinch-hitters three times in the AL and was the WS MVP of ’52 (hitting .400 with three homers). Member of five World Champions (1949-53). STATS Inc. NL Rookie of the Year (1936). Seven-time STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1937-40, 1942, 1947-48). Two-time Win Shares NL MVP (1940, 1947). Three-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1939-40, 1947). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1948). Ten-time All-Star (1937, 1939-42, 1946-49, 1953). NL leader for BA (1939), SLG (1938-40, 1942), R (1947), TB (1938-40), 2B (1941), 3B (1938), HR (1939-40, 1947-48), RBI (1940, 1942, 1947), Adj. OPS (1938-40), OPS+ (1939-40), XBH (1938-40, 47) and Times on Base (1939-40). Retired with the Cardinals’ franchise season record for HR (43 in 1940) and the career record for SLG (.600), as well as the Giants’ franchise season record for HR (51 in 1947) and the career record for SLG (.549).

Paul Molitor – 2004 – 3B/DH/2B/1B
16.0 seasons with: Milwaukee (AL) 1978-92; Toronto (AL) 1993-95; Minnesota (AL) 1996-98
Cap: Milwaukee Brewers (AL)
A member of the 3,000 base hit club (3,319, 9th highest in ML history), “The Igniter” sparked his teams with his bat, his feet and, during the first half of his career, with his glove. A .306 lifetime hitter with 605 doubles, the right-handed “Molly” batted over .300 12 times, scored over 100 runs 5 times, collected over 200 hits 4 times and drove in over 100 RBIs twice. He also had 3 seasons with both an OBP topping .400 OBP and slugging over .500, as well as a well-documented 39-game hitting streak in 1987. A marvelous base stealer (504 SB and a 79% success rate) and always ready and able to stretch a hit, his speed also played a factor at the many positions that he ably manned (he led AL third baseman once each in double plays and games). Member of the second-half division winner (1981) and two pennant-winners (1982 and the World Champions of 1993); his postseason batting line of .368/.435/615 is one of the best ever, while his 5-hit game in Game 1 of the 1982 WS is a ML record. AL-WS MVP (1993); he finished the series with an outstanding line of .500/.571/1.000. Four-time AL Silver Slugger-DH (1987-88, 1993, 1996). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Designated Hitter (1987, 1993). Seven-time All-Star (1980, 1985, 1988, 1991-94). AL leader for G (1994), AB (1982, 1991), PA (1982, 1991, 1993), R (1982, 1987, 1991), H (1991, 1993, 1996), 2B (1987), 3B (1991), 1B (1994, 1996) and Power/Speed Number (1983). Retired with the Brewers’ franchise single-season records for BA (.353 in 1987), OBP (.437 in 1987), OPS (1.004 in 1987), AB (666 in 1982), PA (751 in 1982), R (136 in 1982), 3B (16 in 1979) and TOB (299 in 1991), as well as the career records for BA (.303) and SB (412).

Dobie Moore – 1991 – SS/OF
25th Infantry Wreckers (1916-1920); Kansas City Monarchs (1920-26)
Cap: Kansas City Monarchs
The greatest all-around shortstop in the Negro Leagues for the first half of “The Roaring Twenties,” some feel “The Black Cat” was the best at his peak all-time at that position. A star for the Army’s great Wrecker team (Casey Stengel brought him to the Monarchs’ attention after seeing him play at the 25th Infantry’s base), he was outstanding offensively and defensively despite his bulky physique. A .355 hitter, Moore had fine power to go with that. His best season at the plate was in 1924, batting .461 with 10 home runs and 24 doubles. As a shortstop, he was superb. With outstanding range and a strong, accurate arm, he was regarded as a flashy player at the position. A fine clutch hitter during the postseason (his impressive contributions helped Kansas City win the first NeL World Series), his best effort was in the ’25 World Series when he hit .364 while leading the Monarchs in many other important categories. Moore is credited with the highest career batting average ever attained in the California Winter League with his .385 and achieved a remarkable .487 average to lead the league during the 1924-1925 season. Member of two Western pennant-winners (1925-26). Six-time Holway All-Star (1920-25). NeL Western leader for BA (1924), HR (1924), 3B (1925), and 2B (1924).

Joe Morgan  - 1990 – 2B
16.7 seasons with: Houston (NL) 1963-71, 1980; Cincinnati (NL) 1972-79; San Francisco (NL) 1981-82; Philadelphia (NL) 1983; Oakland (AL) 1984
Cap: Cincinnati Reds (NL)
Acknowledged by many as the greatest all-around second baseman in the last fifty years, “Little Joe” was noted as much for his baseball smarts as his talent. Flapping his arm as he waited for a pitch, the left-handed Morgan had one of the great batting eyes in history (8 times over 100 walks, a .392 OBP, and left the game with the NL record for BB with 1,865), not to mention plenty of power in his small frame (retiring with the ML second baseman record for home runs with 268 and the NL career record for games played with 2,649 at that position). Excellent speed and a great ability to read pitchers allowed him to compile 689 SB and an 81% success rate (9 seasons with at least 40 thefts). Fine hands defensively, “The Little General” led the NL 3 times in fielding percentage and putouts; he also led once in games, assists, and double plays. Member of three division-winners (1973, 1979-80) and four pennant-winners (1972, 1983, and the World Champion “Big Red Machine” teams of 1975-76). Two-time NL MVP (1975-76). ML-AS MVP (1972).  Five-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1973-77). NL Silver Slugger Award-2B (1982). Eleven-time STATS, Inc. NL Second Baseman (1967, 1969-77, 1982). Three-time Win Shares NL MVP (1973, 1975-76). Four-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1972, 1974-76). Ten-time All-Star (1966, 1970, 1972-79). NL leader for OBP (1972, 1974-76), SLG (1976), OPS (1975-76), R (1972), 3B (1971), BB (1965, 1972, 1975, 1980), Adj. OPS+ (1975-76), Times on Base (1972), Sac. Flies (1976), and Power/Speed Number (1976-77). Retired with the Astros’ franchise career records for OPS (.374) and 3B (63); the Reds’ single-season records for OBP (.466 in 1975), BB (132 in 1975), OPS+ (post-19th century record: 187 in 1976), and Power/Speed Number (37.5 in 1973); as well as the Reds’ career records for OBP (.415), SB (post-19th century record: 406), and Power/Speed Number (221.2).

Eddie Murray  - 2003 – 1B/DH
19.5 seasons with: Baltimore (AL) 1977-88, 1996; Los Angeles (NL) 1989-91, 1997; New York (NL) 1992-93; Cleveland (AL) 1994-96; Anaheim (AL) 1997
Cap: Baltimore Orioles (AL)
The best switch-hitting first baseman in ML history (driving in 1,917 runs, tops among switch-hitters), “Steady Eddie” lived up to his nickname year-in and year-out with his consistent fine play at both the offensive (129 career OPS+) and defensive sides of the game. Recognized as one of the game’s best clutch hitters (with 19 career grand slams) and for his extreme durability, fine contact skills (batting .300 or greater 7 times) and power (8 seasons with an SLG above .500 and 5 times with 30 or more home runs,) which all helped enable him to become only the third player in ML history with career totals of at least 3,000 hits and 500 homers (finishing with 3,255 and 504, respectively.) Other notable achievements on offense: most career sac. flies (128), 100 or more RBI 6 times, 100 or more runs scored 3 times, 560 doubles and a .71% career SB success rate. A standout at his position (playing a ML record 2,413 games at first), he set the AL record for most career assists (1,865) and led AL first basemen 4 times in double plays and 3 times each in assists, putouts, fielding percentage and games at first (he also led designated hitters in games played once). Member of one division-winner (1996) and three pennant-winners (1979, 1995 and the World Champions of 1983). AL Rookie of the Year (1977). Two-time AL Silver Slugger-1B (1983-84). NL Silver Slugger-1B (1990). Three-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1982-84). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL First Baseman (1981-84). STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1990). Two-time Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1983-84). Four-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award (1979, 1981-83). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1989). Five-time All-Star (1979-80, 1984, 1986-87). AL leader for OBP (1984), G (1984), HR (1981), RBI (1981), BB (1984) and IBB (1982, 1984). NL leader for IBB (1990). ML leader for BA (1990). Retired with the Orioles’ franchise single-season record for IBB (25 in 1984), as well as their career record for IBB (135).

Stan Musial – 1969 – 1B/LF/RF/CF
19.6 seasons with: St. Louis (NL) 1941-44, 1946-63
Cap: St. Louis Cardinals (NL)
One of the most respected players of all-time on and off the playing field, “Stan the Man” may very well be the greatest left fielder the NL produced at the time of his induction into the Hall of Merit (our 9th unanimous selection!), though he was a stand-out at other positions during his fabled career. Hitting doubles, triples, and homers at impressive rates, the left-handed Musial had a distinctive batting crouch that helped him as a truly consistent offensive force (he had over 3,000 hits and over 400 home runs, not to mention a .331 BA). Very durable and equipped with good speed, “The Donora Greyhound” was also a fine defensive player (he led the NL outfielders 3 times in games, once in double plays, and once in fielding average, as well as leading NL first basemen once in double plays and assists). Retired with the doubleheader record for most homers (5 on May 2, 1954), as well as the NL career records for Games (3, 026), AB (10,972), Hits (3,630), RBI (1,951), 2B (725), Runs (1,949), Times on Base (5,282), and consecutive games played (896); he also ended his career with the ML records for TB (6,134) and XBH (1,377). Member of four pennant-winners (1943 and the World Champions of 1942, 1944, and 1946). Three-time MVP (1943, 1946, 1948). Ten-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1942-44, 1948-54). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL First Baseman (1946, 1956-57). Eight-time Win Shares NL MVP (1943-44, 1946, 1948-52). Seven-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1943-44, 1946, 1948-49, 1951-52). Five-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1942-43, 1947, 1949, 1958). Twenty-time All-Star (1943-44, 1946-63). NL leader for BA (1955, 1958), OBP (1954-55, 1958, 1960), Games (1952, 1957), AB (1949), Hits (1951, 1953, 1958), Triples (1950, 1958), BB (1954, 1957-58, 1960), SB (1948), 1B (1951, 1953, 1957-58), and Times on Base (1954-55, 1957-58, 1960). Retired with the Cardinals’ franchise season records for XBH (103 in 1948) and IBB (26 in 1958), as well as the career records for 3B (177), HR (475), BB (1,599), 1B (2,253), Sac. Flies (53), and IBB (127).

Graig Nettles – 2006 – 3B
17.0 seasons with: Minnesota (AL) 1967-69; Cleveland (AL) 1970-72; New York (AL) 1973-83; San Diego (NL) 1984-86; Atlanta (NL) 1987; Montreal (NL) 1988
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
One of the slickest-fielding third baseman of all time, “Puff” also ranks as the greatest ever to man the hot corner for the Yankees, his tenure there also noteworthy for his being the third captain in their history. A power threat (twice over 30 homers, he also holds the AL career record for home runs by a third baseman with 319 and had 390 in total), the left-handed pull-hitter drove in 1,314 runs during his long career. But he is best remembered for his work in the field – Nettles had a .964 fielding percentage as a third baseman and set AL records with 412 assists and 56 double plays in 1971 (he led AL third basemen 4 times in assists, 3 times in double plays, twice in both games and putouts and once in fielding percentage). A member of two division-champs (1969 and 1980) and five pennant-winners (1976, 1981, 1984 and the World Champions of 1977-78; in Game Three of the 1978 World Series, he made 4 sensational defensive gems). ALCS MVP (1981). Two-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1977-78). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Third Baseman (1971-72). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1980). Seven-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1970-73, 1975-76, 1978). Six-time All-Star (1975, 1977-80, 1985). AL leader in HR (1976), XBH (1976), Sac. Flies (1975) and AB/HR (1976).

Hal Newhouser – 1960 – P
Detroit (AL) 1939-53; Cleveland (AL) 1954-55
Cap: Detroit Tigers (AL)
Two-time AL MVP (1944-45). AL Pitching Triple Crown (1945). Three-time STATS Inc. AL Pitcher of the Year (1944-46). Four-time The greatest left-handed pitcher of the forties, “Prince Hal” held court in a most distinguished way. The only pitcher to win two consecutive MVP awards (he won 29 games in ’44), Newhouser was able to dominate the opposition with a terrific fastball, an outstanding overhand curve, and fine control. He won two complete-games during the ’45 World Series (including the game that clinched it for the Tigers). Member of two pennant-winners (1954 and the World Champions of 1945). STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1944-46, 1948). Win Shares AL MVP (1945). Four-time Win Shares AL Pitcher of the Year (1945-48). Seven-time All-Star (1942-48). AL leader for ERA (1945-46), Wins (1944-46, 1948), WHIP (1946), Hits Allowed/9IP (1942, 1945-46), K/9IP (1942, 1944-46), Innings (1945), K (1944-45), GS (1945), CG (1945, 1947), SHO (1945), and Adj. ERA+ (1945-46). Retired with the Tigers’ franchise season records for Hits Allowed/9IP (6.61 in 1946), K/9IP (8.46 in 1946), K (275 in 1946), SO to Walk (2.81 in 1946), and Adj. ERA+ (195 in 1945), as well as the career records for K (1770) and Adj. ERA+ with at least 1,000 IP (2,944).

Kid Nichols - 1911 - P
Boston (NL) 1890-1901; St. Louis (NL) 1904-05; Philadelphia (NL) 1905-06
Cap: Boston Beaneaters (NL)
Often cited as the greatest pitcher of the 19th Century, Nichols relied on his outstanding fastball and impeccable control to amass 297 wins during the 1890’s (the most for the decade by thirty). Nichols finished his major league career with a record of 361-208 and an ERA+ of 139 over 5056.3 innings. The author 48 career shutouts, Nichols won 30 or more games 7 times in his illustrious career, including four consecutive years of 30+ wins from 1891 to 1894. His ERA of 2.95 is over one whole run better than the park-adjusted league average for the time period (4.12). Retired with the major league career record for saves (17) and tied for the single-season record for fielding percentage (1.000 in 1896). The Kid was the ace for five pennant winners (1897 and the champion Boston teams of 1891, 1892, 1893, and 1898). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year Awards (1896-98). Seven-time STATS, Inc. Staff Pitcher (1891-93, 1896-98, 1904). Win Shares NL MVP (1897). Three-time Win Shares NL Pitcher of the Year Award (1892, 1897-98). At various times, the Kid led the league in Wins (1896-1898), Adjusted ERA+ (1891, 1897), Games (1897-98), Innings (1897), Shutouts (1890, 1894, 1900), Batters Faced (1890, 1892-1895, 1897-98), Walks/9 IP (1891), Hits Allowed/9IP (1898), (BB + H)/9IP (1893, 1897-98), SO to Walk (1890-91, 1895, 1897) and Saves ((1891, 1895, 1897-98). He left the game with the Braves’ franchise single-season record for Adj. Era+ (172 in 1898), as well as the career records for W (329), G (556), S (16), IP (4,538), K (1,667), GS (501), CG (475), SHO (44) and Adj. ERA+ (143).

Phil Niekro – 1994 – P
Milwaukee/Atlanta (NL) 1964-83, 1987; New York (AL) 1984-85; Cleveland (AL) 1986-87; Toronto (AL) 1987
Cap: Atlanta Braves (NL)
The greatest starting pitcher to handle a knuckleball, “Knucksie” was a star in his twenties and later on in his forties. A 318-game winner (he won 20 3 times) despite the efforts of many of the teams that he played for, the righty hurler amassed 3,342 Ks (3 seasons over 300) with his floating pitch during his 24 years on the mound (achieving the distinction of being the oldest player to regularly play at age 48). Also utilizing a fastball, curve and slider as weapons of choice, Niekro also defended his position well. His greatest seasons was in 1974, fashioning a 20-13 record with a 2.38 ERA (despite pitching in Atlanta’s “Launching Pad” for a good chunk of his career, he was still able to attain 6 sub-3.00 ERAs). Left the game tied for the most seasons with 200+ innings (19). Member of two division-winners (1969, 1982). No-hitters (1973). Five-time Gold Glove Award winner (1978-1980, 1982-1983). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1969, 1974, 1979). Four-time NL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1974, 1976, 1978-79). Five-time All-Star (1969, 1975, 1978, 1982, 1984). NL leader for ERA (1967), Wins (1974, 1979), W-L% (1982), Innings (1974, 1977-79), K (1977), GS (1977-80), CG (1974, 1977-79), Adj. ERA+ (1967) and Sac. Hits (1968). Retired with the Braves’ franchise single-season record for ERA (1.87 in 1967), K (modern record: 262 in 1977), as well as the career records for G (740) and K (2,912).

Alejandro Oms  – 2006 – CF/LF/RF
Cuban Stars (East) 1917, 1922-1932; All Cubans (1921); Santa Clara (CWL) 1922-24, 1929-30, 1935-38; San Jose (CWL) 1925; Marianao (CWL) 1926; Habana (CWL) 1927-29, 1930-32; Cienfuegos (CWL) 1929-30; Venezuela (1933-34, 1936), New York Cubans (1935); Almendares (1939-40); Cienfuegos (1945-46)
Cap: Cuban Stars (East)
An acrobatic fielder and an excellent batter, “El Caballero” (The Gentleman) delighted fans in the US, Cuba and Venezuela and is recognized as one of Cuba’s greatest stars. As a defender, he displayed extraordinary range and an accurate arm (in one-sided games, he was known to catch fly balls behind his back). With the bat in his hands, the left-handed “Walla Walla” had good power to all fields and retired with a lifetime .345 batting average in Cuba (second-place in that league; he set the record for the most .300 seasons with 11, 8 of them consecutive, as well as a record 30-game hitting streak; he also attained the highest BA ever with .432 in 1928-29) and records show a .325 career average in the Negro Leagues. He was also known as a fine base runner and was proficient at base stealing. A member of one NeL East-West winner (second-half: 1935) and six Cuban Winter League championship teams (1923-24, 1927-28, 1928-29, 1935-36, 1937-38, 1939-40). Three-time Holway NeL All-Star (1923, 1927, 1930). NeL Eastern leader for HR (1922) and 2B (1928). Cuban Winter League leader for BA (1924-25, 1928-29 and 1929-1930), H (1928-29, 1931-32), 2B (1924-25, 1928-29, 1932-33), HR (1931-32), SB (1931-32) and R (1931-32).

Jim O’Rourke - 1899 - CF/LF/C/RF/1B/3B
20.6 seasons with: Middletown (NA) 1872; Boston (NA: 1873-75; NL: 1876-78, 80); Providence (NL) 1879; Buffalo (NL) 1881-84; New York (NL) 1885-89; 91-92; New York (PL) 1890; Washington (NL) 1893
Cap: Boston Red Caps (NL)
Incredibly long career for the era, and consistently among the best players in the game (.311 BA, 1,729 runs scored, and batted over .300 14 times), “Orator Jim” was the first man to have a hit in the NL. He led NA first basemen in putouts and double plays once. In his prime he was a consistent 32-40 Win Shares performer, reaching that range 1876-80 and 1884-85. 2643 career hits, 465 doubles in just 1999 career games. Won WS Gold Glove in 1877. Compared to the leagues he played in, his AVG was +45 points, his OBP +43 points and his SLG +70 points. Adjusting for season length, 488 career WS and that does not include 3.8 seasons in the NA. That’s an average of 29 WS per 162 games from age 25-42. Retired with the ML career record for most OF games (1,444). Key contributor to pennant winners 1873-75, 1877-79, 1888-89. Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1876-77, 1883-84). STATS, Inc. PL Outfielder (1890). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1877). Career OWP .672. NL leader in OBP (1877, 1879), Games (1876-77), Runs (1877), Hits (1884), Triples (1885), HR (1880), BB (1877), Singles (1883) and Times on Base (1877). NA leader in HR (1874-75), SB (1874) and Power/Speed Number (1874-75).

Mel Ott - 1952 – RF/3B/CF
17.7 seasons with: New York (NL) 1926-47
Cap: New York Giants (NL)
With his unorthodox right leg lift prior to contact with the ball, “Master Melvin” owned a big chunk of NL records when he retired (including 511 homers, 5,041 total bases, 1,859 runs, 1,708 walks, 1,071 extra-base hits and 4,606 times on base) and hit .304. Exhibiting great plate discipline and deceptive power despite his size (he had 100 or more walks 10 times and 100-plus runs 9 times) , the left-handed Ott scored six runs in a game twice, three times drew five walks in a game, and posted a NL record eight consecutive 100-RBI seasons (9 total). Ott was also a standout in right field for his Giants (leading in double plays and assists twice). Member of three pennant winners (1936, 1937 and the World Champs of 1933).  Eleven-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1929, 1931-37, 1940-42). STATS, Inc NL Third Baseman (1938). Two-time Win Shares NL MVP (1934, 1938). Four-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger winner (1934, 1936, 1938, 1942). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1933). Thirteen-time All-Star (1933-45). NL leader for OBP (1930, 1932, 1938-39), SLG (1936), OPS (1936, 1942), OPS+ (1932, 1934, 1936, 1938, 1942), Games (1932), Runs (1938, 1942), RBI (1934), BB (1929, 1931-33, 1937, 1942), HR (1932, 1934, 1936-38, 1942).  Retired with the Giants’ season records SLG (.635 in 1929), RBI (151 in 1929), walks (118 in 1938) and XBH (81 in 1929); as well as the Giants’ career records for OBP (.414), SLG (.533), games (2,730), AB (9,456), hits (2,876), doubles (488), RBI (1,860), singles (1,805) and Adj. OPS+ (155).

Satchel Paige - 1959 – P
Birmingham Black Barons (1927-30); Baltimore Black Sox (1930); Cleveland Cubs (1931); Pittsburgh Crawfords (1931-37); Kansas City Monarchs (1935-36, 1939-48); Santo Domingo (1937); Santo Domingo All-Stars (1937); Newark Eagles (1938); Mexican League (1938); Satchel Paige’s All-Stars (1939); New York Black Yankees (1943); Memphis Red Sox (1943); Philadelphia Stars (1946, 1950); Cleveland (AL) 1948-49; St. Louis (AL) 1951-53; Kansas City (AL) 1965
Cap: Pittsburgh Crawfords
Immense talent (second on the NeL list with 147 wins) and showman extraordinaire (a witty man who always gave his fans what they wanted), when people think of the Negro Leagues, Paige’s name is probably the first people think of. Probably the most famous barnstormer of all-time, he played numerous games against white players before Jim Crow ended in baseball. Owning a fastball that looked like a pea by the time it reached the plate, the lanky and durable right-hander also developed a curveball and his legendary “hesitation pitch,” among other colorfully self-named named pitches. His most famous game may be the greatest Negro League game ever: a 1-1 tie against Slim Jones that ended in the 10th inning due to darkness in 1934. In 1948, Paige became the oldest rookie ever (42) as he finally was allowed to play major league ball. On August 20 of that same year, he pitched in front of a record 78,382 fans (a record for a night game). Member of the World Champions of 1948. Member of four Western winners (1940-42, 1946). Member of three East-West winners (1933-35). George Stovey Award (1934, 1936). Rube Foster Award (1942). Two-time AL All-Star (1952-53). Western leader for Wins (1936), Strikeouts (1929, 1936, 1941-43), Total Run Avg. (1946) and Win Percent. (1936, 1941). East-West leader for Wins (1932), Strikeouts (1932-34), and Total Run Avg. (1934). Five-time NeL All-Star (1934, 1936, 1941-42, 1944). AL leader in Games (1952).

Rafael Palmeiro - 2012 - 1B
17.9 seasons with Chicago (NL) 1987-1988; Texas (AL) 1989-1993, 1999-2003; Baltimore (AL) 1994-1998, 2004-2005
Cap: Texas Rangers (AL)
The Cuban-born Rafael Palmeiro was one of the best 1B in the game during 1990s, a player who was remarkable for his consistency. From 1993-2003 (excluding the strike-shortened 1994 season), Palmeiro never finished with fewer than 37 home runs and 104 RBI in any given season. His prolonged excellence allowed him to put up impressive career numbers, as at the time of his induction, he ranked in the top 25 all-time in G (18th – 2,831), AB (15th – 10,472), PA (15th – 12,046), H (25th – 3,020), TB (10th – 5,388), 2B (16th - 585), HR (12th - 569), RBI (16th – 1,835), XBH (6th – 1,192), and times on-base (18th – 4,460). Palmeiro became the fourth player in history to reach both the 3,000 hits and 500 HR milestones. He was an integral member of two division winning teams (1997 Baltimore Orioles and 1999 Texas Rangers) and one wild-card winner (1996 Orioles). Led the AL in R (1993 - 124), H (1990 - 191), and 2B (1991 - 49). All-time Ranger leader in walks (805). Four-time All-Star (1988, 1991, 1998-1999) who won two Silver Slugger awards (1998-1999) and three Gold Gloves (1997-1999) and received MVP votes in ten separate seasons (1990, 91, 93-99, and 2001).

Jim Palmer – 1990 – P
Baltimore (AL) 1965-67, 1969-84
Cap: Baltimore Orioles (AL)
The greatest pitcher in the franchise history of the Baltimore Orioles, “Cakes” was also the premier hurler in the AL of the Seventies (with 268 career victories, a .638 winning percentage, 8 20-games seasons, and a career ERA of 2.86 to his credit). With his high kick, the right-hander effectively outsmarted batters with his quality pitches and location of them. His superb athleticism helped him out defensively, as he was one of the best out on the mound. Noted for never giving up a grand slam during his major league career. An outstanding postseason competitor (notching 8 wins and a 2.61 ERA), Palmer was the youngest pitcher to win a complete-game shutout (age 20 in 1966) in the World Series. He left the game with the LCS records for strikeouts (46) and complete games (5); he also tied the LCS record for most appearances (6) and wins (4). Member of two division-winners (1973 and 1974) and six pennant-winners (1969, 1971, 1979, and the World Champions of 1966, 1970, and 1983). Three-time AL Cy Young Award winner (1973, 1975-76). Four-time Gold Glove Award winner (1976-79). Nine-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1970-73, 1975-78, 1982). Three-time AL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1975-77). Six-time All-Star (1970-72, 1975, 1977-78). No-hit Game (1969). AL leader in ERA (1973, 1975), Wins (1975-77), W-L% (1982), WHIP (1982), IP (1970, 1976-78), GS (1976-77), CG (1977), SHO (1970, 1975), and Adj. ERA+ (1975). Retired with the Orioles’ franchise single-season records for GS (40 in 1976) and SHO (10 in 1975), as well as the career records for W (268), W-L% (.638), G (558), IP (3,948), K (2,212), GS (521), CG (211), and SHO (53).

Dickey Pearce - 1931 - SS/C
Brooklyn Atlantics (1856-70); Brooklyn Excelsiors (1866); New York (NA) 1871-72; Brooklyn Atlantics (NA) 1873-74; St. Louis Brown Stockings (NA) 1875; St. Louis (NL) 1876-77      
Cap: Brooklyn Atlantics
Almost overnight, tiny Dickey Pearce transformed the position of shortstop from one of little defensive contribution to one of great responsibility for preventing runs.  He expanded the area a shortstop covered, developed defensive positioning based on where the batter would normally hit the ball, refined defensive strategy at the position and showed how a shortstop should throw the ball accurately to first. Besides being a defensive marvel, the speedy Pearce was also an above-average batsman who is credited with inventing the bunt and fair-foul hit. In the few All-Star games of that age, he was named the starting shortstop in 1858 and the starting catcher (which he performed excellently and played many times during his long career) in 1861. Arguably the greatest player of his era at his prime, he was one of the game’s first professionals and was the first to play twenty years or more. Led all shortstops in double plays and assists twice, even though he was an “old man” by the time he had a chance to play in a professional league. Sparkplug for the great champion Atlantic teams of 1864 and 1865. NA leader for Games (1871) and AB/K (1871).

Gaylord Perry – 1989 – P
San Francisco (NL) 1962-71; Cleveland (AL) 1972-75; Texas (AL) 1975-77, 1980; San Diego (NL) 1978-79; New York (AL) 1980; Atlanta (NL) 1981; Seattle (AL) 1982-83; Kansas City (AL) 1983
Cap: San Francisco Giants (NL)
One of the game’s outstanding competitors who could mentally throw batters timing off as much as he did physically, Perry was the first pitcher to win the Cy Young in both leagues and one of only a handful to win at least 100 in the NL and AL. Winning 314 games and striking out 3,534 hitters (8 seasons with at least 200 K’s) over his career, his excellent control helped him win 20 or more games five times and he had a lifetime 3.10 ERA. His greatest season was 1971 when he notched 24 victories, a 168 ERA+, a 1.92 ERA, and 234 strikeouts in 342.7 innings. Member of one division-winner (1971). AL Cy Young Award winner (1972). NL Cy Young Award winner (1978). No-hit Game (1968). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1970, 1978).  Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1972, 1974). Two-time AL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1972, 1974). Five-time All-Star (1966, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1979). NL leader for Wins (1970, 1978), W-L% (1978), BB/9IP (1981), Innings (1969-70), GS (1970), and SHO (1970). AL leader in Wins (1972), CG (1972-73), and Adj. ERA+ (1974). Retired with the Padres’ franchise single-season record for W-L% (.778 in 1978), as well as the Rangers’ career records for ERA (3.26), K/9IP (6.26), Adj. ERA+ (118), and SO to Walk (3.03).

Mike Piazza - 2013 - C
12.2 seasons with Los Angeles (NL) 1992-1998; Florida (NL) 1998; New York (NL) 1998-2005; San Diego (NL) 2006; Oakland (AL) 2007
Cap: Los Angeles Dodgers (NL)
Considered by many to be the best-hitting catcher in Major League history, Mike Piazza hit like a first baseman while playing the most demanding position on the field. A 62nd round draft pick in 1988, Piazza made all the other teams look like fools for not drafting him in 1993 as he won the Rookie of the Year award by hitting .318/.370/.561 (153 OPS+) with 35 HR and 112 RBI. That rookie season announced Piazza as a force to be reckoned with for a long time, as it was his first of ten seasons wherein he would put up an OPS+ of 135 or better, leading the league in both 1995 (172) and 1997 (185). By the time Piazza retired, he held the record for the most HR (427, 396 while playing catcher) and highest slugging percentage (.545) for a catcher. Piazza hit .412/.545/.941 in the NLCS against the St. Louis Cardinals to help the 2000 wild-card winner New York Mets reach the World Series, and was also on two division winners (1995 Dodgers and 2006 Padres) and two other wild-card winners (1996 Dodgers and 1999 Mets). Twelve-time All-Star (1993-2002, 2004-2005) who won ten consecutive Silver Slugger awards (1993-2002). Has the highest career OPS+ in Dodgers history (160) and highest career SLG in Mets history (.542).

Billy Pierce – 1987 – P
Detroit (AL) 1945, 1948; Chicago (AL) 1949-61; San Francisco (NL) 1962-64
Cap: Chicago White Sox (AL)
The winningest southpaw in White Sox history, little Billy Pierce succeeded on the mound despite his small stature. Throwing a terrific curve and changeup with his fastball, he won 211 games and had a 119 ERA+ and 3.27 ERA lifetime. Throwing four one-hitters during his career with two 20 win seasons to his credit, Pierce was the starting pitcher for the junior circuit 3 times in the All-Star game. In 1953, he had 7 shutouts and pitched 51 innings without giving up an earned run. Despite being a starting pitcher throughout almost his entire career, Pierce came in between starts numerous times for his teams. Member of two pennant-winners (1959 and 1962 – in the latter series, he had a 2.40 ERA and won a 3-hit shutout in Game Six). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1955, 1957-58). Two-time AL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1955, 1958). Seven-time All-Star (1953, 1955-59, 1961). AL leader for ERA (1955), Wins (1957), WHIP (1955), HA/9IP (1953), K/9IP (1953-54), K (1953), CG (1956-58), SO to Walk (1955), and Adj. ERA+ (1955).  Retired with the White Sox franchise single-season record for Adj. ERA+ (201), as well as the career record for K (1,796).

Lip Pike - 1940 – CF/2B/3B
Philadelphia Athletics 1866; Irvington 1867; New York Mutuals 1867-68; Brooklyn Atlantics 1869-70; Troy (NA) 1871; Baltimore (NA) 1872-73; Hartford (NA) 1874; St. Louis (NA: 1875; NL: 1876); Cincinnati (NL) 1877-78; Providence (NL) 1878; Worcester (NL) 1881; New York (AA) 1887
Cap: St. Louis Brown Stockings (NA/NL)
One of professional baseball’s earliest stars, “The Iron Batter” is usually credited as the game’s first Jewish player to play professionally. Generally recognized as the fastest man of his era, he also was one of early baseball’s great sluggers (including a 155 OPS+ and 6 .300+ BA seasons). Some of his clouts were considered awe-inspiring among his generation even before the NA was formed. Pike holds the NA single-season home run record (6 in 1872), as well as the career records for homers (15), power/speed number (22.74) and extra-base hits (135); he also retired with the NL career records for homers (20), power/speed number (28.06) and extra-base hits (192). A graceful, sure-handed fielder (he led outfielders in his leagues twice in double plays), Pike played almost every position (including in the infield as a left-hander!)  NA leader for Adjusted OPS+ (1875), Slugging % (1874), Games (1872), Doubles (1874), HR (1871-73), RBI (1872), Extra Base Hits (1871) and Power/Speed Number (1872-73). NL leader for HR (1877). 

Eddie Plank - 1924 - P
Philadelphia (AL) 1901-14; St. Louis (FL) 1915; St. Louis (AL) 1916-17
Cap: Philadelphia Athletics (AL)
The winningest lefthander in major league history at the time of his retirement, “Gettysburg Eddie” was a model for all steady, crafty finesse mound artists.  Introduced to baseball at the college that gave him his nickname, he came to the A’s well-equipped with a fastball and his “cross-fire” (or sidearm curve) pitch. A 20-game winner 8 times, he posted a 1.32 ERA in 54.7 innings (7 games) in World Series play. Retired with the AL career records for wins (326), complete games (410) and innings pitched (4,495.70). Important contributor for six pennant winners (1902, 1905, 1914 and the three World Series champions of 1910, 1911 and 1913). Six-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1903-05, 1909, 1911-12). STATS, Inc. FL Staff Pitcher (1915). AL leader for Won-Loss % (1906), Games (1903), Saves (1911), Games Started (1903, 1905), Complete Games (1905), and Shutouts (1907, 1911). FL leader for (BB + H)/9IP, Base on Balls/9IP, and Adjusted ERA+ for 1915.

Charley Radbourn - 1905 - SP
Providence (NL), 1881-85; Boston (NL) 1886-89; Boston (PL) 1890; Cincinnati (NL) 1891
Cap: Providence Grays (NL)
Achieving standards that may never be challenged again, “Old Hoss’’” 1884 was one of the greatest seasons any pitcher has ever had in the year the overhand pitch was first allowed. Marked by his 59-12 record (his wins for that year are the ML record), with a 1.38 ERA (205 ERA+), 18-straight wins and 441 strikeouts (the NL record) in 679 IP, the righty curveball and “in-shoot” sidearmer led Providence to the pennant that season (he won 3 games and had a microscopic ERA of 0.00 in 22 IP in the postseason as the Grays won their only World Series). This followed his great 1883 season, where “Rad” was 48-25, with a 2.05 ERA (150 ERA+) in 632 IP. Winning 20 or more games 9 times, he had 6 sub-3.00 ERA seasons and 4 times struck out at least 200 batters. Career record 309-195, 120 ERA+ in 4,535 IP. Pitching Triple Crown (1884). No-Hit Game (1883). STATS, Inc. NL MVP (1884). STATS, Inc. Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1883-84). Three-time Win Shares NL Pitcher of the Year (1882-84). NL leader in ERA (1884), ERA+ (1884), W (1883-84). W-L % (1881, 1884), WHIP (1883), G (1883-84), IP (1884), K (1882, 1884), GS (1884), CG (1884) and SHO (1882).

Tim Raines – 2008 – LF/CF/DH
15.4 seasons with: Montreal (NL) 1979-90, 2001; Chicago (AL) 1991-95; New York (AL) 1996-98; Oakland (AL) 1999; Baltimore (AL) 2001; Florida (NL) 2002
Cap: Montreal Expos (NL)
The most exciting and best left fielder in the National League during the 1980s, “Rock” combined spectacular speed with an exceptional ability to get on base to become one of baseball’s greatest ever run scorers (including 6 seasons with over 100 runs scored and 1,571 in his career). One of only a handful of men to steal 800 bases (808) he left the game with the highest SB success rate on over 300 attempts in ML history (84.7%), the right-handed leadoff hitter also stole 70 or more bases 6 times (1981-1986) with a high of 90 in 1983. At bat, he hit over .300 five times, walked 1,330 times in his career and had a OBP over .400 4 times (.385 career). Blessed with great range in the outfield, Raines led left fielders 3 times in assists, twice each in putouts and double plays and once in games (he also topped right fielders once in games). A member of three division-winners (1981, 1993, 1997) and two pennant-winners (the World Champions of 1996 and 1998). ML-AS MVP (1987); batted .301 in league championship series’, his 1993 batting line of .444/.483/.556 was his best at that level. NL Silver Slugger-OF (1986). Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1981, 1983, 1986-87). Three-time Win Shares NL MVP (1985-87). Two-time Win Shares NL Silver Slugger Award (1985-86). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1984). Seven-time All-Star (1981-87). NL leader for BA (1986), OBP (1986), PA (1982-83), R (1983, 1987), 2B (1984), SB (1981-84), TOB (1983-84, 1986) and OWP (1986). Retired with the Expos’ single-season records for PA (731 in 1982) R (133 in 1983) and 3B (13 in 1985), as well as the career records for R (947), 1B (1,163), 3B (82), BB (793), SB (635), BtRuns (266), BtWins (26.0), TOB (2,440) and IBB (118).

Willie Randolph – 2001 – 2B
13.9 seasons with: Pittsburgh (NL) 1975; New York (AL) 1975-88; Los Angeles (NL) 1989-90; Oakland (AL) 1990; Milwaukee (AL) 1991; New York (NL) 1992
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
The dominant Yankee second baseman of the last 50 years, Randolph was consistent, calm and level-headed, playing a key role in the Bronx machine (traits that helped earn him the honor of captain late in his pinstripe career). A very patient hitter, the right-handed leadoff man had a .400 OBP in three seasons and more than 100 walks once. An exceptional bunter and a very hard man to strike out, he also batted over .300 twice and was skilled at stealing bases (271 SB with a 74% success rate). Proficient at the double play, he was tops among his keystone sack contemporaries in the AL twice in that category, as well as leading them once each in putouts, assists and games. Member of two division leaders (1975 and 1980; in the latter series, he had a batting line of .385/.429/.538) and five pennant-winners (1976, 1981, 1990 and the World Champions of 1977 and 1978). AL Silver Slugger Award-2B (1980). Three-time STATS, Inc. AL Second Baseman (1978, 1980, 1987). Three-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award (1979, 1984-85). Six-time All-Star (1976-77, 1980-81, 1987, 1989). AL leader for BB (1980) and AB/K (1987).

Pee Wee Reese – 1964 – SS/3B
Brooklyn-Los Angeles (NL) 1940-42, 1946-58
Cap: Brooklyn Dodgers (NL)
The captain of many a great Dodger team of the forties and fifties, “Pee Wee” (in honor of his marble skills, not his height) was the NL’s star shortstop during his time. One of the game’s most outstanding leadoff hitters, the right-handed Reese was an expert at creating bases on balls (1,210) and for his impressive bat control. A terrific fielder, “The Little Colonel” led the NL in total chances 3 times, putouts 4 times, assists once, fielding percentage once, and double plays twice. Reese was also an extremely durable player who was good for at least 140 games each season, not to mention a fine base stealer. Member of seven pennant-winners (1941, 1947, 1949, 1952-53, 1956 and the World Series champions of 1955). Six-time STATS, Inc. NL Shortstop (1942, 1946-49, 1954). Three-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1941-42, 1948). Nine-time All-Star (1942, 1946-54). NL leader for Runs (1949), BB (1947), SB (1952), and Sac. Hits (1953). Retired with the Dodger career franchise record for Runs (1,338), BB (1,210), and Power/Speed Number (163.3).

Rick Reuschel - 2012 - P
Chicago (NL) 1972-1981, 1983-1984; New York (AL) 1981; Pittsburgh (NL) 1985-1987; San Francisco (1987-1991)
Cap: Chicago Cubs (NL)
Pitching in an era saturated with star pitchers, Rick Reuschel was often overlooked during his time, but that lack of recognition should not reflect on the quality he brought to the bump. A workhorse moundsman during both the 1970s and 1980s (he threw over 200 innings in 12 different seasons),”Big Daddy” had his best season in 1977. That year, in 252 innings, he won 20 games with a 2.79 ERA (good for a 158 ERA+) and a league-best 0.5 HR/9. In 1987, not long removed from a serious rotator cuff injury, Reuschel led the NL in CG (12), SHO (4), WHIP (1.097) and BB/9 (1.7). The portly right-hander was a key component of two pennant winning teams (1981 New York Yankees and 1989 San Francisco Giants) and another division winner with San Francisco in 1987. He led the NL in GS (1980-38 and 1988-36). Three-time All-Star (1977, 1987, 1989) who won two Gold Gloves (1985, 1987). Reuschel also received votes for the Cy Young Award in three seasons (1977, 87 and 89), finishing as high as third in the two earlier years.

Hardy Richardson - 1905 - 2B/LF/CF
11.9 seasons with: Buffalo (NL) 1879-85; Detroit (NL) 1886-88; Boston (NL) 1889; Boston (PL: 1890; AA: 1891); Washington (NL) 1892; New York (NL) 1892
Cap: Buffalo Bisons (NL)
After establishing himself as a star with Buffalo in the early 1880’s, “Old True Blue” was a standout for the great Detroit Wolverine team of 1886-87, as a power hitting 2B-LF. Richardson hit .351/.402/.504 in 1886 (league .261/.311/.358). He hit .328/.366/.484 as Detroit won the pennant in 1887 (league .278/.337/.396). In 1885 Richardson hit .319/.350/.458 (league .250/.294/.335). He led second basemen in his leagues once in putouts, third basemen in double plays once, and outfielders in assists once. Hardy won a Win Shares Gold Glove in 1881 (as a CF) and led the Player’s League in RBI in 1890 helping Boston to the pennant. For his career Richardson hit .299/.344/.435 (league .264/.314/.360). Career OWP .651. Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Second Baseman (1882, 1885, 1887, 1889). STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1886). STATS, Inc. PL Outfielder (1890). NL leader in AB, Hits, HR, Singles and Power/Speed Number for 1886.

Cal Ripken  - 2007 – SS/3B
18.0 seasons with: Baltimore (AL) 1981-01
Cap: Baltimore Orioles (AL)
Baltimore’s greatest player in their history and the AL’s finest shortstop based on career,  “Iron Man” is also remembered as baseball’s all-time consecutive games played record holder with a remarkable 2,632 during between 1982-1998. With more than 3,000 hits and the most career home runs for a shortstop (345), the right-handed “Rip” hit .300 and drove in over 100 runs 4 times, had three season each topping 100 runs scored and a .500 slugging percentage and compiled over 200 hits twice. At 6’4’’, his height was not the detriment many expected when he began his career as he exhibited great range and a powerful arm at short (he holds the AL single-season shortstop records for highest fielding percentage with .996 in 1990 and consecutive games without an error with 95 in the same season). Ripken led AL shortstops 12 times in games played, 8 times in double plays, 7 times in assists and 6 times in putouts; he also led third basemen twice in games played. Some other notable records held by Ripken include: career double plays by a shortstop in the AL (1,682), All-Star Games at short (15), consecutive All-Star Game starts (16) and the All-Star Game leader in total fan balloting (36,123,483). A member of one wild card winner (1997), one division leader (1996) and the World Champions of 1983. Two-time ML-AS MVP (1991, 2001). AL Rookie of the Year Award (1982). Eight-time AL Silver Slugger Award-SS (1983-86, 1989, 1991, 1993-94). Two-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1991-92). Seven-time STATS, Inc. AL Shortstop (1983-86, 1989, 1991, 1994). Two-time Win Shares AL MVP (1983-84, 1991). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1982). Five-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1983-84, 1986, 1989, 1994). Nineteen-time All-Star (1983-01). AL leader for G (1983-84, 1987, 1989, 1991-93, 1996-97), AB (1983, 1993), PA (1983), R (1983), H (1983), TB (1991), 2B (1983), XBH (1983, 1991), and Sac. Flies (1988). Retired with the Orioles’ franchise single-season record for G (163 in 1996), as well as the career records for G (3,001), AB (11,551), PA (12,883), R (1,647), H (3,184), TB (5,168), 1B (2,106), 2B (603), HR (431), RBI (1,695), BB (1,129), XBH (1,078), TOB (4,379) and Sac. Flies (127).

Eppa Rixey – 1968 – P
Philadelphia (NL) 1912-17, 1919-1920; Cincinnati (NL) 1921-33
Cap: Cincinnati Reds (NL)
The NL’s winningest left-handed pitcher at his retirement with 266 victories, “Eppa Jeptha” was successful during the Deadball Era and even more so during the beginning of the Lively Ball Era. Extremely competitive and crafty, the tall (6’ 5’’) hurler threw a good fastball, curve, and change of pace. Hardly one to give up a gopher ball (only 3 for his career), Rixey is the only pitcher since the introduction of the Lively Ball to give up only one homer with at least 200 IP for a season. An exceptional fielder, he accepted 108 chances without error in 1917. One of only a handful of players who never played in the minor leagues. When he left the game, he was was tied for the single-season record for fielding percentage (1.000 in 1917). Member of one pennant-winner (1915). STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1925). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1916, 1921-23, 1925). NL leader for Wins (1922), Innings (1922), GS (1922, 1928), and SHO (1924). Retired with the Reds’ career records for Wins (179), Games (440), IP (2,890.7), and GS (356).

Robin Roberts – 1972 – P
Philadelphia (NL) 1948-61; Baltimore (AL) 1962-65; Houston (NL) 1965-66; Chicago (NL) 1966
Cap: Philadelphia Phillies (NL)
Arguably the best pitcher of the 1950’s, the ace of the Philadelphia Phillies throughout most of his career matched quality pitching with excellent durability. A rising fastball pitcher with impressive control (never walking more than 77 batters) who liked to upset opposing hitters by interrupting their rhythm, the right-hander won 20 games and racked up 300-plus IP six years in a row from 1950 to 1955 (not to mention 286 wins and 305 complete games for his career). Roberts had the honor of being the starting pitcher in the game-winner that gave the Phils the pennant on the last day of the ’50 season (going all ten inning of the game and allowing only one run). Member of one pennant-winner (the “Whiz Kids” of 1950), he pitched quite well in his only World Series. Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1952, 1955). Six-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1950, 1952-1955, 1958). Six-time NL Win Shares Pitcher of the Year (1950-55). Seven-time All-Star (1950-56).  NL leader for Wins (1952-55), WHIP (1954), BB/9IP (1952-54, 1956), Innings (1951-55), K (1953-54), GS (1950-55), CG (1952-56), SHO (1950), and SO to Walk (1952-54, 1956, 1959).  Retired with the Phillies’ franchise post-19th century single-season record for W-L % (.800 in 1952), as well as the career records for Wins (234), Games (529), IP (3,739), K (1,871), GS (472), and CG (272).

Brooks Robinson  - 1983 – 3B
16.7 seasons with: Baltimore (AL) 1955-77
Cap: Baltimore Orioles (AL)
Acclaimed by many as the game’s greatest fielding third baseman of all-time, The Human Vacuum Cleaner” sucked up more baseballs than anybody else ever at the “hot corner.” Holding major league career records for games (2,870), seasons (23), putouts (2,697), fielding average (.971), chances (9,165), assists (6,205), and double plays (618) at the position, his cat-like reflexes, soft hands, and instincts also allowed him to lead the AL 11 times in fielding average, 8 times in games and assists, 6 times in total chances, and 3 times in putouts and double plays. A quality batter, the right-handed Robinson’s 2,848 hits, 1,357 RBI, and 268 homers were standout for a third baseman when he left the game. One of the game’s nice guys, his performance on the field and at the plate (.429 BA/.810 SLG) during the ’70 WS catapulted him to super stardom. Member of two division leaders (1973-74) and four pennant-winners (1969, 1971, and the World Champions of 1966 and 1970). AL MVP (1964). Sixteen-time AL Gold Glove Award winner (1960-75). Five-time STATS, Inc. AL Third Baseman (1960, 1964-65, 1967-68). Six-time Win Shares AL Gold Glove Award winner (1960, 1963-64, 1967-69).  Fifteen-time All-Star (1960-74). ML All-Star MVP (1966). ML World Series MVP (1970). AL leader for G (1961-64, 1968), AB (1961), RBI (1964), and Sac. Flies (1962, 1964, 1967-68). Retired with the Orioles’ franchise single-season records for G (163 in 1961 and 1964) and Sac. Flies (10 in 1962, 1964, and 1969), as well as the career records for G (2,896), AB (10,654), R (1,232), H (2,848), TB (4,270), 2B (482), RBI (1,357), 1B (2,030), XBH (818), TB (3,761), and Sac. Flies (114).

Frank Robinson – 1982 – RF/LF/DH/1B
18.3 seasons with: Cincinnati (NL) 1956-65; Baltimore (AL) 1966-71; Los Angeles (NL) 1972; California (AL) 1973-74; Cleveland (AL) 1974-76
Cap: Cincinnati Reds (NL)
The first man to become MVP in both leagues, “The Judge” (nicknamed that for his leadership skills) is usually considered to have been the toughest position player of his generation. Not afraid to crowd the plate, the right-handed Robinson is high on the lists for home runs (586), RBI (1,812), and hits (2,943). Robby was a very good percentage base stealer who was fast and slid hard. Defensively, he was strong in all departments (leading the league twice in OF fielding percentage, once in games, and once in 1B double plays). A great impact player, he was a standout during the postseason with his.532 career SLG (in ’66, he had a .857 SLG). Member of five pennant-winners (1961, 1969, 1971 and the World Champions of 1966 and 1970). NL MVP (1961). AL MVP (1966). Triple Crown (1966). NL Rookie of the Year Award (1956). NL Gold Glove (1958). Four-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1956, 1961-62, 1964). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1966-67, 1969, 1971). STATS, Inc. AL DH (1973). Win Shares NL MVP (1962). Win Shares AL MVP (1966). Win Shares AL Silver Slugger Award (1966).  Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1961). Twelve-time All-Star (1956-57, 1959, 1961-62, 1965-67, 1969-71, 1974). ML All-Star MVP (1971). ML World Series MVP (1966). NL leader for OBP (1966), SLG (1960-62), OPS (1960-62), Runs (1956, 1962), 2B (1962), Adj. OPS+ (1960-62), XBH (1962), Times on Base (1962), HBP (1955, 1959-60, 1962-63, 1965), Sac. Flies (1961), IBB (1961-64), and Power/Speed Number (1961). AL leader for BA, OBP, SLG, OPS, Runs, TB, HR, RBI, Adj. OPS+, XBH, Times on Base, Sac. Flies, and AB per HR in 1966 and HBP in 1969. Retired with the Reds’ franchise single-season records for Runs (134 in 1962: modern record), TB (380 in 1962), 2B (51 in 1962), XBH (92 in 1962), and HBP (20 in 1956); the Reds’ career records for SLG (.554), OPS (.943), HR (324), RBI (1,009), Adj. OPS+ (150), HBP (118), IBB (129), and AB/HR (17.1); the Orioles’ single-season record for HR (49 in 1966) and Adj. OPS+ (199); as well as the Orioles’ career records for Adj. OPS+ (170).

Jackie Robinson – 1962 – 2B/SS/3B/1B/LF
Kansas City Monarchs (1945); Brooklyn (NL) 1947-56
Cap: Brooklyn Dodgers (NL)
Though rightfully recognized for his role in ending ML baseball’s 63-year old color line and for his significance to American culture, the HoM honors him for his greatness as a player. The best second baseman of the late 1940’s and early 1950’s (scoring 100 or more runs 6 times), the fiery Robinson reintroduced speed as a weapon on the basepaths (including stealing home 19 times during his career and once during the ’55 WS) and was regarded by many as the greatest at avoiding a rundown tag. An outstanding contact hitter (.311 BA and six seasons with at least .300) with a great eye at the plate (.409 OBP and 6 seasons over .400), he had good power for a player at his position. A dazzling fielder, he led all NL first basemen once in double plays and NL second basemen in double plays four times, fielding average twice, total chances once, putouts once, and assists once. He retired with the single-season records for fielding average for a second baseman playing at least 150 games (.992 in 1951) and double plays (137 in 1951). Member of five pennant-winners (1947, 1949, 1952-53, 1956 and the World Series champions of 1955). NL MVP (1949). NL Rookie of the Year Award (1947). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Second Baseman (1948-52). Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award winner (1951). Six-time ML All-Star (1949-54). NeL All-Star (1945). NL leader for BA (1949), OBP (1952), SB (1947, 1949), HBP (1948), Sac. Hits (1947, 1949), and Power/Speed Number (1947-49, 1952). NeL Western leader for HR/550AB in 1945.

Bullet Rogan - 1940 – P/OF
All Nations (1917); Kansas City Monarchs (1920-38); Aldemares (Cuban League) 1924/25
Cap: Kansas City Monarchs
One of the great double-threats baseball ever produced, Rogan could do it on the mound and at the plate. As a hurler, the durable right-hander possessed a blazing fastball, a dandy curve and good control. He pitched sidearm without a windup and claimed a forkball, palmball and spitter as part of his arsenal. When he didn’t pitch, “Bullets” patrolled the outfield to keep his dangerous bat in the lineup (not to mention his scintillating fielding). He batted mostly cleanup and exhibited good power and contact ability. Prior to his Negro League days, he was a member of the great 25th Infantry Army team of the 1910’s. Member of five Western pennant winners (1923, 1925, 1929, 1937 and the Negro League Champions of 1924; Rogan hit .410 in World Series competition).  Member of one Cuban league pennant (1924/25). 1936 All-Star. Three-time Fleet Walker Award winner (1922, 1924-25). Two-time George Stovey Award winner (1922-25). Four-time Holway Western All-Star (1922, 1924, 1927-28). Western league leader for Wins (1922-25), Strikeouts (1920-21, 1923, 1925), Winning Percentage (1925) and BA (1923).

Pete Rose  - 1993 – RF/3B/LF/2B/1B
22.4 seasons with: Cincinnati (NL) 1963-78, 1984-86; Philadelphia (NL) 1979-83; Montreal (NL) 1984
Cap: Cincinnati Reds (NL)
Picked by many to be the finest player of The Seventies, “Charlie Hustle’s” mix of talent, drive, and grit earned him one of the game’s most impressive records (4,256 career hits). A star at five positions, the skillful switch-hitter is also the career leader in 1B (3,215), AB (14,053), times on base (5,929), and games played (3,562), not to mention notching 2,165 runs, a .303 BA (15 seasons over .300), and a NL-record 746 doubles. On the defensive front, Rose led NL second baseman once in putouts and games; right fielders once in assists, putouts, and fielding percentage; left fielders thrice in putouts and games, twice in fielding percentage, and once in assists; third basemen once in games and fielding percentage; and first basemen twice in games and once in assists and fielding percentage. Member of two division-winners (1973, 1981) and six pennant-winners (1970, 1972, 1983 and the World Champions of 1975-76, and 1980). NL Rookie of the Year (1963). NL MVP (1973). ML-WS MVP (1975). Two-time NL Gold Glove Award winner (1969-70). NL Silver Slugger Award-1B (1981). Two-time STATS, Inc. NL Second Baseman (1965-66). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1968-69, 1973). Two-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1970, 1980). Seventeen-time All-Star (1965, 1967-71, 1973-82, 1985). NL leader for BA (1968-69, 1973), OBP (1968, 1979), G (1972, 1974-75, 1977, 1982), AB (1965, 1972-73, 1977), R (1969, 1974-76), H (1965, 1968, 1970, 1972-73, 1976, 1981), 2B (1974-76, 1978, 1980), 1B (1973, 1979, 1981), Times on Base (1965, 1968-69, 1973-76, 1979, 1981), and HBP (1980). Retired with the Reds’ franchise single-season records for G (163 in 1974), AB (680 in 1973), H (230 in 1973), 2B (51 in 1978), 1B (181 in 1973), and TB (311 in 1969), as well as the career records for G (2,722), AB (10,934), R (1,741), H (3,358), TB (4,645), 2B (601), BB (1,210), 1B (2,490), XBH (868), and Times on Base (4,654); he also retired with the Phillies’ single-season record for G (163 in 1979). NL record: 44 consecutive games with a hit in 1978.

Edd Roush  - 1996 – CF
13.0 seasons with: Chicago (AL) 1913; Indianapolis (FL) 1914; Newark (FL) 1915; New York (NL) 1916, 1927-29; Cincinnati (NL) 1916-26, 1931
Cap: Cincinnati Reds (NL)
The National League’s finest center fielder for the last half decade of the deadball era and arguably the greatest center fielder in the history of the Cincinnati Reds. A line-drive hitter who made excellent contact (a career .323 hitter who topped the .300 mark 11 times) with outstanding on base ability (3 seasons with an OBP of .400+), the left-handed batter was noted for his triples hitting (5 seasons over 15) and for his abundance of inside-the-park homeruns (30 career.) He also gained a reputation for using multiple batting stances. An acrobat in center, Roush appeared to know where the ball was going to land even before it was hit (led NL center fielders once each in games, putouts and fielding percentage). Member of one pennant-winner (the World Champions of 1919). Five-time STATS, Inc. NL Outfielder (1917-20, 1923). Win Shares NL MVP (1919). Five-time Win Shares NL Gold Glove Award (1919-20, 1923-25). NL leader for BA (1917, 1919), SLG (1918), OPS (1918), 2B (1923), 3B (1924), 1B (1917), Adj. OPS+ (1918), Sac. Hits (1918) and AB/K (1918, 1921, 1931). Retired with the Reds’ franchise single-season record for AB/K (75.2 in 1931), as well as the career records (for the modern era) for G (1,399), AB (5,384), PA (5,965), R (815), H (1,784), TB (2,489), 2B (260), 3B (152), RBI (763), 1B (1,325), XBH (459), Times on Base (2,179), Power/Speed Number (76.0) and AB/K (31.7), as well as the Reds’ all time record for Sac. Hits (186).

Red Ruffing – 1966 – P
Boston (AL) 1924-30; New York (AL) 1930-42, 1945-46; Chicago (AL) 1947
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
The Yankees’ biggest winner from the thirties, Ruffing was durable and consistently good for those great Bronx Bombers teams. Working with a fastball, curveball, and a changeup, the right-hander won 20 or more games during 1936-39. As a batter, he distinguished himself as one of the best that has ever played at his position – Ruffing’s career records consist of a .269 BA (10th among pitchers with at least 500 AB; he hit .300 8 times), 36 HR (3rd), 273 RBI, and a .254 BA as a pinch-hitter in 228 appearances. In World Series competition, Ruffing won seven out of nine decisions. Member of seven pennant-winners (1942 and the World Champions of 1932, 1936-39, and 1941). STATS, Inc. Pitcher of the Year (1938). Five-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1932, 1936-39). Win Shares AL Pitcher of the Year (1938). Six-time All-Star (1934, 1938-42). AL leader for Wins (1938), K/9IP (1932, 1934), K (1932), CG (1928), and SHO (1939). Retired with the Yankees’ franchise season records for K/9IP (6.60 in 1932), as well as the career records for Wins (231), Games (426), K (1,526), Games Started (391), CG (261), SHO (40), Batters Faced (13,353), and Innings (3,168.7).

Amos Rusie - 1904 - P
Indianapolis (NL) 1889; New York (NL) 1890-95, 97-98; Cincinnati 1901
Cap: New York Giants (NL)
The premier flamethrower of the 1890s (so feared was he that he was the catalyst for the league to move back the mound in 1893), “The Hoosier Thunderbolt” led the NL in strikeouts 5 times (1890-91, 93-95); he fanned 200 or more 5 times and 300 twice. In 1894, the right-hander was 36-13 with a 189 ERA+ in 444 IP (2nd in the league). Also led league in K/9 5 times while being extremely durable during his peak, leading the NL in starts twice and innings once; finished first or second every year between 1890 and 1894. Allowed fewest H/9 four times (1890-91, 93-94) and led the league in shutouts four times. With his crackling fastball, sharp curve and quality change of pace, the 8-time 20-game hurler (4 times with at least 30) was also a good hitter. Career record: 245-174, 130 ERA+ in 3770 IP. NL Pitching Triple Crown (1894). STATS, Inc. NL Pitcher of the Year (1894). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1891, 1894, 1897). Win Shares NL MVP (1894). Two-time Win Shares NL Pitcher of the Year (1893-94). No-hit game (1891). NL leader in ERA (1894, 1897), Adj. ERA+ (1894), Wins (1894), HA/9IP (1890-91, 1893-94), K/9IP (1890-91, 1893-95), IP (1893), K (1890-91, 1893-95), GS (1893-94), SHO (1891, 1893-95), G (1893) and CG (1893). Retired with the Giants’ franchise single-season record for G (67 in 1890), as well as the career records for K (1,819), SHO (29) and Adj. ERA+ (137).

Babe Ruth - 1941 – RF/LF/P
16.5 seasons with: Boston (AL) 1914-1919; New York Yankees (AL) 1920-1934; Boston (NL) 1935
Cap: New York Yankees (AL)
The HOM’s fourth unanimous selection! The most dominating player of all-time, “The Sultan of Swat” created a new style of play with his prodigious home run hitting (13 30-HR seasons, which include 11 seasons of 40+ and 4 50+). Besides the power, the left-handed slugger (he had 12 seasons of 100 or more runs and 13 seasons with at least 100 RBI) also was a great contact hitter (.342 BA and 17 seasons of at least .300) and extremely patient (13 seasons with at least 100 BB). However, “The Bambino” began his career as the finest lefty pitcher of his time (a two-time 20-game winner, a 2.28 ERA, and 122 ERA+). Retired with numerous records including the career records for HR (714), OBP (.474), SLG (.690), OPS+ (207), RBI (2,213), BB (2,062), XBH (1,356), most WS HR (15) and consecutive WS scoreless innings (29 1/3), as well as the single-season records for HR (60 in 1927), XBH (119 in 1921), TOB (379 in 1923) and SLG (.849 in 1920). Member of ten pennant winners (1921-22, 1926 and the World Champions of 1915-16, 1918, 1923, 1927-28, and 1932). AL MVP (1923). STATS, Inc. AL Rookie of the Year (1915). STATS, Inc. AL Pitcher of the Year (1916). Two-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1916-17). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL MVP (1918-21). Fifteen-time STATS, Inc. AL Outfielder (1918-24, 1926-33). Nine-time Win Shares AL MVP (1918-21, 1923-24, 1926-28). Eight-time Win Shares Silver Slugger Award (1920-21, 1923-24, 1926, 1928-29, 1931). Win Shares Gold Glove winner (1923). AL All-Star (1933-34). AL leader for OPS (1918-24, 1926-31), OPS+ (1918-24, 1926-31), HR (1918-21, 1923-24, 1926-31), RBI (1919-21, 1923, 1926, 1928),  BB (1920-21, 1923-24, 1926-28, 1930-33), R (1919-21, 1923-24, 1926-27), TB (1919, 1921, 1923-24, 1926, 1928), OBP (1919-21, 1923-24, 1926-27, 1930-32), SLG (1918-24, 1926-31), XBH (1918-21, 1923-24, 1928) Power/Speed Number (1921, 1923, 1926), ERA+ (1916), CG (1917), SHO (1916) and BA (1924). 

Nolan Ryan – 2000 – P
New York (NL) 1966, 1968-71; California (AL) 1972-79; Houston (NL) 1980-88; Texas (AL) 1989-93
Cap: California Angels (AL)
With a fastball capable of registering 100 MPH “The Ryan Express” never stopped,  tallying 324 wins including 61 shutouts over a record-tying 27-year pitching career. With his heater and tantalizing curveball, the highly dedicated right-hander holds the ML record for most no-hitters (7) and shares the ML record for one-hitters (12). He also holds ML records in career strike outs (5,714), strike outs in a single season (383 in 1973,) season with 300 or more strikeouts (6) as well as most seasons leading the league in strikeouts (11). Other ML records with Ryan’s name on them: he left the game holding the career records for K/9IP (9.548) and HA/9IP (6.56), as well as the single season records for both stats (5.261 HA/9IP in 1972 and 11.48 K/9IP in 1987). Member of four division champs (1979-81, 1986) and the World Champion Amazin’ Mets of 1969 (he won 1 game and posted a ERA of 2.57 in the World Series). Four-time STATS, Inc. AL Staff Pitcher (1972-74, 1977). Three-time STATS, Inc. NL Staff Pitcher (1981, 1983, 1987). Eight-time All-Star (1972-73, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1985, 1989). AL leader for WHIP (1990-91), HA/9IP (1972, 1974, 1976-77, 1979, 1989-91), K/9IP (1972-74, 1976-79, 1989-91), IP (1974), K (1972-74, 1976-79, 1989-90), CG (1977) and SHO (1972, 1976, 1979). NL leader for ERA (1981, 1987), HA/9IP (1981-83, 1987), K/9IP (1987-88), K (1987-88), SO to Walk (1987), Adj. ERA+ (1981, 1987) and Sac. Hits as a batter (1985). Retired with the Angels’ franchise single-season records for W (22 in 1974), HA/9 IP (5.26 in 1972), K/9 IP (10.57 IN 1973), IP (332.7 in 1974), GS (41 in 1974) and CG (26 in 1973); the Angels’ career records for W (138), HA/9 IP (6.27), K/9 IP (9.97), IP (2,181.3), K (2,416), GS (288), CG (156) and SHO (40); the Astros’ single-season record for K/9 IP (11.48 in 1987); the Astros’ career records for K/9 IP (9.05) and K (1,866); the Rangers’ single-season records for WHIP (1.006 in 1991), HA/9IP (5.31 in 1991), K/9IP (11.32 in 1989) and K (301 in 1989); as well as the Rangers’ career records for WHIP (1.126), HA/9IP (6.35) and K/9IP (10.06).


Posts may only be made on the Hall of Merit Home Page.

For the Hall of Merit Home Page, please click here.

For Hall of Meriters A-F, please click here.

For Hall of Meriters G-L, please click here.

For Hall of Meriters S-Z, please click here.

John (You Can Call Me Grandma) Murphy Posted: May 31, 2005 at 03:28 AM | 0 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Related News:

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
JE (Jason)
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Syndicate

Page rendered in 0.8387 seconds
46 querie(s) executed