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Bullpen Mechanics
— A Scout's View

Monday, February 26, 2007

The $103,000,000 mechanics of Daisuke Matsuzaka

Here’s the link to the article at THT

Of course, comments/questions are welcome

ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: February 26, 2007 at 01:41 PM | 23 comment(s)
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   1. Slinger Francisco Barrios (Dr. Memory) Posted: February 26, 2007 at 02:37 PM (#2303414)
I learn so much every time, and in nice bite-sized chunks. Thank you, CBW. (Now that you're retired, would you be ChadBradfordWantedToBe?)
   2. ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: February 26, 2007 at 02:41 PM (#2303416)
Maybe ChadBradfordWantedToBeIncludingTheRidiculousContractHeJustGot......nah, not catchy
   3. Mister High Standards Posted: February 26, 2007 at 02:56 PM (#2303423)
Good stuff...

CBW, I really like the articles... as a constructive point perhaps you should consider adding a "control" video next to each frame. The same video in each article, one for each vantige point that works as an example to illustrate what a typical pitchers tempo for example would look like. I'd recomend using whatever picther has typiclal, average mechanics.
   4. sardonic Posted: February 26, 2007 at 05:36 PM (#2303495)
Carlos, what are your thoughts on the potential effectiveness of his high fastball? I've heard pundits mention that he won't be able to throw that here, but I've never really known why...
   5. ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: February 26, 2007 at 06:23 PM (#2303512)
sardonic--

I believe we're thinking the same way. All the video I've seen of Matsuzaka, his pitching sequences, his location, his stuff......to me, anyway, his high fastball wil be the key to his success.

Let's face it, he's a 4-seam fastball straight over the top-type pitcher. In a lot of ways, he'll attack hitters much the same way Schilling attacks hitters--straight, hard, high fastballs.

Do I think he'll be homer-prone? Absolutely. But some pitchers(say like Schilling) can succeed with moderately high HR rates. At some point during the season, after an uberbomb that he'll give up, Joe Morgan will say "94-mph fastballs up in the zone might work in Japan, but not in the bigs."

Bullsh!$

Barry Zito works up in the zone with 86-88 mph fastballs because of the threat of his curve and change. Schilling works up in the zone because of the threat of his splitter. As long as he shows that he can command his other pitches (which he can, at least on the video I've seen), AND his location is good, his high hard fastball will be a very valuable asset.
   6. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: February 26, 2007 at 06:27 PM (#2303516)
Ah, I just found this. Nice work CBW!
   7. Phil Coorey is a T-Shirt Salesman Posted: February 28, 2007 at 10:07 AM (#2304319)
Just an amazing article to read, especially with the video footage. Well Done
   8. ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: March 02, 2007 at 03:19 AM (#2305634)
A side shot of Matsuzaka...thanks to one of my readers.

Dice-K side shot
   9. ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: March 02, 2007 at 03:26 AM (#2305637)
Oh yeah, let me comment on it.

From the side, it's actually better than I thought. Although there is an element there I still don't like.

Check out his drive though, WOW. Watch him lead with his butt/hips....well done
   10. OCF Posted: March 02, 2007 at 03:28 AM (#2305640)
One thing that shows up in that side view (besides the long stride) is that his right foot loses contact with the rubber well before he releases the ball from his hand. Is that legal? Does everyone do that?
   11. PJ Martinez Posted: March 02, 2007 at 03:45 AM (#2305643)
Great stuff, Carlos. I read this when it first appeared and sent it to a bunch of fellow Red Sox fans.

I wonder if this kind of thing is the wave of the future for baseball coverage-- game recaps with embedded clips, etc. In any case, it's surprising you don't see more of this yet-- it's a lot of fun.
   12. 1k5v3L Posted: March 02, 2007 at 03:48 AM (#2305646)
One thing that shows up in that side view (besides the long stride) is that his right foot loses contact with the rubber well before he releases the ball from his hand. Is that legal? Does everyone do that?


I wondered the same thing...

I read this when it first appeared and sent it to a bunch of fellow Red Sox fans.


Great. That's like giving bringing alcohol to a Kennedy family reunion...
   13. JC in DC Posted: March 02, 2007 at 03:58 AM (#2305651)
Incredible, as usual. I feel smarter just for having read it, CBW. How about some analysis of Igawa?
   14. cercopithecus aethiops Posted: March 02, 2007 at 04:07 AM (#2305654)
Is that legal?

no

Does everyone do that?

yes

CBW, one of these days I'm going to get my act together and send you some video of my son. Not that I'm particularly dissatisfied with his coaches, but you talk lots better than them.
   15. ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: March 02, 2007 at 05:03 AM (#2305676)
Like Ignoratio says, everyone does that....well not everyone--but they should. If you are able to control and move your body aggressively through space, why not try to throw the ball as far forward as possible? I'll do the Tim Lincecum article in a few days, and you'll see a GROSS example of someone almost literally jumping off the mound.

CBW, one of these days I'm going to get my act together and send you some video of my son. Not that I'm particularly dissatisfied with his coaches, but you talk lots better than them.

I just started in a baseball instruction place, teaching mostly younger kids so far. I've had 5 lessons so far, and each one has gotten a video clip of himself, usually compared to his favorite pitcher or someone who I think he should emulate (so far, Roy Oswalt has been the poster boy). However, I just wrote an article for THT on Matt Cain, and he might become a favorite, REAL quick.

Anyways, another one wouldn't be a problem, especially for my (sob, sob) loyal readers.
   16. JC in DC Posted: March 02, 2007 at 05:12 AM (#2305677)
And Igawa?
   17. ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: March 02, 2007 at 05:20 AM (#2305681)
I haven't even seen Igawa pitch yet. On my radar right now....Matt Cain (done and submitted at THT), Tim Lincecum, Jake Peavy, Rich Harden (I moved him up in the rotation--I'd like to work for the A's), RJ?
   18. ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: March 02, 2007 at 02:38 PM (#2305744)
Well thank you Monty. I hope you enjoy the next few as well.
   19. ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: March 02, 2007 at 02:51 PM (#2305750)
Oh, BTW, Dice-K makes his ST debut tonight. If anyone has a link to where I can watch him either live today or the video repeat tomorrow, that would be great.
   20. cercopithecus aethiops Posted: March 02, 2007 at 07:00 PM (#2305894)
...each one has gotten a video clip of himself, usually compared to his favorite pitcher or someone who I think he should emulate...

My kid would definitely pick Rivera. They're both tall and skinny, but I think the similarity pretty much ends there. BTW, I realize that you're trying to make a living, and I'm willing to compensate you (within reason) for your analysis and advice. I'll send you an e-mail to work out the logistics.
   21. ChadBradfordWannabe Posted: May 15, 2007 at 12:18 PM (#2364665)
Interesting quote by Brandon Inge:

Inge said deception played a big part.
“More than anything, it was his delivery,” he said. “It would go nice and slow and then all of a sudden, he’d kind of jump at you, and that’s what kind of throws everyone’s timing off.”
   22. bunyon Posted: May 15, 2007 at 12:32 PM (#2364669)
CBW, thanks for bumping this. I somehow missed it when it came out. Excellent article.

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