Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


Contributors

Jim Furtado
Founder & Publisher
Repoz
Editor - Baseball Primer

Syndicate

Angels Newsbeat

Friday, April 18, 2014

Fletcher: Foes have slowed Trout in one category so far - steals

But..but..Miguel Cabrera has none.

Of all the elements of the young Angels season that have not gone according to expectations, there might be nothing as surprising as this: It took Mike Trout 14 games to even attempt a stolen base.

This is a guy, after all, who stole 49 bases as a rookie, a guy whose value is accentuated by his combination of power and speed.

Stealing bases, however, is about more than speed. It’s about opportunity, and that has been the obstacle for Trout since the start of last season.

“I think every team and every pitcher knows when he gets on he’s a threat to steal, and they have made adjustments,” said Angels bench coach Dino Ebel, the third-base coach for Trout’s first two full seasons.

Although Trout has the green light most of the time, he has not been running as much over the past season-plus.

Trout’s stolen base total dropped from 49 in 2012 to 33 in 2013, and this season he has just one through 15 games.

“Pitchers have been giving me a lot of different looks,” Trout said. “You don’t want to run into outs, but we’re going to stay aggressive for sure.”

The low total this season has been about a combination of pitchers holding him close and a surprisingly low number of opportunities.

After 71 plate appearances, Trout has found himself on first base, with second unoccupied, only 10 times. In six of those instances, a left-handed pitcher has been on the mound. In one of the other four, the game was 11-1.

Repoz Posted: April 18, 2014 at 07:27 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: angels

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Design Room: Top 10 Logos in MLB History.

The Montreal Expos (French: Expos de Montréal) team started in 1969 and never changed their logo.  For almost 40 years the team held on to this awesome mark because it was smart and looked great. Expos de Montreal Baseball. That is the secret behind this logo. Interwoven script pieces all come together to abbreviate the full name of the team. This logo is a little dated looking, but I can imagine this being modernized and still looking amazing without significant change. That is how you know this is a good logo. The line work is smooth, it is creative and clever and I commend the designer for coming up with a mark that doesn’t rely on a baseball to remind the viewer that it is a team logo. This is easily one of the smartest logos in baseball history.

I literally went, “Oh wow,” when I read this bit. I’d never understood this about the Expos logo.


Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Nightengale: Pujols nears 500 home runs…and no one seems to care

Could always ask Brad Lidge.

It’s sure getting harder and harder to impress us these days.

Here we are, on the brink of one of the most magnificent milestones in all of sports, and it seems nobody cares.

Just 25 men in Major League Baseball history have ever hit 500 homers in their lifetime, and here’s Los Angeles Angels first baseman Albert Pujols ready to join them after hitting No. 496 on Monday night.

Yet it’s getting all of the acclaim of an NBA triple-double.

What has happened to us?

“I don’t know what has happened.’’ Hall of Fame president Jeff Idelson tells USA TODAY Sports. “It should be front and center. There have almost been 18,000 players who have played our game, and only 25 have hit 500 homers.

“We’ve had a string of power hitters achieve the mark in the past decade, but that shouldn’t diminish how big of a mark it really is.’‘

The trouble, of course, is that the steroid era has dulled our senses and watered down the excitement.

Just four players hit 500 home runs by 1965, but in the last 15 years, 10 new members joined the 500 club.

We’ve seen the likes of Barry Bonds, Alex Rodriguez, Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa, Manny Ramirez, Rafael Palmeiro and Gary Sheffield all eclipse 500 home runs since 1999, and in some cases, 600 and 700 home runs.

We’ve also seen each of them test positive, or at least be strongly linked to performance-enhancing drugs.

The only players in the last seven years to eclipse 500 home runs with no links to PEDs are Frank Thomas and Jim Thome.

Does anyone remember the moment Thomas hit his 500th homer? How about Thome’s 600th?

Repoz Posted: April 16, 2014 at 10:10 AM | 82 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, history

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Fine for Yankees being considered in tampering case with Mike Trout

Commissioner Bud Selig is considering whether to fine the New York Yankees for tampering, the result of an investigation triggered by Yankees President Randy Levine’s comment last winter that he would offer Angels outfielder Mike Trout a 10-year contract.

The potential fine was disclosed by two people with knowledge of the matter but not authorized to comment about it. The amount of the possible fine was not disclosed.

The Angels were furious Levine dropped Trout’s name into a December interview about why the Yankees declined to match the 10-year contract the Seattle Mariners offered to 31-year-old second baseman Robinson Cano.

“If it was Mike Trout, I’d offer him a 10-year contract,” Levine told reporters in New York. “But for people over 30, I don’t believe it makes sense.”...

Levine apologized to the Angels for his remarks on the day he made them, telling the New York Daily News he realized they “could be misconstrued.”...

In October, Dodgers co-owner Magic Johnson said his free-spending team would not bid for Cano.

“I can’t talk about the other guy, the guy in New York. He’s going to get paid—not by us, but he’s going to get paid,” Johnson said. “When you’re a superstar, you get paid. We understand that.”

It is believed that the Dodgers were not disciplined—Johnson was a rookie owner and not the team’s chief executive—but Johnson was asked to be mindful of the effects his public comments could have.

The polite way of saying Magic is an “owner” like Paula Abdul was a “singing judge.”

The District Attorney Posted: April 13, 2014 at 06:13 PM | 28 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, mike trout, yankees

Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Angels’ Josh Hamilton set for thumb surgery, likely out 6-8 weeks

and by that time the instant replay result should be in.

Bad news for the Angels, as the team announced on Wednesday that outfielder Josh Hamilton is set for thumb surgery and will likely be sidelined for the next six to eight weeks. Hamilton injured his left thumb while sliding head-first into first base on Tuesday night against the Mariners, and a subsequent MRI revealed a torn ligament. The surgery will be performed in the coming days in Los Angeles.

The Angels have thus placed Hamilton on the 15-day DL, and they’ve recalled outfielder J.B. Shuck to take his place on the active roster. Shuck will be available to play Wednesday night.

Repoz Posted: April 09, 2014 at 06:33 PM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: angels

Cameron: Numbers don’t lie: The decline of Pujols is stunning

Pujol’s Pitch Black...

When the Detroit Tigers announced that they had signed Miguel Cabrera to an eight-year contract extension that didn’t even begin for another two years, the deal was immediately met with skepticism. The Tigers tacked on an additional $248 million in guaranteed money to lock up Cabrera’s age-33 to age-40 seasons, and the history of aging, super-sized, bat-only players is littered with disappointments. Exhibit A: Albert Pujols, who has been a severe disappointment since joining the Angels and would be my choice as the owner of the worst contract in baseball right now. The Pujols disaster is why so many of us—myself included—believe the Tigers might end up regretting the Cabrera extension.

But, at the same time, we should also acknowledge that the Pujols disaster is one of the most inexplicable anomalies in baseball history. There have been hitters as good as Albert Pujols before, but they generally haven’t declined nearly to the same degree that Pujols has since joining the Angels.

...What Pujols is now simply is not what he was a few years ago, and his contract is a giant red flag for any team thinking of entering into a long-term deal with a slugger on the wrong side of 30. However, for hitters who established themselves as elite, inner-circle Hall of Fame talents, this kind of early career collapse is basically unprecedented. It’s one thing when Cecil Fielder, Mo Vaughn, or Ryan Howard stop being productive in their early thirties, but those guys weren’t transcendent best-hitters-of-their-generation types. Pujols was that. Cabrera is that now. By and large, these guys keep hitting until their mid-thirties at least, and sometimes even into their late-thirties.

Pujols’ decline is absolutely not the norm. We’ve seen other great hitters get worse but remain highly productive, and we’ve seen lesser hitters become essentially unplayable, but Pujols’ fall from his lofty perch is a bit unprecedented. That doesn’t mean I’m now on board with the Tigers handing out $248 million for the right to watch Cabrera slow down, but we also shouldn’t lean on the Pujols example too heavily. Just like not every prospect is going to become Mike Trout, not every aging first baseman is going to become Albert Pujols.

Repoz Posted: April 09, 2014 at 02:32 PM | 203 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, sabermetrics

Thursday, April 03, 2014

Mike Trout: 6 years, $144.5 million

Trout is clearly an elite hitter already, at age 22. There is certainly no reason, on the surface, to question whether he’ll be worth his recent six-year, $144.5M extension that will carry him through his age 28 season. Still, let’s look into the game’s past and try to identify his peer group. Does he even have one? How did they age, when did they peak, and what might the future hold for Mike Trout, and for the Angels’ investment in him?

[...]

The start to Trout’s career is almost unparalleled in modern baseball history. He ranks fourth on the all-time list of players with the most cumulative standard deviations above league average OBP and SLG in their first two years as a regular, behind Babe Ruth, Joe Jackson and Frank Thomas – who were all three years older and more physically mature than Trout when they completed their second seasons as regulars. Yup, he was younger at the end of his second year as a regular than they all were at the beginning of their first.

An Athletic in Powderhorn™ Posted: April 03, 2014 at 02:29 PM | 96 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, contract extensions, history, mike trout

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Jonah Keri: 2014 AL West Preview

This article is pretty much what it sounds like. Keri goes over each team, additions and subtractions, and projections. It makes me fondly remember the days of team season previews on baseball primer.

Joyful Calculus Instructor Posted: March 25, 2014 at 02:29 PM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, astros, athletics, mariners, rangers

Friday, March 07, 2014

Fletcher: Angels find instant replay procedures not so instantaneous

And we’ll be right back after we sell a few cars.

That’s when things got interesting.

Angels manager Mike Scioscia came out to argue two things: that Trout had beaten the tag with his head-first slide, and also that Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis had been in violation of the new rule prohibiting catchers from blocking the plate before they have the ball.

The rule about blocking the plate – rule 7.13 – is reviewable by umpires without using a managerial challenge. But while they are looking at it, they can also review whether the runner was safe.

Essentially Scioscia got a free challenge, which he lost, because the out call was confirmed.

“The first thing we look at when there’s an umpire challenge is whether he’s blocking the plate or not, or if the runner deviates from his path trying to score,” umpire Gerry Davis said. “But once we go for that reason, we can review the whole play.”

Scioscia said he’s under the impression that umpires have the discretion to review any play – even in the first six innings – without charging a team with a challenge, but Davis said they can only do that to review rule 7.13 or boundary calls for home runs.

For now, it’s all a little messy.

“It’s interesting because everybody seems to have a different take,” Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said. “Mike was interpreting it one way. Then, listening to the umpires, they seem to be interpreting it another way. It’s going to be a little crazy at first, especially that play at home.”

Repoz Posted: March 07, 2014 at 06:14 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: angels

Thursday, March 06, 2014

THT: Jackson: The hustling Russells

If not for a bad rotator cuff, Kurt Russell might never have given us the film classic, Used Cars.

That 30-man roster allowed for a bit of nepotism. So Russell, in 1973, saved a roster spot for his son. Having been a movie and TV actor since the late 1950s, Kurt Russell was no stranger to many Mavericks fans. In fact, he was no stranger to the Northwest League. After he signed with the Angels in 1971, they assigned him to their Northwest League team in Bend, Ore. As a switch-hitting second baseman, he hit .285 for the Bend Rainbows. The next year he hit .325 for the Walla Walla Islanders in the same league (the landlocked franchise was so-called because it was affiliated with the Hawaii Islanders of the Pacific Coast League). One of his teammates that year was Tom Trebelhorn, who made it to the majors as a manager but not as a player.

In 1973 Russell got off to a flying start (.563 average based on 9 for 16) for the Double-A El Paso Sun Kings before a collision at second base resulted in a rotator cuff injury that derailed his season and eventually his career – like father, like son. When he returned to action that season, he hit a mere .229 at Portland. And that was the end of Kurt Russell’s baseball career, save for a brief (one at-bat) encore for the Mavericks in 1977.

 

Bruce Markusen Posted: March 06, 2014 at 10:06 PM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: angels

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Dwyre: Chone Figgins is back and might just catch on with the Dodgers

NL pennant is secure!

It has come to this for Figgins. His talent and history in the game will no longer carry him. He has to make the team by performing, starting with that first pitch Wednesday.

He knows it. There is no sulking, no hint of entitlement. The quiet, hustling personality that made him so popular in Anaheim has not changed. His perspective has.

On Jan. 15, he worked out in his hometown of Tampa, Fla., for officials of most of the major league teams. When he finished — “It was like a high school workout. I ran two 60s, threw from home, from shortstop, third, from the outfield” — he told all of them, “What you saw in Seattle is past. Go back, tell your bosses you have a player who played in the big leagues and can still play.”

The Dodgers called the next day.

Greg Franklin Posted: February 26, 2014 at 02:22 PM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, dodgers, mariners, marlins

Coker: Josh Hamilton, Angels Slugger, Downsizes Role of Anti-Drug “Accountability Partner”

Crutch/crutches.

John Hamilton came to your Anaheim Angels of Anaheim with a big stick and a lot of baggage. The first overall pick in the 1999 Major League Baseball draft spent most of his first eight seasons in the minors or suspended due to drug and alcohol addiction. He’s gone on to become a lifetime .295 hitter, five-time All-Star outfielder and 2010 American League MVP in the Bigs. By his side on and off the road has been an “accountability partner”—think a life chaperon. But the Angels and Hamilton have announced that’s about to change.

The franchise released a statement that says Hamilton has, in his own words, “downsized the role” of his accountability partner, having him only accompany the slugger on road games and not dress for games in a uniform like an additional coach. Among the partner’s duties is handling the 32-year-old’s meal money.

“It’s time to cut the cord a little bit,” Hamilton says in the Halos’ release. “I don’t really use it for home games. I go to the park, I do what I need to do, I know what I need to do, and I have my family. That was one of the main reasons.”

Filling the role for most road games during the 2014 season will be Boyd Bassham, who attends Hamilton’s church in the Dallas area. For games in Texas, Chad Harrington, who has known Hamilton for five years and, according to the player, “loves me a lot,” will step in. Neither Bassham nor Harrington are all that interested in baseball, which Hamilton considers a good thing, according to the Angels statement, which quotes him saying of Bassham’s influence that it’s “more of a spiritual thing.”

Repoz Posted: February 26, 2014 at 11:50 AM | 26 comment(s)
  Beats: angels

Monday, February 24, 2014

Angels’ Albert Pujols prepared to ‘shut a lot of mouths’ this season

Albert productions: The basics.

As a three-time MVP, a .321 career hitter with 492 home runs and a certain Hall of Famer when he retires, Albert Pujols has no need to listen to critics, especially those ripping on his huge contract.

Oh, but how he would love to silence them.

Pujols, who is trying to bounce back from the two worst seasons of his career, said he avoids reading stories about himself and doesn’t have time to indulge those who say he’s an old 34 and will never reach his previous heights again.

There’s a perception that such doubts fuel Pujols’ drive, which he denies, but he does say, “I’m still in my prime. If I’m healthy, I’m going to show that on the field and shut a lot of mouths.’‘

...The OPS figure was especially troubling, because it was the fifth year in a row it dwindled. While with the Cardinals, Pujols thrice led the National League in OPS with numbers above 1.100.

“I know because of injuries I haven’t been the same player the last two years, but what I’ve been able to do, I’ve done on one leg and coming off surgery,’’ Pujols said. “If I feel 100%, I have no doubt I can reach the goals I’ve always had.’‘

He certainly looks ready for the task. Pujols came into camp seven pounds lighter, and his legs are stronger after being able to implement his usual workout regimen in the offseason without concern for the knee.

Repoz Posted: February 24, 2014 at 06:58 AM | 26 comment(s)
  Beats: angels

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Source: Angels, Mike Trout talking monster extension

Supposedly the Angels are haggling for 6 years, low $140-million range, and Trout wants a little more.

If I were the Angels I would stop haggling immediately, agree to whatever Trout wants and throw in a new car, and then send the entire organization on a celebratory trip to Bermuda for a week.

Tuque Posted: February 23, 2014 at 04:25 PM | 103 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, contract extensions, contracts, mike trout

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Ruptured Achilles ends Mulder’s comeback attempt with Angels

hjw

Thanks to a new throwing motion, veteran left-hander Mark Mulder planned to attempt a comeback this season after five years away from the game. His career had been derailed by shoulder problems back in the day.

The Angels gave Mulder a minor league contract because hey, why not? It’s a no risk move. Unfortunately, the comeback attempt is over before it could really even begin.

...What an awful, awful break. Even if he wanted to continue his comeback attempt, the Achilles injury would sideline Mulder for the entire season and he’d have to wait until 2015. At age 36 and already five years removed from his last MLB action, that just isn’t realistic. Mulder is taking the news well, his family ... not so much:

I can handle this. But seeing my son in tears when he saw me in a boot and crutches and I told him I wasn’t going to pitch. That was tough.

Repoz Posted: February 15, 2014 at 08:38 PM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: angels

Friday, February 14, 2014

Newhan: Remembering an All-Star Friend

Good stuff from Ross Newhan on Jim Fregosi…

I met Jim Fregosi in that first Palm Springs camp in the first year of the American League’s newly created Los Angeles Angels.

He was 19, a shortstop selected out of the Boston Red Sox organization in baseball’s first ever expansion draft. I was 24, on my first beat assignment for the Long Beach Independent, Press Telegram, and in over my head—unlike Fregosi, who would make his big league debut in September and become the Angels fulltime shortstop in 1963 at 21.

No surprise to Manager Bill Rigney, who would brag about him from the first day of that first spring, often telling the story of how longtime San Francisco Giants’ scout and executive Tom (Clancy) Sheehan had come to him soon after that draft and scoffed, “Hell, Rig, you can find a player like him under every rock in Arizona.”

Rig knew differently, of course, and so did and does most every scout who keeps turning over rocks in Arizona and elsewhere, looking for players of Fregosi’s young skills and, if they look hard enough, perhaps, the inate traits that would quickly enable him to become a leader on and off the field, the full blown personality that was on display for 54 years as player, manager, scout.

...And the last time I saw Jim was in the Anaheim press box in 2012. I was working on a freelance story and he was on an assignment for the Braves.

We took a minute before the game to have a cup of coffee together, and he said, wistfully almost for a man whose voice usually boomed and whose passion was as large, “I don’t think anyone will have as much fun as we did in those early years. It was just another time, and I’m glad I had a chance to experience it.”

Me, too. RIP, Jim Fregosi.

Repoz Posted: February 14, 2014 at 01:46 PM | 1 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, history

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Keri/Grantland: Baseball’s Worst Contracts

A little schadenfreude is good for everyone.

Bad deals are inescapable in sports and pop culture. Endless, exorbitant, ridiculous contracts can destroy a team’s future, ensnare a rising young star, or cripple a major studio. Also, they’re hilarious. In honor of these horrible agreements, we present a look at some of the most egregious in their respective fields. Welcome to Worst Contracts Week.

Chris Fluit Posted: February 12, 2014 at 11:10 AM | 71 comment(s)
  Beats: albert pujols, alex rodriguez, angels, contracts, grantland, jonah keri, yankees

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Albert Pujols drops defamation suit

Los Angeles Angels slugger Albert Pujols dropped a defamation lawsuit against Jack Clark on Monday after Clark issued a statement retracting his previous comments alleging that Pujols had used performance-enhancing drugs.

gehrig97 Posted: February 11, 2014 at 02:28 PM | 42 comment(s)
  Beats: albert pujols, angels, peds

Friday, January 31, 2014

Motorsport: C. J. Wilson pitches racing as often as possible

My STP, my girl and me.

Knowing where his bread is buttered, Wilson hasn’t spent as much time with racing as he would like, but he realizes he’ll have plenty of opportunity once his playing days are over with. Wilson’s contract, like that of other high-paid stars, has clauses that preclude participation in so-called dangerous endeavors, such as racing, ice hockey and other contact sports. “I am not going to drive something that is not safe,” Wilson said while at the Rolex24. “I have a lot to lose by taking risks that I don’t need to. I believe in the sanctity of my contract, and I want to be able to throw 200 innings a year until I am done with baseball, then I can go race all I want.”

Wilson did race recently in a 25-hour endurance event at California’s Thunderhill Raceway Park. “I was in a front-wheel drive (Mazda 6) diesel, and I did a couple of stints in the car with one being about four hours. Even though I hadn’t been on track for a long time, I didn’t have any incidents, although I felt a little bit rusty. I am really bummed that I don’t get to race more. The more I am around racing the harder it is to walk away.”

...Wilson’s long-term desire is to move up the ladder, possibly advancing to the newly constituted TUDOR United SportsCar Series and one day to race at the 24 Hours of LeMans. But that’s in the distant future and for now, he must concentrate on baseball, as that sport pays the bills. “I have a great job that keeps me busy, and it’s not like I am in Siberia drilling for ice. I am playing baseball, which is pretty cool,” he noted.

Repoz Posted: January 31, 2014 at 06:37 AM | 3 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, vroom-vroom

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Bourjos says he would like 40 stolen bases

Yeah, and I’d like “40 Steps of Revenge” on DVD.

New Cardinals outfielder Peter Bourjos said he didn’t expect to be designated a regular just yet but he had a lofty goal if he received significant playing time this season.

“I’d like to be in the 40s,” said Bourjos, referring to his potential stolen-base total as he was interviewed at the Cardinals’ Winter Warm-Up, which wrapped up Monday.

“It’s all about how you’re swinging the bat,” said Bourjos. “In the minor leagues, I had a season where I stole 50 bags and I had a lot of seasons where I was in the 30s. So, in the 30-to-40 range would be nice.”

...Given his lack of use by the Angels the last couple of years, Bourjos said he wasn’t at all surprised to be dealt.

“Things haven’t gone well the last couple of years there. I didn’t think I was going to stick around much longer,” he said.

Bourjos has the speed associated with a leadoff man but not necessarily the on-base percentage. For instance, he walked only 10 times in 175 at-bats last year.

“I’ve never walked, so I can’t really say I’m an on-base guy,” Bourjos said. “I think I’m more of a gap-to-gap guy. I don’t inherently draw a lot of walks.

“I don’t go up trying to walk because I don’t think it’s one of my strengths.”

Repoz Posted: January 21, 2014 at 06:54 AM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, cardinals

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Angels sign John McDonald to minor league deal

The Los Angeles Angels have agreed to a minor league contract with infielder John McDonald, according to Rob Bradford of WEEI.com. Bradford adds that the deal will include an invitation to major league spring training, and that McDonald will earn $850K plus incentives if he makes the major league roster.

McDonald, 39, appeared in the majors for four teams in 2013, ultimately receiving a World Series ring with the Red Sox. In 37 games with the Pirates, Phillies, Indians and Red Sox on the season, he hit .111 with 1 HR and 4 RBI in 54 at-bats.

McDonald will likely compete for a backup spot in the Angels’ infield throughout spring training, along with Grant Green, Andrew Romine, and Tommy Field.

Good cripple hitter Posted: January 16, 2014 at 02:59 PM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, john mcdonald, signings

Saturday, January 11, 2014

Calcaterra: Dontrelle “Rasputin” Willis to sign minor league deal with Giants

Some guys never get a shot at the big leagues. Or if they do, it’s far too short a shot and they are overlooked for the rest of their careers, exiled to Triple-A or worse. You gotta make the best of that shot. You may never get another one.

Unless you’re Dontrelle Willis, of course, in which case you seemingly get a couple dozen shots and will until you just don’t fell like trying anymore:

I heard Dontrelle Willis will be signing a minor-league contract with the #sfgiants

— John Shea (@JohnSheaHey) January 10, 2014

... Since [Willis] left Florida following the 2007 season he’s 4-15 with a 6.15 ERA while walking 7.1 hitters per nine and allowing 9.3 hits per nine. And… he hasn’t even gotten a significant MINOR league look since 2011.

I know he’s a lefty and lefties are supposed to live forever, and by all accounts he’s a great guy to have around (at least if you don’t ask the Orioles). But there has been nothing — literally nothing — positive to be seen in his pitching in a decade. No indication whatsoever that he can help a ball club. How does he still get chances when so many other pitchers don’t?

Probably like this:

Dontrelle Willis turns 32 Sunday. In prime years. If he’s in good shape and figured out control issues, he could be great story. #sfgiants

— John Shea (@JohnSheaHey) January 10, 2014

A nice thought. But people have been having that same thought for years. It never pans out.


Wednesday, January 08, 2014

MLB’s Five Positive Regression Candidates

Jonah Keri has the audacity to not write about the Hall of Fame or steroids!

The biggest reason for Boston’s worst-to-first season, however, was that the players who failed miserably in 2012 were amazing in 2013. David Ortiz, Jacoby Ellsbury, Dustin Pedroia, Jon Lester, Clay Buchholz, and John Lackey went from off years, lousy years, or entirely missed years to huge performances during the team’s ride to rings. Everything that could have gone wrong two years ago did, but then everything that could have gone right last year did, too…

From 2010 to 2012, Castro’s first three big league seasons, only five other shortstops (Troy Tulowitzki, Jose Reyes, Hanley Ramirez, Asdrubal Cabrera, and Derek Jeter) were more productive offensively on a park-adjusted basis. Castro was just 22 at the time, and he’d posted a .297/.336/.425 line over his first three seasons. While not all players develop at the same rate, Castro looked poised to improve over the course of the deal if he joined the majority of baseball players who peak in their mid-to-late twenties.

That’s what makes me doubt that Castro’s disastrous 2013 season has much predictive value

Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:48 PM | 3 comment(s)
  Beats: 2014, angels, blue jays, brewers, cubs, nationals

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Jim Leyritz lands job with Angels-owned station despite troubled past

Freida people now…

Angels-owned radio station KLAA (AM 830) has hired troubled ex-major leaguer Jim Leyritz to co-host a new sports talk show, a peculiar move for a club that lost promising young pitcher Nick Adenhart to a drunk-driving accident in 2009.

Leyritz, a two-time World Series champion with the New York Yankees who had a brief stint with the Angels in 1997, was convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol when he struck and killed a woman in a 2007 automobile accident.

A Fort Lauderdale, Fla., jury in 2010 acquitted Leyritz of DUI manslaughter in the death of 30-year-old Fredia Ann Veitch, a mother of two, sparing the former catcher from a possible 15-year prison sentence.

Instead, Leyritz, now 50, was sentenced to one year’s probation and fined $500, a far lesser penalty than he faced before a jury determined he wasn’t responsible for the woman’s death.

“That was in the past—he’s dealt with it, he’s open about it, and I’ll leave it at that,” KLAA program director Bob Agnew said. “We hired Jim based on his broadcast and baseball experience. He had an issue he has not hidden from. It’s not something to go backwards on. He has to live with what’s happened in the past.”

Repoz Posted: December 24, 2013 at 07:10 AM | 47 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, booze, media

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Angels agree to one-year deal with Raul Ibanez

The Angels have agreed to terms with Raul Ibanez on a one-year contract to be their designated hitter.

The contract would be worth $2.75 million, with incentive bonuses that could increase the value to $5 million. There would be no option year in the contract.

I feel old just reading that.


Page {e2c518d61874f2d4a14bbfb9087a7c2dcurrent_page} of {e2c518d61874f2d4a14bbfb9087a7c2dtotal_pages} pages {e2c518d61874f2d4a14bbfb9087a7c2dpagination_links} | Site Archive

 

 

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOT: NBA Monthly Thread - April 2014
(341 - 6:22pm, Apr 19)
Last: Tom Cervo, backup catcher

NewsblogOT: The NHL is finally back thread, part 2
(149 - 6:21pm, Apr 19)
Last: cardsfanboy

NewsblogChase Utley is the hottest hitter in baseball and has a shot at .400
(43 - 6:19pm, Apr 19)
Last: cardsfanboy

NewsblogOTP April 2014: BurstNET Sued for Not Making Equipment Lease Payments
(1720 - 6:18pm, Apr 19)
Last: Bitter Mouse

NewsblogSCD: Bobby Cox Rookie Card Goes from Common Box to Hall of Fame
(9 - 6:11pm, Apr 19)
Last: Pat Rapper's Delight

NewsblogDoug Glanville: I Was Racially Profiled in My Own Driveway
(350 - 6:11pm, Apr 19)
Last: David Nieporent (now, with children)

NewsblogNYT: Sandomir: When Swastikas, on Caps, Meant Luck
(9 - 6:09pm, Apr 19)
Last: bobm

NewsblogBryce Harper benched for 'lack of hustle' despite quad injury
(5 - 6:07pm, Apr 19)
Last: JE (Jason Epstein)

NewsblogCesar Cabral tossed from game, from team
(21 - 6:06pm, Apr 19)
Last: Walks Clog Up the Bases

NewsblogGleeman: Mets minor league team is hosting “Seinfeld night”
(159 - 5:51pm, Apr 19)
Last: Joe Bivens, Minor Genius

NewsblogOMNICHATTER FOR APRIL 19, 2014
(55 - 4:39pm, Apr 19)
Last: Rickey! In a van on 95 south...

NewsblogSeidman: Velocity talk angers Papelbon, who cites Halladay
(6 - 4:38pm, Apr 19)
Last: NJ in DC

NewsblogRosenthal: MLB likely to adjust two rules: plays at home & transfer catches
(11 - 3:35pm, Apr 19)
Last: bobm

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread March, 2014
(913 - 3:32pm, Apr 19)
Last: nick swisher hygiene

Newsblogmets.com: Through hitting system, Mets aim to build winner
(6 - 2:36pm, Apr 19)
Last: The District Attorney

Demarini, Easton and TPX Baseball Bats

 

 

 

 

Page rendered in 0.0809 seconds
15 querie(s) executed