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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Brewers’ Eric Thames mashes home runs vs. Reds | MLB.com

With five April games left to play, Thames has a Major League record within reach. Albert Pujols hit a record 14 April home runs in 2006, and Alex Rodriguez matched that in 2007.
Has Thames ever had more fun playing baseball?

“I would say the last three years. When I actually started to let go,” said Thames, referring to his time in Korea. “When I was a prospect and [breaking into] the big leagues, I stressed out a lot. I drank a lot. I was just like, ‘Oh my God, I have to hit a home run or I’m going back to Double-A and Triple-A.

“Now, in Korea and here, I’m just like, ‘OK, I’m going to do my job, I’m going to work as hard as I can, and when it’s time for game time, just relax and let it all go.’ It’s amazing when stress levels decrease and you start to actually have fun and be loose and be able to react. It’s crazy.”

Jim Furtado Posted: April 25, 2017 at 06:40 AM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, eric thames

Friday, April 21, 2017

Brewers’ Eric Thames adjusts to attention | MLB.com

He is used to this kind of attention. In South Korea, where Thames averaged 41 home runs over three seasons, fans nicknamed him “God.” He still has a pile of T-shirts somewhere with that word written on them in Korean, a gift Thames sheepishly accepted. He went on a date one night and was out on the street kissing a girl when a fan tapped him on the shoulder and asked for an autograph.

Jim Furtado Posted: April 21, 2017 at 08:59 AM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, eric thames

Thursday, April 20, 2017

How is free swinger Eric Thames crushing his second act?

The problem? He swung at everything. And it almost cost him everything. But he’s back and emerging as the biggest surprise of the 2017 season. How did he climb back for this second act that most players never get?

“Plate discipline,” Thames said, simply. “I learned in Korea that they won’t challenge you as much as they do in the minor leagues and [majors]. And maintaining the strike zone and swinging at strikes, that’s like the ultimate goal for everybody.”

Thames signed with the NC Dinos of the South Korean League, then spent the next three seasons putting up Ruthian numbers on the other side of the globe. All told, he hit .349/.451/.721 with 124 homers, 382 RBIs and 64 steals in Korea, but Thames wasn’t just dominating lesser competition; he was working on his game, making it more pliable for a return to the States. Part of it was metrics. Or at least one metric: Thames started to track the number of pitches he chased out of the zone, and mixed that with a little self-motivating tool.

“Starting in Korea, every time I chase, I put a dollar in the pot and I donate it at the end of the year,” Thames said. “It’s a challenge. I was a guy that swung at everything, so many balls out of the zone early on in my career. It’s a big thing. That’s why I couldn’t handle it in Seattle. It’s why I got sent down.”

He’s been really impressive to watch so far.  I also like how this article is framed around comparing this approach with Tim Anderson.


Sunday, April 09, 2017

Haudricourt: Rebuilding a team leads to roster roulette

“Inexperienced rosters are going to be more fluid,” said manager Craig Counsell, whose job is to put the puzzle back together every time the pieces change.

“There are challenges, certainly. The challenging thing is making roster decisions when it’s not always about performance. That’s because we have to manage 25 players (in the majors), 40 players (on the protected roster), options, bullpen availability, small injuries.

“It doesn’t always come down to performance. It comes down to how do we get through this day the best way to have a chance to win the game? And how do we preserve guys for the long term that have growth potential or ceilings? That’s part of David’s job.

“From my end, you are aware of it. Guys who are young in their careers are aware of it. It’s one of the hurdles that young players face in their careers — the insecurity about, ‘Am I here? Am I there?’ It’s part of the challenge they face. It’s a mental challenge more than anything. We all want to know where we’re going to be; we all want security.”

Jim Furtado Posted: April 09, 2017 at 12:35 PM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, rebuilding

Thursday, April 06, 2017

Eric Thames is a legend in Korea, now he’s restarting his career with the Brewers

The Babe Ruth of Korea is a Jesuit prep school graduate who is built like Terry Crews, wears a beard down to his chest, and was nicknamed God. But Eric Thames’s rock star life in Changwon reached its most outrageous point one late night last year.

“I was on a date,” he says. “We were on the street kissing, and a fan came up, hit me on the shoulder and was like, ‘Hey, can you sign?’ I’m like, ‘I’m with a girl right now! Get out of here.’ I was blown away.


“Wouldn’t matter if it was six in the morning, three in the morning, a dark alley or what. It was crazy. Because of my look—the beard, the tattoos—and because of what I did on the field, I couldn’t go anywhere.”

This year Thames said goodbye to South Korea, where for the past three seasons he put up video game numbers for the NC Dinos (.348 with 124 homers in 388 games), to take his second crack at fame in major league baseball. His first stint here, in which he bounced among the Toronto, Seattle, Baltimore and Houston organizations, was nondescript. Now, at age 30, he has a rebuilt swing, a newly found love of meditation and visualization, and the security of a three-year, $16 million contract to play first base for the Brewers.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 06, 2017 at 10:48 AM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, eric thames, korean league

Saturday, April 01, 2017

Brewers reliever ponders job in which he’s ‘treated like a human’ after not making roster

Brewers 27-year-old reliever Tyler Cravy thought he had a realistic shot at cracking the team’s 25-man roster coming out of spring training, but those hopes were dashed on Saturday when he was cut. To hear Cravy tell it, the Brewers’ front office informed him and fellow reliever Tyler Scahill that they’d be competing for a bullpen spot in Milwaukee. As it turns out, Cravy and Scahill each had a strong spring training—2.03 ERA and 0.73 ERA, respectively—but along the way the team’s plans changed

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 01, 2017 at 11:45 PM | 191 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Scooter Gennett waived by Brewers, picked up by Reds

Gennett was put on waivers by the Brewers despite having a minor-league option available. His contract for the 2017 season was $2.525 million, which will be picked up by the Reds. The transaction opens up a spot on the Brewers’ 40-man major-league roster.

Gennett, a Cincinnati native, was drafted in the 16th round by the Brewers in 2009 and played four seasons in the majors with the ballclub. In 2016, he batted .263 (.317 OBP) with 14 homers and 56 RBI in 137 games.

Brewers general manager David Stearns said the team tried to trade Gennett but nothing materialized.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: March 28, 2017 at 01:55 PM | 41 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, reds, scooter gennett

Wednesday, March 22, 2017


Tuesday, February 14, 2017


Friday, January 13, 2017

Brewers urge Junior Guerra out of winter ball | MLB.com

Venezuelan baseball fans were abuzz Thursday after Junior Guerra told reporters he would make a pair of starts in that country’s winter league playoffs.

Not so fast, the Brewers say.

Contrary to the suggestion made in Venezuelan news reports, the Brewers have not endorsed Guerra’s participation with Tiburones de La Guaira, according to a source, and are discussing the matter with Guerra’s agent, Peter Greenberg.

Jim Furtado Posted: January 13, 2017 at 07:53 AM | 1 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, junior guerra

Thursday, December 08, 2016

Brewers quickly revamped their infield

First, Eric Thames was signed to a three-year deal after playing for three years in Korea. Then, third baseman Travis Shaw was acquired from Boston in a trade Tuesday that sent closer Tyler Thornburg to the Red Sox.

The Shaw deal meant Jonathan Villar would move from third base to second, leaving shortstop Orlando Arcia as the only starter to return at the same position. And he has all of two months on the job.

Assuming second baseman Scooter Gennett is not traded, he becomes a bench player. And super utility man Hernan Perez provides backup at every infield spot if needed.

Jim Furtado Posted: December 08, 2016 at 06:10 AM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers

Tuesday, December 06, 2016

Red Sox trade Travis Shaw, Mauricio Dubon to Brewers for Tyler Thornburg - Over the Monster

I’m not up on Pennington but this seems like a decent haul for a reliever. Neither Shaw or Dubon are great but they are decent players.

The Red Sox have traded Travis Shaw, Mauricio Dubon, and Josh Pennington to the Milwaukee Brewers in exchange for reliever Tyler Thornburg.

Jim Furtado Posted: December 06, 2016 at 10:30 AM | 59 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, red sox, trades

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Brewers sign Eric Thames to play first base

[T]he Brewers announced a three-year deal with a club option for a fourth year with free agent Eric Thames, who played the last three seasons in the Korean Baseball Organization. Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com reported the deal is worth more than $15 million.

....

During three years playing for the NC Dinos of the hitter-friendly KBO, Thames put together fantasy league offensive numbers, batting .348 over 388 games with a .450 on-base percentage and .720 slugging percentage.

It’s a sign of the Thames.

The Fallen Reputation of Billy Jo Robidoux Posted: November 29, 2016 at 09:29 AM | 25 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, free agents, korean league

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Ryan Braun pleads case to special panel Thursday trying to avoid 50-game suspension

I think the destructive, vicious, negative nature of much of the news media makes it harder to play this game, and I am appalled that you would begin a three-member panel inquiry with a topic like that!

Ryan Braun, the National League’s Most Valuable Player, pleaded his case Thursday before a three-member panel that will decide whether he faces a 50-game suspension for testing positive for elevated levels of testosterone.

The appeal came just two days before Braun will accept his MVP award at the New York Chapter of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America’s dinner Saturday night at the New York Hilton, sources familiar with Braun told the Daily News.

A decision by the panel, which includes MLB Players Association executive director Michael Weiner, MLB executive vice president for labor relations Rob Manfred and independent arbitrator Shyam Das, is not expected to come before Braun accepts his award. It was unclear if the hearing would continue into Friday.

...The Milwaukee outfielder, however, is playing a game that no major leaguer has won; despite conflicting reports, no player has ever seen a suspension overturned by the arbitration panel, according to people familiar with the process.

It is possible for a player to test positive for a banned substance and see his case dismissed in advance of arbitration because of chain of custody or other issues, without the public ever learning of his positive test. But Braun is past that point, and is looking to the arbitration panel as his final chance to avoid suspension.

Repoz Posted: January 19, 2012 at 10:42 PM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, rumors, steroids

The Onion: Prince Fielder Wondering If He Has Truly Free Agency

NEWPORT BEACH, CA—After meeting with his agent Monday to discuss his free agency prospects, Prince Fielder told reporters he was left wondering if he or any man can ever say his agency is truly free.

“Free agency suggests I am able to make a choice void of any constraint, but right from the get-go, that premise is problematic,” said Fielder, adding that it isn’t as if he can just get a job as an acoustical engineer, or even as a professional athlete in another sport.

“In the end, I am not an autonomous entity who can choose a path based on multiple options. Instead, I am one link in a causal chain, so my actions are merely the inevitable product of lawful causes stemming from prior events. What I’m saying is, I’m essentially limited to the 30 baseball organizations in North America; realistic, long-term socioeconomic factors have already decided which cities can support a team that pays the kind of salary I demand; and roster decisions dating all the way back to the invention of the game have determined which teams are in need of a first baseman today—so there are only a few clubs that could logically take me. And human nature will compel me to pick the one that offers the best, highest salary.”

Fielder concluded the press conference by saying that he is essentially a determinist, and that he enjoys hitting baseballs.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 19, 2012 at 07:59 PM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, business

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

MVP Ryan Braun to speak at dinner

BBWAAH, must we?

Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun, who faces a 50-game suspension for testing positive for a performance-enhancing drug, is expected to speak at a banquet where he will accept his award for being voted National League MVP.

Braun will appear at the annual awards dinner of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America on Saturday in New York, a spokesman for the player told The New York Times.

“He will be there and he will accept his award,” Matthew Hiltzik told The Times.

...He has not made a public appearance since news of the positive test broke on Dec. 10. Hiltzik told The Times that Braun does not intend to do interviews Saturday. Braun was named MVP on Nov. 22.

Repoz Posted: January 18, 2012 at 09:14 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: awards, brewers, rumors, steroids

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Brewers sign Japanese slugger Norichika Aok

This “slugger” hit four home runs and slugged .360 in 643 PAs. In Japan.

The Milwaukee Brewers have signed three-time year contract with a club option for 2014.

The Brewers won the negotiating rights to Aoki on December 19.
The 30-year-old Aoki has played his entire eight-year professional career with the Tokyo Yakult Swallows, batting .329 with 84 HR, 385 RBI and 164 stolen bases in 985 games.

The Central League batting champion in 2005 (.344), 2007 (.346) and 2010 (.358), Aoki won the CL Rookie of the Year award in 2005. He is also a six- time Golden Glove Award winner.

 

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 17, 2012 at 07:11 PM | 5 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, japan

K-Rod signs for $8 million

Why make billions when you can make millions?

The Brewers have struck a one-year deal with Francisco Rodriguez for $8 million, avoiding what could have been a complicated arbitration case.

Rodriguez had a base salary of $11.5 million last year and was a free agent who unexpectedly accepted the Brewers’ offer of salary arbitration last December.

The Brewers plan to use “K-Rod” as a setup man for closer John Axford. His agent, Scott Boras, views him as closer material, and thus the stage was set for an interesting philosophical debate.

Instead, this deal was struck, leaving the Brewers with three players in arbitration: RHP Shaun Marcum and relievers Kameron Loe and Jose Veras.

Rodriguez was acquired from the Mets at the all-star break last season and formed a dynamic 1-2 punch with Axford. In 31 games, he compiled a 1.86 ERA and held batters to a .209 batting average. He logged 33 strikeouts in 29 innings.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 17, 2012 at 12:55 PM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers

Brewers’ Craig Counsell retires

Advisory Counsell, if you will.

It’s official. The Brewers have named Craig Counsell as a special assistant to general manager Doug Melvin. There will be a news conference at Miller Park at 1:30 p.m.

“We are pleased to have Craig join our organization in a very significant role,” Melvin said. “His knowledge of how to play the game along with his work ethic and passion to see the Brewers succeed will now be utilized and welcomed by our front office.”

“I am excited to begin a new challenge in baseball,” Counsell said. “I look forward to contributing in any way I can to the success of an organization that has been a special part of my life for many years.”

Craig Counsell played all or part of 16 seasons in the major leagues, appearing in 1,624 games as a versatile infielder who played second base, shortstop and third base. He compiled a .255 batting average with 218 doubles, 40 triples, 42 home runs, 647 runs and 390 RBI in 4,741 at-bats.

Repoz Posted: January 17, 2012 at 12:49 PM | 62 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers

Sunday, January 15, 2012

MLB Trade Rumors: Bartolo Colon Agrees to Sign With Unknown Team

Bartolo Colon has agreed to a deal with an unknown club reports Bob Nightengale of USA Today (on Twitter). The right-hander wouldn’t divulge the team because he has not yet passed his physical.

Pretty sure it’s either the All-Stars or the Champs.


Friday, January 13, 2012

Stein: Judaism on Steroids

The widespread use of PEDs in baseball is nearly as old as the game itself. In 1889, pitcher Pud Galvin of the Pittsburgh Burghers began endorsing a testosterone supplement made from dog testicles. He won 23 games that season. Anecdotal evidence indicates that baseball legends Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, and Babe Ruth experimented with testosterone, amphetamines, and sheep testicle extract, respectively. By the 1970s, amphetamine use was rampant, and an increasing number of ballplayers soon began experimenting with anabolic steroids and human growth hormone. Cocaine reached epidemic levels in the 1980s.

Jewish sources confirm this human desire for self-improvement, but also discuss the potential moral and medical drawbacks. The most comprehensive study of medicine in the Bible and Talmud remains Biblisch-Talmudische Medizin (Biblical and Talmudic Medicine), published by Julius Preuss in 1911. Preuss, who was a doctor and Hebraic scholar, utilized a rigorous, analytical approach in studying the ancient texts, and this extensive volume reflects a lifetime of serious medical and Judaic scholarship.

Over 18 chapters, Preuss covers anatomy, neurology, psychology, obstetrics, sexual health, Jewish medical rituals, dermatology, and a range of obscure and familiar maladies as discussed in talmudic and biblical writings. He also chronicles ancient remedies, some fantastical, others familiar. For an earache: pour lukewarm kidney fluids in the ear (though melted chicken fat works in a pinch).  A fever calls for radishes; a cold for beets; and cabbage works across the board.  Wine, small fish, and leeks were known to aid digestion. Fred Rosner, who translated Preuss’s tome in 1978, summed up the general health and nutrition advice of the Talmud: “Eat moderately, eat simply, eat slowly, and eat regularly.”

However, the advice is not merely gastronomical. Rabbis throughout Jewish history also experimented with a range of concoctions meant to increase strength and stamina—kosher PEDs.

In tractate Gittin, the sage Abaye recommends a mixture of ground safflower boiled with wine to promote vascular and sexual health. Rabbi Yohanon appears to have been a fan of the formula and offers an emphatic endorsement: “This restored me to my youthful vigor!” Maimonides, in his treatise “The Regimen of Health,” mentions oxymel, refined syrup of roses, and infusion of tamarind as effective means to increase strength and ward off disease.

Of course, Braun was not busted for high levels of tamarind in his system. Regardless of talmudic inspiration, cheating is certainly frowned upon in Jewish law. At the least, steroid use represents a violation of gneivat da’at, deceit; at most, it is downright theft. If steroids influenced Braun’s on-field performance (which, I understand, is kind of the point), then he effectively robbed another worthy ballplayer of the MVP trophy, a spot on the All-Star team, and perhaps a lucrative spot on the Brewers’ roster.

PEDs also violate the biblical prohibition of self-endangerment. Based on the verse “you shall guard yourself rigorously,” rabbis derived a series of laws prohibiting physical or spiritual self-harm. Steroids may qualify as both: Physical consequences of steroid abuse include liver tumors and cancer, jaundice, high blood pressure and increased cholesterol, kidney tumors, fluid retention, and severe acne; men may experience shrinking of the testicles, reduced sperm count, infertility, baldness, breast development, and increased risk of prostate cancer. Psychologically, steroid abuse can lead to increased aggression, anxiety, and depression.

H/T DSM

Renegade (((JE))) Posted: January 13, 2012 at 07:22 AM | 1 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, steroids

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

On balance, Bud Selig has been good for baseball

I bring all this up because word came out this week that Selig, who has said he would retire at the end of this year, will be offered a contract extension at the owners meetings this week. And by all accounts, he’ll take it, adding at least two more years to his tenure as commissioner. He’s been on the job since 1992, and two more seasons would take Selig to his 80th birthday.

cardsfanboy Posted: January 11, 2012 at 06:27 PM | 34 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, business, history, mariners

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Mattingly: Braun shouldn’t be MVP if PED appeal fails.

Throwing that bogus 4.2% bump in HOF voting weight around already, eh Donnie.

Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said he hopes that Milwaukee Brewers left fielder Ryan Braun is successful in appealing his positive test for a banned substance, but that it would “make sense” to revote on the MVP award, or strip Braun of the award if it is found that he indeed used a banned substance.

“In the end, I hope the appeal it’s something that was a mistake. I don’t want to see anything bad come out of it for him,” Mattingly said.

When asked if a player who tested positive for a banned substance should be stripped of the MVP award, Mattingly answered, “I don’t know. It makes sense though, a little bit. It’s not 10 years later, it’s a month later.”

...Mattingly said he thinks Kemp should’ve won the award in the first place.

“To me Matt was the best player in the game last year,” Mattingly said. “Ryan had a great year too.

“But you guys (the media) always ask me about unwritten rules, about catchers and stuff like that. Then we have the unwritten rules about voting, because he wasn’t on a winning team. You guys gotta get your unwritten rules together.”

Repoz Posted: January 10, 2012 at 05:59 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, dodgers, steroids

Monday, January 09, 2012

Another shutout for Brewers Walk of Fame

For the second consecutive year, no former Milwaukee Brewers or Milwaukee Braves players earned enough votes for induction into the Miller Park Walk of Fame. Candidates must be named on 75% of the returned ballots to be elected.

The closest candidate in 2012 was former Braves shortstop Johnny Logan, who received 61.5% of the vote (24 votes). Top vote-getters among former Brewers were Teddy Higuera (51.3%, 20 votes) and Geoff Jenkins (48.7%, 19 votes). This year marked the first time that Jenkins was on the ballot and eligible for election…

Past winners of the award include Hank Aaron, Rollie Fingers, Paul Molitor, Robin Yount in 2001; Commissioner Bud Selig and Cecil Cooper in 2002; Bob Uecker and Harry Dalton in 2003; Jim Gantner and Gorman Thomas in 2004; Don Money and Harvey Kuenn in 2005; Eddie Mathews, Warren Spahn and John Quinn in 2007 (the first year that former Braves players appeared on the ballot); and Lew Burdette in 2010.

Complete voting totals in the article.  (Is Wes Obermueller a better or worse Walk of Fame candidate than Bill Mueller is a Hall of Fame candidate?  Meditate upon this.)

The District Attorney Posted: January 09, 2012 at 11:45 PM | 19 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers

Stein: Judaism on Steroids

The widespread use of PEDs in baseball is nearly as old as the game itself. In 1889, pitcher Pud Galvin of the Pittsburgh Burghers began endorsing a testosterone supplement made from dog testicles. He won 23 games that season. Anecdotal evidence indicates that baseball legends Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, and Babe Ruth experimented with testosterone, amphetamines, and sheep testicle extract, respectively. By the 1970s, amphetamine use was rampant, and an increasing number of ballplayers soon began experimenting with anabolic steroids and human growth hormone. Cocaine reached epidemic levels in the 1980s.

Jewish sources confirm this human desire for self-improvement, but also discuss the potential moral and medical drawbacks. The most comprehensive study of medicine in the Bible and Talmud remains Biblisch-Talmudische Medizin (Biblical and Talmudic Medicine), published by Julius Preuss in 1911. Preuss, who was a doctor and Hebraic scholar, utilized a rigorous, analytical approach in studying the ancient texts, and this extensive volume reflects a lifetime of serious medical and Judaic scholarship.

Over 18 chapters, Preuss covers anatomy, neurology, psychology, obstetrics, sexual health, Jewish medical rituals, dermatology, and a range of obscure and familiar maladies as discussed in talmudic and biblical writings. He also chronicles ancient remedies, some fantastical, others familiar. For an earache: pour lukewarm kidney fluids in the ear (though melted chicken fat works in a pinch).  A fever calls for radishes; a cold for beets; and cabbage works across the board.  Wine, small fish, and leeks were known to aid digestion. Fred Rosner, who translated Preuss’s tome in 1978, summed up the general health and nutrition advice of the Talmud: “Eat moderately, eat simply, eat slowly, and eat regularly.”

However, the advice is not merely gastronomical. Rabbis throughout Jewish history also experimented with a range of concoctions meant to increase strength and stamina—kosher PEDs.

In tractate Gittin, the sage Abaye recommends a mixture of ground safflower boiled with wine to promote vascular and sexual health. Rabbi Yohanon appears to have been a fan of the formula and offers an emphatic endorsement: “This restored me to my youthful vigor!” Maimonides, in his treatise “The Regimen of Health,” mentions oxymel, refined syrup of roses, and infusion of tamarind as effective means to increase strength and ward off disease.

Of course, Braun was not busted for high levels of tamarind in his system. Regardless of talmudic inspiration, cheating is certainly frowned upon in Jewish law. At the least, steroid use represents a violation of gneivat da’at, deceit; at most, it is downright theft. If steroids influenced Braun’s on-field performance (which, I understand, is kind of the point), then he effectively robbed another worthy ballplayer of the MVP trophy, a spot on the All-Star team, and perhaps a lucrative spot on the Brewers’ roster.

PEDs also violate the biblical prohibition of self-endangerment. Based on the verse “you shall guard yourself rigorously,” rabbis derived a series of laws prohibiting physical or spiritual self-harm. Steroids may qualify as both: Physical consequences of steroid abuse include liver tumors and cancer, jaundice, high blood pressure and increased cholesterol, kidney tumors, fluid retention, and severe acne; men may experience shrinking of the testicles, reduced sperm count, infertility, baldness, breast development, and increased risk of prostate cancer. Psychologically, steroid abuse can lead to increased aggression, anxiety, and depression.

Renegade (((JE))) Posted: January 09, 2012 at 06:56 PM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, steroids

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