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Drugs Newsbeat

Friday, April 10, 2015

Arte Moreno won’t promise Josh Hamilton will play again for Angels

Angels owner Arte Moreno said Friday he might try to enforce contractual language he says protects the team from a substance-abuse relapse by outfielder Josh Hamilton.

The owner also would not say that Hamilton would play another game for the Angels.

“I will not say that,” Moreno said.

An arbitrator ruled last week that Hamilton, who reported the relapse, had not violated baseball’s drug policy and thus could not be suspended. Angels President John Carpino said it “defies logic” that Hamilton, who was suspended from baseball from 2004-06 after battles with drugs and alcohol, would not have violated his treatment program.

Moreno said he has not spoken to Hamilton since the outfielder reported his relapse to the league. Hamilton met with league officials in New York on Feb. 25….

Any contract language that supersedes baseball’s collectively bargained drug policy generally is not allowed. The players’ union released a statement to that effect It was regarding Moreno’s remarks.

“The MLBPA emphatically denies Los Angeles Angels owner Arte Moreno’s assertions from earlier today that the Angels had requested and received the approval of the Union to insert language into Josh Hamilton’s contract that would supersede the provisions of the Joint Drug Agreement and/or the Basic Agreement. To the contrary, the collectively bargained provisions of the JDA and the Basic Agreement supersede all other player contract provisions and explicitly prevent Clubs from exactly the type of action Mr. Moreno alluded to in his press comments today.”

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 10, 2015 at 11:04 PM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, arte moreno, drugs, josh hamilton, suspensions

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

How MLB Profits from Players with Addiction

Intentional or not, MLB’s steroid policy has been a massive money-saver for owners. In the Biogenesis case alone, $31 million in salaries were saved by teams. MLB even went so far as to threaten Alex Rodriguez with a lifetime suspension from the game, which would have saved the Yankees at least another $60 million on top of the $22 million the club retained in 2014—all before potential eight-figure luxury tax savings are accounted for. While suspensions without pay are far easier to justify for performance-enhancing drugs than they are for drugs of abuse, MLB and the Yankees attempted to go above and beyond the joint drug agreement in an attempt to bilk Rodriguez out of money he’s contractually-owed.

MLB needs to fix its incentives. It shouldn’t be hard. Just look at what the rest of the major sports leagues do with their suspension and fine money. Section 6 of Article VI of the NBA’s collective bargaining agreement lays out a policy in which all fines and pay lost through suspensions are channeled to charity, with one half going to charities selected by the NBA Players Association and the other half going to charities selected by the league. The NHL directs its player fines to the Players’ Emergency Assistance Fund, with a mission to help former NHL players who have fallen into poor health or dire financial straits. Similarly, all NFL on-field fines go to the NFL Player Care Foundation.

As for how things work in baseball? After 60 days in the drug program—according to the Los Angeles Times, it’s unclear if Hamilton exhausted these 60 days during his time with the Devil Rays in the early 2000s or not—a player is no longer entitled to salary retention even if he is in treatment. As such, a year-long suspension for Hamilton would save the Angels anywhere from just under $17 million to the full $23 million if MLB determines his treatment days have already been used up.


Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Peter: Accident or Suicide?

Worth reading all the way through.

NEW BRAUNFELS, Texas—Detective Juan Guerrero pulled back the yellow blanket that covered Brad Halsey, a 33-year-old former major league pitcher. He inspected the cold body found at the base of a 100-foot cliff on private property near the Guadalupe River, about 30 miles northeast of San Antonio.

No cuts or scratches. No sign of a struggle. No evidence of homicide, the detective concluded. Both legs looked broken, he noted, likely caused by the impact of a fall. Probably suicide, the detective said he thought early that Halloween afternoon.

Then Guerrero checked Halsey’s black Honda parked nearby. On the passenger’s seat he found a baseball glove, a baseball and a flier advertising pitching lessons Halsey was offering. No suicide note.

A week later, with an autopsy showing Halsey died from blunt force injuries, Guerrero told the captain of investigations at the Comal County Sheriff’s Office he thought Halsey likely died in an accidental fall. Yet the detective says he still wonders, and the case remains open pending the completion of a toxicology report. ...

Public records and interviews with former coaches, teammates and friends show Halsey was quiet, private, quirky, smart and witty. But his behavior changed as he tried to hang on to a fading baseball career and fell victim to prescription and recreational drug abuse.

Less than four months ago, police found Halsey walking chest-deep in the nearby Comal River and identifying himself as Lucifer. Officers had responded to a call about a man who fit Halsey’s description throwing rocks at people floating by on inner tubes and talking to people no one else could see.

Halsey said he was prepared to fight “Mitch,” but witnesses said they saw no other man. After Halsey exited the river and turned unruly, police put him in shackles and drove him to an area hospital for evaluation. The police report noted Halsey had mental problems due to drug use.

A few months earlier, according to two men who spent time with the former pitcher in the last months of his life, Halsey told them he had schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The men also said Halsey made an outrageous statement, claiming he was on cocaine and other drugs when he gave up Bonds’ historic home run and had spent much of the $1 million he made during his baseball career on drugs.

JE (Jason) Posted: December 16, 2014 at 10:45 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: drugs, mental health, suicide

 

 

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