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Dugout Newsbeat

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-28-2015

Toledo News-Bee, January 28, 1915:

Even more dangerous to the life and well being of the national pastime than the Federal, organized baseball and the warring magnates, is the European war. So declares Curtis Guild, former United States minister to Russia. He remarks if trade with the czar’s kingdom is not continued there will be no more baseball. Here’s why, according to Guild: “The only leather which will not stretch under sudden impact comes from the hides of Siberian ponies.”

If you think World War I will mess with baseball, stick around about three years. The Siberian Pony Leather Crisis of 1918 lasted nearly 75 years.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 28, 2015 at 08:07 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, siberian pony leather

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-27-2015

Grand Forks Daily Herald, January 27, 1915:

“Boston, Philadelphia, Washington and Detroit will make the fight for the 1915 pennant,” declared Bill Carrigan, the Red Sox manager today. “It’s hard telling which of the four will win, though I think Boston and Philadelphia will be the more formidable and less dependent upon breaks in the luck.
...
“Getting Larry Lajoie has put Connie Mack in the race. Bender and Plank were slipping and realy not necessary. I look for our stiffest competition from the Athletics.

Carrigan was mostly right. Boston won the World Series, Detroit won 100 games and finished second, Washington went 85-68, and…well…the Athletics finished 43-109, 58.5 games out of first.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 27, 2015 at 08:17 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, January 26, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-26-2015

Pittsburgh Press, January 26, 1915:

Morris Farrell, son of the millionaire president of a lumber company [in Little Rock], has been signed by President Allen, of the local Southern association club. Farrell has played with Kansas City and Waco, but quit both clubs because he objected to discipline.

It would seem young Farrell’s time with Little Rock was cut short because he couldn’t play. Farrell hit .143 and slugged .196 in 15 games with the 1915 Travelers. John Henry Williams, eat your heart out.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 26, 2015 at 08:14 AM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, January 23, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-23-2015

Braves manager George Stallings, quoted in the January 23, 1915 edition of the Pittsburgh Press:

“I don’t like $2 bills, and I never laid a hand on one during the world’s series.

“Throughout the season, of course, I have to come in contact with some of these, but I would fold them over and tear the corners off just as soon as I got hold of one to kill the jinx. If any of the readers of this story come across a $2 bill with the corners trimmed off they will know that the $2 bill circulated somewhere in the Boston club.

“All my players got to doing it last season, and our luck changed just as soon as we began to play this $2 bill jinx off the map.

I, for one, like $2 bills. Anyway, my initial reaction is that what Stallings did was probably illegal, but my interpretation of the US Code (18 U.S. Code § 333) is that defacing American currency is only illegal if it’s done with the intention to make it unfit to be reissued.

(I am not a lawyer and have no legal training. If you take my word for it, you likely have made a bad decision.)


Thursday, January 22, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-22-2015

Washington Times, January 22, 1915:

The Indianapolis Federals, world’s champions by default, probably will do their spring training at home. There is plenty of money in sight to sent them on a training trip such as a world’s championship team would be supposed to take, but the Hoosier Fed promoters think better results can be obtained in the latitude of Indianapolis in March and April.

Team owner Harry Ford Sinclair really did have plenty of money - shady oil deals can be extremely lucrative - but he didn’t want to spend it on baseball in Indianapolis. By the time the 1915 Federal League season rolled around, the Hoo-Feds had relocated to Newark, New Jersey. It’s probably safe to assume they didn’t go back to Indiana for Spring Training.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 22, 2015 at 09:41 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-21-2015

Pittsburgh Press, January 21, 1915:

H.A. Jennings, a lawyer at the Lackawanna county bar in the winter time and manager of the Detroit American league baseball team in the spring and summer, has been elected a director of the Traders’ National bank, of Scranton. Hughey, as he is familiarly known throughout the baseball world, has been a stockholder in the Traders bank for several years.

Jennings appears to have done just about everything in Scranton, other than catching the Scranton Strangler.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 21, 2015 at 08:14 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, hughie jennings

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-20-2015

Pittsburgh Press, January 20, 1915:

The Cleveland Naps are to be called Indians hereafter. Unless all signs fail, the Indians are in for a scalping next summer.

Washington Herald, January 20, 1915:

Possibly the owners of the Cleveland club, by changing the name of the Sixth City club from “Naps” to “Indians” had in mind the Boston Braves.

This makes so much more sense than the strained explanation about honoring Louis Sockalexis.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 20, 2015 at 08:51 AM | 38 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, indians

Monday, January 19, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-19-2015

Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, January 19, 1915:

“Will you please deny for me the stories printed in several New York papers that I was a candidate for the position of secretary or business manager of the Yankees,” writes Ed Barrow, president of the International League. “These stories were copied by the papers of our circuit and have caused some unpleasant and unfavorable comment on the part of several sporting writers.”

Barrow stayed with the International League until the end of the 1917 season, spent 1918-1919 as manager of the Red Sox, then indeed became a candidate for the position of business manager of the Yankees. Barrow ran the show in the Bronx from 1920-1946.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 19, 2015 at 08:30 AM | 25 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, ed barrow, history

Friday, January 16, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-16-2015

Topeka State Journal, January 16, 1915:

The fame of Caruso is safe. Ivy Wingo, catcher of the St. Louis Cardinals, indorses [sic] him. In writing to a friend in St. Louis the near Cincinnati Red said:

“I have just bought a phonograph and bunch of records and a lot of them are by this Caruso. He is there. I would rather be Caruso than anybody in the world but Ty Cobb. At that, I’d like to be Cobb in summer time and Caruso in the winter. I have never seen the big [1915-era Italian racial slur redacted], but I have seen his pictures, and I’m not stuck on his shape, but he is there with the pipes, though.”

Ivey Wingo: Opera fan.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 16, 2015 at 11:52 AM | 28 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, ivey wingo

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-15-2015

Pittsburgh Press, January 15, 1915:

Cleveland sporting writers gathered with officials of the local American league club to decide on a new name for the Naps. The sale of “Nap” Lajoie to the Athletics necessitates the move. Suggested names are: “Colts,” “Black Sox,” “Bucks,” “Hustlers,” and “Grays.”

All of the above would have been fine by me. One wonders what the Black Sox scandal would have been called if that name had already been taken.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 15, 2015 at 09:26 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, indians

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-14-2015

Pirates owner Barney Dreyfuss quoted in the Pittsburgh Press, January 14, 1915:

“If Rube [Waddell] were living, he could go on the [witness] stand and swear that he was once traded for a Pittsburg stogie. Yes, it’s true.

“Rube was with the Pirates at the time, and we were tired of him. Clarke gave him to Chicago, and he came to the office to see me about it. He said he was perfectly willing to go to the Windy City, but he wanted half of the purchase money.

“‘Here, take it all, Rube,’ said I, and I pushed toward him to a stogie. Stogies in those days sold four for a nickel. On his way out of the office, he was served with an attachment of the wages for a bill of $10 her owed a tailor for a pair of pants.”

Rube wore out his welcome in Pittsburgh in almost exactly one season. He spent 1900 with the Pirates and made two starts in 1901 before getting shipped to the Orphans.

Connie Mack was a bit more patient with Waddell in Philadelphia, probably because the Rube was the best player in the American League from 1902-1905

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 14, 2015 at 07:52 AM | 24 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, rube waddell

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-13-2015

Richmond Times-Dispatch, January 13, 1915:

Jim Bluejacket, the Indian twirler of the Brooklyn Federals, is the only pitcher in baseball history who ever got credit for a victory without pitching a ball.

It happened late last summer when the Brookfeds were playing the Pittsburg Rebels. Bluejacket was ordered to the mound as a relief twirler in the ninth inning, when his own club was behind.
...
Steve Yorkes [sic], the Pittsburgh second baseman, was on first. Bluejacket saw him taking a long lead and men heaved the ball to first. Yorkes was caught, making it three out. During their session at bat the Brookfeds pounded out enough runs to win the game.

Since the beginning of bb-ref’s pitch-by-pitch data, two pitchers have won games without throwing a pitch: Colorado’s Alan Embree on July 7, 2009 and Baltimore’s B.J. Ryan on May 1, 2003

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 13, 2015 at 08:10 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, January 12, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-12-2015

Toledo News-Bee, January 12, 1915:

That in two instances baseball managers traded players in exchange for dogs was one of the many allegations contained in affidavits filed in federal court [in Chicago] on Monday in support of the Federal league suit to have organized baseball, the national commission and the American and National leagues declared a trust.

It was in an affidavit by Mordecai Brown that the above charges were made.
...
Brown’s affidavit in brief says: “Your affiant is informed and believed to be true, that one Joe Cantillon, manager of the Minneapolis club of the American association, a member of so-called organized baseball, at one time traded a professional ball player for a bulldog.

“Your affiant also believes that Roger Bresnahan, while manager of the St. Louis club in the National league, traded a professional baseball player, a pitcher named Hopper, to Dick Kinsella, then manager of the Springfield, Ill., club in the Three-Eye league, for a bird dog.”

You can read Brown’s affidavit in its entirety here, if you’re so inclined. IANAL, but to me, the dog-swapping allegations are weirdly and a bit incongruously thrown into the middle of an affidavit that’s otherwise mostly about teams being able to release players and nullify contracts with ten days’ notice.

Other Federal League v. American League et al affidavits I’ve seen: Charles Comiskey and Joe Tinker.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 12, 2015 at 08:32 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history, mordecai brown

Friday, January 09, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-9-2015

Milwaukee Journal, January 9, 1915:

That the proposed tour of South America by major league baseball teams during the winter of 1915-16 will be a financial success and boom for the sport south of the equator is the confident prediction made by several American business men conversant with conditions throughout the southern continent. Baseball is frequently played by Americans residing in the principal cities of Chile, Peru, Argentina and other South American countries.
...
The younger generations are taking to the game and already play fair baseball. Leagues composed of native players are predicted within the next ten years…

Okay, so maybe there haven’t been any major leaguers from Chile, Peru, or Argentina, but South America has produced some excellent ballplayers. One of the best catchers in the American League was born and raised in Brazil.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 09, 2015 at 08:13 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, international

Thursday, January 08, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-8-2015

Pittsburgh Press, January 8, 1915:

Ball Player With Conscience Found

After all, there are some players with a conscience. Baker Borton is now trying to buy his release from the St. Louis Federals. Naturally the query arises why a player should purchase his release, when he could jump his contract and make the Federals sue for his services.
...
Borton appears to be a young man who is of a different mold.

He didn’t get his release. Borton led the 1915 Federal League in games played, runs scored, and walks, while putting up a 126 OPS+.

All of which means they were probably sold out of Borton license plates in the gift shop.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 08, 2015 at 09:44 AM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: babe borton, dugout, federal league, history

Wednesday, January 07, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-7-2015

Grand Forks Daily Herald, January 7, 1915:

It is an open secret that Connie Mack felt compelled to rid the Athletics of Eddie Collins to restore some measure of harmony to the team. And it is generally understood that the discord which Connie seeks to alleviate was caused by Eddie Collins’ ill-advised newspaper articles, in which he disclosed team secrets, and thus, in the opinion of his fellow-players, put them under a handicap.
...
The authorities of the American league recognized the evil and sought to suppress it, but evidently Mr. Collins held himself above authority and proceeded with his labors as an author.

Looks like the team-instigated hatchet job is at least 100 years old today.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 07, 2015 at 08:27 AM | 3 comment(s)
  Beats: connie mack, dugout, eddie collins, history

Tuesday, January 06, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-6-2015

Milwaukee Journal, January 6, 1915:

Larry Lajoie no longer is a member of the Cleveland Naps. The veteran second baseman, with a record of thirteen years’ service under President Charles W. Somers, was released yesterday to the Philadelphia Athletics. Connie Mack came [to Cleveland] from Philadelphia and closed the deal—which does not involve any other players, according to Mr. Somers.

And thus ended the era of the “Cleveland Naps” nickname in the Forest City.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 06, 2015 at 07:58 AM | 25 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, indians, nap lajoie

Monday, January 05, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-5-2015

Milwaukee Journal, January 5, 1915:

It is upon his pet “fork ball” that Pete Standridge, one of the [San Francisco] Seals most successful pitchers, will depend to make good with the Chicago Cubs with whom he has contracted to play next season.
...
The “fork ball” is thrown with the pellet wedged between the fingers. Ever since he first saw Bert Hall use it in the Northwestern league four years ago, Pete has worked to master it.

The forkball is most often described as having been invented by Bullet Joe Bush around 1920, but that’s pretty clearly not the case. Rob Neyer, writing in the Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers, mentions that Hall was throwing the forkball as early as 1908. Standridge spent one season with the Cubs, was almost exactly replacement level, then headed back to the PCL.


Friday, January 02, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-2-2015

Chicago Eagle, January 2, 1915:

Thirty-five deaths and 918 injuries were caused by baseball during 1914, according to figures made public by a sport writer who kept a tabulation of the season’s records.

Of the players who died from injuries 20 were hit by pitched balls, five were struck by bats, four were in collisions, four overexerted themselves, one was hurt sliding into a base, and one was killed in a fight.

Injuries to amateur players are classified as follows: Broken limbs, 314; concussion of the brain, 18; fractured skulls, 13; paralysis, 4; sprains, 37; spiked, 26; fractures, 17; dislocations, 7; torn ligaments, 10.

Eek. Safety has come a long way in the past 100 years.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: January 02, 2015 at 08:23 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, injuries

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-31-2014

Spokane Spokesman-Review, December 31, 1914:

A coroner’s jury acquitted Walter F. (“Poll”) Perritt, pitcher of the Los Angeles baseball team, [yesterday] of blame for the death of Herbert Lathrop, whom Perritt shot and killed in the Mountains on Monday when he mistook him for a mountain lion. The foreman said it was an accident, pure and simple. Lathrop, who was a well-known guide, was wearing a gray sweater at the time of his death. Perritt saw him moving in the underbrush and opened fire.

Dude. Mountain lions walk on all fours. People walk upright.

Anyhoo, this appears to have been Madison F. “Pol” Perritt of the Los Angeles Angels and not William D. “Pol” Perritt of the St. Louis Cardinals. Both were born in Arcadia, Louisiana in the 1890s, so it’s likely that they were brothers, but I haven’t been able to confirm that suspicion.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 31, 2014 at 08:16 AM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, pol perritt

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-30-2014

Milwaukee Sentinel, December 30, 1914:

A Federal league official stated on Tuesday that the reason the new organization did not persist in its efforts to sign Eddie Collins, formerly of the Athletics and now of the White Sox, was because his demands were so great that the officials were dumfounded.
...
To their great astonishment Collins demanded $80,000 for a three year contract. Not only that, but he wanted $20,000 in cash and demanded that the other $60,000 be deposited in the bank for him.

This demand, the Federal league officials state, breaks all records for nerve.

It was worth a shot, particularly if he didn’t really want to jump. All they could do was say no.

Anyway, if you adjust for inflation, Collins was asking for the equivalent of a three year contract worth a total of around $1.85M in 2014 dollars.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 30, 2014 at 08:10 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, eddie collins, federal league, history

Monday, December 29, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-29-2014

Milwaukee Sentinel, December 29, 1914:

Cyril Slapnicka, the Brewer pitcher, is up in arms these days.

According to the official pitching averages of the American association, issued last week by President Chivington, Slap is credited with eight victories and is charged with nine defeats. According to his record he lost only eight games, giving him an average of .500 for the season. As Slap had a bonus of $200 coming, in the event of his winning half his games, naturally he is quite interested to know how that extra defeat happened to be charged against him.

If I had more spare time, I’d flip through the Milwaukee newspapers from the 1914 season and calculate Slapnicka’s record myself. Anyway, BB-Ref says Slap was 8-9 in 1914, so his protest was probably denied.

Even without the $200, Cy did okay for himself. After retiring, he served as the Indians’ general manager from 1935-1940, then spent the next 21 years as a scout. Slapnicka was the guy who signed Bobs Feller and Lemon for Cleveland.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 29, 2014 at 08:21 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: cy slapnicka, dugout, history

Friday, December 26, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-26-2014

Milwaukee Sentinel, December 26, 1914:

The superstitious idea of a “jinx” is not uncommon in baseball. The worst case was that of poor old Kid Baldwin, one of the grandest catchers of his time.
...
Pitchers began to fear to pitch to him. It was strange, but it seemed as if some misfortune happened to all the players who were his closest friends. It drove him out of the business. He tried the minors; and found them even worse.

When he left Cincinnati he gave away a pair of baseball shoes. Oddly enough, every player who wore those shoes got hurt. One scoffer who tried it after several had thrown them away broke a leg.

“Kid Baldwin’s shoes” hung in the club house for years. No one dared touch them. Finally they disappeared. A boy was suspected. The news came that the boy had broken his leg playing ball down in the bottoms—and the players were sure he was the thief. Whether the ill-luck followed those shoes further no one knew—but for years, whenever a player was hurt, the athletes would remark: “He must have been wearing Kid Baldwin’s shoes.”

Has anyone checked to see whether Nick Johnson owns a pair of baseball shoes from the 19th century? I’m just sayin’.

Anyway, Kid Baldwin’s story is pretty grim. He partied and drank himself out of the big leagues before his 26th birthday, bounced around the minors for a while, literally went years without seeing his wife, nearly went blind, became homeless, continued to drink heavily, and was eventually confined to a mental hospital until he died at age 32. (Hat tip to Baldwin’s excellent SABR bio.)

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 26, 2014 at 08:03 AM | 3 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, kid baldwin

Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-24-2014

Milwaukee Journal, December 24, 1914:

With the money obtained from the sale of a herd of steers, Walter Johnson, star pitcher of the Washington American league club, yesterday mailed a draft reimbursing Charles Weeghman, president of the Chicago Federals, for the bonus given Johnson when he signed a Federal contract. The draft was for $6,000.
...
“As far as I’m concerned the incident, which has proven an unpleasant one to me , at least, is now closed,” Johnson said. “There is nothing more I can do. I shall report to the Washington club when the spring training season opens.

Charles Weeghman, president of the Chicago Federals, will refuse to accept the $6,000 returned by Walter Johnson, according to James A. Gilmore, president of the Federal league. Gilmore said he had not hear a word from Johnson in answer to his invitation to come here and submit his contracts to a trio of Chicago lawyers.

Don’t hold your breath, Jim. I don’t think he’s coming.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 24, 2014 at 08:27 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history, walter johnson

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-23-2014

Tacoma Times, December 23, 1914:

Eddie Collins came near never being a member of the Chicago White Sox because his wife refused to believe that the biggest men in baseball wanted to see him.
...
“Hello,” said a voice [on the phone]. “This is President Johnson of the American league. I want to speak to Mr. Collins.”

“We’ve had practical jokers call us up before,” replied Mrs. Collins sweetly as she hung up the receiver.

Five minutes later the telephone rang again and a voice said: “This is President Comiskey of the Chicago White Sox. I would like to speak to Mr. Collins.”

“Your friend, Mr. Johnson, must have lost his voice and asked you to call,” responded Mrs. Collins and hung up again.

Another five minutes passed. Then Connie Mack called up. Mrs. Collins recognized his voice and almost fainted when he told her that both Johnson and Comiskey already had called.

Later that day, the Collins family received calls from Mike Rotch, Oliver Klozoff, I.P. Freely, and Jacques Strap.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 23, 2014 at 08:06 AM | 50 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, eddie collins, history

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