Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


Contributors

Jim Furtado
Founder & Publisher
Repoz
Editor - Baseball Primer

Syndicate

Dugout Newsbeat

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-30-2014

Milwaukee Journal, July 30, 1914:

If eight hours is made a legal working day in California, J. Cal Ewing, the boss of the San Francisco Seals, says he is going to get a legal day’s work out of his ball players. The most that any of them work now is five hours. Three hours of this is in the game in the afternoon, a couple in morning practice.

In the rest of the time, Ewing says he can find work for them cutting grass in the park, sweeping the stands, and marking the foul lines. If the law says eight hours is a day’s work, Cal declares he will see to it that the law is obeyed.

Jeffrey Loria: the early years.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 30, 2014 at 06:44 AM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-29-2014

Pittsburgh Press, July 29, 1914:

Manager Clark Griffith, of Washington, blames his team’s failure to be higher up in the race on the fact that no less than six of his players are inveterate cigaret smokers and inhalers.
...
The Nationals’ manager argues that it is impossible for a ball player to do himself justice when he takes liberties with cigarets, and he called all his smokers to task and gave them to understand that the habit must cease if they expect to be of any service to their team.

Smoking annoys me too, Clark, but your team’s failure is probably more a result of your starting catcher hitting .169/.274/.226 and your starting shortstop hitting .203/.274/.243.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 29, 2014 at 06:48 AM | 46 comment(s)
  Beats: clark griffith, dugout, history

Monday, July 28, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-28-2014

Tacoma Times, July 28, 1914:

Tacoma has a new pitcher.
...
The “Mysterious Pitcher” will warm up today. He will warm up tomorrow also. And he will pitch against Ballard either Thursday or Friday afternoon.

But the man of mystery will wear a mask over his face during every game. He will be escorted from the field in a closed taxicab. There are not more than five persons who know his identity, not even the players having the slightest idea of who he is.

Looks like the “mysterious pitcher” never actually appeared in a game. It turned out to the telegraph operator from the press box.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 28, 2014 at 06:41 AM | 49 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, July 25, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-25-2014

Bennington [Vermont] Evening Banner, July 25, 1914:

The management of the Athletics, the American League baseball club, has forbidden the further operation by newspapers or other news distributing agencies of baseball score boards on which the games in [Philadelphia] are reproduced on the street play by play. The management takes the ground that the boards are responsible for the loss of more than $1,000 a day in attendance at the ball park.
...
[Athletics president Ben Shibe:] “It is just as if everything that was taking place in theatres should be reported free to a crowd outside the house. I don’t see why the newspapers want to supply such news. Why don’t they give their papers away free? It would be just as reasonable.”

100 years later, baseball fans can use pocket devices to get free live pitch-by-pitch updates of dozens of MLB and MiLB games every day, not to mention free content from newspapers.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 25, 2014 at 07:55 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-24-2014

Washington Times, July 24, 1914:

Eppa Jephtha Absolom Rixey, jr., [sic] former Virginia varsity twirler, was sadly bumped again yesterday by the Cubs. Rixey insisted on remaining at college until June this season and has been of no use to the Phillies at all. He has yet to win a ball game and may be released.

This is the second day in a row that a newspaper suggested that a guy who’d go on to become the winningest pitcher in franchise history would be released. Yesterday it was the Phils’ eventual all-time wins leader, today the Reds.

Rixey went 2-11 and allowed 73 runs (50 earned) in 103 innings in 1914, but the Phillies didn’t release him. They kept him long enough for him to pitch brilliantly for a few years and lead the league in losses twice (the Phillies were terrible for most of his time there). Eventually they traded him to Cincinnati for a Hall of Famer, but unfortunately it was a Pro Football Hall of Famer: Greasy Neale. They also got league-average innings eater Jimmy Ring in the Rixey deal.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 24, 2014 at 10:44 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, eppa rixey, history

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-23-2014

The [Missoula, MT] Daily Missoulian, July 23, 1914:

Grover Cleveland Alexander, a bear with the Phillies only two seasons back, has taken a hurry-up drop. In view of his poor work last season and this year his release by the Phillies had been anticipated, but it was thought he would go to a class AA organization. Instead he has been consigned to Syracuse in the New York State league

Yeah, Ol’ Pete had a really rough 1914. He only led the league in wins, innings pitched, complete games, and batters faced.

I have absolutely no idea what the author of this blurb was thinking, but Alexander didn’t pitch in the minor leagues again until 1930, when he was a washed up 43-year-old.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 23, 2014 at 06:38 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, grover cleveland alexander, history

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-22-2014

Pittsburgh Press, July 22, 1914:

Pain and thoughts of injury disappeared when Guy Copeland, 22 years old, who had been injured in a ball game at Fifteenth st. [sic] and the Paseo, awoke from a semi-conscious condition and found himself in an undertaking shop, where he had been taken for treatment.
...
Copeland sprang from the table. It was too far to the door, and he plunged through a window, taking screen and all with him…Copeland forgot his aching head; he just kept on running…He finally was caught and the wound, which was not serious, was treated. “I thought they’d made a mistake and thought I was dead,” gasped Copeland.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 22, 2014 at 06:36 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, July 21, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-21-2014

Milwaukee Journal, July 21, 1914:

President Frank E. Murphy of the Green Bay club, in a letter to President Frank R. Weeks of the W-I League on Monday, demanded that punishment be meted out to Catcher Snow of the Oshkosh club for throwing chewing tobacco into the grandstand during Saturday’s game.
...
In the affidavit it is declared the tobacco hit several women in the stand.

I guess it’s better than getting hit by a flying chair.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 21, 2014 at 06:33 AM | 49 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, July 18, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-18-2014

An account of the game of the year from the Pittsburgh Press, July 18, 1914:

In the sixth inning, Wagner singled, after Mowrey had been retired, and took third of [sic] Viox’s drive to center. Bescher pegged to Stock, but when the Giant third-sacker tried to locate the ball it was missing. Wagner jumped up and started for home, and as he ran the sphere dropped from his clothing…Umpire Byron called Wagner out for interference.
...
The decision caused a mighty howl, which was participated in by many of the players and by Manager Fred Clarke, who applied a flow of profanity to the umpire, which was anything but pleasing to the disgusted spectators who were forced to listen to it or leave the grounds. Mr. Clarke’s language on this occasion, or any other, will not win ball games. It is doing things - and doing them right - that counts in the records.

The whole article is worth a read if you have a couple minutes.

New York won the game 3-1 in 21 innings, a classic that included complete games from Rube Marquard and Babe Adams, Adams going 21 innings without issuing a walk, Mike Mowrey costing the Pirates a win by not running out a ground ball, and the goofy play mentioned in the excerpt.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 18, 2014 at 08:40 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, honus wagner

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-17-2014

Milwaukee Journal, July 17, 1914:

HAS DENT IN HEAD

George Weaver, captain and shortstop of the Chicago White Sox, who was injured in a collision with Demmitt, the left fielder, while going after a fly ball at Shibe Park yesterday, will probably be out of the game several days. Weaver has a dent in his forehead over his left eye as the result of coming in contact with Demmitt’s chin.

Seems like you’d get the exact opposite of a dent in your head if you ran into somebody’s chin.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 17, 2014 at 09:55 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: buck weaver, dugout, history, ray demmitt

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-16-2014

Pittsburgh Press, July 16, 1914:

Eight of the Boston Redsox [sic] were chased from the bench by the umpires yesterday for making uncomplimentary remarks about the Cleveland players.

I find it fascinating that this is buried deep in the “baseball notes” column. If eight players from one team got ejected in one game in 2014, it would be the top sports story everywhere in the country.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 16, 2014 at 08:23 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-15-2014

Pittsburgh Press, July 15, 1914:

A dispute over the color of uniforms is said to have a large part in the breaking up of the California State league, which has disbanded.
...
The freeholders of Modesto got up and declared themselves. The had had an independent team known as the Modesto Reds, which wore red uniforms; they put it in the state league and the uniforms were changed in color. If the State league backer would consent to Modesto’s team wearing red uniforms they would back the game; if not, by heck, they wouldn’t because there wasn’t no goshdanged good to their town in having a team that didn’t wear colors that were distinctly Modesto’s. The other towns wouldn’t agree to the red uniform proposition and the league was buried.

Eh, you can have a league without Modesto. Modesto is not that sweet.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 15, 2014 at 10:11 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, overreaction

Monday, July 14, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-14-2014

Harrisburg Telegraph, July 14, 1914:

“Baseball-football,” a combination of the diamond and gridiron sports originating in the mind of Herman Brosoweska, director of the [Detroit] board of education’s model playground center, was conceived to satisfy 200 schoolboys.

A very large, but light, ball is used. The pitcher tosses the ball to the batter at a level of one foot above the ground. Football tactics are employed by the batter, who kicks the ball. The usual rules for fielding and base running are used. A runner is called out only when he has been hit fairly with the ball.

So…kickball, I guess? Seems more like “baseball-association football” to me.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 14, 2014 at 08:22 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, July 11, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-11-2014

Washington Herald, July 12, 1914:

Boston, July 11—The Red Sox took a fall out of the tail-end Naps here to-day, beating them 4 to 3 in a game that was hard-fought all the way. “Baby” Ruth, the $25,000 Baltimore star, opened in the box for the winners, but game way to a pinch hitter in the seventh, when the score was three all. Leonard finished up. Mitchell did the hurling for Cleveland and was hit hard at opportune times by the home team.

Duffy Lewis: The first man to pinch-hit for Babe Ruth in the big leagues.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 11, 2014 at 08:29 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: babe ruth, dugout, history

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-10-2014

Washington Times, July 10, 1914:

The Boston American League team today purchased of the Baltimore International team Pitcher Ruth, Catcher Egan, and Shore, paying in the vicinity of $30,000 for the three men.

President Lannin, in making the announcement, would not state the exact amount, other than it was in excess of the $25,000 offer he made for Ruth, Shore, and Derrick when the Boston club was in Washington last week.

Worth every penny.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 10, 2014 at 09:30 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: babe ruth, dugout, ernie shore, history

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-9-2014

Pittsburgh Press, July 9, 1914:

Ossie E. Schreckengost, aged 39, better known as “Schreck,” former battery mate of “Rube” Waddell, died here today of a complication of diseases. Although ill for the past two years, his condition was not considered serious until yesterday, when he collapsed in a cafe.
...
He caught for the Mackmen 10 years.

Waddell passed away in April 1914, just three months before his batterymate. Seems odd that a pitcher and catcher who worked together so frequently would die young so close to each other.

Schrecongost (there are a number of spellings that get used, but this is what BB-Ref uses) was a pretty good player. Played 11 years in the majors, career .271 hitter, top ten in the league in dWAR three times. Got some mild HOF support for a few years, but was never a legitimate candidate.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 09, 2014 at 08:16 AM | 25 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, ossee schrecongost

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-8-2014

Washington Times, July 8, 1914:

While [Baltimore owner] Jack Dunn will not admit it, deals have been practically consummated by which Shortstop Claude [sic] Derrick and Outfielder George Twombley [sic], of the Orioles, will soon be wearing Cincinnati uniforms, while Birdie Cree, the highest priced fielder in the International League, will go to the New York Americans.
...
With the information concerning the probable sale of Derrick and Twombley also come several other rumors. One is to the effect that President Lannin, of the Red Sox, offered Dunnie a big pile for Ruth, Shore, and Twombley. The Oriole leader, however, denied that Lannin had made any proposition, and added that the Red Sox did not want any of the Orioles.

That’s probably for the best. I can’t imagine that Ruth guy being a good ballplayer.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 08, 2014 at 07:52 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: babe ruth, dugout, ernie shore, history

Monday, July 07, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-7-2014

Washington Times, July 7, 1914:

“Iron Man” McGinnity, president of the Tacoma, Northwestern League club, formerly a big league twirler of renown, is enthusiastic today over a ground drying machine he has invented. The machine is similar to a huge blow torch, is about four feet long, and mounted on three wheels. Four distillate burners furnish the heat. After a hard night’s rain McGinnity claims the machine will dry out the diamond in two hours.

Well, it might, as long as Juan Pablo Montoya doesn’t run into it.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 07, 2014 at 07:38 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, joe mcginnity

Thursday, July 03, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-3-2014

[Phoenix] Arizona Republican, July 3, 1914:

GIRLS! LISTEN, THE NEW PLAYERS ARE HANDSOME

Three handsome youths are en route to Phoenix to sign up with the Riverside team. At least Manager Barrett says they are handsome, and what he says goes—for it’s good publicity and may attract the girls. Incidentally that also may be credited to the above mentioned far-sighted manager.

They may or may not be able to play baseball, but they sure are dreamy.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 03, 2014 at 08:04 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-2-2014

Pittsburgh Press, July 2, 1914:

Pitcher Elmer Daily, of the Allegheny Steel team of Tarentum and Brackenridge, killed a dog with a batted ball Tuesday evening at Peterson park when the Steel team was practicing. A dog was chasing the ball over the field when it seized a hot one from Daily’s willow too soon after it had left the bat. The drive turned him end over end and left him inert on the ground.

:(

No snark today. Just a “that really sucks”.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 02, 2014 at 07:47 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-1-2014

Milwaukee Journal, July 1, 1914:

Ball players never hand the ball to an umpire? [sic] It would be a violation of one of the strictest of the unwritten laws of the game. Even though a player is within a couple of paces, or one pace, of an umpire, he will flip the ball to him. Why this is true the majority of players cannot say. When asked one of them stated: “Guess it’s just because we don’t like to have any more to do with an umpire than is absolutely necessary…”

I’d never thought about it before, but this is still the case, isn’t it?

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: July 01, 2014 at 08:07 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, unwritten rules

Monday, June 30, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-30-2014

New York Tribune, June 30, 1914:

A near-riot marked the first game of the Cincinnati-Chicago series [in Chicago yesterday], which the Cubs won by a score of 10 to 7. In the visitors’ sixth inning Moran fouled down the third base line. Hoblitzell protested to Eason, the umpire, that the hit was fair and was ordered to the clubhouse. Charley Herzog ran into the argument and was ordered to join Hoblitzell.

A few moments later one of the players took Moran’s bat and threw it toward the players’ bench. The aim was wide and the bat landed in the field boxes. Immediately spectators swarmed out upon the field, but they were calmed by attendants and players.

The only similar incident I can recall was back in 2008, when Peoria pitcher Julio Castillo tried to throw a baseball into the Dayton dugout, missed, and drilled a fan in the head.

Unsurprisingly, that was the last time Castillo threw a baseball while wearing a professional uniform.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: June 30, 2014 at 07:44 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, June 27, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-27-2014

Milwaukee Journal, June 27, 1914:

Charlie Meara, the sensational batter, who was bought by Frank Chance from the Perth Amboy club, has explained his ability to hit. He made 24 hits in forty-two times at bat—5 homers, 4 triplets [sic] and 1 double.

“It’s a funny story,” says Meara. “When I was 5 years old my parents moved to New Jersey. The mosquitoes down there were bad, and it was my job to keep them out of the cottage when any one opened the door. After four years of practice I got so I missed only one out of ten. Then I began using a baseball bat and trying to place them when I hit them. By the time I was 14 I could break their bills off without killing them.

“If I can get Ty Cobb and Joe Jackson to spend a summer with me, we’ll clear Jersey of mosquitoes.”

Meara only got seven career MLB at-bats, all in 1914, but they were pretty decent: He hit .286/.444/.286.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:03 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: charlie meara, dugout, history

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-26-2014

Milwaukee Journal, June 26, 1914:

The baseball fans of Washington will probably hereafter enjoy a supply of cool drinking water, furnished by spigots throughout the local ball park, thanks to a bill introduced by Representative Howard of Georgia…
...
Mr. Howard is himself a baseball fan, but has no taste for soda pop. For a time he was able to get drinking water from one hydrant at the Washington ball park, but finally the soft drink interests broke the handle off the faucet.

In other words, the pump didn’t work because the vandals stole the handle.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: June 26, 2014 at 08:07 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-25-2014

Pittsburgh Press, June 25, 1914:

A jury in [Springfield, MA] Superior court awarded a verdict of $14,000 to Edward Collins in his suit against the Holyoke Street Railway Co. Collins, who is aged 10, lost his right leg as a result of a collision between trolley cars in June, 1912. The railway company admitted liability, but argued that artificial legs have been so perfected that the loss of a leg is no longer a serious handicap.

Attorney William P. Hayes, for the plaintiff, called attention to the profession of baseball as one from which young Collins is barred, and said that he could never follow in the footsteps of his illustrious namesake, Edward Collins, of the Philadelphia Athletics.

Good thing his name wasn’t Allan Travers.

Also, “the loss of a leg is no longer a serious handicap”? Wow, Holyoke Street Railway Co. Just…wow.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: June 25, 2014 at 07:20 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, unmitigated gall

Page {e2c518d61874f2d4a14bbfb9087a7c2dcurrent_page} of {e2c518d61874f2d4a14bbfb9087a7c2dtotal_pages} pages {e2c518d61874f2d4a14bbfb9087a7c2dpagination_links} | Site Archive

 

 

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
HowardMegdal
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOT: Monthly NBA Thread- July 2014
(1034 - 3:12am, Jul 31)
Last: Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim

NewsblogCubs Acquire Felix Doubront
(48 - 2:57am, Jul 31)
Last: Norcan

NewsblogEric Chavez Retires
(31 - 2:49am, Jul 31)
Last: Wahoo Sam

NewsblogVICE: Baseball Erotica #1: John Smoltz and Tom Glavine
(11 - 2:19am, Jul 31)
Last: Petunia inquires about ponies

NewsblogSOE: Minor League Manhood - A first-hand account of masculine sports culture run amok.
(159 - 2:08am, Jul 31)
Last: Petunia inquires about ponies

NewsblogJULY 31 2014 OMNICHATTER/TRADE DEADLINE CHATTER
(2 - 2:05am, Jul 31)
Last: Mess with the Meat, you get the Wad!

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread July, 2014
(530 - 2:03am, Jul 31)
Last: Swedish Chef

NewsblogOMNICHATTER 7-30-2014
(45 - 1:30am, Jul 31)
Last: CFBF Is A Golden Spider Duck

NewsblogRed Sox trade rumors: 'Very good chance' John Lackey and Jon Lester are traded - Over the Monster
(59 - 1:10am, Jul 31)
Last: SoSHially Unacceptable

NewsblogPosnanski: Hey, Rube: Phillies pay dearly for Amaro’s misguided loyalty
(23 - 1:04am, Jul 31)
Last: Ray (RDP)

Hall of MeritMost Meritorious Player: 1957 Discussion
(15 - 12:19am, Jul 31)
Last: MrC

NewsblogPosnanski: Four theories about Hall of Fame voting changes
(28 - 11:50pm, Jul 30)
Last: Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams)

Hall of MeritMost Meritorious Player: 1956 Ballot
(9 - 11:17pm, Jul 30)
Last: lieiam

NewsblogCameron: Why a July 31 trade deadline just doesn’t make sense anymore
(14 - 11:06pm, Jul 30)
Last: cardsfanboy

NewsblogOTP - July 2014: Republicans Lose To Democrats For Sixth Straight Year In Congressional Baseball Game
(3797 - 10:47pm, Jul 30)
Last: zonk

Page rendered in 1.0039 seconds
143 querie(s) executed