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Dugout Newsbeat

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-30-2016

Pittsburgh Press, August 30, 1916:

If there is a nation-wide railroad strike the major league ball clubs in the east will make their jumps in automobile. In the west motor cars and trolleys will be used, but numerous double headers will have to be arranged to allow time for the comparatively long trips between cities.

That would not have been fun. Driving from Detroit to St. Louis in a car built around 1916 in the era before interstate highways sounds like an absolute nightmare.

Thankfully, it wasn’t necessary. The threatened strike was averted with the passage of the Adamson Act, which mandated an eight-hour work day for railroad employees.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 30, 2016 at 10:13 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, August 29, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-29-2016

Rock Island Argus, August 29, 1916:

The most interesting deal of the 1916 baseball season, or for years for that matter, was swung last night between the Cubs and the New York Giants. The deal involves the transfer of Heinie Zimmerman, the recalcitrant infielder, to the Giants in return for Larry Doyle, Hunter, an infielder, and Jacobson, an outfielder.

Because of the fact that both Doyle and Zimmerman are two of the widest known players in the National League at present, the deal is easily the feature of the 1916 season. In fact, from the Chicago fans’ standpoint it can be ranked as one of the most important transfers negotiated in the parent body since the modern era of the game under the national commission.

It was kind of a big deal. Zimmerman hit .372 and led the league in home runs, hits, doubles, slugging percentage and total bases in 1912, but wore out his welcome doing things like fixing ballgames and not trying very hard. Doyle was the reigning National League batting champion, and back in 1912 when Zim was leading the league in every offensive category including nose hair, it was Doyle who came away with the Chalmers Award as the league MVP.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 29, 2016 at 10:31 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, heinie zimmerman, history, larry doyle, trades

Friday, August 26, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-26-2016

Pittsburgh Press, August 26, 1916:

[The Giants] have not been making many runs. Until they tied the score in the ninth inning of yesterday’s game at Forbes Field, the McGraw tribe had crossed the plate but once in 54 consecutive innings—and that score was made in Thursday’s game here.

I don’t have any idea how you’d measure this, but the 1916 Giants just have to be the single streakiest team in MLB history.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 26, 2016 at 10:30 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-25-2016

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, August 25, 1916:

Manager Mathewson today announced that he had agreed to pitch his first game for the Reds at Chicago on September 4 when the opposing pitcher will be Miner [Mordecai] Brown for the Chicago Cubs.

It was the final major league game for two no-doubt, obvious Hall of Famers. Has there ever been a game in which two comparably great players played for the final time?

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 25, 2016 at 10:55 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: christy mathewson, dugout, history, mordecai brown

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-24-2016

Pittsburgh Press, August 24, 1916:

A freak feature of the Whitesox victory at the Polo grounds Saturday was the scoring of three runs by the Sox on four pitched balls, with no hit good for more than one base. Here is the way it happened:

Eddie Collins hit the first ball pitched by Mogridge in the fourth inning for a single to center. Jackson hit the next one to center and Collins camped on second. Flesch [sic] hit the next one to center and when Magee’s throw rolled through Baumann and to the stands Felsch pulled up at third, both runners having scored. The first ball pitched to Fournier was turned into a long sacrifice fly and Felsch scored. Here were three runs and one out on four pitched balls. It cannot be done on less and such scoring is as rare as an unassisted triple play.

Even more rare, I’d imagine, particularly in the current Three True Outcomes era of baseball.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 24, 2016 at 10:47 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-23-2016

Grantland Rice via the Pittsburgh Gazette Times, August 23, 1916:

The Giants of 1916 will always be held as one of the main mysteries of the game…First [the club] loses 13 out of 15. Then the same club wins 19 out of 21. Then comes another big drop. Then comes a rally that yields seven out of nine, then a slump that leaves but two out of eight.

At this point Buck Herzog and Sheriff Sallee are added. Now, exclaims the multitude, the machine is rounded out at last. As a starter it wins 13 out of 16 games at home…And then—Wowie! Kazunk!—another long string of defeats comes on apace and the pennant aspect for the year is officially discarded.

Well, Mr. Rice, stay tuned. You haven’t seen anything yet. The 1916 Giants still have a memorable trick up their sleeve.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 23, 2016 at 10:53 AM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, August 22, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-22-2016

Topeka State Journal, August 22, 1916:

The Philadelphia Athletics, for many years the idols of the game, have provoked much mirth this season and are now preparing to finish the race the worst last we have had for a long time.
...
It may sound queer to many, but as the season begins to sight its close Connie Mack is expressing satisfaction with the team he has been training this summer.
...
“By next year I expect to have a club that will be a big factor in the pennant race, and within two years I expect to have a pennant winning combination.

Well, uh, no.

1917 Athletics: 55-98, eighth place, 44.5 GB
1918 Athletics: 52-76, eighth place, 24 GB
1919 Athletics: 36-104, eighth place, 52 GB
1920 Athletics: 48-106, eighth place, 50 GB
1921 Athletics: 53-100, eighth place, 45 GB

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 22, 2016 at 10:00 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, August 19, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-19-2016

Ogden Standard, August 19, 1916:

Philadelphia Doubles Its Attendance Since Raw College Boys Have Taken the Place of Famous $100,000 Infield.

“Stuffy” McInnis, Eddie Collins, Jack Barry and Frank Baker are names to conjure with. Names to inspire the beardless youth to falsetto cheering and the hodcarrier and banker to lusty applause…While the combination could go out any old day and win a ball game, it began to do it with too much regularity. To make a short story shorter, the state of affairs became such that Philadelphia began to long to see errors.
...
Connie Mack was right. The fans would pay their dollars and the half dollars and their quarters to see tyros perform, whereas they had tired of seeing champions play errorless baseball, winning—almost perfect—baseball.

This is a nice story and stuff, but it’s not even remotely close to being true. Total attendance for the Athletics in 1909, at the beginning of their streak of 90+ win seasons, was 674,915. In 1915, immediately after Mack sold everybody who wasn’t nailed down, total attendance was 146,223, down more than 78% in six years.

It’s entirely possible that Mack was better off financially by selling fewer tickets and no longer paying good baseball players. But attendance sure as heck didn’t go up.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 19, 2016 at 10:42 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: attendance, dugout, history

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-18-2016

Pittsburgh Press, August 18, 1916:

Manager Joe Tinker yesterday indicated very plainly his sentiments toward Heine Zimmerman. In spite of the fact that he did not have enough outfielders to go around, he sent Zimmerman to the bench, Zeider to third and employed Gene Packard, a pitcher, in left field for the game against the Giants. This is taken to mean that Tinker is about through with Zimmerman.

Good guess. The Cubs suspended Zimmerman a few days later for “laying down on the job”, and eventually traded him to the Giants for Larry Doyle.

This was a pretty big deal at the time; Zimmerman was a huge star who had won the NL Triple Crown in 1912 and finished in the top five in the NL in Offensive WAR in 1912, 1913, and 1914. On the other hand, Zimmerman was a giant pain in the butt who fixed games, so it’s easy to understand why Tinker wanted to get rid of him.

Zim was never officially banned from baseball, but he was no longer welcome as a pro ballplayer after 1919.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 18, 2016 at 11:00 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, heinie zimmerman, history

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-17-2016

Pittsburgh Press, August 17, 1916:

According to Eddie Ainsmith, the Washington catcher, Walter Johnson is developing a spitball delivery. What does this mean. There have been rumors of late that the Capitol City Speed King is losing his wonderful speed. Batters who have been facing him for several years say Walter doesn’t have the oldtime zip to his flings this year. And if it is a fact that he is trying the spitball there must be something to the rumors. The moist fling is regarded only as the last resort of a slipping pitcher, who realizes that his “old stuff” has deserted him.

Yep, it was the end of the line for The Big Train. He only had eleven and a half seasons, 192 wins, 1445 strikeouts, seven strikeout titles, three ERA crowns, two pennants, and one World Series championship remaining in that right arm.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 17, 2016 at 07:49 AM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, walter johnson

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-16-2016

Arizona Republican, August 16, 1916:

Babe Ruth came out the victor in a 13-inning pitching duel with Walter Johnson today, the Boston Americans defeating Washington in the latter’s final appearance at Fenway Park this season, 1 to 0.

Add that to the list of early MLB games I’d give a significant body part to be able to watch: Babe Ruth and Walter Johnson trading zeroes for 13 innings.

Also in the news 100 years ago today: A fan sues the St. Louis Browns for $15,000, claiming he was wrongly accused of stealing a ball that was batted into the stands.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 16, 2016 at 09:19 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: babe ruth, dugout, history, walter johnson

Monday, August 15, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-15-2016

Pittsburgh Press, August 15, 1916:

[Reds manager Christy Mathewson got a letter] from a bug in Hamilton, Ont., who has a lucky penny that he wants to dispose of. This rich card claims that the possession of the penny will make an instantaneous winner out of the Reds.
...
He offers to sell it to Matty for the small sum of a thousand dollars.

Matty replied by asking if the penny could play shortstop of had ever been known to make a home run with the bases full. He offered to take it on option, paying a nickel down and a nickel a week while the penny was on trial. He said if the Reds finished in the first division through the aid of a penny he would pay the full sum of a thousand dollars at the end of the season.

Matty was no dummy. Elsewhere in the newspapers of August 15, 1916, Indians outfielder Braggo Roth is suspended for throwing a glass bottle into the stands, and the Giants spend $2,000 to buy a teenage outfielder named Ross Youngs from Sherman (TX) of the Western Association.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 15, 2016 at 10:53 AM | 31 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, August 12, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-12-2016

Pittsburgh Press, August 12, 1916:

When Charles E. Hughes, Republican candidate for President, visited the Athletics-Detroit game in Detroit, Cobb was introduced to the candidate. Ty then presented Mr. Hughes with a baseball which was among his most treasured possessions and which any fan would be glad to own. The horsehide bears the signature of Theodore Roosevelt, Christy Mathewson, Chief Bender and Ty Cobb.

As a baseball nerd, a history nerd, and a baseball history nerd, this sounds to me like just about the coolest thing a person could own.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 12, 2016 at 07:19 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-11-2016

El Paso Herald, August 11, 1916:

As we get it, [Browns manager Fielder Jones’s] view of a winning policy is to tighten the defence to the point where the other fellow can’t score, except through miscarriage of plans; and then to outthink him a run or two on attack.
...
Taking as a basis for consideration the games from July 22 to Aug. 5, inclusive, the first facts the figures reveal are these.

That the Browns scored 69 runs on 127 hits, an average of one run for every 1.84 hits. That the opposition clubs have scored only 32 on 114, or only one run for every 3.56 hits made.
...
In the matter of counting tallies, given an equal amount of hitting Jones has taught his team to outthink or to somehow outdo the enemy.

Unsurprisingly, the 1916 Browns hitters led the league in walks by a mile. Their pitching staff gave up a below-average number of walks.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 11, 2016 at 07:29 AM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-10-2016

Bismarck Daily Tribune, August 10, 1916:

LOST—“Dolly” Elder and Joe Collins, crack diamond artists of the Bismarck baseball team. Last seen on the streets of Jamestown with two fair ladies. Anyone having any information as to the whereabouts, kindly advise the sporting editor of the Tribune as they are needed for the game with Mandan next Sunday.

I’m not sure if they ever found Elder and Collins. I’m just saying they’re local baseball stars and both almost exactly the right age to be the grandfather or great uncle of Travis Hafner, born 1977 in Jamestown, ND.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 10, 2016 at 10:13 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, August 09, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-9-2016

Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, August 9, 1916:

The Athletics not only have equaled the American League record for consecutive defeats by dropping 20 games in a row, but they also have broken the greatest record in the history of the game for defeats over a long stretch. Since June 26 the Athletics have won only two games and have dropped 39 out of the last 41 contests, which beats the greatest record of this sort ever made in the major leagues.
...
When the losing streak was started the Mackmen had won 17 and lost 39 games, while today the Mackmen have 19 won and 80 lost.

I’m having a tough time grasping how terrible the 1916 Athletics were. In a sport where even the worst teams win nearly a third of the time, to have a 2-39 stretch…that’s…wow.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 09, 2016 at 07:49 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, August 08, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-8-2016

Grand Forks Herald, August 8, 1916:

By losing yesterday’s game to Detroit, 4 to 2, the Philadelphia club placed itself in a position to tie Boston’s record of 20 consecutive defeats, established years ago.
...
Charles E. Hughes, presidential nominee, watched two innings of the game.

He didn’t win the election, but Hughes had a better 1916 than the Philadelphia Athletics.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 08, 2016 at 11:35 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, August 05, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-5-2016

Bridgeport Evening Farmer, August 5, 1916:

Captain Johnny Evers of the Boston National league baseball club last night issued a formal statement expressing his “sincerest regret” over the incident yesterday afternoon, when he had an altercation with Third Baseman Smith of the home club and was ordered off the field by Umpire Byron.

“I am perfectly willing to admit I lost my head,” the statement says.

“It will be a day or two before I am able to get back into the game because of my back and neck…As for my feeling between Red Smith and myself, let me say that we shook hands in the club house in the afternoon, of our own volition, and I am quite sure that from now on we will be the best of friends.”

“Sorry I attacked our third baseman. I done goofed.”

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 05, 2016 at 07:46 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, fights, history, johnny evers

Thursday, August 04, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-4-2016

Milwaukee Journal, August 4, 1916:

After a couple of battles in which Capt. Johnny Evers and Red Smith, Boston Nationals, figured yesterday, Evers announced he was “disgusted” with the way things were going, and that if he could obtain an unconditional release he was “about ready to quit the Braves.”

The trouble started when [Evers] called Red down for unsportsmanlike conduct. Louden, Cincinnati, had tripled and was about to make a dask for the home plate after a fly, when Red held him. Quigley, umpire on bases, saw the incident and let Louden walk to the plate. Red muttered something and Evers yelled “That’s a great alibi for your dirty playing.”

When they got back to the dugout, Evers and Smith got in a fistfight and the other Braves had to pull them apart. Evers got ejected for the brawl. In the clubhouse after the game, Evers and Smith fought again and their teammates hung back and let them pummel each other.

Who’s the last manager to physically attack one of his players? Billy Martin?

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 04, 2016 at 11:05 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, fights, history

Wednesday, August 03, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-3-2016

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, August 3, 1916:

The sudden disappearance of Harold Isroff, aged 12, son of Mrs. Anna Isroff, was solved when the lad was found in the American League baseball park, Cleveland, after relatives [in Youngstown] had become frantic. He is a good ball player and said he wanted to see Tris Speaker play, as he was tired of playing “one ol’ cat.”

Okay, maybe he shouldn’t have done things that way, but it’s tough to get upset at a kid for wanting to watch Tris Speaker.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 03, 2016 at 09:54 AM | 30 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, August 02, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-2-2016

Toledo News-Bee, August 2, 1916:

The secret of the Browns’ winning streak in spite of the heat is out. It’s hot hotels. They deserted them and went to the ball park where they slept nights under tents while their opponents spent hot sleepless nights in downtown hotels.

Air conditioning is so ubiquitous in 2016 that I guess I never realized this would have been an issue back then.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 02, 2016 at 07:31 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, August 01, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-1-2016

Milwaukee Journal, August 1, 1916:

R.J. (Bobby) Wallace, umpire for the American league, today signed to play the rest of the season with the St. Louis Americans. For several years Wallace was star shortstop for the St. Louis team, but two seasons ago joined the American league staff of umpires.
...
Branch Rickey, business manager of the St. Louis team, said he had signed Wallace because Ernest Johnson, shortstop, had been injured Sunday.

No big deal. Just your everyday “umpire gets signed to a major league roster” story. Admittedly, this umpire is a Hall of Famer as a player, but still…

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 01, 2016 at 07:39 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: bobby wallace, dugout, history

Friday, July 29, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-29-2016

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, July 29, 1916:

Bands must cease playing in American League ball parks while games are in progress, according to a ruling made today by President Johnson. His decision was the result of a protest made by the Cleveland club because Umpire O’Loughlin stopped a band in the Indians’ park.

“People come to ball games to see baseball,” said Mr. Johnson. “Music is all right between innings, but not while the game is on. I shall instruct all umpires to follow O’Loughlin’s example.”

This is a follow up to yesterday’s link, in which O’Loughlin threatened to forfeit a game to Boston if the drummer in a band didn’t stop playing during the game.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: July 29, 2016 at 09:09 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-28-2016

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, July 28, 1916:

Ump Silk O’Loughlin stopped the fracas between the Boston Red Sox and the Cleveland Indians three times [yesterday] and threatened at one time to forfeit the game to Boston—all on account of a band, the feature of which was a bass drum soloist. The band, and particularly the drummer, got on the nerves of the Red Sox especially when the Indians started batting rallies.
...
The drummer soloist shut his eyes and whanged away in such fashion that the Boston pitchers—there were two of ‘em—wobbled. O’Loughlin ordered the band to stop playing, something never done before in Cleveland in the history of the game.

I knew John Adams and his drum had been showing up at the ballpark in Cleveland for a long time, but 100 years? Must’ve been John Adams Senior Senior Senior.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: July 28, 2016 at 12:06 PM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, indians

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-27-2016

Toledo News-Bee, July 27, 1916:

RED SOX PITCHER, ACCUSED OF USING BEANBALL, SAYS NO HURLER DELIBERATELY TRIES TO HIT AN OPPONENT

“The beanball will always be a part of the game,” said [Carl] Mays, who has punctured five men this season. “I don’t believe there’s a pitcher in any league in the country who ever deliberately tried to hit a batsman. No man’s arm is as true as a rifle.”
...
“Some [batters] ‘choke up’ to within two inches of the plate instead of sticking within the six-inch boundary prescribed by the rules of the game.”

“Naturally the pitchers who try to keep the ball high and inside on these, or any other batters are liable to hit men when they put a lot of stuff on the ball.”

There’s an accompanying photo with this article, with a caption that reads in part, “Below, Carl Mays, of world’s champion Red Sox, center of latest campaign on deadly pitch.”

Four years and three weeks later, Mays would again be the center of unwanted attention over a beanball.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: July 27, 2016 at 09:16 AM | 30 comment(s)
  Beats: beanballs, carl mays, dugout, history

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