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Dugout Newsbeat

Thursday, March 05, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-5-2015

Pittsburgh Press, March 5, 1915:

They are counting 10 on Hunter Hill, the Texan who startled by St. Louis by carrying a gun in his back pocket even on the playing field. Hunter has grown fat and can’t pick them up any more.

A gun in your pocket on the field? That seems ill-advised. Tim Raines’s cocaine vials are no longer the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard of an MLB player keeping in his back pocket during a game.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: March 05, 2015 at 09:30 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, hunter hill

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-4-2015

Grantland Rice in the Pittsburgh Press, March 4, 1915:

Dear sir—

In your opinion could a ball club be picked from those who live in the south good enough to beat or make an even fight against a club picked from northern players?  E.H.K.

The north would have a decided margin in pitchers, catchers and infielders. The south’s big edge would come in the outfield play, where Cobb, Speaker, Jackson and Milan would close out the debate.

I’ll give this a shot in the comments. My border will follow the Mason-Dixon Line, Ohio River, and the Missouri Compromise line. Players will be classified by birthplace and starters will be determined by Career WAR.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: March 04, 2015 at 08:27 AM | 19 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, March 03, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-3-2015

Pittsburgh Press, March 3, 1915:

A letter from [Washington] Pitcher Bert Gallia, which reached Manager Griffith this morning, explains why the Texan has not reported at Charlottesville with the advance squad.

Gallia writes that his mother is dangerously ill, and that it may be several days before he can leave Woodboro, Tex., where he lives, for Charlottesville.

“Dear Mr. Griffith, Please excuse Bert’s absence. He is helping me recover from an illness. Signed, Gallia’s Mother.”

Gallia’s mom appears to have recovered, because this article quotes a letter he sent her in 1918. As for Bert, he had his best season in 1915, winning 17 games while putting up a 130 ERA+ in 259.2 innings.


Monday, March 02, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-2-2015

Pittsburgh Press, March 2, 1915:

Oscar Theander Harstad, whom Cleveland Indians got from the Northwestern league, turned loose on Addie Joss’ delivery in his first workout and is hailed the first eye opener among the rookies.

I’m not the sort of guy to pooh-pooh other people’s achievements, but just about anyone could have hit Addie Joss’s fastball in 1915. Addie had been dead for four years.

So I’m going to go ahead and call this report fictitious.

Anyhoo, Harstad made the team as a reserve pitcher and put up 82 innings of 89 ERA+ ball in 1915, his only season in the big leagues.


Friday, February 27, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-27-2015

Washington Times, February 27, 1915:

Six major league ball teams are today en route to their training headquarters, and within a few days you fans will have the greatest kind of a feast over the news which is coming from the various camps regarding the development of the players.
...
The Athletics will [train] at Jacksonville, while the Brooklyns will proceed by rail to Daytona, and the Phillies to St. Petersburg, Fla.

The other teams which are traveling south today are the Chicago Cubs, who left the Windy City last night, the Indians, or Cleveland American League team, which goes to San Anton [sic], Tex., and the St. Louis Cardinals, which are guided to Hot Wells, Tex., by Miller J. Huggins.

Interesting to note that even though the locations of Spring Training camps have changed, the length of camp has stayed about the same. They started camp a bit later in 1915, but the season also started later.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 27, 2015 at 08:33 AM | 62 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-26-2015

Pittsburgh Press, February 26, 1915:

[During a team jogging drill, White Sox pitcher Reb] Russell repeatedly lagged behind the others and once when passing the home plate, where the manager stood the boss called: “Show some speed, Tex. Where’s your ‘pep’?”

“What do you think this is, my birthday?” was the rather sarcastic reply of the bulky athlete.

“Well, it isn’t any holiday,” came the answer from the manager. “This isn’t a vacation trip. You’re out here to work.”
...
The affair was whispered about among the other boys rather apprehensively after the practice was over.

Russell is a pretty fascinating player, often overlooked when people talk about the best two-way players in baseball history. He pitched in the majors for six years, put up a 121 OPS+ in 1291.2 innings, led the league in fewest walks per nine innings twice, and allowed a total of two home runs in his final 807.2 innings.

After an elbow injury made it impossible for him to pitch, Reb converted to the outfield and hit .323/.377/.568 (142 OPS+) in two seasons with the Pirates as a position player. He wasn’t much of a defensive outfielder, so those gaudy hitting numbers weren’t enough to keep him in the majors. Russell headed to the American Association and continued to put up eye-popping hitting numbers. He retired with a lifetime minor league batting average north of .320.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 26, 2015 at 10:03 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, reb russell

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-25-2015

Toledo News-Bee, February 25, 1915:

Happy Felch [sic], a 1914 [Milwaukee] Brewer, is a confident rookie. He showed up to join the Chicago White Sox on the training trip, carrying a special bat.

“Mister, what position do you play?” inquired a youngster as Felch passed through the crowd at the station.

“Batter,” announced Felch.

I’m pretty sure he said “Bettor”.

Also on the same page as the linked article, Joe Tinker tells the Smitty-approved story of the time he and Cincinnati’s Dick Egan got into a fight after the game, on the field. Frank Chance was in the shower when he heard about the fight and ran out to the field break it up…but forgot to wear pants. Or underwear. Or a towel.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 25, 2015 at 08:01 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, happy felsch, history

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-24-2015

Red Sox third baseman Larry Gardner, quoted in the Toledo News-Bee, February 24, 1915:

The funniest thing I ever saw on a baseball field was a pitcher sliding clear past third base and spiking a coacher, and at the same time preventing his team from making what might have been considered a serious error.
...
[After a fly out to center, while the runner on second was heading for third base, Browns pitcher Bill] Bailey came tearing across to back up the third baseman. Just as he reached the base line his feet slipped and he fell sliding feet high in the air straight at [Red Sox manager Patsy] Donovan who was too interested in the welfare of the runner to see Bailey.

Bailey slid straight into Donovan, spiked him and brought him down on top of himself. Meantime the runner slid to third, the ball took a crooked hop, got past the baseman and hit Bailey, who recovered it before the base runner could start home, and prevented a score. It is the only time on record that a pitcher spiked the coacher.

I’d love to see video of this, preferably set to Yakity Sax, but obviously that’s not going to happen.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 24, 2015 at 07:57 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, February 23, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-23-2015

Pittsburgh Press, February 23, 1915:

“If baseball players did not load around and drink so much booze during the off-season, there wouldn’t be any necessity for so much training in the spring. This was “Billy” Sunday’s opening clout when asked what he thought of training camps for the major league clubs.

“Of course, I don’t mean to say that training camps are not necessary. They are even more so today than they were when I was in the game, although there isn’t nearly as much boozing among the players now as there was then,” continued the evangelist…

Billy Sunday sounds like a one-man party. (Yes, I’m very familiar with his post-baseball career in the ministry.)

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 23, 2015 at 08:17 AM | 31 comment(s)
  Beats: billy sunday, dugout, history, loafing

Friday, February 20, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-20-2015

Pittsburgh Press, February 20, 1915:

One writer suggests that the Cleveland Americans be called the Submarines, because they are always on the bottom. The only objection is that the Cincinnati Reds might dispute this title.

...and elsewhere on the same page:

After being with a second-division team for several years Lajoie has got renewed ambition. He has got something worth while to work for in 1915.
...
“I can hardly wait for the time to go south,” said Lajoie. “It has been several years since I was so eager to get into a baseball uniform as I am now. I want to show that I’ve got a lot of good ball playing yet left in me, and I think the ‘old boy’ will be back there in the .300 class next season.”

The joke was on Nap. The 1915 Athletics lost 109 games, which was the third-worst record in MLB from 1900-1915. The 1916 Athletics were the worst team of baseball’s modern area. They went 36-117 (.235) and finished 54.5 games out of first place. 41-year-old Nap hit .246 with no OBP or SLG to speak of, then retired.

And the Cleveland Submarines? They won a World Series before the Athletics finished above last place.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 20, 2015 at 08:10 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: athletics, dugout, history, indians, nap lajoie

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-19-2015


From a mini-biography of Clark Griffith in the Tacoma Times, February 19, 1915:

The strain of managing appears to have rasped his nerves. His hair turned gray in one season at Cincinnati, and he holds the record of taking 28 drinks of water in four minutes in a crisis of a game.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 19, 2015 at 09:46 AM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: clark griffith, dugout, history

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-18-2015

Pittsburgh Press, February 18, 1915:

[League President] Ed Barrow says that while the International league will adhere to a roster limit of 17, it will not be compulsory for clubs to carry playing managers. Bench managers will be considered as players, however.

16-17 man rosters? How are they supposed to run a pitching staff with less than 12 pitchers?

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 18, 2015 at 10:15 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-17-2015

Washington Times, February 17, 1915:

Fans [in Philadelphia] stand amazed at the official announcement from Connie Mack that J. Franklin Baker, the famous home run slugger, hero of every world’s series he has played in except the last, has quit baseball.
...
[Connie Mack says] “There has been no disagreement over salary terms with Baker. He has just simply decided to quit, that’s all.”
...
Baker’s real reason for quitting baseball is that he prefers to remain on his big farm at Trappe, Md. Mrs. Baker, particularly since the death of their children, has been urging him to stay home with her, instead of traveling around the country with the Athletics.

Most sources, including SABR, the Baseball Hall of Fame, and contemporary newspapers, suggest that Mack is stretching the truth here. According to those reports, Baker wanted to renegotiate his contract as a result of Mack selling off most of the team, Mack declined to do so, and neither was willing to budge.

After the 1915 season, under pressure from Ban Johnson to get one of the American League’s star players back on the field, Mack sold Baker to the Yankees.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 17, 2015 at 08:42 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: connie mack, dugout, history, home run baker

Monday, February 16, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-16-2015

New York Tribune, February 16, 1915:

“Don’t look any further, for I am the mascot you want,” wrote Babe Shiels, of The Bronx. The committee appointed by Damon Runyon, of “The American,” took the advice and Shiels was chosen yesterday to help Bill Donovan revive the Yankees.

There will be no trouble in distinguising the players from the mascot next season. Shiels is very small. He is shorter than [5 foot 7] Fritz Maisel.
...
[Third place finisher Joseph] Livingston’s statement of his qualifications for the job was somewhat original.

“Why do I want to be mascot?” said his letter. “Because I am crazy. Everybody in baseball is crazy. If I wasn’t crazy I wouldn’t think that I could get the job. If the people that got up this idea wasn’t crazy they wouldn’t expect a boy of ten to write a composition.” Joseph will receive a league baseball.

I’d have chosen Livingston. Sounds like a cool kid.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 16, 2015 at 08:13 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, mascots

Friday, February 13, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-13-2015

Pittsburgh Press, February 13, 1915:

[University of Michigan pitcher] George Sisler, southpaw extraordinary until he strained his arm last spring, dug up a mitt, tossed a few balls and joyously informed his college mates that his offside wing was as good as ever. If Coach Lundgren agrees with him, that means that George will bear the brunt of the mound work this spring.

Sisler was in the big leagues for good as a 1B/RF/P by June 1915.

Obviously he was a terrific hitter, but (as I’ve mentioned before) he was also a good MLB pitcher when he had the opportunity. In 1915-16, when he did the bulk of his pitching, Sisler threw 97 innings of 2.32 ERA (122 ERA+) ball, didn’t allow a home run, and gave up 7.4 hits per nine innings. Among pitchers who debuted in the past 100 seasons, George Sisler has the third-most career innings (111.0) without ever giving up a home run.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 13, 2015 at 08:04 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, george sisler, history

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-12-2015

Washington Times, February 12, 1915:

President Joseph A. Lannin, of the Boston Red Sox, predicted two-dollar baseball in the near future unless the controversy between [organized baseball] and the Federals comes to an early termination, at the “Home Night” annual dinner of Boston College last night.
...
“I know personally that the Federal League has already lost more than $1,000,000, one backer alone dropping $650,000.” This cannot continue if the sport of baseball is to live, he said.

According to the federal government’s Consumer Price Index, $2 in 1915 had the same buying power as $46.88 in 2014. Other conversions: $1M in 1915 is about $23.4M in 2014, and $650K in 1915 is around $15.2M in 2014 dollars.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 12, 2015 at 09:51 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-11-2015

Harrisburg Star-Independent, February 11, 1915:

Manager Bill Donovan, of the New York American League baseball team, was unsuccessful yesterday in his attempt to sign Hugh High and Walter Pipp, members of the Detroit club. Each player asked Donovan for a higher salary than he was willing to offer.
...
President Navin, of the Detroit club, said he is willing to release the two players to New York provided they and Donovan agree on terms.

So I guess they’re saying Wally Pipp was being…a headache.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 11, 2015 at 07:47 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, wally pipp

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-10-2015

Harrisburg Telegraph, February 10, 1915:

Curtis Guild, former ambassador to Russia, declared in a recent address that America was vitally dependent upon Russia, as the hides of Siberian ponies were used in the manufacture of baseballs.

The makers of the Spalding, Reach and Victor balls, which are used, respectively, in the National, the American and the Federal League, assert vehemently that they use nothing but American horsehide. They state further that all the materials used in the manufacture of baseball goods come from this country and not from Russia.

Crisis averted.

By the way, I never imagined that I’d use the “Siberian pony leather newsbeat” more than once, but here we are.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 10, 2015 at 07:58 AM | 5 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, siberian pony leather

Monday, February 09, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-9-2015

Pittsburgh Gazette-Times, February 9, 1915:

Ray Corhan, star shortstop of the Pacific Coast League, who signed a contract with the St. Louis Federals and accepted $500 advance money, will be allowed to remain with the Los Angeles team, Phil Ball of the St. Louis Feds announced today.
...
“Probably we could force him to play, but I don’t see the use. We will let him go to the little old Coast league if he returns the $500 and you may bet he’ll return the coin. Corhan kicked about the St. Louis climate.”

Corhan next appeared in the major leagues in 1916 with…*drum roll*...the St. Louis Cardinals. Climate change, I guess.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 09, 2015 at 08:05 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, ray corhan

Friday, February 06, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-6-2015

Pittsburgh Press, February 6, 1915:

One of the prettiest fights on the [White Sox spring training] schedule will be the finale in the elimination series for the third base post. There are four entrants for this prize—Howard Baker, Jimmy Breton, Al Bromwich and Russell Blackburne.

The entries are not closed yet and the number of contestants for this price may be materially increased, but the chances are one of this quartet will be the winner.

The White Sox having a question mark at third base? That’s unpossible!

Blackburne won the job and was absolutely miserable, slugging .240 in 96 games. It got so bad that Sox manager Pants Rowland, flying by the seat of his, uh, Pants, put outfielder Braggo Roth at third base for 35 games. The good news is that Braggo led the league in home runs. The bad news is that he fielded .837 and committed 15 errors in 35 games. Thankfully, nobody ever let Braggo play another inning at third. Until he changed his name to Bobby Bonilla.

In other news that could have been taken from just about any year in the 20th century, Charles Comiskey isn’t sure who’s going to win the American league, but he’s confident it won’t be Cleveland. (To the right of the linked article.)

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 06, 2015 at 08:22 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, February 05, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-5-2015

Milwaukee Journal, February 5, 1915:

Because he just can’t think for a moment of leaving his home town, his parents and his best girl and going several hundred miles to Kansas City where he would be required to remain for some [illegible] months without a trip back home, “Cy” Young, 21 years old, standing third in batting in the Michigan State league with an average of .306 for the 1914 season, and the leading fielding shortstop in the Class D organization in 1913, and again in 1914, has notified [illegible], president of the Cadillac [Michigan] club, that he is through with baseball.

With the loss of Young, baseball loses a real ball player—a boy who looked good enough for the majors.

“Young sure loves that girl a heap and then some,” said [team president] Dr. Moore, after reading Young’s latest letter…

It’s tough to tell, but Young may have spent a couple months with Sioux City in 1915. The “Young” that played for Cadillac in 1913-1914 was named R. Young and played shortstop. A shortstop named Roy Young appears in the SABR/BB-Ref records on the 1915 Sioux City Indians (in the Class A Western League), plays poorly in 35 games, then disappears for good.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 05, 2015 at 09:38 AM | 19 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, February 04, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-4-2015

Pittsburgh Press, February 4, 1915:

Baseball devotees of Murphysboro [Illinois] have introduced an innovation in the world of sport by converting a frozen lake into a diamond, where regulation nine-inning games will be played the remainder of the winter. The members of the opposing teams wear skates, and the agility with which they cavort around is truly amazing. In the first game the Federals defeated the Unions by a score of 11 to 8 in the presence of a crowd nearly as large as the attendance at a contest in midsummer.

I’m pretty sure this is what a bunt would have looked like.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 04, 2015 at 08:13 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, February 03, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-3-2015

Pittsburgh Press, February 3, 1915:

The president of the Phillies [William Baker] was closeted with [Braves owner] James E. Gaffney and George Whitted for several hours. Whitted refused to tolerate a transfer to the Quakers.
...
“I appreciate,” said [Whitted], “that I am not a star. I have worked hard to advance in my chosen profession. In Boston finally I was able to establish myself in the esteem of fandom as a regular. I am not sure that I would earn kindred distinction in Philadelphia.
...
“I would prefer to be with a champion club. The world’s series pool means a lot to the lucky player and I consider myself as having been lucky to be with the Braves last year. It is because of this that I would not consent to a transfer to Philadelphia save for an increase in salary that would represent the winning share of the world’s series pot.”

Whitted eventually agreed to go to Philadelphia. I’m not sure whether he got the salary increase he was looking for, but he did get a share of the World Series pot after the Phillies won the 1915 NL pennant.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 03, 2015 at 08:05 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, possum whitted

Monday, February 02, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-2-2015

Pittsburgh Press, February 2, 1915:

Today is the thirty-ninth birthday anniversary of the National league. There will be no unusual activity about league headquarters here. Secretary Heydler was not even aware today was the league’s birthday until reminded of it.

Can I put an entire league on the Birthday Team?

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: February 02, 2015 at 08:16 AM | 39 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, national league

Friday, January 30, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-30-2015

A followup on yesterday’s Link of the Day, from the Pittsburgh Press, January 30, 1915:

Two major leagues only will be recognized by the powers of organized baseball so long as the civic laws of the land permit the operation of the national pastime under existing circumstances.
...
A number of promoters of fast minor league clubs evidently have fooled themselves into the idea that their circuit will be granted classification equal to the big two. It is a foolish hope.
...
According to stories from the west the American association has taken for granted that it is to be raised to major classification because the National and American leagues have expressed a willingness to lift the draft on it. Such an absurd conclusion scarcely can be imagined.

So I guess that’s a “no”.

Willie Horton Hears The Who (Dan Lee) Posted: January 30, 2015 at 08:06 AM | 39 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, minor leagues

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