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Dugout Newsbeat

Friday, March 23, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-23-2018

Washington Times, March 23, 1918:

So many of the small minor leagues in the Middle West have disbanded or temporarily suspended operations for the period of the war that there are now only a few organizations in the vicinity of St. Louis to which major league clubs can farm out young players.

In view of this, [Branch] Rickey has conceived the idea of organizing a team which he will enter in the justly celebrated “Muny” League of St. Louis, and independent professional circuit that has municipal support and which includes a number of really good ball clubs.

A major league team operating a minor professional ballclub? It’s crazy. It’ll never work.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 23, 2018 at 09:41 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-22-2018

Washington Times, March 22, 1918:

[Reds catcher Harry Smith describes an attempted triple steal:] “We had a manager…who had an elegant set of signs, and one of them was the order to steal a base, made by tapping himself on the forehead with his right hand. One afternoon we had the bases full and none out in a most important game, when he gave the sign to steal. Nothing to do but obey, so everybody stole with the bases full. Of course, the cruel enemy rounded us up and made it a triple play. The manager was a maniac till he told him he had ordered the triple steal—and then he remembered that he had slapped a mosquito which lit upon his forehead!”

This almost has to be made up, right? I can’t even fathom how somebody could get caught stealing second 2-5-4. Well, maybe Ernie Lombardi.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 22, 2018 at 12:27 PM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-21-2018

Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, March 21, 1918:

The ability to heave hand grenades has been oft mentioned as a point in favor of the ball player as a war prospect. Outfielders have been declared especially adapted for the peculiar heave required to effectively shoot the hot ones into the ranks of the foe. That there is a more important feature to the grenade business still is indicated by late reports which pronounce catching grenades of more importance than heaving them. The thing, it seems, is to handle chances cleanly and return the pellets into the enemy’s ranks, there to do a boomerang stunt.

My immediate reaction is that I wouldn’t want to be the guy catching the grenade and throwing it back, but I guess it sure beats having it land near you and explode.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 21, 2018 at 12:27 PM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-20-2018

Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, March 20, 1918:

There is much gloom and sadness in St. Pete these days, because one of the best little plans that ever split the plate has been wrecked beyond repair. Al Lang, the hustling Mayor, is wearing a grouch and other members of the welcome-to-our-city club are disconsolate. They have been foiled, and the worst part of it is that no one can be blamed, not even themselves.

On Monday night it was decided to have a monster celebration to welcome the incoming Phillies when they stepped off the train. Mayor Lang had his speech of welcome all prepared, the Kilties Band was tuned up to sprinkle harmony all over the town in the triumphant march from the station to the hotel…Then the train came in…The passengers were scrutinized carefully as they stepped off the Pullmans, but there was no sign of the Phillies.

After the train steamed out of the station the Kilties’ Band put mufflers on their instruments, Mayor Lang took the key [to the city] home and the crowd dispersed. Gavvy Cravath was the only arrival, and now he is sore because they did not lead him to the hotel like a regular ball player.

Cue the Price is Right losing horn. There are more fun details of the story in the linked article. Definitely worth a read if you like 100-year-old fails.

Also in the news a century ago today, baseball clubs are trying to figure out whether or how the newly-enacted Daylight Saving Time law should affect start times.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 20, 2018 at 10:14 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, March 19, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-19-2018

Toledo News-Bee, March 19, 1918:

Pitcher George Foster, star of the Red Sox hurling staff in the 1916 world’s series, announced today that he had quit the game. He will devote his future to raising hogs. The contract Boston offered Foster this season specified a cut of $2000 in salary. This is said to have prompted Foster to quit. Foster is building one of the biggest hog ranches in [Oklahoma].

I can see why he’d have been upset. Foster was still in his 20s and a good pitcher, had a career ERA+ of 116 in five seasons and would have been a prime candidate for MVP of the 1915 World Series if there had been such an award. (2-0, 2.00, 2 CG, 18 IP, 12 H, 13 K, 2 BB, and went 4-for-8 with a double as a hitter). And they offered him a multi-thousand dollar pay cut. Anyway, Foster did indeed walk away and didn’t play professional baseball again until 1922, when he resurfaced as a slugging second baseman in the Western Association. Rube spent 1923-1925 as a ho-hum pitcher in the PCL, finishing his career 9-15 with a 4.95 ERA for the ‘25 Oakland Oaks.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 19, 2018 at 09:50 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, March 16, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-16-2018

Washington Times, March 16, 1918:

Wally Schang is playing third base for the Red Sox in their practice skirmishes [in Arkansas]. Manager Barrow will not admit that Schang will continue to hold down the hot corner, but he keeps the former Philadelphia catcher right out there facing sizzlers.

Babe Ruth at first, Johnny Evers at second, [Everett] Scott at short and Schang at third is the line-up of the infield right now.

Man, things are so bad in Boston that they’ve got a pitcher playing first base. They’ll never win anything in 1918.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 16, 2018 at 11:26 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-15-2018

Toledo News-Bee, March 15, 2018:

Al Timme, president of the Milwaukee club, is probably the busiest man in the world today, answering communications from baseball men who want to manage the Brewers, now that it is clear Ned Egan, hired for that job, is out of the game for the year. Egan, who injured his spine in a skating accident, is in a bad way.

When I first saw this, I thought it was kind of amusing: An ice skating accident ending a manager’s season. But the more I read about it, the more awful it is. Another ice skater ran into Egan and knocked him over. Egan thought it was a minor injury, but it turned out that he broke two vertebrae. Eventually it became so bad that Egan was unable to walk. He shot and killed himself in May 1918.

There’s more on Ned Egan, who was known as the “Connie Mack of the Minors”, in an excellent post from 2014 at Baseball History Daily.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 15, 2018 at 10:09 AM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-14-2018

Toledo News-Bee, March 14, 1918:

The story of how Arthur Fletcher nearly lost a pair of fingers from his right hand reached [New York] on Thursday. The star Giant shortstop was trying to count the revolutions of the fans in his motor with the two fingers. He escaped with bruises.

Art Fletcher: A new candidate for Biggest Idiot Ever.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 14, 2018 at 09:44 AM | 38 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-13-2018

Bridgeport Times, March 13, 1918:

The mystery as to why Harold Ruel of the Yanks was nicknamed “Muddy” was explained by [Yankees team secretary] Harry Sparrow, who says it is because Ruel’s uniform while at Memphis was always the color of the Missouri, part of the Mississippi river. He never had his unirofm washed while on a hitting streak, and, as he always hit well, the flannels never saw any water.

Bill James mentions a completely different story in the Historical Baseball Abstract, in which a baseball splattered mud all over Ruel’s face when he was a kid. Your guess is as good as mine as to which is true.

Also in the linked article, railroad workers wouldn’t let Benny Kauff take both his clothes and his bats to spring training, so he took the clothes and left the bats. On one hand, it seems crazy that a ballplayer who’s obsessive about hitting would intentionally leave his bats behind. But on the other hand, they were probably cheaper to replace than a trunk full of suits.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 13, 2018 at 09:50 AM | 40 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, March 12, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-12-2018

Washington Herald, March 12, 1918:

An unusual and interesting feature of the spring training of the St. Louis Americans is focusing the attention of the fans upon Shreveport, La., for there Jack Powell, fat and middle-aged, is attempting what, if successful, will prove one of the most remarkable come-backs in the history of baseball.

Powell, who twirled for the St. Louis club during the team’s first year in the American League, and who left major league baseball in 1912, is paying his own expenses during the training season, so confident is he of his ability to outdo Father Time.

Powell was 43 years old and hadn’t thrown a pitch in organized baseball since 1914. He was so old that he pitched multiple seasons for the Cleveland Spiders. Unsurprisingly, he didn’t make the 1918 St. Louis Browns and never pitched again.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 12, 2018 at 08:22 AM | 34 comment(s)
  Beats: comebacks, dugout, history

Friday, March 09, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-9-2018

Bridgeport Times, March 9, 1918:


On March 9, 1859, at a meeting of the fathers of baseball held in New York, it was declared that the bat should be made of wood, and have a diameter not to exceed two inches and a half and a length not greater than 42 inches.
The early rule that the bat should be made “of wood” wasn’t binding enough in the early days of professionalism for some of the players sneaked in bats into which holes had been made and filled with lead.

It would blow their minds to learn that 100 years later, people would be filling bats with cork instead of lead.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 09, 2018 at 09:53 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: bats, dugout, history

Thursday, March 08, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-8-2018

Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, March 8, 1918:

It generally is admitted that the International League awaits only the dead line, March 25, to formally disappear from the baseball scenery. The scene already is set for the obsequies and the remains will be quietly interred.

Persistent word is heard, however, of an effort, said to be backed principally by Jack Dunn, of Baltimore, and McCaffery, of Toronto, the only club owners voting to continue, to patch up a new circuit and in a way keep the old hulk going…The probable line-up of the league will be Toronto, Buffalo, Rochester and Syracuse in the north and Newark, Baltimore, Richmond and Wilmington, Del., in the south.

Sounds like they were just kind of winging it at this point, but it worked. Dunn and McCaffery saved the International League and it’s still here 100 years later.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 08, 2018 at 07:48 AM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, March 07, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-7-2018

Washington Times, March 7, 1918:

Now that Dave Robertson has decided to retire from baseball, it is a certainty that Manager McGraw will use Ross Young [sic] in right field this season.
He is a wide, heavy swinger, with a good eye, and is fleet of foot. Ever since Young has been playing professional ball he has never hit under .300, and he has played in several minor leagues.

Ross Youngs hit .145 in 55 at-bats for the 1914 Austin Senators, though he was a 17-year-old playing in the Texas League. I’m willing to cut him some slack.

Youngs was a .322/.399/.441 career hitter in the major leagues and wound up in the Hall of Fame. Yes, it was a Veteran’s Committee pick and yes, he was elected during the years when the Committee was inducted everybody Frankie Frisch ever played with. But Ross Youngs was a hell of a hitter. I’m not going to make a HOF case for him, but Youngs was basically Tony Gwynn from 1918-1924, then struggled in 1925 before being diagnosed with the illness that ended his career in 1926 and his life in 1927. You can sort of see how Hall voters would look at his career and try to figure out what would have happened if he hadn’t been ill.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 07, 2018 at 11:57 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, March 06, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-6-2018

Toledo News-Bee, March 6, 1918:

The Cleveland Indians arrived [in New Orleans] on Wednesday without bats, uniforms, or trunks. Their equipment is somewhere in Dixie. The players and baggage traveled on the same train from Cleveland to Cincinnati. Then they parted company. Manager Fohl ordered first practice on Wednesday, and planned to borrow equipment.

I’ve never played professionally, but I imagine it would be more difficult to practice without bats or baseballs.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 06, 2018 at 09:43 AM | 43 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, March 05, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-5-2018

Washington Times, March 5, 1918:

The Red Sox are to share Braves Field with George Stallings’ National League club this year. Work will be started on a new clubhouse within a few days. Fenway Park, situated in the Fenway, now a handsome residence section, is today worth twice as much as it was when the American League moved there from Huntington avenue a few years ago.
The overhead costs of Braves Field have caused President Haughton and his associates to extend an invitation to the Red Sox to share the larger ball park.

It seems incomprehensible now that the Sox could have permanently moved to Braves Field, demolished Fenway, and sold the land.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 05, 2018 at 10:22 AM | 27 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, fenway park, history

Friday, March 02, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-2-2018

Bridgeport Times, March 2, 1918:

Mr. George Perritt of Shreveport, La., right-handed pitcher for the New York Giants, says he’s through. No more baseball for him. He will not play for John J. McGraw in 1918, and never, never, never will bend another outshoot over the old pan at the Polo Grounds. So he says.
[Perritt:] “It won’t do any good for McGraw to come here to sign me to anything—unless he wants to buy an automobile…I’m through with baseball—through forever. I’m selling automobiles now, and the selling is good. I have no dispute with the New York Baseball Club over enything, but I won’t sign to play ball, because I can’t. I can make more money in the automobile business.”

Pol Perritt started 31 games for the 1918 Giants. No word on how many whitewalls he sold.

Also, Perritt’s given name was William.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 02, 2018 at 10:36 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, March 01, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-1-2018

El Paso Herald, March 1, 1918:

Harry Frazee, Jr., 15 years old, is an enterprising school boy. Last spring he wrote to his father, president of the Red Sox, for half a dozen new balls. Frazee, Sr., paid $1.25 each for them and shipped them immediately. Several weeks later he received another urgent request for a second half dozen, which also were sent with a letter asking what had been done with the first batch. Back came a reply which read:

“I sold the first half dozen at a quarter apiece. Business is rushing!”

And somehow, young Frazee only had the second-worst baseball business mind in the family.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 01, 2018 at 10:50 AM | 27 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-28-2018

Washington Times, February 28, 1918:


A definite decision on the part of the International League to close its parks for the season of 1918 is expected soon, it was said [in New York] today.

Almost daily indications of a collapse of the league are found in the sale of players by the various clubs. In many cases the clubs are selling their best men.

Seems like this is the sort of thing you’d want nailed down before March. Anyway, the IL didn’t go dark for 1918. It claims to have operated continuously since 1884, though the history gets a bit convoluted and strained in the late 19th century.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 28, 2018 at 10:03 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-27-2018

New York Sun, February 27, 1918:

Some years ago [recently deceased professional boxer] Terry McGovern had an idea that he was a first class baseball player. He did perform with several semi-professional clubs, and got to putting in his mornings working out with the Superbas at old Washington Park. One morning Charley Ebbets found Terry coming out of the clubhouse, and Charley evidently did not like the idea of having strangers about the sacred diggings.

“Don’t you know that clubhouse is only for the ball players?” said Ebbets.
“Yes,” snapped Terry in quick retort. “Why don’t you get some?”

...and at that, the referee waved off the verbal jousting match. McGovern by TKO in the first round.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 27, 2018 at 10:29 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, February 26, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-26-2018

Washington Times, February 26, 1918:

“Irish” Meusel, the young outfielder once with the Griffmen and now on the reserve list of the Philadelphia Nationals, is due to receive his third contract in a day or so. He’s in the contract-receiving business.

The first contract he got from Colonel Baker angered him because of the low salary mentioned and he threw it away. Back again went another contract, calling for the same old figured. Meusel tore that up and mailed the pieces to the classical leader of the Alexanderless Phillies.

Now goes another little contract, containing the identical figured mentioned in the other two. Maybe Meusel will send it back by freight collect this time.

Meusel eventually became a star, but at this point he was approaching his 25th birthday, hadn’t appeared in a big league game since 1914, and had zero career hits. Irish didn’t have a ton of leverage here.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 26, 2018 at 09:37 AM | 44 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, February 23, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-23-2018

Bridgeport Times, February 23, 1918:

Charles H. Weeghman, President of the Chicago Cubs, last night served notice on players regarded as “holdouts” that unless they come to terms before the departure of the club for the spring training camps, early next month, they would be obliged to seek other employment.
[Weeghman:] “The club cannot afford to pay enormous salaries and the players should be made to understand the situation confronting the owners.

Yeah, gosh, I wonder where people got the crazy idea that Weeghman had a giant pile of cash he wanted to spend on ballplayers.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 23, 2018 at 10:24 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-22-2018

Washington [Pennsylvania] Reporter, February 22, 1918:

The end of the spit-ball spit-ball [sic] is coming. John K. Tener, president of the National League, has issued a warning to young pitchers, advising them not to cultivate the use of the spitball, and indicating that it was only the matter of a short time when it would be abolished.
[Tener:] “The spit-ball is a disgusting, unsanitary delivery not likely to endure more than a few more seasons at the most. All the members of the National League Rules Committee, Dreyfuss, Heydler and myself are strongly opposed to it, and favor its abolishment.”

The narrative I’ve always heard is that the spitter was banned as a reaction to Ray Chapman’s death, but obviously there was strong opposition to the pitch long before it was eliminated.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 22, 2018 at 12:57 PM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, spitball

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-21-2018

Bridgeport Times, February 21, 1918:

“Snooks” Dowd, a highly touted player with the Springfield [Massachusetts] High school last season, has turned down an offer from Miller Huggins, manager of the Yankees, according to a report from his home town. The lad intends to complete his education at Dean Academy and at Lehigh before he gives thought to professional baseball. Dowd is said to be a fine hitter, excellent fielder and possessed of remarkable speed.

Dowd hit .115/.115/.115 in 26 career plate appearances in the big leagues.

Snooks is best known for an alleged incident in a 1918 Lehigh-Lafayette football game in which he took the ball, ran 15 yards the wrong way into his own end zone, circled the goal posts, and then ran the length of the field for a touchdown. I hate to be a downer, but I don’t think that happened. The New York Sun reported the day after the 1918 Lehigh-Lafayette game that Dowd had scored a 40 yard touchdown. Nice story, though. Dowd was a three-sport athlete; he spent more than a decade playing professional basketball.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 21, 2018 at 10:19 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-20-2018

Bridgeport Times, February 20, 1918:

Clark Griffith yesterday received a contribution to his bat and ball fund from the Juno Islands, the most outlying possession of the United States. The Junos came under Uncle Sam’s protection with the Philippines. The money was cabled by a company of United States marines who are stationed there. They said: “We civilized these cannibals with baseball. Accept this to help civilize Germany.”

I’m not saying this isn’t true. I’m just saying I can’t seem to find any evidence that the Juno Islands exist anywhere other than Florida and Club Penguin, neither of which came under American occupation after the Spanish-American War.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 20, 2018 at 09:45 AM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, February 19, 2018

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-19-2018

Bridgeport Times, February 19, 1918:

An overseas professional baseball organization to be composed of six clubs and to be known as the Anglo-American League has been launched, according to W.A. Parsons, who was in [Bridgeport] yesterday on a hunt for players.
London, Paris and Brighton are sure of places in the league. Three clubs will be located at camps—with representation likely for Aix-les-Bains and Vichy, recreation centres for American troops. The league will play a five-month season, opening on April 1 and closing on Sept. 1.

If this league had worked out, road trips to Vichy would have been a bit awkward in the first half of the 1940s.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 19, 2018 at 09:55 AM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

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