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Dugout Newsbeat

Friday, September 30, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-30-2016

Chicago Eagle, September 30, 1916:

“I took up professional baseball after receiving a diploma in mechanical engineering at the University of Michigan because the financial returns were there,” remarked George Sisler of the St. Louis Browns, the other day.
...
“I intend to use the winter months to advantage, however, by keeping in touch with engineering. Baseball is a grant game and I want to get to the top if possible. At the present rate, I think I can retire in 12 years with a fortune.

“One thing: I will never play in the minors. As soon as I start to slow down I will quit, and then see what I can do with mechanical engineering.”

I don’t know that Sisler ever actually worked as a mechanical engineer. He spent virtually all of his adult life in baseball as a player, scout, and coach.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 30, 2016 at 10:40 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, george sisler, history

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-29-2016

New York Evening World, September 29, 1916:

Twenty-five straight!

If the Giants never do anything else they can rest on that record. The twenty straight of the old Providence Club lasted for thirty-two years. Under the law of averages—with the increasing difficulty of winning games as the strain of a long drawn out effort grows—the new record of the Giants should last for a century!

I don’t know, man. 100 years is a long time. People probably won’t even be playing baseball anymore in 2016.

At this point, the Giants, who had a losing record as late as the second week of September, still had an outside chance to win the pennant. Strange things were afoot at the Circle K.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 29, 2016 at 08:10 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-28-2016

New York Sun, September 28, 1916:

The great winning streak of the Giants looked deader than Dickens’s door nail on the Polo lawn yesterday when the ninth inning came rolling around. With two out in the ninth and the Cards leading at 2 to 0, the boys in the stands were edging toward the exits. Then came the explosion.

A warm slap to right by Charley Herzog was converted into a triple by Owen Wilson’s keystone komedy fielding, and Lew McCarty and George Burns rushed home with the tieing runs. The St. Looey lads then staved off defeat for one inning, but gave way before a Harlem attack in the tenth.

This was the Giants’ 23rd consecutive win. That’s pretty good.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 28, 2016 at 09:52 AM | 24 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-27-2016

[Portland] Oregonian, September 27, 1916:

Charged with assault with intent to kill George Johnson, American Association umpire, Jacob Scholkey, 24 years old, was indicted by a grand jury [in Toledo yesterday].

During the game with St. Paul at Swayne Field last July 23, Umpire Johnson was struck on the head by a pop bottle thrown from the stand and rendered unconscious. He was in the hospital two days and it was feard for a time he could not recover.

I’m not sure what happened to Scholkey. I can’t find any mentions of him anywhere on the internet apart from this specific story appearing in a bunch of different newspapers, so I wonder if his name is misspelled here or something.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 27, 2016 at 09:53 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, September 26, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-26-2016

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, September 26, 1916:

GIANTS CREATE WORLD’S MARK—WIN 21 STRAIGHT

By winning another double-header from St. Louis [in New York yesterday], 1 to 0 and 6 to 2, the New York Giants won their twenty-first straight victory and created a new record for successive victories, smashing the record of the Providence Nationals who won 20 straight games in 1884.

And they weren’t done yet.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 26, 2016 at 07:52 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, September 23, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-23-2016

Chicago Eagle, September 23, 1916:

Monte Cross is responsible for a story of two base runners being put out by a batted ball. While the Athletics were playing the Browns years ago Cross was on second and Clements on third. With two out and three and two on the batter, both base runners started with the windup. The batter hit along the third base line, winging Clements, and the ball carromed off the latter’s shin and struck Cross just as he reached third, both being declared out as the result of being hit by a batted ball.

I’m going to call shenanigans here. With two outs in the inning, two baserunners were put out on the same play? As fun as the mental image is, I don’t buy it.

Checking back in on the 1916 Giants, they’re still rolling. Slim Sallee scattered seven hits yesterday en route to a 5-0 shutout win over the Cubs. That’s New York’s 17th win in a row. St. Louis is in town for a doubleheader this afternoon.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 23, 2016 at 08:05 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-22-2016

Pittsburgh Press, September 22, 1916:

The complaint of the Brooklyn Ball club against the Flatbush Hygeia Ice Co. for permitting cinders to pour out into the air and get into the eyes of the Dodgers, was dismissed by Magistrate Voorhees yesterday. The case was called while the baseball men were outside the court taking the air. The club’s appeal to reopen the case was denied.

I’ve gotten cinders in my eyes before. It’s no fun. On the other hand, if the cinders were getting into the Dodgers’ eyes, they were also getting into the opponents’ eyes.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 22, 2016 at 09:27 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-21-2016

Bemidji Daily Pioneer, September 21, 1916:

Baseball’s champion foolish play was made in a game between Washington and the White Sox in 1907. In that battle Larry Schlafly was captain of the Washingtons and also played second base.

At the end of an early inning Schlafly went out to telephone or buy a goat or something and was delayed so long that the Senators had three men put out before his return…the game went on that way till Fielder Jones hit one straight across second. Then, and not till then, was it discovered that there was nobody on second base.

Incredible as it may seem, nineteen men—seventeen players and two umpires—had started the half inning in this fashion and not one of them got wise till Jones’ hit shot over the empty station.

While everyone was standing around trying to figure out what to do, Schlafly reappeared. Eventually the umpires decided to nullify Jones’s plate appearance and have him bat all over again.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 21, 2016 at 08:21 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-20-2016

Pittsburgh Press, September 20, 1916:

Zach Wheat, the Puissant Pill Pusher from Polo, was an exasperated young gentleman when he failed to get a safe hit off big Fred Toney in the second game of Saturday’s duplex bill in Flatbush. Prior to facing Toney, Zach had hit safely in 29 consecutive games, which is within 11 games of the major league record, established, of course, by Tyrus Raymond Cobb.
...
Wheat, by the way, has brown eyes. Big league ball players with brown eyes are so much the exception that I have heard it said there is [sic] none…though Wheat failed to tie the record of Tyrus Raymond Cobb, he may, without doubt, lay claim to the fact that he is the world’s paramount consecutive game hitter among those possessing brown eyes.

Wheat was a heck of a player, but unbeknownst to the baseball world of 1916, there was a better hitter with brown eyes already in the big leagues.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 20, 2016 at 12:26 PM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, zack wheat

Monday, September 19, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-19-2016

New York Sun, September 19, 1916:

The Giants gained another full line of trenches on the Polo Grounds yesterday and ran their September string of victories to a full dozen. Ferdie Schupp painted kalsomine over the Pirates by a score of 2 to 0 in the first tiff of a twin bill.
...
A young man from Dixie named Burleigh Grimes pitched a well regarded spitter at the Giants so skilfully in the second bout that they knocked it back for only three hits…the score was 1 to 1 when Will Klem, the bald eagle of Lakewood, terminated hostilities because of rain and darness in the first half of the ninth inning. The winning streak therefore is not broken, but merely brought to a temporary halt.

Game two of that doubleheader was only the second start of Grimes’s MLB career. It was officially ruled a 1-1 tie game, and officially didn’t end the Giants’ winning streak, which had now reached 12 games. It wasn’t anywhere near finished.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 19, 2016 at 07:53 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, September 16, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-16-2016

Some high-end snark in the New York Evening World, September 16, 1916:

Benny Kauff has improved his batting wonderfully since he stopped swinging at throws to first to catch the runner napping.
...
After years of experimenting with rook shorstops they have finally decided that the best way to fill Hans Wagner’s shoes is to put ‘em out in the rain.
...
The Giants’ belated rally is somewhat similar to an ice skater reaching the top of his form in June.
...
Physiologists can’t figure out whether those 36 spectators at Shibe Park last week were relatives of the players or simply attracted by a morbid curiosity.

Probably wound up in the ballpark by mistake.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 16, 2016 at 09:32 AM | 5 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-15-2016

Guess who’s back? Back again. Tubby’s back. Tell a friend. Toledo News-Bee, September 15, 1916:

Tubby or Hack, or Edward Spencer, to give his true moniker, undoubtedly is the most remarkable comeback in the history of baseball.

Ten years ago [Spencer] donned a St. Louis uniform. He was a star from the initial bell. Two years later he was traded to the Boston Americans. There he became a great favorite. Popularity ruined him. He neglected training, grew immensely fat and was of no use to the team.

He took to drink, went from bad to worse, and, after a season in the A.A., disappeared…Months later Spencer, a bedraggled hobo, showed up in St. Louis.

Tubby’s always been a Dugout favorite. If you can think of a ridiculous and insane thing a drunk person would do, Tubs probably did it. The man dove through a plate glass window for a sandwich, for crying out loud.

From 1910-1915, Spencer made a total of 11 MLB appearances. In 1912, he hit .194 for Louisville before being more or less banned from the city as a result of his drunken antics. He went west to San Francisco, where he slugged .141 for the 1913 Seals. Tubby was literally a hobo. His career should have been over. Instead, he cleaned himself up, signed with Detroit in mid-1916, and hit .370/.443/.481 down the stretch.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 15, 2016 at 09:52 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, tubby spencer

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-14-2016

Harrisburg Telegraph, September 14, 1916:

Denied admission to the baseball park by officials of the Petersburg Virginia League Club, Umpire Buckley, assigned to officiate at yesterday’s game with Newport News, crawled through a hole in the fense, declared the game forfeited to Newport News, and then was taken to jail on a trespass warrant sworn out by the city collector…The incident caused a near-riot among the fans.

I should say so. That’s not something you see every day.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 14, 2016 at 11:47 AM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, umpshow

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-13-2016

Pittsburgh Press, September 13, 1916:

Hal Chase, in spite of being a left handed thrower, has played magnificently at second base for the Reds. The records show that the only southpaw infielders of any account were Hulen, Keeler, and Jimmy Ryan.

I understand why left-handed infielders are so rare, but it does seem like an extremely talented lefty first baseman (Keith Hernandez in his prime, for instance) could have pulled it off. Okay, maybe they might drill a few baserunners in the face with double play pivot throws as the runner instinctively slides to the outside of the bag, but I guess you’ve gotta break some eggs (or faces) to make an omelet.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 13, 2016 at 10:02 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, September 12, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-12-2016

...in which a quiet, intelligent, thoughtful ballplayer who mostly kept to himself threatens to beat the crap out of every single person on his own team. In the leadup to this incident, the Dodgers had lost seven of nine and had fallen out of first place.

Pittsburgh Press, September 12, 1916:

In one corner of the [locker] room Jack Coombs arose, quietly and unobserved.

“Boys, I would like to talk with you for a few moments,” he said. Now, the Brooklyn ball club has been talked to before, often before. In fact, so often that they dreaded the thought of another “lecture.”
...
However, they listened. Coombs is not in the habit of making speeches. In fact, this is the first that he has ever made to the players. He is a college graduate, intelligent and well read—high-class fellow. He commands respect.
...
“I never was put out of a ball game or fined in all my baseball career…I had hoped to finish my diamond days with that honor still mine. But do you know what I am going to do now? I am going to put some fight into this Brooklyn club if I have to fight every player on the team and be thrown out of the grounds every day—beginning right now.”

Coincidentally or not, the Dodgers won 16 of their next 22 games.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 12, 2016 at 09:35 AM | 61 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, September 09, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-9-2016

Pittsburgh Press, September 9, 1916:

PLAYER KNOCKS HOME RUN WITH HIS CRANIUM

The Fitzsimmons team of [Newark, Ohio], composed of amateur ballplayers, boasts of one real curiosity. He is Outfielder Nutter, who, so far as is known, is the only man in baseball who ever knocked a home run with his head.

In a recent exhibition game with the Philadelphia Athletics, Nutter lost a flyball. It hit him on the top of the head and bounced over the fence for a circuit smash.

Coincidentally, Jose Canseco is also kind of a nutter.

1916 Giants Watch: McGraw’s men have now won two games in a row, the most recent victory being a 9-3 win over the Phirst Place Phils. New York hung eight runs on Grover Cleveland Alexander while Jeff Tesreau tossed a complete game and hit a home run for the Giants, who are now 61-62.

Next up: A home doubleheader against the Phillies on September 9 [PHI: Demaree (14-12) and Bender (7-6), NY: Perritt (14-10) and Perritt], then another home game vs. the Phils on the tenth [PHI: Rixey (19-6), NY: Tesreau (12-13)].

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 09, 2016 at 10:24 AM | 5 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, September 08, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-8-2016

Pittsburgh Press, September 8, 1916:

The ushers at Braves’ field have received the following instructions in regard to balls fouled into the grandstand. If the visiting team is in the field and an old ball is hit into the stand it is to be retained so that a new ball may be put into play; an old ball fouled in with the home team in the field is to be thrown out again.

It’s a clever idea, but I can’t imagine it would have been a massive help for the Braves. It is interesting, though, to see MLB teams slowly moving away from demanding the return of balls fouled into the stands.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 08, 2016 at 07:51 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, September 07, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-7-2016

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, September 7, 1916:

COBB DEFEATS BROWNS BY HIS BASERUNNING

With one out [in the tenth inning] Cobb beat out a hit to the shortstop. He stole second and Hartley’s low throw bounded into Marsan’s hand [in center field], but Cobb continued to third and beat the throw. Veach grounded sharply to Sisler, who forces Cobb to return to third, but as Sisler was touching first Cobb tore for home and beat the throw by an eyelash.

Well, that certainly would have made for an exciting walkoff win. I always hear that Ty Cobb had both blazing speed and a level of confidence that bordered on insanity, but it still blows me away when I read stories about specific incidents.

Time for a new feature in the Dugout, the 1916 Giants watch:
Heading into today’s home game with the Dodgers, McGraw’s men are 59-62, in fourth place and 14.5 games out of first. The Giants lost to Brooklyn 2-1 yesterday. Ferdie Schupp gets the start this afternoon for New York, facing Brooklyn’s Nap Rucker.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 07, 2016 at 01:58 PM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, ty cobb

Tuesday, September 06, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-6-2016

Pittsburgh Press, September 6, 1916:

Suitcase Charley Pechous, the new Cub third sacker, is a recruit from Peoria…He received his cognomen from the fact that when he joined the Cubs he was so excited at the prospect of taking a trip with the big leaguers that he invested 80 cents in a paper suitcase in which to carry his toothbrush and hankey. He left the case on the station platform in the rain and when he picked it up the handle came away and the sides of the case fell in.

The Cubs’ nickname game was on point in 1916. Suitcase Charley was a better nickname than a ballplayer, though. After hitting .180/.228/.217 in parts of three seasons, he was out of the big leagues for good before his 21st birthday.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 06, 2016 at 10:55 AM | 28 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, nicknames

Friday, September 02, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-2-2016

Pittsburgh Press, September 2, 1916:

Tom Seaton has had his last of Pullman drawing rooms and private suites in hotels on the road. Seaton…was one of the Phillies’ pitching stars in 1913. He accepted terms for the following year, and then jumped to the Brooklyn Feds. He held up [Brooklyn’s owners] for a three-year contract at $8,000 per, with the stipulation that his employers should pay the traveling expenses of Mrs. Seaton while the team was on the road. Furthermore, he insisted on having a drawing room set aside for him whenever the Brookfeds rode in a sleeping car, as well as a suite of rooms with a private bath in each hotel where the team stopped.

Tom Seaton knew how to negotiate. Unfortunately for Seaton, his throwing arm more or less quit working during the contract, and he went from leading the National League in wins as a 25-year-old in 1913 to being out of the majors for good before his 30th birthday.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 02, 2016 at 07:24 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, tom seaton

Thursday, September 01, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-1-2016

[Liberty, Mississippi] Southern Herald, September 1, 1916:

According to a report Johnny Evers’ layoff may be somewhat extended. He has in addition to a lame leg and a sore arm a bad case of nerves.

Obviously, this is a result of all those fudge orgies and nicotine sprees.

I find reports like this fascinating; it seems like there may have been less of a stigma about anxiety and depression among athletes 100 years ago than there is today. I know Zack Greinke and Dontrelle Willis had anxiety issues that kept them sidelined at times, but IIRC those absences were made into a bigger deal than if they’d have turned their ankle or had a blister. They weren’t “oh, by the way” sorts of things.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 01, 2016 at 09:39 AM | 26 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, johnny evers, mental health

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-31-2016

Cubs owner Charles Weeghman explains the Heinie Zimmerman trade, from the Pittsburgh Press, August 31, 1916:

“Manager Tinker tolerated many infractions of the rules in the hope that Zimmerman eventually would see the folly of his conduct…His indifferent playing and conduct on the ball field Aug. 23 before a large crowd was the straw that broke the camel’s back.
...
Hisses and catcalls were directed at him by the fans. He made offensive remarks at Tinker within the hearing of men and women patrons, as well as officials of the club. Drastic punishment was meted out to the player in a suspension of 10 days without pay and an additional fine of $50.”

Elsewhere in today’s edition of Zimmerman Notes: Larry Doyle, the centerpiece of the trade for the Cubs, is refusing to report to Chicago until he gets a long-term contract and as much money as Zim was making.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 31, 2016 at 11:09 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, heinie zimmerman, history, larry doyle

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-30-2016

Pittsburgh Press, August 30, 1916:

If there is a nation-wide railroad strike the major league ball clubs in the east will make their jumps in automobile. In the west motor cars and trolleys will be used, but numerous double headers will have to be arranged to allow time for the comparatively long trips between cities.

That would not have been fun. Driving from Detroit to St. Louis in a car built around 1916 in the era before interstate highways sounds like an absolute nightmare.

Thankfully, it wasn’t necessary. The threatened strike was averted with the passage of the Adamson Act, which mandated an eight-hour work day for railroad employees.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 30, 2016 at 10:13 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, August 29, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-29-2016

Rock Island Argus, August 29, 1916:

The most interesting deal of the 1916 baseball season, or for years for that matter, was swung last night between the Cubs and the New York Giants. The deal involves the transfer of Heinie Zimmerman, the recalcitrant infielder, to the Giants in return for Larry Doyle, Hunter, an infielder, and Jacobson, an outfielder.

Because of the fact that both Doyle and Zimmerman are two of the widest known players in the National League at present, the deal is easily the feature of the 1916 season. In fact, from the Chicago fans’ standpoint it can be ranked as one of the most important transfers negotiated in the parent body since the modern era of the game under the national commission.

It was kind of a big deal. Zimmerman hit .372 and led the league in home runs, hits, doubles, slugging percentage and total bases in 1912, but wore out his welcome doing things like fixing ballgames and not trying very hard. Doyle was the reigning National League batting champion, and back in 1912 when Zim was leading the league in every offensive category including nose hair, it was Doyle who came away with the Chalmers Award as the league MVP.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 29, 2016 at 10:31 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, heinie zimmerman, history, larry doyle, trades

Friday, August 26, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 8-26-2016

Pittsburgh Press, August 26, 1916:

[The Giants] have not been making many runs. Until they tied the score in the ninth inning of yesterday’s game at Forbes Field, the McGraw tribe had crossed the plate but once in 54 consecutive innings—and that score was made in Thursday’s game here.

I don’t have any idea how you’d measure this, but the 1916 Giants just have to be the single streakiest team in MLB history.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: August 26, 2016 at 10:30 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

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