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Dugout Newsbeat

Friday, March 24, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-24-2017

Topeka State Journal, March 24, 1917:

John Couch, a recruit pitcher with the Detroit Americans doesn’t have to worry about the price of potatoes or whether he makes good in the majors.

Couch and his five brothers own a cattle ranch of 16,000 acres in Montana and he is well fixed with the world’s goods. He has been playing ball in the summer and going to Leland Stanford university in the winter.

Couch was never a star in the big leagues, but he made 147 career appearances with a 91 ERA+. He won 16 games for the 1922 Reds.

I don’t know if or when Couch graduated from Stanford, but he pitched for San Francisco in 1915-1916 and 1919-1921. That could have been convenient for his classwork. If he lived in San Mateo or thereabouts, he’d have been 15 miles from San Francisco and 15 miles from Palo Alto.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 24, 2017 at 10:01 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-23-2017

Pittsburgh Press, March 23, 1917:

Manager Robinson has a hard time getting his Brooklyn players to train enough. Yesterday he hit upon a new plan and gave them an “Irishman’s Ride.” What’s that? Well, he invited them all to take a motor ride into the country. Then he made them walk back.

This seems like something that would work once. Once.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 23, 2017 at 10:53 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-22-2017

Washington Herald, March 22, 1917:

Dispatches received [in Detroit yesterday] from the training camp of the Detroit Americans at Waxahachie, Texas, state that the Detroit ball players are in sympathy with a movement started by fellow athletes to abandon the military drills they now are receiving. It is understood that the Cleveland club already has taken such action.

Several Detroit players claim that the drills have caused severe strain upon muscles not brought into play on the baseball diamond and that the work has hindered more than it has helped their playing.

Truth be told, I’m surprised that it took this long for the players to express displeasure at mandatory military training.

Elsewhere on the same page, it still looks likely that the Yankees will relocate to Long Island City.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 22, 2017 at 10:17 AM | 32 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-21-2017

Pittsburgh Press, March 21, 1917:

Manager Mathewson is a great believer in speeding up the play during the games. He allows no loafing, and is constantly urging the players to keep on the move. Nothing annoys him so much as a game that lasts over two hours.

If time travel were a thing, I’d pay to see what would happen if Christy Mathewson watched Steve Trachsel pitch to Mike Hargrove.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 21, 2017 at 10:24 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, pace of the game

Monday, March 20, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-20-2017

Pittsburgh Press, March 20, 1917:

“Aviation,” says Charlie Herzog, “has a remarkable fascination, once a fellow becomes interested in it. Several times this winter, after I had become interested in the art of flying, I decided to give it up, but in a few days I was back in the seat of the old hydroplane. It’s great stuff, and I have become quite enthusiastic about it.”

This is the first mention I’ve seen of a big league ballplayer being an aviator. I guess this means he wouldn’t have been in any sort of position to criticize players who drive cars.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 20, 2017 at 10:13 AM | 37 comment(s)
  Beats: aviation, dugout, history

Friday, March 17, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-17-2017

Former Browns scout Charley Barrett on the time he tried and failed to sign an amateur pitcher named Grover Alexander, quoted in the Bridgeport Evening Farmer, March 17, 1917:

“I stopped over in Beardstown to change trains and went to a hotel. Carrie Nation then was making a lecturing tour. She was at the hotel, but was to leave on another train. I set down my grip in the lobby, so did Carrie. She paid her bill, and making a great clatter grabbed a grip and hustled to the depot.
...
I got to the station and had occasion to open my grip. It was full of an old lady’s nightcaps, prohibition literature and certain other things I don’t know about, not being a married man. It was not my grip, though it was exactly like mine, except for the contents…[Nation sent my suitcase] back on the next train, with her blessing. But I had to wait. I missed my train.
...
The day I was to be in Galesburg Grover Alexander was hit in the head with a pitched ball and badly hurt. It looked like he was done for. I got there in time to learn that he even might die…I called off the deal that practically was closed and returned to St. Louis.

It took a Nation of one to hold the Browns back.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 17, 2017 at 10:31 AM | 26 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, grover cleveland alexander, history, scouts

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-16-2017

Tacoma Times, March 16, 1917:

Baseball…is in a fine fix today. Every major league baseball club the country contains is miles and miles from home—and the railroad men say they’re going to stop running trains.

Thus, thrown right up to them, there is the prospect of no trains home for the axe victims and no trains north for those who stick.

The railroad unions were fighting for an eight-hour work day, which was nominally enacted by the Adamson Act in late 1916. The railroad companies challenged its constitutionality in Wilson v. New and it wound up before the Supreme Court.

Coincidentally (or not), the railroads agreed to the provisions of the Adamson Act on the same day SCOTUS ruled it constitutional. That averted a strike and prevented any major problems for baseball.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 16, 2017 at 10:25 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-15-2017

Seattle Star, March 15, 1917:

Joe Wood, the Indians’ $15,000 gamble, won’t be in shape to pitch when the season opens. He admits his costly arm has developed a kink—a sort of “grating in the shoulder.” Doctors are working on Joe.

The Cleveland Indians ought to burn up the American league. They’ve just bought $15,000 worth of wood.

As you know by now if you’ve been following the Dugout, Joe Wood’s arm was completely and irredeemably scragged at this point. He turned into a pretty good outfielder, but wasn’t worth all the money the Indians threw at him.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 15, 2017 at 10:16 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, smoky joe wood

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-14-2017

Harrisburg Telegraph, March 14, 1917:

GEORGE M. COHAN AFTER BALL TEAM

The Providence International League baseball club was sold this afternoon by William H. Draper, its owner, to a syndicate of local men for $18,000.
...
Dennis O’Brien, George M. Cohen’s [sic] attorney, was present and said that Mr. Cohen intended buying the entire holdings. It may be possible that the New York theatrical man may yet get control, taking it out of the hands of the local men who bought it just for civic pride.

As far as I can tell, the Yankee Doodle Boy never did buy his hometown ballclub. Cohan was a huge baseball fan and a personal friend of Connie Mack who, according to his New York Times obituary, almost always went to see the Giants play when there was a home game. As theatre guys go, it’s safe to assume he’d have been a better owner than Harry Frazee.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 14, 2017 at 10:45 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, March 13, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-13-2017

Harrisburg Telegraph, March 13, 1917:

It was learned [in Pittsburgh] yesterday that there is little likelihood of Honus Wagner ever again playing professional baseball. Wagner’s business and legal representative is authority for the statement that the famous Dutchman has about concluded arrangements to enter the oil producing business with Fred Clarke, former manager of the Pirates, regardless of what the Pittsburgh club offers him in the way of salary for the coming season.

Honus played on in 1917, but at 43 years old he was no longer Honus Wagner. Wagner hit .265/.337/.304 as the closest thing Pittsburgh had to a starting first baseman, then retired at the end of the 1917 season.

If he indeed went into the oil business, there’s no mention of it in his SABR bio.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 13, 2017 at 10:18 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, honus wagner

Friday, March 10, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-10-2017

Chicago Eagle, March 10, 1917:

Did you ever hear about one pinch-hiter who retired two pitchers with one swing of his mace?

His name is Tom Clark, the Rhinelander backstop. On June 13, 1916, the Reds and Braves battled to a 16-inning scoreless tie. Toney started the game for the Cincinnatians and Rudolph did likewise for the Bostonians. But neither finished it, because Clark finished both of them in the twelfth.
...
Cholly Herzog, then piloting the Red skiff, decided to send Clark to back in place of Toney…Rudolph served up a twister to Clark and the catcher at once whaled it right back to Rudolph. The drive hit the bald-headed flinger on his operating fin—and he went away in search of a doctor.

Two birds with one line drive.

Elsewhere on the same page of the newspaper, dugout legend Tubby Spencer tells the story of the time Red Sox owner J.I. Taylor gave pitcher Frank Arellanes $500 to delay the player’s wedding. This was particularly easy for Arellanes, as he had no plans to get married.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 10, 2017 at 11:01 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, March 09, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-9-2017

Washington Times, March 9, 1917:

Manager Griffith today ordered carboys of spring water placed in the rooms occupied by his players, and spring water will also be served at the dining tables.

The Old Fox is most serious over conditions of the [Augusta, Georgia] water supply. “I had no idea the water here was so bad,” said he today. “I am not going to have any of my players made sick drinking this dark brown stuff, and so have ordered spring water for all of them.

And ever since the day Clark Griffith ordered that spring water, it’s been known as spring training.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 09, 2017 at 10:09 AM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-8-2017

Harrisburg Telegraph, March 8, 1917:

Japanese baseballs or baseballs made in any other country no longer will be able to masquerade in America as American productions.

The Secretary of the Treasury, who has ample power in the matter, has issued an order requiring that hereafter all imported baseballs be indelibly stamped with the name of the country of their origin, such identification marks when placed on cartons being considered insufficient.

This was all part of the Pink Hawley-Homer Smoot tariff plan.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 08, 2017 at 10:15 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, March 07, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-7-2017

Washington Times, March 7, 1917:

The death knell has been sounded for “mashed potatoes” in the camp of the Griffmen.

In its stead has come old kid “Ham And.”

For five years the Griffmen training at Charlottesville were filled with mashed potatoes, morning, noon and night. They lived with King “Mashed Potatoes” day in and day dut [sic]. They went to bed with him. They dreamed of him, knowing that they would meet him in the morning.

But now has come old “Ham And.”

This means something. This is important.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 07, 2017 at 10:24 AM | 24 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, March 06, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-6-2017

A brutally honest season preview in the Seattle Star, March 6, 1917:

Fifth or sixth place seems to be the best the Reds can hope for. There is no silly pennant talk being stirred up here, as the team doesn’t look as good as the one Buck Herzog took South last spring.

Coincidentally, fifth or sixth place seems to be the best the Reds can hope for in 2017.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 06, 2017 at 10:30 AM | 27 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, March 03, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-3-2017

Fairmont West Virginian, March 3, 1917:

When [Indians owner Jim] Dunn announced that he had paid $15,000 for Joe Wood the baseball world gasped, because it was the greatest gamble that had ever been made in the game. With Wood’s first year’s salary the gamble amounts to $20,000.
...
And Dunn, or his manager, Lee Fohl, or Joe Wood himself can’t tell whether Joe Wood will be the “Smoky Joe” of old, or even whether his pitching arm which went back on him two seasons ago will be able to stand the gaff this season.

The good news is that Wood won a World Series ring with the Indians in 1920. The bad news is that Dunn didn’t get the ace pitcher he was looking for.

Wood’s arm was shot and wasn’t coming back. Smoky Joe became a right fielder for good in 1918, hitting .298/.376/.433 after making the move.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 03, 2017 at 10:14 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, smoky joe wood

Thursday, March 02, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-2-2017

Bismarck Tribune, March 2, 1917:

Following the most sensational performance in baseball pitching fandom this year will closely scrutinize the work of Ferd Schupp, Giant phenom, to see if his record of last year was the preface to a wonderful pitching career or a flash in the pan.

Schupp permitted .90 runs per game working in 140 innings, 15 full games.
...
Schupp could not be expected to go through the 1917 season with such a pitching record, but with a scoring team even if he should allow 20 per cent more scores per game he would still be a big winner and that’s what McGraw wants.

Schupp’s ERA more than doubled from 1916 to 1917. Instead of another 0.90 ERA, he posted a 1.95 ERA. (Gasp!)

From 1916-1917, Ferdie Schupp went 30-10 with a 1.59 ERA (158 ERA+), allowing less than one baserunner per inning. Ferdie may well have been on his way to a Hall of Fame career, but he blew out his shoulder before the 1918 season. Depending on which version of the story you believe, he either injured himself in a fight or on the first pitch of Spring Training 1918. Either way, Schupp was never again a productive MLB pitcher.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 02, 2017 at 01:01 PM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, ferd schupp, history

Wednesday, March 01, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-1-2017

Butte Post, March 1, 1917:

A difference of opinion exists among baseball moguls as to the reason, or reasons, for the falling off in the attendance and the apparent lack of interest in the pastime by America’s great population of sportsmen.

The magnates agree on one point—that there is something radically wrong with baseball…

Dick Kinsella, scout of the New York Americans, says that the movies have hurt baseball. President Navin of Detroit days that motoring is causing many thousands to forget baseball. Jack Hendricks, the Denver manager, says that golf is the lure of many from the ball parks. Grantland Rice…claims that the continual bickerings of the players and magnates are driving the fans to other forms of amusement, and James McGill, the owner of the Denver club, asserts that the decline of baseball is due to the increased interest in other outdoor sports by the people who were formerly baseball fans.

Baseball is doomed! Doomed! The sky is falling!

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 01, 2017 at 11:02 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: doom, doom and gloom, dugout, history

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-28-2017

Keokuk Gate City, February 28, 1917:

Charles W. Murphy, ex-president of the Chicago Cubs…recently has been credited with the statement that rough stuff on the baseball diamond is often profitable as far as the box office is concerned. A fist fight now and then, says Charles, is one good way of swelling the attendance.

When a ball player forgets himself and swings on the nose of an umpire or player in his fury, the fans very often flock to the park the next day in the hope of seeing it repeated.

I’m sure the umpires loved to hear this.

In other Cubs-related news from 100 years ago, William Wrigley says the Cubs may establish a $100,000 training camp in Pasadena if the Pacific Coast League guarantees spring exhibition games. Wrigley did eventually build a baseball facility in Los Angeles, but it wasn’t a direct result of this specific proposal.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 28, 2017 at 10:37 AM | 19 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, fights, history

Monday, February 27, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-27-2017

Washington Times, February 27, 1917:

CALDWELL ABSENT

Rumor Has Him Pitching for Ball Club in Panama

Ray Caldwell, according to a rumor reaching the Yankee camp [in Macon, Georgia] today, is pitching in Panama. [Yankees business manager] Harry Sparrow received this information in a round about way from a friend of his in the canal zone.

Caldwell was a good pitcher; in both 1914 and 1915 he finished in the top ten in the league in WAR. BBRef’s similarity scores have him as similar to Dock Ellis and Joaquin Andujar, which is true both on and off the field. Ray Caldwell’s career was equal parts good pitching and erratic behavior.

The Yankees suspended him for the last two months of the 1916 season for “failing to keep in condition”, among other things, and Caldwell didn’t bother showing up for the start of Spring Training in 1917. Eventually he arrived and gave the team almost exactly what you’d expect from a talented but out of control addict: Frustrating play and off-the-field headaches.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 27, 2017 at 10:38 AM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, ray caldwell

Friday, February 24, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-24-2017

El Paso Herald, February 24, 1917:

Gus Hoover, Stanford’s giant twirler, is against the presence of women at Stanford, against dances and all such affairs. The combined force of these is inducive to the weakening of his pitching arm, says Hoover.

This became known in campus baseball circles when Gus reported a sore arm to trainer Fritz Roth. He said he was in no condition to pitch, and when asked how he came about his arm, Gus explained thusly:

“You see, we had a dance last night and I had to support all those heavy girls on my right arm, and the strain was too great.”

C’mon, Gus, that just means you’ve gotta spend more time training with the ladies. Think of it as a muscle-building program.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 24, 2017 at 10:46 AM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-23-2017

Hartford Republican, February 23, 1917:

The Boston Braves were having a bad time one afternoon and George Stallings, their temperamental manager, was having one of his tantrums. At such times Stallings gives vent to language both caustic and picturesque. Motor cars were popular with the players that season but not with managers, who thought motoring and baseball did not mix
...
Maranville had booted a grounder; Red Smith had let fly with an errant throw; Hank Gowdy had misjudged a high foul.

“Look at that P——d blankety blank!” raved Stallings, seizing on the first automobile name that came into his head…“and you, you B—-k fathead!” anathemizing the second sinner, after which he turned his attention to the third. But by that time he had run out of names of automobiles and could only sputter, “And you, Gowdy, you—you—you bicycle blankety blank!”

Man, it’s a good thing there weren’t four errors. Rickshaws would have been in the crosshairs. (I assume the blanks are Packard and Buick, by the way.)

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 23, 2017 at 10:49 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-22-2017

Tacoma Times, February 22, 1917:

Grover Cleveland Alexander, after six years in the National league, has finally jumped into the class of ball players drawing huge salaries.
...
He signed a contract in Philadelphia calling for a salary, it is believed, of $12,500 a year. This is $2,500 less than the sum he was holding out for and $2,500 more than he was “finally” offered by President Baker of the Phillies.

There are now five men in baseball believed to be drawing larger salaries than Alexander. Two of these, John G. [sic] McGraw and George Stallings, are managers. Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker and Eddie Collins are the others. They are admittedly the greatest players in the game.

Alexander’s reported salary, $12,500, tied him with Walter Johnson as the highest-paid pitchers in baseball. That’s fair, since they were the two best pitchers in baseball and both in their late 20s.

The third-best pitcher in baseball in 1916 was a 21-year-old left-hander named George Ruth. Weirdly, he didn’t pitch much longer. I wonder what happened to him.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 22, 2017 at 10:13 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, grover cleveland alexander, history

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-21-2017

Washington Times, February 21, 1917:

A verdict in favor of the St. Louis American League Baseball Company was returned [in St. Louis] today in the suit of James C. Reach against the company for $15,000 damages. Reach alleged that while at a game last August he was led from his seat by an usher who charged him with having taken a baseball which was knocked into the stand.

To give this lawsuit some perspective, $15,000 was the amount that the greatest pitcher on Earth, Grover Cleveland Alexander, was struggling to pry from the Phillies as an annual salary.

That was always going to be an uphill battle for Mr. Reach. In fact, this lawsuit is where the term “reach” comes from, meaning “to attempt something ill-advised and unlikely to work”*.

* - This derivation is not in any way true.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 21, 2017 at 10:47 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, lawsuits

Monday, February 20, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 2-20-2017

Tacoma Times, February 20, 1917:

Bill Pickens has made Grover Cleveland Alexander an offer which ought to help big Alex land the $15,000 salary he wants, regardless of whether he accepts it.

Pickens has devised a scheme, whereby a circus he represents is to retain Alexander at $1,000 a week for 35 weeks. He will do a freak baseball stunt inside the tent and later will exhibit his prowess by defending the circus’ offer to give $50 to anyone who can make a base hit off him.

This would have been a tough offer to pass up. $35,000 was 75% more than the salary of the highest paid player in baseball in 1917.

The first player to make more than $35,000 was Babe Ruth in 1922, who undeniably had a better year than President Harding.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 20, 2017 at 10:27 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, grover cleveland alexander, history

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