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Dugout Newsbeat

Wednesday, May 04, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-4-2016

The [Chicago] Day Book, May 4, 1916:

“Lefty” Russell, who once cost Connie Mack $12,000, is now playing first base for Baltimore.

Not only did Russell cost the Athletics $12,000 (a huge sum at the time) when he was sold in 1910, but he was a pitcher. Not a particularly good sign when your high-priced pitcher becomes a minor league first baseman.

Russell threw 58 big league innings and allowed 113 baserunners. His 6.36 ERA in the dead-ball era was good for a career ERA+ of 49. He wasn’t much of a hitter, either. Russell disappears from the minor league record at age 26 after hitting .227 with one home run as an everyday first baseman for Newark.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 04, 2016 at 12:15 PM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, lefty russell

Tuesday, May 03, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-3-2016

Toledo News-Bee, May 3, 1916:

[Detroit pitcher] Harry [Coveleski] was sitting on the bench when Brother Stan was mowing down the Tigers in Monday’s moist conflict…“Atta boy, Stan, atta boy. Guess that brother of mine hasn’t got something,” he yelled as Veach fouled to Turner.

“That’s it, Stan. You’ve got his number,” he muttered as Sam Crawford hit a roller to Howard, forcing Cobb at second.

“Say, Harry, if you are going to root for Cleveland, go over on the Cleveland bench,” shouted [Detroit third baseman] Oscar Vitt.

Brother Harry was dazed for a minute. He had forgotten Brother Stan was pitching against his own team.

“Say, fellows, I clean forgot,” he said sheepishly…

I imagine this would have been a bit annoying for the Tigers, coming on the heels of Harry refusing to pitch against Stan earlier in the season. I certainly would have been irritated as a teammate.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 03, 2016 at 07:58 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, harry coveleski, history, stan coveleski

Monday, May 02, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-2-2016

Washington Times, May 2, 1916:

Charlie Chaplin…had the honor of throwing out the first ball at the Los Angeles game, opening the Pacific Coast baseball season for 1916.

After the sphere had been tossed to the first batter to step to the plate, it was presented to Chaplin by the team’s manager. The fans gave the comedian a big hand, despite the fact that the ball, as he hurled it toward the box, fell short, bumping against the head of the umpire. There were no casualties, however.

Chaplin then put on his bowler hat, twirled his cane, and walked away hurriedly.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 02, 2016 at 10:22 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, first pitch, history

Friday, April 29, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-29-2016

Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, April 29, 1916:

Charles Wagner laid down his tools in the riveting department of the Hale & Kilburn plant and munched an apple. The proximity of the Athletics’ ball park stirred him to action.

“Play ball,” he said to a fellow-workman, Daniel Dougherty, as the latter assumed a Ty Cobbesque pose with a hammer as a bat.

He threw the core of the apple toward Dougherty, who, in attempting to single to right, let the hammer slip from his hands. It struck Wagner in the head, necessitating his removal to the Samaritan Hospital, where he was found to have a fractured skull.

Let that be a lesson to you. Don’t play baseball with an apple and a hammer. It may seem like a good idea, but I assure you it is not.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 29, 2016 at 08:13 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: bad ideas, dugout, history, stupid ideas

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-28-2016

Bemidji Daily Pioneer, April 28, 1916:

BIBLICAL BASEBALL.

Abel made the first hit; Adam and Eve retired on the first double play; Adam was the first man up. Noah on deck; Abel made the first sacrifice; Noah issued the first rain checks; Eve displayed the first curve; Moses took the first team to a training camp; Elijah’s bears were the original cubs; Reuben was caught stealing by Joseph; Joseph was the first player sold; Lazarus died at first; Laban was the first contract jumper; Elijah’s chariot was the first coach; the dove was the first foul out. When you make a home run after the game, refresh yourself with golden grain juice. Try it. It “satisfies.”

Zacchaeus had season tickets next to Bob Uecker. Julio Franco was Methuselah’s first manager. The serpent was the first to turn two.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 28, 2016 at 12:00 PM | 28 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-27-2016

Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, April 27, 1916:

FUTURE GIANT HURLS NO-HIT GAME

Erasmus Hall High School won another baseball game by defeating Manual Training High School by a score of 4 to 1…Waite Hoyt, who is under contract with the Giants and who pitched a no-hit game Saturday, relieved Davidson and repeated his feat of holding his opponents hitless. Hoyt went into the box in the second inning, and during the remainder of the game was never touched for even a scratch hit. He struck out seven of the opposition.

Say, I think this Hoyt kid is going to be pretty good.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 27, 2016 at 09:58 AM | 27 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, waite hoyt

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-26-2016

Pittsburgh Press, April 26, 1916:

LAVAN TRIES TO CALL BALK ON OWN PITCHER

For the first time in a big league a team has tried to call a balk on its own pitcher. When Graney stole second in the first inning of Monday’s Indian-Brown battle while Groom held the ball, then took third on Groom’s wild throw, Johnny Lavan rushed in with a wild shout of “balk.” He claimed Groom moved from the pitcher’s pose and that therefore Graney was only entitled to one base on a balk.

Very quick thinking on Lavan’s part, even if it was ineffective.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 26, 2016 at 10:11 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: doc lavan, dugout, history

Monday, April 25, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-25-2016

New York Evening World, April 25, 1916:

Baseball statisticians have been conspicuously negligent in failing to tabulate whether left or right handed umpires are hit the hardest.

TouchĂ©. That hits a bit close to home, old-timey people. (I should mention that the “Answers to Queeries” below the linked blurb gave me a chuckle or two.)

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 25, 2016 at 10:32 AM | 27 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, April 22, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-22-2016

The Washington Post reprinted in the Pittsburgh Press, April 22, 1916:

When all other remedies fail try baseball. It is the saving grace of the nation. When the perspective of the public is a little awry the baseball season invariably acts as a restorer.

Just now, when the whole world is in an upheaval, when the voices of many men clamor for different courses of conduct on the part of the United States, and when the nation is on edge, it is fortunate that the season of the national sport is at hand.

Baseball: Is there nothing it can’t do?

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 22, 2016 at 10:15 AM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-21-2016

Pittsburgh Press, April 21, 1916:

Some of the bugs persist in calling Hal Chase “Haul.” It is pronounced to rhyme with “pal” and “shall”. Real name Harold, but the r, the o and the d are silent, like the “x” in “mule.”
...
Frank McKendry’s throw to first continues to cause hilarity. Mr. McKendry, of the Reds, is persevering, however, and figures that if he throws the ball on Thursday he may catch some runner left over from the previous Monday.

Must have looked something like Jon Lester’s throw to Anthony Rizzo this past Sunday.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 21, 2016 at 10:23 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, hal chase, history, limb mckenry

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-20-2016

Williams [Arizona] News, April 20, 1916:

An improved baseball bat is the recent invention of George J. Blahos, a sailor on board the U.S.S. Mississippi. His device can be applied to any bat by any carpenter, says New York World. It consists of cutting slots in the thick or batting end of the bat, inserting in them strips of nonresilient material, cardboard, for instance, fastening these with a peg driven through at right angles to them.

And thus, George J. Blahos invented the corked bat. Anyway, here’s a copy of his patent filing.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 20, 2016 at 11:17 AM | 32 comment(s)
  Beats: bats, dugout, equipment, history

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-19-2016

Toledo News-Bee, April 19, 1916:

HORRORS! PEANUT SUPPLY RUNS OUT

Along about 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday at Swayne field (in Toledo) some of the fans who had been in line since about noon in order to get seats, began to grow hungry. Then came the demand on the peanut men. It was so great the supply ran out and crackerjack had to be substituted. Before the end of the game the crackerjack supply was pretty low.

#OpeningDayProblems

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 19, 2016 at 07:38 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, April 18, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-18-2016

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, April 18, 1916:

For the first time in 20 years and the second time in baseball history in the major leagues brother was scheduled to pitch against brother at League Park [in Cleveland yesterday].

Manager Lee Fohl of Cleveland announced that Stanley Coveleskie [sic], right hander, procured by Cleveland from Portland, would oppose his left-handed brother, Harry Coveleskie, picked by Manager Hugh Jennings to hurl for Detroit.

Harry Coveleskie refused to pitch against his “kid” brother when it came time to start the game, saying he didn’t want to try to defeat Stanley in his first big league appearance…It was back in the ‘90s when the first brother-brother duel was staged in the National League, Brownie Foreman pitching for Cincinnati against Frank Foreman for Baltimore.

I assume brother vs. brother pitching matchups have taken place fairly recently, though I haven’t looked it up. Between the Martinezes, Niekros, Mahlers, Madduces, Benii, Perries, Forsches, Leiters, and Reuschels, it had to have happened at some point, right?

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 18, 2016 at 10:46 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, harry coveleski, history, stan coveleski

Friday, April 15, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-15-2016

Pittsburgh Press, April 15, 1916:

The Ohio Penitentiary Baseball league opened its 1916 season in the prison grounds [in Columbus] today. No. 1 team played No. 2. The members of both squads, though they frequently expressed the belief that it would put them in better form, were deprived of the customary southern training trip. Warden Thomas said today, however, that both teams are fast. The convict players have new uniforms—baseball uniforms, that is—and equipment, this year.

It’s a good league, but it’s no California Penal League.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 15, 2016 at 09:52 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-14-2016

Hugh Fullerton via the Richmond Times-Dispatch, April 14, 1916:

“Center Fieldin’ Ain’t No Puddin’” is the title of a song Artie Hoffman used to sing. Neither is umpiring any pastry, but they are the whole dessert compared with managing a ball club. I used to feel sorry for the mother of nine growing boys or a teacher in a parential school until I found out what a baseball manager is up against.

I was flabbergasted to learn that “Center Fieldin’ Ain’t No Puddin’” is an actual song. (Or at least a poem.) It’s on page 65 of this PDF, a collection of works by Hugh Keough.

Someone needs to get these lyrics to The Baseball Project for their next album.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 14, 2016 at 07:48 AM | 34 comment(s)
  Beats: centerfield, dugout, history, music

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-13-2016

Grand Forks Daily Herald, April 13, 1916:

Cleveland lost its opening game to St. Louis [yesterday], 6 to 1, chiefly because they could not hit Groom, ex-Federal league pitcher.
...
Tris Speaker played his first game as a Cleveland player. He fielded spectacularly and walked three times, being passed purposely twice. The crowd was the largest that ever witnessed an opening game in Cleveland.

Something tells me Cleveland fans are going to like Tris Speaker. I think he’s going to have a big year.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 13, 2016 at 09:38 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, indians, tris speaker

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-12-2016

Pittsburgh Press, April 12, 1916:

Early this afternoon the eye of Mr. Average Citizen will take on a restless look. He will fidget and squirm. Then with the best excuse available he will grab his hat and overcoat, drop into the next office to pick up Miss Average Citizen and start for the ball lot.

Somewhere between 150,000 and 175,000 average citizens are expected to click through the turnstiles, paying about $100,000 for the privilege of being in on the big opening of the baseball season.

For this is the day of days. Sixteen major league ball clubs clash in their first games in the dual fight for the pennant—heralded to be the warmest scraps the leagues have yet known.

Well, fifteen. The 1916 Athletics would have had serious trouble fighting for the International League pennant.

Elsewhere, the Press reports that the San Antonio Bronchos have a quaint way of advertising ball games. They send an African American guy to ride around the city on a pony and announce that there’s a game, in the style of an old-timey town crier. The article uses less respectful language to describe the marketing intern, of course, as that’s how they rolled in 1916.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 12, 2016 at 06:51 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, opening day

Monday, April 11, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-11-2016

Pittsburgh Press, April 11, 1916:

Howard Shanks blames his failure to hit as well during the summer as he does in the spring to the fact that he is playing a sunfield most of the time, and that it affects his eyes to such an extent that he cannot hit up to his true standard. This argument Shanks made to Griffith, who, recognizing its logic, has decided to allow Shanks to continue in left field as long as he is hitting, and then shift him to a field where there is no sun to bother him.

Uh, sure, Howie. Suuuuure. By the way, it didn’t help. In 1916, Shanks hit .288/.368/.342 through the end of May, then .206/.266/.300 in June and July.

Howie Shanks career splits:

1st Half:  .255/.308/.350
2nd Half:  .254/.309/.328
April:     .257/.318/.388
May:       .251/.304/.346
June:      .258/.307/.345
July       .261/.317/.340
August     .260/.306/.342
September: .238/.301/.300

I’d say we have a pretty good idea what kind of hitter he was, regardless of where the sun may have been.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 11, 2016 at 09:52 AM | 45 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, howie shanks

Friday, April 08, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-8-2016

Pittsburgh Press, April 8, 1916:

According to a Cleveland war correspondent Chick Gandil swings the heaviest bat used in the American league. His sticks weigh around 56 ounces. In the National league Larry Doyle and Jack Meyers are said to use the heaviest bats.

56 ounces is ludicrously heavy. Edd Roush’s 48 ounce bat is frequently called the “heaviest in Major League history”, but if this report is accurate, Gandil’s bats were ~17% heavier than Roush’s bats.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 08, 2016 at 07:51 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: bats, chick gandil, dugout, history

Thursday, April 07, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-7-2016

Toledo News-Bee, April 7, 1916:

There is a story [in New York] to the effect that the most important baseball deal of the season will be completed [there] on Friday or Saturday. By the deal the world’s champion Red Sox will lose their big sticker, Tris Speaker, who will go to Bill Donovan’s Yankees.
...
As part of the deal for Speaker, Fritz Maisel, the little third sacker, will be sent to the Red Sox.

Meanwhile, the Pittsburgh Press reports that Red Sox president Joe Lannin denies the Speaker to New York rumors. That much was true; Speaker wasn’t headed to New York.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 07, 2016 at 09:41 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, trade rumors, tris speaker

Wednesday, April 06, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-6-2016

Topeka State Journal, April 6, 1916:

[Eddie] Collins, by the way, not only is a great baseball player, but in his college days was “some pumpkins” on a football gridiron. And ‘tis said that even now when he is the idol of more human beings than any crowned monarch upon the face of Mother Earth solely because of his baseball ability, Collins considers football a greater sport than baseball.

Yeesh. If he was as good at football as he was at baseball, he was some pumpkins indeed.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 06, 2016 at 10:49 AM | 5 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, eddie collins, history

Tuesday, April 05, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-5-2016

Pittsburgh Press, April 5, 1916:

The Morris [Illinois] Reds baseball nine today started suit to restrain Farmer Thomas Anderson from plowing up their outfield to plant corn. Anderson owns the ground but the club claims a two-year lease.

“Is this heaven?”
“No, it’s Morris, Illinois.”

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 05, 2016 at 07:07 AM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, April 04, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-4-2016

Salem [Oregon] Daily Capital Journal, April 4, 1916:

“Bat’ries for today’s game!”
“Get that of’shul score card!”
“Peanuts!”
“One o’ those lo-o-ong innings!”
(Deleted by censor).
“Larceny!”

These and many other cries of the great American fan and his minions are heard along the western edge of the United States today, yea, even from Salt Lake’s icy mountains to Vernon’s coral strangs, or whatever they make strands out of there.

It was opening day in the Pacific Coast League, and big crowds were the order of the day. Salt Lake expected 15,000 for its opener, Los Angeles hoped for 16,000 (double its 1915 Opening Day attendance), and Portland’s boosters were underway with their “Twenty thousand or bust” campaign for the Beavers’ home opener on April 18.

Out east, things weren’t as peachy for Buffalo’s IL club. When they showed up at the ballpark in Harrisburg for training, the playing field was under three feet of water as a result of a flood.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 04, 2016 at 09:42 AM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, opening day

Friday, April 01, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 4-1-2016

Toledo News-Bee, April 1, 1916:

President Weeghman announced on Friday that the Federal league pennant, won by his Chicago Whales, will be raised at the Cub park. Regular flag raising ceremonies, bands, parade and speechmaking will accompany the event, which will be held probably in July.

Does anyone know if this actually happened, and if so, how long it flew? A quick googling was unsuccessful.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: April 01, 2016 at 09:55 AM | 19 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-31-2016

Pittsburgh Press, March 31, 1916:

Strawberry shortcake was blamed by Manager Tinker of the Cubs for the many defeats handed to the team, according to statements he made [at New Orleans] today. Tinker says the chef at the training camp told that Cubs were eating double orders of the pastry. “Next year it will be tabooed,” said Tinker.

Yeah, well, it figures that Johnny Evers’s mortal enemy would be opposed to the ingestion of junk food.

100 years ago today in saddled burro news, Pat’s Corral in Phoenix has both burros and saddles for sale.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: March 31, 2016 at 09:30 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: cubs, dugout, history, joe tinker

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