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Dugout Newsbeat

Friday, June 24, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-24-2016

Bismarck Daily Tribune, June 24, 1916:

Several years ago while pitching for the Boston Red Sox, [Fred] Anderson was studying dentistry on the side. Finally he decided to give up baseball and follow his other profession. He bought out the practice of an old tooth carpenter down in Georgia and hit 1.000 in the prosperity league.

Finally his health broke under the strain. A physician advised him to take a long rest and be outdoors as much as possible. The Federals, just starting up, offered an opportunity and Anderson grabbed it, signing with Buffalo.

“I guess, Doc. If you insist I need to be outside, I’ll go play big league baseball.”

Anderson was a pretty good pitcher, certainly better than you’d expect from somebody who didn’t really want to play pro baseball. He led the 1917 National League with a 1.44 (!) ERA and never had a single season FIP above 2.59. As you’d expect, he went back to dentistry when he was done playing baseball.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 24, 2016 at 10:53 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, fred anderson, history

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-23-2016

Milwaukee Journal, June 23, 1916:

[Ban Johnson] is of the opinion that managers are carrying things so far in their constant shifting of pitchers they are not only injuring their pitchers, but are reducing the interest felt by the steady patrons in the players, and consequently in the game itself.

President Johnson declared: “They are making a joke out of the pitchers by taking them out of the game if a couple of hits are made in succession, or by removing a pitcher who is going along finely to permit some bench warmer to go to bat and strike out or fly out for him.

“I am hearing from the patrons of baseball constantly about this increasing tendency to change pitchers without reason.

His head would explode if he watched baseball these days.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 23, 2016 at 09:44 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-22-2016

New York Tribune, June 22, 1916:

George Foster, the sturdy little right hander of the Boston Red Sox, won lasting fame among the pitchers in baseball [yesterday]. He shut the New York Yankees out without a hit, beating them by a score of 2 to 0.

Three momentary lapses in control was all that prevented this stocky little native of Oklahoma from joining Addie Joss and Cy Young in the ranks of the immortals in the national pastime by allowing no man to get to first base.

This was the second no-hitter in a week. Tom Hughes threw a no-no on June 16.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 22, 2016 at 07:31 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, no-hitters

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-21-2016

Pittsburgh Press, June 21, 1916:

Down in the Ohio State league there is a young outfielder by the name of McHenry, who is…going like the proverbial house afire and the harder the pace the better he seems to like it. Already a number of major league clubs are after him but he will likely stick the season out with Huntington or at least until such time that he will be in danger of draft.

McHenry stayed in the Ohio State League until it folded, a few weeks after this mention in the newspaper.

I’ve mentioned him before, but Austin McHenry is one of my favorite ballplayers and one of the great “what if” stories in baseball history. He spent five seasons in the majors, never had an OPS+ worse than 110, and hit .350/.393/.531 (145 OPS+) as a 25-year-old in 1921.

McHenry followed that up with a 1922 season in which he hit .303/.344/.466 (111 OPS+). That sort of performance wouldn’t be all that impressive if he hadn’t done it with a brain tumor affecting his vision. The effects were bad enough that in June, McHenry told his manager that he thought he might be going blind. Austin McHenry was dying and couldn’t see, but he kept playing and kept hitting. Finally, the team sent him home in July to deal with his health issues. He passed away in November 1922.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 21, 2016 at 09:54 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: austin mchenry, dugout, history, prospect reports

Monday, June 20, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-20-2016

Pittsburgh Press, June 20, 1916:

Third Baseman Johnny Dodge of the Mobile Southern association team, died from a concussion of the brain. He was struck by a pitched ball Sunday thrown by Pitcher Tom Rogers of the Nashville club.

Dodge was drafted by the Philadelphia National league club several years ago from the Virginia league upon the recommendation of Frank Haller, who was scouting for the Phillies at the time. He figured in a trade with the Cincinnati club, after a year’s service with the Phillies, and played with that club for a season.

Aw, man, that sucks.

I wasn’t familiar with the John Dodge incident; as far as I knew, Ray Chapman was the only player to both play in the major leagues and die as a result of getting hit by a pitched ball.

Rogers’ BB-Ref Bullpen page cites a source that says Dodge had a habit of running at curveballs to hit them before they curved. Unfortunately, he ran at a high fastball and it hit him in the face.

As for Rogers, he went on to throw a perfect game three weeks later, then spent four so-so years in the majors.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 20, 2016 at 10:45 AM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: beanballs, dugout, history, john dodge, tom rogers

Friday, June 17, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-17-2016

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, June 17, 1916:

Tom Hughes, lanky Brave pitcher, broke a fast curve ball over the outside corner with Honus Wagner at the plate [yesterday] afternoon. Umpire Bill Klem’s right arm swung in strike fashion and with that gesture Long Tom’s name was flashed to the baseball Hall of Fame. The achievement was a no-hit game against the Pitates and the Braves scored a shut-out victory, 2 to 0.

Hughes’ feat is the first of its kind in the major leagues this season.

The baseball Hall of Fame meant something different in 1916 than it does in 2016.

Anyway, Salida Tom Hughes (not to be confused with Long Tom Hughes) was frequently used out of the bullpen - the closest thing to a relief ace that you were likely to find in that era. He led the league in games pitched, games finished, and saves in 1915 while also throwing 280.1 innings, 17 complete games, and four shutouts. Hughes made 13 starts and 27 relief appearances in 1916, but clearly he had the ability to be a regular starting pitcher if George Stallings had needed one.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 17, 2016 at 09:59 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, no-hitters, salida tom hughes

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-16-2016

Pittsburgh Press, June 16, 1916:

WAMBSGANSS PICKS HIMSELF FOR BENCH

Fans are wondering what will happen when Manager Fohl finally decides to put Ray Chapman back in the Indian’s [sic] lineup—a thing which won’t happen, says Fohl, as long as the tribe is hitting its present great winning clip.

But Chappie’s going to get back there sooner or later, and then the rooters are guessing whether it’ll be Ivan Howard or Bill Wambsganss who’ll go to the bench for utility infield duty.
...
[Wambsganss:] “Ivan’s a marvel at second—that’s all there is to it. And he’s playing such a game that Fohl can’t afford to let him sit the bench…Of course I’d like to be in there all the time but there’ll be no hard feelings when I have to go to the bench to let Chappie back in the game.”

One of the two benching candidates won a World Series ring as an everyday infielder with the 1920 Indians. One was out of the big leagues for good after failing to slug .250 as an Indian.

Methinks Wamby was overly modest.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 16, 2016 at 10:49 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-15-2016

Bismarck Daily Tribune, Jule 15, 1916:

BOYS TRY OUT AXES ON GRAND STAND

The Bismarck Baseball Club has been aroused by the industry of certain small boys in trying out their new axes on the ball park grand stand.

Considerable damage has already been done, which will necessitate extensive repairs before the next game.

Ice Bear will take care of it.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 15, 2016 at 10:34 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-14-2016

Milwaukee Journal, June 14, 1916:

Ed Walsh came back at Comiskey park yesterday to say farewell to the game, of which he was one of the most brilliant ornaments. The iron man of former seasons lasted less than three tinnings, and although he tried to look fate squarely in the face when he walked from the box to give way to Reb Russell, it was noticed that his strong right hand made a motion as if to brush away a tear.

It was Walsh’s final start as a White Sock. He made a relief appearance in July 1916 and made a handful of starts with the 1917 Braves, but his career was essentially over at this point. To this day, Walsh is the all-time MLB leader in career ERA (1.82) and career FIP (2.02). He’s tenth all-time with a 145 ERA+.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 14, 2016 at 09:33 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, ed walsh, history

Monday, June 13, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-13-2016

Pittsburgh Press, June 13, 1916:

Babe Ruth of the Redsox is some athlete. He is not only a good pitcher, but can produce at the bat. He was used as a pinch hitter yesterday and made good with a home run.

Man, it’s too bad pitchers only make 38-40 starts per year. I guess we’ll never see what Ruth could do if he got 500 at bats. He could hit 15 or 20 home runs in a season!

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 13, 2016 at 09:30 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: babe ruth, dugout, history

Friday, June 10, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-10-2016

AP via Honolulu Star-Bulletin, June 10, 1916:

REPRESSIVES TO SELECT TY COBB FOR PRESIDENCY

It is rumored that Tyrus Cobb of Augusta (Georgia) and Detroit will be nominated for president on the first ballot.
...
Gedeon of New York and Shotten of St. Louis are mentioned for the war portfolio, while Shore is a possibility for secretary of the navy. Wheat looks to have the nomination for secretary of agriculture, although Meadows may make a strong showing in the St. Louis delegation.
...
Judge of Washington may be given the position as attorney-general…Speaker is slated for temporary chairman.
...
Burns for hot house inspector and Barry as head of the undertaking bureau are possibilities. Love, Good, and Long are mentioned often as members of the Hague conference.

100 years later, Buck Farmer is the Secretary of Agriculture, Chris Sale is the Secretary of Commerce, and Anthony Gose runs the Department of Transportation.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 10, 2016 at 10:11 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, June 09, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-9-2016

Pittsburgh Press, June 9, 1916:

White’s Wonders, a ball team composed of seven one-armed boys, using two-arm men only at first base and behind the bat, now touring the south, started their season with an easy victory over the Elberton [Georgia] Home Guards, 11 to 3. Five batters on the Wonder team each poled triples. Brown, pitcher for the one-arm team, allowed six blows. The Wonders committed three errors.

They blew it. Should have called the team the Oneders.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 09, 2016 at 10:16 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, June 08, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-8-2016

Pittsburgh Press, June 8, 1916:

OPPOSITION TO BEAN BALL INCREASING

It is high time that a baseball law was passed making a real penalty for the bean ball, the most dangerous weapon now in the power of big league ball players.

The bean ball is far worse than any player’s spikes, for its effects have been known to injure a player for life.
...
Two persons fainted in the stands [in Cleveland Sunday] as [a pitch] crashed into Gandil’s skull and he dropped to the ground. He was lucky to be hit in front of the ear instead of behind it, and therefore was only dazed.

Such a rule probably would not have prevented the Mays-Chapman incident four years later - most contemporary sources say it was purely accidental - but it certainly wouldn’t have been a bad idea.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 08, 2016 at 09:48 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: beanballs, dugout, history

Tuesday, June 07, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-7-2016

Pittsburgh Press, June 7, 1916:

Stories printed [in Chicago] under a Boston date say that Manager Tinker of the Chicago Nationals will begin negotiations calculated to bring Johnny Evers of the Boston club back to the Cubs. The stories could not be confirmed here.

In other news, Al Capone is going into business with Bugs Moran, Joseph Stalin is palling around with Leon Trotsky, and Biggie is recording an album with Tupac.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 07, 2016 at 09:21 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, June 06, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-6-2016

Pittsburgh Press, June 6, 1916:

George Wintherbotham, former pitcher in the Pacific Coast league, is a private today in the 211th battalion of the ‘American Legion.’ He joined in order to win the hand and heart of a lady fair—also $50,000 of her papa’s money.

Wintherbotham is a cigar salesman. When he duly requested parental consent for the marriage he proposed, the prospective father-in-law declared he first must prove his merit by going through the war.

To the meritorious son-in-law he also promised the modest sum of $50,000. So Wintherbotham got measured for a uniform.

I’m not sure whether Winterbotham ever got the money, but I’m confident he didn’t get the girl. The 1930 census shows George E. Winterbotham, born circa 1893, was married to Caryl M. Winterbotham, born circa 1905.

If that’s the same girl he proposed to in 1916, I understand why her father thought George should have to face bullets.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 06, 2016 at 09:26 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, June 03, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-3-2016

Chicago Eagle, July 3, 1916:

“Iron Men” is the latest nickname for the Toledo baseball club. Two Toledo sport writers are using the name exclusively in referring to the club. Whether it will become popular is problematical.

Rajahs and Bresna Hens were two names that for a short time seemed to strike the popular fancy, but fandom decreed that neither was suitable andreturned to the old name of Mud Hens.

Toledo’s baseball team was owned at this point by Roger Bresnahan, by the way. I’d have been all about Bresna Hens, which is both clever and a nod to the history of baseball in Toledo.

But nobody asked me.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 03, 2016 at 10:09 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, June 02, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-2-2016

Toledo News Bee, June 2, 1916:

Breakfast Food Ball Is the Latest Shoot Used By Some A.A. Heavers To Fool Batter

Latest substance used by American association pitchers in making the old baseball do convulsive leaps as it is hurtled towards the plate, is oatmeal. This, rolled oats or some other mealy matter is kept in the back pocket of the flinger, who sprinkles the ball and then polishes it on his trouser leg.
...
Our old friend, Lefty James, here on Thursday with the Louisville club, is the league’s leading disciple in evoluting this peculiar shoot.

I guess it’s better than the McGriddle ball or the Croissan’wich ball.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 02, 2016 at 09:44 AM | 47 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, foreign substances, history

Wednesday, June 01, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-1-2016

Pittsburgh Press, June 1, 1916:

It has become known that when George Harold Sisler was declared a free agent by the National commission, a “gentlemen’s agreement” was entered into, whereby all other clubs were to keep their hands off the player, and allow Pittsburg to sign him. Of course, this was not reduced to writing—it was a “gentlemen’s agreement.”

Pray, what is a “gentlemen’s agreement?” Well, in baseball it is a combination of the double cross and the dagger in the back.

Somewhere, Pop Lloyd, Oscar Charleston, and Rube Foster are nodding in agreement.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: June 01, 2016 at 11:24 AM | 36 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-31-2016

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, May 31, 1916:

Manager Charles (Buck) Herzog of the Reds was struck on the head and rendered unconscious by a thrown ball shortly before [yesterday’s] game started. Ivy Wingo was warming up the pitchers and threw one a little wild which struck the manager on the side of his head as he was running to his position.

Herzog did not regain his senses for 15 minutes, the athlete recoving consciousness in the club house. He told the writer after the game that he would be able to play today. Bob Fisher played short.

“It was a million to one shot, doc. Million to one.”

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 31, 2016 at 10:29 AM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: buck herzog, dugout, history

Friday, May 27, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-27-2016

Pittsburgh Press, May 27, 1916:

The Reds were playing the Boston Braves and Wade Killifer smashed out a home run. A fan, who is known as the “Milkman,” who paid his quarter to get into the bleachers, became so enthused over the home run that he went outside the park and purchased a bouquet for Wade. The “Milkman” rushed back to the park, paid another quarter to again get inside the park and gave the flowers to a ground attendant and they were presented to Killifer.

...and then Killifer filed for a restraining order, hopefully.

If this story is true, this has to be the game in question. Killefer hit a two-run inside the park home run in the fourth inning. I’m sure that would have been exciting, but it doesn’t seem like something you lose your mind over: A guy hitting a fourth inning home run to give his sub-.500 team a 2-1 lead in a nondescript mid-May ballgame.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 27, 2016 at 11:51 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: crazytown bananapants, dugout, fans, history

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-26-2016

Pittsburgh Press, May 26, 1916:

Ohio State university baseball team boasts a one-armed pitcher in Herman F. Recker, freshman agricultural student. University baseball coaches say he has the smoke and stuff to give many a western conference heavy hitter the shivers.
...
“It takes just one arm to throw the ball—and I’ve got one,” Recker says. He has no place to wear a glove, but is a wizard at spearing hot liners barehanded.

He’s got a point. It only takes one arm.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 26, 2016 at 10:56 AM | 37 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-25-2016

Pittsburgh Press, May 25, 1916:

Manager Lee Fohl of the Cleveland Indians does not agree with Clark Griffith that cigarets are bad for professional ball players.

Griffith is deadly opposed to cigarets and his players know it, for any member of the local club caught smoking a cigaret is fined $10.
...
Fohl said: “You’ve got to show me where cigarets ever harmed a ball player. I will admit that perhaps they would be better off without smoking, but I don’t believe it hurts them much…In the first place, you can’t stop an inveterate cigaret smoker by threatening to fine him. He is going to smoke—that’s all there is to it. I have placed no ban on cigaret smoking—all I ask for is that my men play good ball; if they don’t I’m through with them.”

*Jim Leyland nods in agreement*

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 25, 2016 at 10:20 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, tobacco

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-24-2016

Pittsburgh Press, May 24, 1916:

Mike Mowrey was put out of yesterday’s game after he had been called out at second on a close play. He laid on the ground and gave an imitation of swimming. Umpire Byron promptly ordered him from the field.

Just keep swimming. Just keep swimming.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 24, 2016 at 09:54 AM | 24 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, umpshow

Monday, May 23, 2016

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 5-23-2016

Pittsburgh Press, May 23, 1916:

Ray Caldwell of the New York Yankees, owes his late start this spring to a peculiar accident which befell him in the spring training came at Macon, Ga. While carving his initials on his favorite bat the knife slipped and cut into the top of his right index finger.

When a pitcher starts fooling with a bat there’s no telling what will happen to him. People should never monkey with machinery they don’t know anything about.

Caldwell was actually a pretty decent hitter, good enough that he spent some time as a position player. Ray played 46 games in the outfield, started 17 in center, and even got a few starts at first base. He was a career .248/.297/.322 (78 OPS+) hitter - not someone you’d want as a regular starter, but good enough that he wouldn’t kill you if you needed him to fill in as a backup center fielder.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: May 23, 2016 at 09:44 AM | 27 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, ray caldwell

Sunday, May 22, 2016

AP: Plumbing issues in Yankees’ dugout at Oakland Coliseum

And Shooty forgot to bring his plunger.

There were plumbing issues in the visitor’s dugout at the Oakland Coliseum before the start of Saturday’s game against the New York Yankees.

Several maintenance workers spent nearly an hour trying to fix a backed up toilet while a member of the Coliseum staff mopped up the standing water seeping into the dugout. Yankees manager Joe Girardi and some New York players sidestepped the mess as they made their way to the field for pre-game workouts.

Renegade JE (((Jason))) Posted: May 22, 2016 at 09:46 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: athletics, dugout, oakland coliseum, yankees

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