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Dugout Newsbeat

Friday, November 27, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-27-2015

El Paso Herald, November 27, 1915:

Before the documents were signed that made Cyril [Slapnicka] a Brewer, he thought his twirling services were worth so much per season. The club owners thought he valued the power of his arm about $400 too much, and they told him so.
“We will give you a contract calling for the figures we have mentioned. Into this contract we will insert a proviso to the effect that if you win one half of your games we will pay you the extra $400.”
[With a 14-15 record,] Cyril got ready [for the final road trip of the season, but] the manager, he says, spoke to him thusly:

“You ain’t goin’ along, old kid; you’re gonna linger behind. We don’t need you.”

Slapnicka sued for the $400 and won, successfully arguing that the team intentionally prevented him from having a chance to get the bonus. He threw 308.2 IP in 1915, but it was the innings he didn’t throw that won Slap the cash.

Slapnicka may have been a Quad-A pitcher, but he went on to become one of the most successful scouts of all time. He signed Bob Feller, Bob Lemon, Roger Maris, Lou Boudreau, Mel Harder, Ken Keltner, Herb Score, Bobby Avila, and Hal Trosky.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 27, 2015 at 08:25 AM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: cy slapnicka, dugout, history

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-25-2015

Not a ton of baseball in the newspapers of Thanksgiving Day 1915.

Topeka State Journal, November 25, 1915:

Arthur (Buck) Weaver, formerly catcher for the Denver and Wichita Western League baseball clubs, was probably fatally injured today in an explosion and fire that damaged the plant of the Mountain Motor Fuel company of which he was superintendent…An electric spark is believed to have caused the explosion.

This is not Black Sox Buck Weaver, but the Browns/Cardinals/Pirates/White Sox catcher who played in the majors from 1902-1908. I’m not sure whether he ever recovered from these injuries, but this Buck Weaver passed away in Denver in March 1917.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 25, 2015 at 08:05 AM | 36 comment(s)
  Beats: art weaver, dugout, history

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-24-2015

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, November 24, 1915:

The motor driven scow in which Dwight F. Mallory, one of the large backers and directors of the Baltimore Federal League club and society man, started out alone in a gale from the Magothy River at noon Friday…was found [yesterday] at Wartons Point, in the Chesapeake Bay by a dozen searching parties…There was no trace of the owner.

Mallory was never found, and his body is presumed to have washed out to sea.

It was one of a number of catastrophic setbacks for the Federal League in the offseason of 1915-16. Brookfeds owner Robert Ward, who is said to have bankrolled the league to the tune of more than a million 1915 dollars, died unexpectedly in October. And a quarter of the league (Kansas City and Buffalo) forfeited their franchises as a result of running out of money.

As of November 24, 1915, the Feds were behaving as if their league was still a thing, but it’s tough to imagine them being able to pull out of this death spiral. (No pun intended.)

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 24, 2015 at 08:21 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history

Monday, November 23, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-23-2015

Bridgeport Evening Farmer, November 23, 1915:

It has been almost forgotten that Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis has a decision of moment to baseball in his hands, writes J.B. Sherian in the St. Louis Globe-Democrat.
It has been said that if Judge Landis’ decision declares Organized Baseball is a trust within the meaning of the Sherman anti-trust law that all contracts made by players with Organized Baseball clubs will be voided.
Good lawyers say that the judge’s decision will not have any such effect…almost all the star players have very good contracts, better, perhaps, than they could get tomorrow if they were free agents.

Sure. That makes sense. Competition for scarce resources never drives prices up.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 23, 2015 at 07:52 AM | 27 comment(s)
  Beats: antitrust exemption, dugout, history

Friday, November 20, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-20-2015

Bridgeport Evening Farmer, November 20, 1915:

That the Yankees will erect their new baseball stadium in Long Island City became almost a certainty yesterday afternoon when Capt. T.L. Huston declared that there are three sites over in Queens that appear favorable to him and Col. Ruppert, President and principal backer of the local American League club.
[Huston:] “There has been a lot of criticism heaped upon us for thinking of deserting Manhattan Island and locating in Queens. But we are ready to sink or swim in our investment and our ideas…With the money we can save by building elsewhere we can invest in new players for the team.”

Obviously, the House That Peckinpaugh Built never actually got built. The Yankees did eventually “desert Manhattan Island”, though that seems to have worked out fairly well for them.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 20, 2015 at 10:03 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, stadiums, yankees

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-19-2015

Liberal [Kansas] Democrat, November 19, 1915:

Baseball 4,000 Years Old

It is now believed that Egypt is the birthplace of the original ball game. How it was played history does not record. Recent excavations made near Cairo have brought to light a number of small balls, some of leather and others of wood, dating back to at least 2000 B.C. These are the oldest balls of this sort known.

Archaeologists excavating the Egyptian tombs also found a Julio Franco rookie card.

And, yes, the newspaper was really called the Liberal Democrat. I know, right?

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 19, 2015 at 07:33 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-18-2015

A follow-up on Senators pitcher Jim Shaw’s hunting accident (yesterday’s link), which resulted in him accidentally shooting himself in the neck:

Washington Herald, November 18, 1915:

Jim Shaw, the big right-hander, regarded as a valuable asset to the Washington baseball club, has worked his last game. In other words, he is through so far as hurling is concerned for all times.
A piece the size of a half dollar is carved out of Shaw’s trusty right arm, which means that his pitching days are over.

Meanwhile, across town in the Washington Times:

The ligaments in his arm and shoulder are so torn by the explosion, but it is expected that they will mend sufficiently for the pitcher again to assume the box.

Times 1, Herald 0. Shaw was back on the mound for the Sens almost exactly six months after the accident.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 18, 2015 at 08:34 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, guns, history, hunting, jim shaw

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-17-2015 which reports of Jim Shaw’s death are greatly exaggerated.

Pittsburgh Press, November 17, 1915:

James Shaw, aged 22, a member of the pitching staff of the Washington American League baseball club…was probably fatally shot Monday afternoon while hunting near Greensburg, when he accidentally discharged his shotgun while holding it about a foot away from his face.
While walking through a thicket, Shaw came to a fence, and while climbing over it, his gun was discharged. The trigger caught on a twig and discharged the gun.

Miraculously, Shaw was back on the mound in May 1916. He spent six more years in the major leagues, even leading the big leagues in innings pitched, batters faced, games pitched, and saves in 1919.

Jim Shaw was a pretty good pitcher, and he’s someone with whom I was unfamiliar until just now. He won 84 games, had a league-average ERA, and occasionally found his way into the AL leaderboards. He’s about halfway in between Steve Avery and Gil Meche on the BB-Ref EloRater.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 17, 2015 at 08:26 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, guns, history, hunting, jim shaw

Monday, November 16, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-16-2015

New York Tribune, November 16, 1915:

James A. Gilmore, president of the Federal League, returned to [New York] yesterday, after attending the annual meeting of the Feds in Chicago.
He announced that the invasion of Manhattan Island by the Federal League was a fact, and insisted that within a week or ten days the location of the grounds and the plans for building the stadium would be made public.

The chief of the youngest organization in baseball was inclined to be a bit reticent, and evaded the question of the possibility of an amicable agreement being reached by the warring factions.

An amicable agreement was reached by the warring factions.

Also in the news 100 years ago today, the Rock Island Argus reports that play is underway in the Rock Island Automatic Baseball league, and that the final score of game one was 347-247. Obviously this wasn’t baseball, but I have no idea what it actually was. My Google Fu is failing me - anyone have any idea what the heck “automatic baseball” was?

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 16, 2015 at 08:19 AM | 24 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history

Friday, November 13, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-13-2015

Richmond Times-Dispatch, November 13, 1915:

Bronx to Get “Fed” Club.

The home of the new baseball club which the Federal League has decided to locate in [New York] is expected to be in the borough of the Bronx. An architect already has begun plans for the stands, and it is stated that work on them will begin next week.

Baseball? In the Bronx? That’ll never work.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 13, 2015 at 08:53 AM | 25 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-12-2015

Fulton County [Ohio] Tribune, November 12, 1915:

One day at Little Rock, where the Detroit team was playing an exhibition, old Red Donahue, who in his day was the sharpest-tongued man in baseball, was tossing them over and letting the Little Rock batters hit at will, to the great delight of the spectators.

“Oh, Red, you’re easy, easy, easy,” shrieked one very wild fan who was getting on Red’s nerves.

“I’m not half as easy as you are,” retorted Red. “You paid 50 cents to see me do it.”

Oh snap.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 12, 2015 at 09:52 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, red donahue

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-11-2015

Toledo News-Bee, November 11, 1915:

One day several years ago Lewis Rober, a retired fireman of Minneapolis, Minn., made a soft ball for a few firemen to play with.

Out of that simple act there has grown an outdoor game so popular it has spread to other cities and an industry with such bright prospects a big sporting goods concern has taken to making the same kind of ball.

The firemen invented a game like indoor baseball…Officials of city playgrounds heard of the ball, tested it, ordered a lot of them and started the game in city parks.

The game they played with Rober’s soft ball eventually became known as - get this - “softball”. There’s some disagreement about the actual inventor of softball, but Rober’s ball eventually became the standard softball we use today.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 11, 2015 at 08:27 AM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, softball

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-10-2015

Pittsburgh Press, November 10, 1915:

Word comes from Havana of the death of a well-known Cuban player. Jose Figarola, who was killed by a pitched ball thrown by Mendez in a practice game on October 22. Figarola was at bat and the ball hit him over the heart. He died almost instantly.

Rumors of Figarola’s demise were greatly exaggerated. As Gary Ashwill writes over at the wonderful Agate Type blog, Jose Figarola (also known as Rafael Figarola) was very much alive and even started at catcher for Almendares on October 25, 1915. He was still playing pro baseball as late as 1923. Not bad for a guy who’d been dead for eight years.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 10, 2015 at 08:21 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, obituaries

Monday, November 09, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-9-2015

100 years ago today, the Federal League’s death spiral picked up steam. Pittsburgh Gazette Times, November 9, 1915:

[Federal League President] Gilmore said it was possible the Kansas City and Buffalo franchises would be declared forfeited at [today’s] meeting, the clubs in those cities having failed, he said, to carry out their financial obligations.

An official of the [Kansas City] club is quoted as having said: “We are through. We have carried the fight this far, but are not prepared to go on.”

William E. Robertson, president of the [Buffalo] Federal League baseball club, admitted [yesterday] that the $100,000 necessary to hold the Federal League franchise in Buffalo another year had not been raised.

I know how this story turns out, obviously, but it still bums me out that the Feds didn’t make it. I’ve got a soft spot for crazy people spending their own money on crazy things.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 09, 2015 at 08:19 AM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history

Friday, November 06, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-6-2015

Bridgeport Evening Farmer, November 6, 1915:

Miller James Huggins, manager of the St. Louis Cardinals, has passed up an opportunity to sign the greatest pitcher the world has ever known. All Huggins would have had to do to get this wonderful “phenom” is to buy 250 shares of mining stock from a Dubuque, Ia., lawyer, and the lawyer in turn would get the pitcher to sign a Cardinal contract.
The gentleman claims to have discovered a semi-pro pitcher who is so good that even the Feds have been after him.
Huggins is afraid that the pitcher would be worth more than the mining stock, and as Hug is not the kind of a person to take unfair advantage of a lawyer it is a leadpipe cinch that he won’t accept the Dubuque attorney’s proposition.

Miller Huggins: Wonderful little fellow.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 06, 2015 at 08:33 AM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, miller huggins

Thursday, November 05, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-5-2015

Virginia (Minnesota) Enterprise, November 5, 1915:

Today the Federal league exists in name only, and unless all signs fail next Tuesday will see the formal dissolution of one of the most remarkablke organizations in the history of promoting, says the [Chicago] Examiner today.
Not a wheel is being turned in the Federal league today and the present expectation is that nothing remains but the completion of the innumerable transactions that will effectually wind up James A. Gilmore’s organization.

A moment of silence, please, for the most audacious (and crazy) baseball organization of the 20th century. Sometimes David doesn’t slay Goliath. Sometimes he just gets stepped on.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 05, 2015 at 10:02 AM | 27 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history, obituaries

Wednesday, November 04, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-4-2015

Rock Island Argus, November 4, 1915:

Plans are nearing consummation to terminate the baseball war by absorbing into the National league the men who hold the federal league’s bank roll.
The scheme as outlined is for [Harry] Sinclair to become part owner of the Giants, [Phil] Ball to purchase the Britton equity in the St. Louis Cards, [PittFeds owner Edward] Gwinner to be bought out by Dreyfuss or to be allowed to buy into the Pirates, and the Whales and Cubs to be consolidated and play on the north side grounds in [Chicago].

I don’t know if this peace plan is going to work. There’s no way it complies with antitrust law, right?

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 04, 2015 at 08:20 AM | 25 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history

Tuesday, November 03, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-3-2015

Milwaukee Sentinel, November 3, 1915:

If Charley Comiskey has his way, Chic [sic] Gandil will be playing first base for the White Sox next season.
Griffith has made it known that he intends to have Judge, a youngster of only 20 years, at the bag when the season opens, and it is not a secret that with this in view he intends to make some sort of a disposition of Gandil. Gandil would come pretty near to making the Chicago team, which is sadly in need of both a first and third baseman.

Don’t do it, Charlie. Trust me. You don’t want Gandil. It may seem like a good idea, but it isn’t. Really.

Chick Gandil spent 1916 with the Indians, who sold him on to Chicago before the 1917 season. Weirdly, Gandil played in all eight games in the 1919 World Series, then he completely disappears from the statistical record. I wonder what happened.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 03, 2015 at 08:02 AM | 33 comment(s)
  Beats: chick gandil, dugout, history

Monday, November 02, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-2-2015

Grand Forks Daily Herald, November 2, 1915:

There is just the suggestion of a “batting scandal” in the National league similar to that which caused the row in the American when Lajoie was allowed to get his eight hits on the final day in St. Louis. The intimation is that they were overly kind to Larry Doyle at Braves field on the final day of the National league race when he registered four hits and thus took the lead in batting for the year.

I had never heard this accusation before. It’s a lot harder to believe than the Cobb-Lajoie story, mostly because Doyle was already leading the league in batting heading into the final day of the season. The guy in second, Fred Luderus, had the day off, so by my calculations, Doyle needed exactly one hit in the final game of the season to secure the batting title. Also, from everything I’ve read, Luderus seems like a reasonably well-liked guy, not the sort of person opponents would go out of their way to rob of a batting title.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: November 02, 2015 at 08:46 AM | 37 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, fred luderus, history, larry doyle

Friday, October 30, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-30-2015

Grand Forks Daily Herald, October 30, 1915:

Long Tom Hughes is believed to be one of the few players in the history of the game to resign.
When the Angels started on their last trip, so the story runs, the players, as is their custom, flipped coins to decide which of them should be sentenced to upper berths or occupy the roomy ground floor. Hughes showed up too late for the lottery and found Scotty Finley occupying the only extra lower berth. That the club trainer should be in a lower and a regular pitcher compelled to hike up a stepladder into the hay loft did not meet with Long Tom’s idea of the general fitness of things.

Officially, Los Angeles released Hughes, but it’s entirely possible that they did so upon his request.

Long Tom was a pretty okay pitcher, but a moody one. He won 132 games in the big leagues playing for mostly awful teams, putting up an ERA+ of 93 along the way. The BB-Ref Elo rater has him in the Carl Erskine/Bob Turley/Steve Avery neighborhood, which seems about right to me.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 30, 2015 at 09:03 AM | 27 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, long tom hughes

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-29-2015

Pittsburgh Gazette-Times, October 29, 1915:

There is little or no chance of peace on the baseball horizon, a talk with the two Pittsburgh magnates proving the fact, and the published rumors and statements of Charles Weeghman, notwithstanding.

[Pirates] President Barney Dreyfuss will not discuss reported plans to deal with the invaders and he stands firm with Messrs. Hempstead, Ebbetts [sic] and others for a stand-pat policy.
President Dreyfuss is on record as saying that he would dynamite Forbes Field rather than enter into a peace pact with the invaders…

Forbes Field was intact in 1916, but the Federal League was not.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 29, 2015 at 09:47 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-28-2015

Pittsburgh Press, October 28, 1915:

Christy Mathewson, probably the most famous baseball player in the history of the national pastime, and mainstay of the Giants for the past 11 years, may never don a uniform again. In a story published under his own signature today, the great pitcher says there is not much chance of the doctors ever getting his arm in shape again and it is very likely that he will accept the position offered him to coach the baseball team at Harvard.

Mathewson pitched again in 1916, but his arm was shot. He made 12 decent but unspectacular appearances for the ‘16 Giants, and was then traded to the Reds in July to serve as their new manager.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 28, 2015 at 09:07 AM | 19 comment(s)
  Beats: christy mathewson, dugout, history

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-27-2015

Milwaukee Sentinel, October 27, 1915:

George Foster, Bogus, Dined by Cincy Fans

A man who the police charge represented himself as George Foster, Boston American pitcher, did not go to the Latonia races last week with a jolly party as planned. The police held him, claiming that he had obtained money under false pretense.
Several fans and other sports, believing he was the noted ball player, arranged a party in his honor at the races. The man has been in the city several days, stopping at leading hotels and being extensively wined and dined by baseball enthusiasts.

Goes to show the old saying is true: A fool and his money are some party.

The good news is that Cincinnati was able to get over this incident quickly enough that the actual George Foster was able to join the Reds 56 years later.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 27, 2015 at 08:58 AM | 35 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, October 26, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-26-2015

Pittsburgh Press, October 26, 1915:

While Babe Ruth was pitching his old team, the St. Mary’s Industrial School, to victory, one of the brothers of the institution to whom Ruth had intrusted [sic] his 2 1/2 carat solitaire ring lost the jewel while working to keep the big crowd from encroaching on the infield.

Ruth paid $500 for the ring, which contained the first diamond he had ever owned. He had bought it from the proceeds of his share of the world’s series games.

Well, it’s not a few hundred gallons of whiskey, but the Babe’s use of his 1915 World Series money didn’t disappoint.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 26, 2015 at 08:18 AM | 31 comment(s)
  Beats: babe ruth, dugout, history

Friday, October 23, 2015

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-23-2015

Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, October 23, 1915:

A brand new one in baseball was pulled in the Western League the day before the season closed. Wichita and Topeka were playing a double-header, and Topeka had the second game clinched in the early innings, when the Wichita players requested the umpire to call the game early, because, they said, “they were tired out.” Realizing that the game would develop into a farce, the umpire complied with their wishes and the game was stopped after six innings, though it was still light.

Ah, the days before greenie-laced coffee. It’s like a whole different baseball universe.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 23, 2015 at 08:11 AM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

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