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Dugout Newsbeat

Friday, October 20, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-20-2017

Richmond [Indiana] Palladium, October 20, 1917:

Byron Bancroft Johnson, president of the American league, is preparing today to leave for Washington, D.C., where he will offer his services to the government in any capacity. Johnson will not express preference for any branch of the service, leaving that matter entirely to the government.

Because of the probability that Johnson will be in the service of the country within a short time, the annual American league meeting scheduled for December in Chicago will be held early in November. Johnson said today he had been planning for some time to retire from baseball, but declined ot discuss his probable successor.

I don’t know whether Johnson changed his mind, or if Uncle Sam simply declined the offer of military service from a pudgy 50-something year old, but Johnson kept his job as the head of the American League through 1927.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 20, 2017 at 07:52 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-19-2017

New York Sun, October 19, 1917:

That Urban Faber, who pitched the White Sox to victory over the Giants in the deciding game of the world’s series at New York on Monday, collapsed in the clubhouse immediately after the contest was the statement made by Mel Wolfgang, one of the Chicago pitchers, [yesterday].
...
“Faber, who pitched that last game for us, walked off the field as cool and composed as though he were going to church, but just as soon as he got in the clubhouse he collapsed. His jaw dropped, his knees sagged and he fell into the arms of some of the fellows.

Faber was fine, of course. Just exhausted.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 19, 2017 at 10:58 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-18-2017

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, October 18, 1917:

When Edward Barrow, president of the International League, was asked [yesterday] about the rumor that he was to succeed President Ban Johnson as head of the American League for the duration of the war. Mr. Barrow said he could not discuss the matter at this time. He admitted that Johnson, however, was contemplating joining the Army and was anxious to get a commission in the Quartermaster’s Department.

Barrow didn’t get the gig. Instead, he managed the Red Sox to the 1918 World Series title.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 18, 2017 at 09:57 AM | 1 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-17-2017

Harrisburg Telegraph, October 17, 1917:

The Chicago White Sox, winners of the 1917 world series, defeated the New York Giants in an exhibition game yesterday, 6 to 4, before 6,000 soldiers from Camp Mills, at Mineola. The soldiers were members of the 165th United States Infantry, most of them New Yorkers, and of the 149th Artillery, composed of men from Illinois.

The Sox finished off the Giants in six before the two teams played this exhibition for American soldiers.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 17, 2017 at 10:48 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, October 13, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-13-2017

Albuquerque Evening Herald, October 13, 1917:

In one of the stormiest games ever played in a world’s series campaign, the Chicago White Sox came from behind today when defeat stared them in the face and beat the New York Giants by a score of 8 to 5...Salee [sic], the Giants’ twirler, held the Chicagos well in hand until the sixth inning and from there on they batted him to all parts of the field. Both teams fielded wretchedly at times.

There were nine total errors in this game, five of which were committed by Buck Weaver, Chick Gandil, and Lefty Williams. I’m not sayin’ anything. I’m just sayin’.

With the win, the White Sox took a 3-2 series lead.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 13, 2017 at 09:49 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-12-2017

Giants outfielder Benny Kauff, quoted in the New York World, October 12, 1917:

The series looks good to me now. I grabbed a bet of $2,000 to my $200 that we would win four straight. Looks good to me.

Nothing to see here, just a ballplayer writing about betting on his own team in the World Series against the late-1910s white Sox.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 12, 2017 at 10:32 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-11-2017

Rogue River [Oregon] Courier, October 11, 2017:

The New York National league Giants trampled over the Chicago American league White Sox by a five to nothing score, making the series even up. Ferdinand Schupp, the Giant’s southpaw duplicated Benton’s shut out performance, by plastering a second coat of white-wash to the would-be victors…The series now stands, Chicago, 2; New York 2.

At this point, the White Sox hadn’t scored a run in 22 innings.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 11, 2017 at 09:59 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-10-2017

Philadelphia Evening Ledger, October 10, 1917:

Big Rube Benton turned the tide of the Giants’ luck in the third game of the world’s series [in New York] this afternoon when he beat Chicago, 2 to 0. The big southerner worked in superb form, outpitching the wizard, Eddie Cicotte, who was believed unbeatable. The series now stands two to one in Chicago’s favor…

The home team had won the first three games of the series at this point. Game four was in New York on the afternoon of October 11.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 10, 2017 at 10:19 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, October 06, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-6-2017

Philadelphia Evening Ledger, October 6, 1917:

Chicago is ready to entertain the world’s series audience and actors today. The stage, while a trifle moist and muddy, is all set, and the big act will go on as per schedule.

It was Ferdie Schupp (Giants) vs. Eddie Cicotte (White Sox) in Game One of the 1917 World Series.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 06, 2017 at 09:46 AM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, October 05, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-5-2017

A World Series preview from the Pittsburgh Press, October 5, 1917:

The batting [of the first basemen] is about even. Gandil strikes out right-handed, while Holke misses ‘em from the left-hand side of the plate…Both [second basemen] are firmly opposed to the Hohenzollerns…McMullin is the best man on the bases, when he gets on, but he never gets on…[Buck Weaver] can throw that old pill farther than any strong arm in the establishment. Weaver often bounces a dollar-and-a-quarter baseball off a four-bit spectator’s skull, giving the 50-cent fan a clear profit of 15 jitneys and one lump on his dome.

Sports media needs more of this sort of thing and less screamy talk shows.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 05, 2017 at 10:40 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, October 04, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-4-2017

Pittsburgh Press, October 4, 1917:

Rogers Hornsby has asked for a three-year contract without the release clause, calling for $22,500, to remain with the Cardinals. President Rickey has offered $5,000 for one year. Hornsby says: “It is my price or I will close my baseball career with this fall series.” President Rickey, according to Hornsby, said: “I will save money if you do not come back next season.”

Pay the man, Branch. Just trust me on this. He’s worth it. I promise.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 04, 2017 at 10:20 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, rogers hornsby

Tuesday, October 03, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-3-2017

The link is to a nearly half-page ad in the Butte Daily Post for One Touch of Nature, a short film featuring John McGraw and the New York Giants.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 03, 2017 at 10:23 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, films, history

Monday, October 02, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-2-2017

Bismarck Tribune, October 2, 1917:


There’s also a fun cartoon about Red Faber at the link.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: October 02, 2017 at 10:54 AM | 34 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-28-2017

Harrisburg Telegraph, September 28, 1917:

The Boston Americans yesterday defeated by a score of 2 to 0 an all-star team, recruited from leading players of the American League, with Maranville, of the Boston Nationals, at shortstop. The entire proceeds went to the family of the late T.H. Murnane, who, until his death last winter, was one of the most prominent American baseball writers. The receipts were well over $14,000.
...
Cobb, of Detroit; Speaker, of Cleveland, and Jackson, of the Champion Chicago Americans played the outfield for the all-stars, and contributed sensational plays. McInnis, of the Athletics, was at first; Chapman, the Cleveland shortstop, at second, and Weaver, of Chicago, at third.

Before the game some of baseball’s greatest stars competed in the field events. McNally, of Boston, won the bunt-and-run-to-first event; Joe Jackson, of the White Sox, made the longest throw; Dutch Leonard, of the Red Sox, the most accurate one, while Chapman, of Cleveland, showed the way to the base circles.

Goodness. A baseball game featuring Cobb, Speaker, Jackson, Walter Johnson, and Babe Ruth. If time travel were a thing, September 27, 1917 at Fenway Park would be near the top of my list.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 28, 2017 at 10:49 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-27-2017

Fulton County [Pennsylvania] News, September 27, 1917:

“I hate to discourage you, but your professional baseball players will make bloomin’ poor bombardiers, unless they go through a lot of training,” is the way Lieut. Lester Elliott of the Australian army expresses the situation, following a morning’s exercise with the Cleveland Indians.
...
“One of the training stunts for the soldiers in the intensive camps in France requires that the bombers shall throw almost without a rest for two hours. When you consider that each bomb weighs from 7½ to 9½ pounds, rather heavier than the American baseball, you will see the difficulty facing Americans who throw their baseball with a snap and overhand.
...
“If they insist on this baseball motion, they will throw their arms away.”

Imagine all the arm injuries if soldiers threw nine-pound grenades like baseballs non-stop for two hours.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 27, 2017 at 10:21 AM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-26-2017

Bridgeport Evening Farmer, September 26, 1917:

NEW YORK BETTOR MAKES $120,000 BY GIANTS VICTORY

With the National League pennant clinched on Monday, wagers were paid off yesterday, and [Arnold] Rothstein’s confidence in the ability of the Giants to capture the flag—a confidence born last fall—netted him the tidy sum of $120,000.

He wagered on the Giants at odds varying from 100 to 1 to even money, but the bulk of it was places at 5 to 6.

Goodness. It’s almost like Arnold Rothstein knows what’s going to happen before it happens.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 26, 2017 at 10:29 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, September 25, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-25-2017

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, September 25, 1917:

Cases against George Weaver and Fred McMullin of the Chicago American League club were dismissed in the [Boston] Police Court [yesterday]. They were charged with assaulting Augustine J. McNally of Norwood during a disturbance on the ball field during a previous visit of the Chicago club to this city…The complainant and his witnesses failed to appear.

Obviously Buck Weaver and Fred McMullin were fine, upstanding ballplayers who would never commit any sort of misconduct on a baseball field.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 25, 2017 at 10:01 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, September 22, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-22-2017

Updates on international baseball in the Chicago Eagle, September 22, 1917:

The American boys in France are finding out that they are not the only men who can play ball. Not counting the Canadians, or “Americans,” there are in the Australian part of the British empire’s army a lot of very nifty baseballers.

The Japanese government, it is reported, plans to send two college [baseball] teams in a tour of its territory in Manchuria, partly to make the Japanese colonists there feel in touch with the home land, and further to get the natives interested, so that they will have less time to grumble about Japanese governmental policies.

If I’m a Manchurian in 1917, I’m going to make an effort to figure out what the Japanese are doing, then do the exact opposite. I wonder if resentment towards Japan had anything to do with baseball’s failure to take hold in China.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 22, 2017 at 10:01 AM | 37 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-21-2017

Bismarck Tribune, September 21, 1917:

The National baseball commission today announced that the world’s series would open on the grounds of the Chicago Americans, October 6, with the second game played there Sunday, October 7.
...
Soldiers now in France and also those who are preparing to fight for liberty, were remembered by the commission. Announcement was made that a 1,000 word story would be cabled to France after each game for the benefit of the soldiers there…

President Wilson and Generals Barry, Carter, Bell and McCain will be invited to attend the series.

“No, that’s cool, you guys have fun at the World Series. Enjoy yourselves. We’ll just hang out here in the trenches getting blown up.”

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 21, 2017 at 08:21 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, world war i

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-20-2017

Fulton County [Pennsylvania] News, September 20, 1917:

John Ganzel, manager of the Kansas City Blues, recently pulled a new stunt in the art of handling pitchers…Ganzel used two pitchers, interchangeably, between right field and the hurling hill. With two out and none on base Pierce, a southpaw, replaced Sanders against Indianapolis. He retired Wickland, a left-handed batter, and then went to right field to permit McQuillan, a right hander who had been playing the old soldiers’ garden, to pitch to Bronkie, who hits right-handed.

This is the earliest example of this tactic that I’ve seen, though I admit I haven’t spent a bunch of time on it. It’s interesting to me that managers as early as 1917 saw the platoon advantage as this important.

Also, “the old soldiers’ garden” meaning right field is a cool phrase and I’d love to know the etymology of it.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 20, 2017 at 10:26 AM | 14 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-19-2017

Harrisburg Telegraph, September 19, 1917:

Ping Bodie, of the Athletics, is an enthusiastic collector of baseball articles which have helped make history for the national game.

When the Athletics played in Detroit recently the Tigers made a triple play. When First Baseman Burns tossed the ball on the diamond after the three-ply killing Umpire Nallin obtained it.

“This should make quite a souvenir for you, Ping,” said Nallin, as he handed the ball to the big Italian.

“You betcha,” said Ping.

Seems like Ping Bodie was a cool guy. He was the butt of a bunch of jokes when he was a ballplayer, but every time I read anything about him personally, he sounds like a lot of fun.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 19, 2017 at 10:57 AM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Monday, September 18, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-18-2017

El Paso Herald, September 18, 1917:

Ball games in the American league will be speeded up hereafter according to president Johnson, who has instructed his umpires not to tolerate any unnecessary delays.

The order today is the outgrowth of a complaint made by president Comiskey, of the Chicago Americans, who said that protests of some managers and players about the condition of the ball in recent games has made it necessary to play two hours or more.

Baseball in the 21st century: “Hold my beer and watch this.”

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 18, 2017 at 09:52 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, September 15, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-15-2017

Chicago Eagle, September 15, 1917:

Don’t use your meat hand to stop hard-hit balls that are batted back at you. If you do you may put an end to your pitching career.
...
Early last spring [Yankees pitcher Allen] Russell reached for a hard-hit ball through the box with his nude flipper. He got his hand on the ball and succeeded in retarding its progress, but immediately afterwards he suffered a sharp pain in the first two digits of his pitching hook, which was followed by numbness. Then his hand grew cold and he had to retire from the game.

Since that time Russell has suffered with a new ailment—that of cold fingers. It only comes upon him at intervals, but at such times he is unable to grip the ball, and therefore unable to control it, so he often has to leave the mound.

I’m not a medical professional, but that pretty much has to be a nerve injury, right?

Russell and his cold fingers stayed in the big leagues through 1925, putting up nearly 1400 innings of league-average performance as a swingman. He won a World Series ring with the ‘24 Senators, even if he couldn’t feel it on his finger.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 15, 2017 at 10:23 AM | 28 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-14-2017

Pittsburgh Press, September 14, 1917:

Ray Caldwell isn’t in jail [in New York] today, but it isn’t the fault of New York fans.

When Caldwell was served with an order for his arrest on a charge of abandoning his wife and their seven-year-old son, the New York club planned to take enough money from the gate receipts of the Boston-New York game to make up his bail of $1,000. They found, however, there were not enough spectators to make the required sum and Ray had to get his bail elsewhere.

Jeez, guys, what about a fundraiser for the wife and son?

Caldwell was a…unique guy. He was an alcoholic who jumped his Yankees contract to play in the Federal League in 1915, then in the same offseason jumped his Federal League contract to pitch for the Yankees. He would disappear without notice during road trips, showed up a week late for Spring Training in 1917 because he had been pitching in Panama under an assumed name, and once threw 9.2 innings of relief, got the win, and was arrested for grand larceny on the same day. In 1919, when Caldwell signed for Cleveland, manager Tris Speaker had a clause inserted in the pitcher’s contract requiring him to get drunk after every game he pitches, then giving him the next day off.

Perhaps the most famous Ray Caldwell story is about the time he got struck by lightning on the mound, then finished the game and got the win.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 09:40 AM | 5 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-13-2017

Pittsburgh Press, September 13, 1917:

James C. Dunn, president of the Cleveland Americans, protested the game which Umpire Owens forfeited to Chicago last Sunday with the score tied in the tenth inning. Owens forfeited the game because he believed the Cleveland players were making a burlesque out of the contest.

The protest was denied.

The story, as best as I can tell: Cleveland’s Jack Graney was called out, the third out of the tenth inning, for interfering with Chicago third baseman Fred McMillan on a pickoff attempt. As a result, the Indians freaked out and argued with Owens for 20 minutes with darkness approaching. Then, in the bottom of the tenth, Indians catcher Steve O’Neill made the traditional throw to third base after a strikeout. Third baseman Ivan Howard intentionally let the ball whiz past him into left field, where Graney turned his back on the ball and refused to pick it up. That was enough for umpire Brick Owens, who called an end to the day’s proceedings.

Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: September 13, 2017 at 10:29 AM | 19 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, umpshow

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