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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Cooperstown vote: The Ron Chimelis ballot

Pedro Martinez, John Smoltz, Randy Johnson, Craig Biggio, Tim Raines, Fred McGriff, Mike Mussina, Jeff Bagwell, Mike Piazza.

Chimelis also voted last year. Piazza picked up spots on his ballot along with the three new guys, taking the spots of Morris and the three guys who were elected last year. Last year I emailed Chimelis presenting the case of Piazza and he wrote a response to me, so he may take fan emails into consideration (he mentioned in his response that he had received a lot of other emails supporting Piazza).

Joyful Calculus Instructor Posted: December 16, 2014 at 07:57 PM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Detroit News’ Tom Gage voted into Baseball Hall of Fame

Gage has covered countless Hall of Famers in his career, and next summer in Cooperstown, New York, Gage will be joining them on stage as the winner of the J.G. Taylor Spink Award.

“We’re thrilled for Tom to win this honor,” said Jonathan Wolman, publisher and editor of The Detroit News. “He’s been a master storyteller from the ballparks of America and he’s made the Tigers come alive for our readers. We tip our Olde English D to his terrific coverage, and to the others who were on the ballot. Tom was in strong company from the day of his nomination to the day of his election.”

Gage, 66, won in the closest vote since 2002 — a result that was the product of some good company. He received 167 votes to 161 for the late Furman Bisher of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Boston Globe columnist Dan Shaughnessy, the biggest name nationally among the three, finished with 134.

WHAT????

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: December 10, 2014 at 02:59 PM | 24 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, tigers, tom gage

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Goold: A modest proposal to improve Hall of Fame voting

I demand a hexidecimal ballot!

This rule has been in place since 1936. But never has the ballot been this backloaded with qualified but controversial candidates, and the clock is ticking on each player and his eligibility. If a voter believes there are 11 deserving candidates, then that voter must choose what 10 he or she will vote for. The voter can decide to, say, leave Randy Johnson off the ballot because he’s a shoo-in and doesn’t need the added vote. That would allow that voter to cast a ballot that, say, includes Tim Raines and keeps his candidacy alive. But then, as a pal just said, you’re the voter who didn’t vote for Randy Johnson. Curse you. With the 10-player limit, the ballot isn’t a vote it’s an exercise in game theory.

The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: December 09, 2014 at 04:19 PM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

The Veterans Committee can’t seem to get it right. | SportsonEarth.com : Brian Kenny

There wasn’t one single bad call on this ballot. I might not be as big on Tony Oliva (batting average driven) or Gil Hodges (aura driven), but the Hall would not be diminished by any one of those great players getting inducted. Dick Allen and Minnie Minoso are both locks for me, and I’m easily swayed by any decent pitch for Jim Kaat or Ken Boyer. A deeper look at Billy Pierce reveals a great pitching career in a hitter’s era. Luis Tiant was both great and legendary. Bob Howsam built the Big Red Machine? I’m listenting. What I’m saying is YOU CAN’T MISS UNLESS YOU DON’T BOTHER TO VOTE ANYONE IN.

And they completely whiffed.

Jim Furtado Posted: December 09, 2014 at 06:50 AM | 72 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Monday, December 08, 2014

Snyder: Veterans committee doesn’t elect anyone to Hall of Fame

Olbermann: Here’s a suggestion to the Veterans’ Committee: if you can’t vote anybody into the #BBHOF, at least vote yourself out of existence.

The Veterans Committee for the Baseball Hall of Fame has elected no one from the Golden Era ballot, MLB announced in a press conference Monday at the annual Winter Meetings.

The committee chose from a ballot of nine players—Dick Allen, Ken Boyer, Gil Hodges, Jim Kaat, Minnie Minoso, Tony Oliva, Billy Pierce, Luis Tiant and Maury Wills—and one executive, Bob Howsam. For a breakdown of the candidates, click here.

The committee consisted of 16 members, and 12 votes were needed to gain enshrinement into the Hall of Fame. Allen and Oliva were the top vote-getters, each coming just one vote shy with 11.

This vote is totally different than the BBWAA vote, from which the results will be revealed in the middle of January.

JE (Jason) Posted: December 08, 2014 at 02:16 PM | 51 comment(s)
  Beats: golden era, hall of fame

Saturday, December 06, 2014


Friday, December 05, 2014

Kepner: In Hall Vote, Tainted Candidates And Split Tickets

So unless the Hall of Fame repeals the arbitrary limit of 10 names, voters could face still more years of a ballot logjam, with Clemens and Bonds taking up just enough space on just enough ballots to squeeze other strong candidates from remaining there.

Perhaps, then, it is time to face this reality: Vote for Bonds and Clemens, and you are throwing those votes away. The veterans’ committee, not the writers, is destined to be their final arbiter. The writers should focus on the candidates who actually have a chance….

Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: December 05, 2014 at 08:53 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Thursday, December 04, 2014

Neyer: The Hall of Fame and the meaning of forever

we should at least be allowed to discuss what removing a few people from the Hall of Fame would look like. All of which I bring up only because the very idea of such a thing seems so difficult for some to even consider.

Why so difficult? I don’t think it’s about fairness. Nearly everyone who’s actually studied the question believes that electing Chick Hafey to the Hall of Fame was a mistake; a mistake, I would argue, that’s actually unfair to the Hall of Famers who deserve to be there, on the merits.

No, I think it’s difficult to consider excising Hall of Famers because the idea touches a deep, dark reality that we prefer to ignore: Nothing lasts forever… But what if we acknowledge the inevitability of change, perhaps even embrace that inevitability? Suddenly all sort of possibilities appear… Once you’ve got a list, then you can ask some smart people to review the list with a great deal of care.

Oh, and by the way? Nobody’s on the list while they’re still living. So don’t worry, Goose Gossage, Rollie Fingers, and Bruce Sutter: Nobody even thinks about questioning your legacy until you’ve been gone for five years. Or 10. Or 20. Hell, I don’t really care. Make it 50 if you want, so even your children don’t have to worry about it.

Your children’s children, though? Apologies, but at some point the grandchildren have to find their own ways, without any help from those plaques in Cooperstown.

 

The District Attorney Posted: December 04, 2014 at 04:43 PM | 29 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, rob neyer

Deadspin: Buster Olney Is Fed Up With Hall Of Fame Voting

Right hole, Buster!

[Mussina’s] chances for induction will improve slightly this year because I’m abstaining from the voting for the first time, and won’t submit a ballot. The same is true for Curt Schilling, and Tim Raines, and at least two others who I think should be inducted into the Hall of Fame.

To repeat: I think Mussina, Schilling and Raines and others are Hall of Famers, but it’s better for their candidacy if I don’t cast a ballot.


Posnanski: Shakedown 1968

Cool kids never have the time… but we do!

1968

In the Hall: Frank Thomas, Robbie Alomar
Talked about: Jeff Bagwell, Mike Piazza, Sammy Sosa, Gary Sheffield, Jeff Kent, Bernie Williams.
Best of the rest: John Olerud…

Based on the way the BBWAA has voted, there was not a single Hall of Fame hitter born in 1961 ([Don] Mattingly cannot get any traction), 1962, 1963 (maybe Edgar Martinez gets some love over time), 1966 or 1967.

But in 1968, there are EIGHT viable Hall of Fame candidates (nine if you consider Olerud, whose career does demand consideration).

And then, before you say, “Well, that’s just the steroids,” go on to the next year, 1969, only Ken Griffey will get elected. In 1970, there were two Hall of Fame candidates born, and I’m not sure either [Jim] Thome or [Jim] Edmonds will get the support I think they deserve. Go to the next year, 1971, only Pudge Rodriguez will get elected from that group…

I do wonder if this is crazy boom of super players has a subtle impact on voters’ mentality… a historic rush of talent like what happened in 1968 doesn’t compute easily. It just doesn’t FEEL right…

I suspect four of the nine will get elected to the Hall by the BBWAA, though Bagwell’s support did take a dip last year. Four Hall of Famers in one birth year is still a lot, but I don’t think it quite captures just how remarkable a year that was.

The District Attorney Posted: December 04, 2014 at 01:11 AM | 40 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, joe posnanski

Posnanski: The 5% rule

Supreme Mathematics!

Here’s one version of what the BBWAA and Hall [of Fame] could do: Create a Hall of Fame nominating committee… The finaly ballot would have a limit — 15 players on it, 20 at the most. The committee would have to work very hard to limit it that much. But that’s good. What they would end up with is a ballot of legitimate Hall of Fame players who deserve real Hall of Fame consideration. It would be a REAL honor to be on that ballot.

And — this is important — the committee would have the opportunity to put ANYONE on the Hall of Fame ballot who deserves to have his case heard, even those who might not have received five percent of the vote the first time around. Let’s face it: Don Mattingly’s case has been heard clearly. He has been on the ballot for TWELVE YEARS. I love Mattingly, he’s one of my all-time favorite players, but how many times do the voters have to say no? Meanwhile, Lou Whitaker never really got his case heard.

The 5% rule [for elimination from the ballot] is ineffective and arbitrary. It’s a poor way to build a ballot. It gives us cacophonous ballots stuffed with cronies who the voters have already dismissed time and again. It encourages a kind of strategic voting that shouldn’t be a part of a an upright Hall of Fame process. It also creates the same conversations every year. Even I was getting tired of the Jack Morris arguments.

There are many things the Hall of Fame and BBWAA could do, I think, to make the process better. But I would begin here: Create a real nominating committee with the power to create a compelling and changing ballot.

The District Attorney Posted: December 04, 2014 at 12:56 AM | 63 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, joe posnanski

Sunday, November 30, 2014

No excuse for Hall of Fame voters to pass over Pedro Martinez - The Boston Globe

Bob Ryan on the Hall of Fame.

Jim Furtado Posted: November 30, 2014 at 09:02 PM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Minnie Miñoso - Golden Era Hall of Fame Candidate and Baseball Pioneer

Over the years, most of the key pioneer black players have been elected to the Hall of Fame:  Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella were voted in by the BBWAA during the 1960’s.  Satchel Paige and Monte Irvin were largely elected for their careers in the Negro League, each gaining induction through a special Negro League Committee which met from 1971 to 1977.  Despite being the second black player to break the color barrier and integrating the American League, Larry Doby had to wait until 1998 to be voted in.  Doby’s long overdue election came through the Veterans Committee, the predecessor to the Golden Era Committee which will judge Miñoso’s Hall of Fame candidacy.  With each of those deserving pioneers elected, Miñoso looms as the Hall of Fame’s most glaring omission from the early days of integration.

Dennis Eclairskey, closer Posted: November 30, 2014 at 12:25 PM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, minnie minoso, veterans committee

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Tangotiger: Who will get the Maddux, Glavine, Thomas, Morris votes?

This is a chart from 1967-2011.  It shows what happens to the voting of the returnees, based on how the voting goes for the players who were removed on the ballot the prior year and added in their first year.

There were 3.43 votes per ballot that are going to be lost from Maddux, Morris et al.

bobm Posted: November 29, 2014 at 09:28 PM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Friday, November 28, 2014

Baseball’s most underrated Hall of Fame candidates. | SportsonEarth.com : Anthony Castrovince Article

Sure, it is a veritable given that Randy Johnson and Pedro Martinez will get in on their first try, as Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and Frank Thomas did this past year. John Smoltz also has a strong shot in his “rookie” year. Meanwhile, Craig Biggio, who fell two votes shy of induction in 2014, and Mike Piazza, who missed it by 74 votes, could see an increase that gets them over the hump. This is a similarly important year for Jeff Bagwell (54.3 percent of a required 75 percent last year) and Tim Raines (46.1) to at least creep closer, lest they lose any “momentum.” And it will again be interesting to see if the likes of Roger Clemens (34.4) and Barry Bonds (34.7) see a drop in support, as they did between 2013 and ‘14, or an uptick.

But what follows is a list of five guys—their underrated cases ranging from strong to quite strong—who are and will be most affected by the jam-packed nature of the ballot or the BBWAA’s sometimes overly stiff standards.

None of these guys, it must be noted, have any reported or documented association with PEDs. They’re merely victims of a cramped circumstance.


Wednesday, November 26, 2014

2015 Potential Hall of Fame Ballot | Baseball-Reference.com

Jay Jaffe and Sean Forman came up with a good list to help Hall of Fame voters.

Jim Furtado Posted: November 26, 2014 at 08:16 AM | 35 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Monday, November 17, 2014

BtBS: The 2015 Hall of Fame ballot—first-time candidates

Four players deserve some discussion. I’m not even going to waste space on Randy Johnson since his induction is such a foregone conclusion. He is quite likely the last 300-win pitcher baseball will ever see (for those who care), and my only interest will be in the tortured excuses from voters who don’t list Johnson on their ballots. Likewise, I discussed Pedro Martinez at some length a couple weeks ago.

Gary Sheffield and John Smoltz will generate significant discussion.

bobm Posted: November 17, 2014 at 01:30 AM | 84 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Thursday, November 06, 2014

Two Unrecognized Hall of Fame Shortstops

In the next part of this article, we’ll walk through the latest DRA estimate, showing Derek Jeter made approximately 450 fewer successful fielding plays that an average-fielding shortstop playing in his place would have fielded and converted into outs. Jeter played 2,674 defensive games at short. A player playing nearly every game per season, say, 150 games, plays 6 games a week, so Jeter played close to 450 “weeks” at short.

The easiest way, then, to put Derek Jeter’s defense into perspective is to recognize that he allowed, on average, about an extra single a week throughout his career: something that nobody could ever notice and keep track of in their head simply by watching him play.

And, as we shall see, with the exception of his first full-time season and a highly intriguing interlude of three seasons at the beginning of the second half of his career, Jeter’s rate of allowing more singles than an average shortstop would have each season was almost exactly the same and almost exactly as consistent year to year as his rate of hitting more singles than an average batter would each season.

Michael A. Humphreys Posted: November 06, 2014 at 03:48 PM | 47 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Tuesday, November 04, 2014

‘Big Red’ GM makes intriguing case for Hall of Fame | MLB.com

An architect of one of baseball’s greatest teams.

Jim Furtado Posted: November 04, 2014 at 06:54 AM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Monday, November 03, 2014

Minnie Minoso: Hall of Fame Worthy

There is a quote on the wall in the third floor of the Baseball Hall of Fame from Minnie that says, “I gave my life to the game. And the game gave me everything.” I think the game owes him one last thing, and I think it’s time he got it.

DL from MN Posted: November 03, 2014 at 03:46 PM | 53 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Sielski: A friend fights for ex-Phillie Dick Allen’s Hall of Fame induction

Welcome back,
Your dreams were to knock Bill James out.

“Bill James,” Frog said. “That’s how it all started, I think. I’d like to punch him in the face.”

The author, historian, and sabermetrician, James wrote in 1984 that Allen “did more to keep his teams from winning than anyone else who ever played major league baseball.” As far as Frog’s concerned, that single sentence, from so influential a voice, has done more to damage Allen’s chances of induction than anything else. Yet time has hardly softened James’ stance.

“What seems to me to be unarguably true is that Dick Allen was a fantastically powerful disruptive force on the teams that he played for,” James wrote in a recent e-mail interview. “For people who are too young to remember, I think you could describe it as Terrell Owens times three. . . .

“So some ignorant . . . wants to punch me in the face about something I wrote 30 years ago, that’s life in the big city.”

Allen, of course, might change that perception merely by opening up more, but he won’t do it. Frog has talked to him about it. He has gotten nowhere.

It doesn’t bother Frog. It shouldn’t bother anyone, because whether Dick Allen gets into the Hall of Fame or even cares whether he gets into the Hall of Fame, the e-mails and the phone calls and the hours Frog has spent in front of that basement computer come down to something bigger, something everlasting, something more important than an athlete’s likeness immortalized on a bronze museum plaque.

Repoz Posted: October 18, 2014 at 09:32 PM | 186 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, history, phillies

Thursday, October 16, 2014

VIDEO: Pete Rose tells CBS News that he thinks he’ll get in the Hall - CBSSports.com

Baseball Rule 21

(d) BETTING ON BALL GAMES.  Any player, umpire, or club official or
employee, who shall bet any sum whatsoever upon any baseball game in
connection with which the bettor has no duty to perform shall be declared
ineligible for one year.

  Any player, umpire, or club or league official or employee, who shall
bet any sum whatsoever upon any baseball game in connection with which
the bettor has a duty to perform shall be declared permanently ineligible.

He admitted to violating the rule. A rule that is posted in every clubhouse.

Jim Furtado Posted: October 16, 2014 at 05:21 PM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, pete rose

Friday, September 19, 2014

John Thorn: Fame & Fandom

Baseball Fan Hall Of Fame debates? (cough) (cough) (cough) (cough) Thorn offers lists for celebrity and non-celebrity wings of the BBFHOF.

Dedicated in 1939, baseball’s shrine was not the nation’s first Hall of Fame, despite the nearly universal impression that it was: Its inspiration was the Hall of Fame for Great Americans, created on a New York University campus in 1901 to honor men and women who had achieved greatness in any of 16 categories. Yet in the media age ushered in by radio and the talkies, missionaries and explorers were no longer our idols. Athletes were, but they couldn’t enter the Hall of Fame unless they bought a ticket. While Hilda Chester’s cowbell, which assaulted tender ears and sensibilities at Ebbets Field, or Freddy Schuman’s frying pan, which has had a similar effect at Yankee Stadium in recent years, might make it into a Baseball Hall of Fame exhibit, neither Hilda nor Freddy would ever be inducted. They have been denied the 21st century’s inalienable right to immortality, just as athletes once were. If in the metastasizing spread of celebrity there are halls of fame for policemen (Miami Beach), businessmen (Chicago), and clowns (Delavan, Wisc.), why not a shrine for fans?

Greg Franklin Posted: September 19, 2014 at 06:41 PM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: celebrities, fans, hall of fame, history, mets

Friday, September 05, 2014

Rickey at the Mic

Earl Robinson.

It shouldn’t have been a surprise that Rickey Henderson, baseball’s most prolific base stealer, stole the show at his 2009 Hall of Fame induction, but the way he did it was…  there was a conspicuous lack of crazy. The anecdotes he told were eloquent and funny. The gratitude he expressed was heartfelt and gracious…

how did he pull it off? I found the unlikely answer in a San Jose Mercury News article one month after the ceremony: Leading up to his induction, Rickey had enrolled in an Intro to Speech class at Laney College in Oakland.

Earlier this year, I reached out to the teacher of that class, Earl Robinson, to interview him on the occasion of the speech’s fifth anniversary… Robinson was a two-sport superstar at Berkeley, winning three conference basketball titles, leading Cal to a baseball national championship in 1957 as an All-American shortstop.

In 1958, he signed with the Los Angeles Dodgers. In his first spring training, Robinson competed in a legendary 60-yard dash against Maury Wills, Willie Davis and Tommy Davis… Wills won the race, but only after (supposedly) getting a jump start… In his first season with Baltimore, onSeptember 26, Robinson was in right field when Roger Maris hit the ball over his head to tie Babe Ruth’s home run record… “I was teaching all along [Robinson said]. We didn’t make the kind of money that these guys make today… As soon as the season ended, I’d come home to the Bay Area and go to the substitute teacher office. They’d hire me for the winter. I enjoyed teaching, and I enjoyed the money. I had a 50-year career as a teacher.”

The students in Robinson’s Intro to Speech class were typical college-age kids, mostly between the ages of 18 and 21. At the time, Rickey was 50 years old…

Two weeks after our conversation, Earl Robinson died on the Fourth of July. He was 77.

The District Attorney Posted: September 05, 2014 at 01:42 PM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: earl robinson, hall of fame, rickey henderson

Monday, September 01, 2014

Trevor Hoffman’s Hall of Fame induction seems inevitable

Hoffman is eligible for the Class of 2016 and Yankees great Mariano Rivera, who saved a record 652 regular season games and 42 more in the postseason, will complete the cast in 2019.

“I think Mo is a slam dunk for sure,” Hoffman said. “We can say our careers paralleled each other a little bit, but when you’re talking about the greatest closer of all time, that sets him apart.”

Comparatively, though, Hoffman certainly is the greatest closer in NL history.

“I don’t know if that’s a ticket to Cooperstown. You and I both know that,” he said. “But I appreciate it. It’s something I didn’t allow myself to think about as a player. I remember Tony answering questions about it and him waiting nervously for that phone call. ‘Do you realize your place in the game and what you’ve accomplished?’ And still there was that ‘not sure’ attitude. I get that. I understand that. There are contemporaries I [compare] to as well. So, we’ll see. I hope things happen.”

Dennis Eclairskey, closer Posted: September 01, 2014 at 11:13 PM | 128 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, padres, trevor hoffman

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