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Saturday, October 19, 2019

CC Sabathia has a case for Cooperstown

I’m sure it was not how CC Sabathia wanted to go out: injured, in a Yankees loss, with his final “pitch” being a warmup toss that revealed that he was too injured to go on. But bad endings to long, illustrious careers tend to wash out of people’s memories in pretty short order. When a great player’s time in the game is over, we almost always remember the greatness, and that will be the same with CC Sabathia.

As I’ve written in this space in the past, it’s rather reductive to only reflect on such careers through the lens of “is he Hall of Fame-worthy?” There are a number of great players who had great, memorable careers which fell short of Cooperstown for some reason or another and, frankly, a whole lot of guys who are in Cooperstown who weren’t necessarily great. Talking about guys only with reference to their Hall of Fame credentials causes us to spend too much time talking about the already well-remembered and risks us forgetting those who should not be forgotten.

But hey, let’s be reductive! It’s OK in this case because, in my estimation, CC Sabathia does have an actual Hall of Fame case and, if I had to bet on it, I’d say he’s inducted at some point down the road.

It’s not a slam dunk case. He’s not some brainless first-ballot guy. A lot of voters will look at his career ERA of 3.74 and think “man, that’s high for a Hall of Famer.” The smarter ones — and the Hall’s electorate gets smarter with each passing year — will note that his ERA+, which adjusts for the mostly high-offense era and hitter-friendly parks in which he pitched, is a respectable 116. Again, that’s not knock-you-off-your-feet great, but it’s in the neighborhood of a good number of Hall of Fame pitchers including Tom Glavine (118), Bert Blyleven (118), Gaylord Perry (117), Fergie Jenkins (115), Steve Carlton (115), and Jim Bunning (115), and is way better than guys like Jack Morris (105), Herb Pennock (106), Pud Galvin (107), Burleigh Grimes (108) and a decent handful of others. Yes, some of those guys were very different pitchers with other things going for them that Sabathia may not have. I’m just saying that Sabathia’s worst Big Stat selling point, his ERA, would not be crazily out-of-whack with Hall of Fame standards.

Never too early for a thread like this, is it?

 

QLE Posted: October 19, 2019 at 12:20 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: cc sabathia, hall of fame

Wednesday, October 09, 2019

 The Cooperstown Case for Yadier Molina, Russell Martin, and Brian McCann - The Ringer

Isn’t this a little early for Hall of Fame discussions? The World Series isn’t over yet.

Jim Furtado Posted: October 09, 2019 at 07:20 PM | 109 comment(s)
  Beats: brian mccann, hall of fame, russell martin, yadier molina

Thursday, October 03, 2019

Baseball Hall of Famer Rube Waddell Gets His Due at the Curtis Theatre

As befits America’s sport, baseball is all about stories, both actual and apocryphal. Such as whether Babe Ruth actually “called his shot” in the 1932 World Series. Or if Waddell would run off the mound in mid-game to chase fire engines. Did he wrestle alligators, punch a lion in the face, or a have a contract forbidding he eat crackers in bed?

It is those sepia-tinged tales, the “Field of Dreams” fantasies, that make Waddell seem like baseball’s Peter Pan.

There are troubling stories as well. Did Waddell conspire with gamblers to fake an injury and sit out the 1905 World Series? Was he affected by a psychosis or attention deficit disorder? Because many mental disorders were not studied or diagnosed at the time, that part of Waddell will never be known.

 

DanG Posted: October 03, 2019 at 05:12 PM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: biography, hall of fame, mental illness, philadelphia a's, rube waddell

Saturday, September 14, 2019

DOES DAVE STIEB DESERVE ANOTHER CHANCE AT THE HALL OF FAME?

Stieb appeared on one BBWAA (Baseball Writers Association of America) ballot, in 2004. A total of 506 ballots were cast. Stieb received a measly 7 votes. With a 1.4% tally, Stieb was wiped away from future BBWAA ballots, having failed to meet the minimum threshold of 5%. Did Stieb get a raw deal? Did he deserve a longer look? And, does he deserve another look this fall by the “Modern Baseball” Eras Committee, the second chance balloting process that used to be called the Veterans Committee?

Dennis Eclairskey, closer Posted: September 14, 2019 at 07:07 PM | 66 comment(s)
  Beats: blue jays, dave stieb, hall of fame, veterans committee

Monday, July 29, 2019

SI.com: Baseball Hall of Fame Inductions Are Heading for a Bleak Period

There’s a chance, then, that 2021 could be another one-man BBWAA class, this time in the person of Schilling. Bonds and Clemens have an outside chance of joining him, but the better bet that year is Omar Vizquel, who has steadily climbed since debuting on the ballot in 2018 and finished with 42.8% of the vote last year. A relatively uncontroversial candidate, Vizquel is a favorite among the older crowd, earning more votes on private ballots than those publicly released, and has an easy hook as one of the best defensive shortstops of all time.

DanG Posted: July 29, 2019 at 03:55 PM | 180 comment(s)
  Beats: bbwaa, derek jeter, hall of fame, hof ballot

Saturday, July 27, 2019

Baseball Hall of Famers considering boycotting Derek Jeter’s induction

Derek Jeter didn’t make many enemies while playing shortstop for the New York Yankees for 20 seasons.

It’s been a much different story in his less than two years as the leader of the Miami Marlins ownership group.

Since taking over the team in 2017, Jeter has garnered animosity through many of his business and baseball-related decisions. And one of those decisions may lead to two Baseball Hall of Famers boycotting Jeter’s surefire induction during the summer of 2020.

Those two men are Andre Dawson and Tony Perez. Both were part of a group of special assistants, along with Marlins legends Jack McKeon and Jeff Conine, that were unceremoniously fired during Jeter’s first round of house cleaning. And both are still harboring ill-will over how the situation was handled.

On the bright side, this sort of thing might swing a few BBWAA voters to not include Jeter on their ballot, and injuring his ego like that is a wonderful thing….

 

QLE Posted: July 27, 2019 at 11:06 AM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: andre dawson, derek jeter, hall of fame, tony perez

Friday, July 26, 2019

Vote: The most-deserving players not in the Baseball Hall of Fame at each position – Baseball: Past and Present

Back in 2010, I started a semi-annual exercise here. Four times over the course of four years, I had people vote on the 50 best players not in the Baseball Hall of Fame. It was a fun exercise, though I eventually stopped doing it for a few reasons. Mostly, the effort seemed like it was starting to run its course creatively and in terms of research value for the amount of work involved.

Lately, though, I’ve been getting the urge to run another poll. Accordingly, I’ve created a survey which draws on my past efforts, but asks a slightly different question.

Essentially, when people talk about Cooperstown and the players not enshrined, they’ll sometimes say that one player should be enshrined but not before another. The following survey goes position by position and asks people to rank 10 players from most-deserving to least-deserving of induction. As with previous polls I’ve done, banned players Shoeless Joe Jackson and Pete Rose are here; so are some active and recently-retired folks.

Jim Furtado Posted: July 26, 2019 at 03:09 PM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame

Monday, July 22, 2019

For Some Players, Not Reaching the Hall Just Brings More Fame

Baseball has kept certain players at arm’s length because of scandals and accusations, but that often has bolstered the players’ popularity.

“It’s the law of unintended consequences,” John Thorn, the official M.L.B. historian, said in an interview, “that if you want to remove or restrict a man’s eligibility for official fame, you may accord him an unofficial fame that’s even greater.”


Six players inducted into National Baseball Hall of Fame

Six players were inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday, marking the 78th such class of inductees in MLB history. Following their election to the Hall in December and January, Mike Mussina, Harold Baines, Edgar Martinez, Lee Smith, and Mariano Rivera accepted the honor among an impressive gathering of their peers, while Brandy Halladay accepted the award on behalf of her late husband, Roy.

Mussina, 50, received 76.7% of the votes needed for induction in his sixth year on the ballot. Over an 18-year career split between the Orioles and Yankees, the right-hander was decorated with five All-Star designations and seven Gold Gloves, and led the league with 19 pitching wins in 1995. He capped his lengthy list of accomplishments in 2008, finishing with a career 270-153 record and a 3.68 ERA, 2,813 strikeouts, and 82.8 WAR.

During his induction speech, Mussina reminisced about his childhood memories of whiffle ball and Little League before launching into a few anecdotes from his career in Baltimore and New York.

An open thread, for discussion of any interesting elements of the Hall of Fame weekend.

 


‘I’m going to do the best I can’: Brandy Halladay was perfect in honoring Roy

They are eulogies in those binders they carry to the Sunday afternoon podium in Cooperstown.

Page by page, turned by trembling fingers, they are goodbyes.

Man by man, what they talk about is immortality. Line by line, tear by tear, what they honor, what they examine, what they express, is mortality.

So they find the eyes of their moms and dads, these men, to say thank you again. Sometimes they must pick a place in the sky that seems about right. They search for their children, their wives, their brothers and sisters, their friends, to say the things that got lost in the days. They’d finally written them down so they wouldn’t forget.

Some thoughts on what induction into the Hall of Fame means to those who participate in the ceremony.

 

QLE Posted: July 22, 2019 at 03:45 AM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, induction, roy halladay

Sunday, July 21, 2019

SI: Stephanie Apstein: What Made Roy Fly

Roy Jr. taught Roy III to master two things. Many baseball fans know how the father searched for a house with a basement at least 60 feet, six inches long; charted the son’s velocity; honed his focus. They do not know that the father also passed on another, greater love: for flying.

Those moments in the air brought Roy III such pleasure, but knowing how it all ended, his mother, Linda, wishes he had never had them. She is angry with her son for whatever happened that day, for whatever he did that took him away from her. His sisters, Merinda and Heather, agree. “I’d rather he be here and miserable,” Heather says. Roy Jr. does not traffic in counterfactuals.

“I wish that he had been more careful,” he says, “But I’m not sorry for what he was doing, and never sorry that he was enjoying his life.”

I found this to be an article worth reading.  It was difficult to pick a quotable section as it’s not really that type of article.

It’s still sad to think of Halladay going too soon.

puck Posted: July 21, 2019 at 08:44 AM | 2 comment(s)
  Beats: blue jays, hall of fame, phillies, roy halladay

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

“I Got Lucky Man” Dennis Eckersley on Surviving His Tough Times

Then on March 30, 1978, near the end of spring training, Eckersley was traded to the Red Sox along with catcher Fred Kendall for an assortment of four players, none of whom wound up altering the Indians’ fortunes.

The same day, his wife Denise, whom he’d married when they were both 18 and with whom he had an infant daughter, Mandee, told him she wanted a divorce. A few months later she told him she wanted to marry his best friend, Indians center fielder Rick Manning….

During a Red Sox-Indians game earlier this season, I saw Eckersley behind the Fenway Park press box gathering intelligence on the Indians from one of the team’s broadcasters. The other guy looked familiar, an ex-ballplayer for sure, a face from a baseball card long since lost. I turned the corner to leave the press box, and then it hit me who it was: Rick Manning.

I mentioned it to Eckersley a few weeks later, after he had brought up the affair between his first wife and his best friend, and the heartbreak and sadness that led to him being traded to the Red Sox. “He’s the father to my daughter,” says Eckersley. “I mean, it’s been 40 years. It’s not about forgiveness. It’s about moving on with your life and living it. We were all young. I was on the road half the time, and I was hardly innocent myself, and suddenly you come home and you’re not that attractive anymore. It was an ugly way to have it happen. It was painful as hell.” He pauses, then says, “[We have] a daughter together. I’ve got to be nice.”

Jose is an Absurd Time Cube Posted: July 16, 2019 at 10:08 PM | 41 comment(s)
  Beats: athletics, broadcasters, cubs, hall of fame, red sox

Wednesday, June 05, 2019

KYW Newsradio: Kenney, Wolf Join Campaign to Elect Dick Allen to the Hall of Fame

The Allen campaign is relentlessly driven by Mark “Froggy” Carfagno — a former Veterans Stadium groundskeeper who believes Allen was “the most productive offensive player from 1964 through 1974.”

“Better than Hank Aaron,” he continued, “Willie Mays, Willie Stargell, Johnny Bench, Ron Santo — all Hall of Famers. They’re all in the Hall of Fame. Why isn’t this guy?”

 

DanG Posted: June 05, 2019 at 08:46 PM | 176 comment(s)
  Beats: dick allen, hall of fame, phillies

Monday, May 13, 2019

Examining Félix Hernández’s Hall of Fame case after 2,500 strikeouts

Seattle Mariners starter Félix Hernández joined elite company on Saturday when he reached 2,500 career strikeouts. Among the 35 other players to do so, 22 are in the Hall of Fame and five more — Roger Clemens, Curt Schilling, Justin Verlander, CC Sabathia and Max Scherzer — likely to join them before long.

Even more impressively, Hernández is the sixth youngest player to do so at 33 years at 33 days old. That only trails Hall of Famers Nolan Ryan, Walter Johnson, Pedro Martinez, Tom Seaver and Bert Blyleven.

But one day after reaching the milestone, Hernández landed on the 10-day injured list with a right shoulder strain. That’s the way things have been going lately for the one-time Cy Young Award winner.

Once considered a surefire lock for the Hall of Fame, Hernández’s career has rapidly regressed, and he’s likely on the outside looking in for Cooperstown.

A consideration of Felix Hernandez’s chance at the Hall of Fame- nothing that will be news to us, but still something to talk amongst ourselves about.

QLE Posted: May 13, 2019 at 03:43 AM | 43 comment(s)
  Beats: felix hernandez, hall of fame, strikeouts

Friday, May 10, 2019

Davidoff: Why I’ll vote for Robinson Cano for Hall of Fame, despite PED stain

The case for Cano

*Eight-time All-Star
*Five top-six finishes in MVP voting
*Two Gold Gloves
*.304 career average, .846 career OPS, 314 home runs, 1,244 RBIs
*Career WAR of 69.5
*WAR higher than those of Hall of Famers Tim Raines, Tony Gwynn, Eddie Murray, Ivan “Pudge” Rodriguez, Carlton Fisk, Edgar Martinez, Ryne Sandberg, Ernie Banks, Roberto Alomar, Pee Wee Reese, Andre Dawson, Willie McCovey, Dave Winfield, Mike Piazza, Harmon Killebrew, Yogi Berra, Vladimir Guerrero and others

bobm Posted: May 10, 2019 at 08:35 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, peds, robinson cano

Wednesday, May 01, 2019

Baseball Hall of Fame names Mead president

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum named longtime Los Angeles Angels executive Tim Mead as its new president on Tuesday.

Mead, 61, has worked with the Angels organization for 40 years, the last 22 as the team’s vice president of communications.

Hall of Fame chairman Jane Forbes Clark made the announcement.

“Tim is deeply respected throughout the baseball industry, among players, executives and media alike,” Clark said in a statement. “He has a great affection for the game and its history, and we are looking forward to having him leading the efforts of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.”

Any thoughts on this appointment?

 

QLE Posted: May 01, 2019 at 05:48 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, hall of fame, tim mead

Friday, January 20, 2012

Q&A: Larry Walker on his Hall of Fame snub

“Mr. Walker is not a suspect…We don’t know if the person was killed at the site or if his body was dumped there.”

CBCSports.ca: Who’s more upset about your low vote total in the second year of your 15 years of eligibility: you or your family, friends and former teammates with Colorado and Montreal?

LW: I don’t think it bothers me a lot. Why am I going to get my feathers all ruffled over something that’s out of my control? Obviously, it would be an amazing honour.

Some people have pointed some things out to me that made me wonder. [Designated hitter] Edgar Martinez [only played 592 of his 2,055 career games in the field] and he’s getting twice as many votes as me [36.5 per cent to Walker’s 22.9 per cent]. Is Edgar Martinez twice the better player than me?

Not to pat myself on the back but I think I was as good as Edgar Martinez.

But I’m not going to rack my brain. I’m sure there’s people that are in the Hall of Fame that a lot people think shouldn’t be there or some that should be there and aren’t.

CBCSports.ca: The knock against you when people say Larry Walker shouldn’t be in the Hall of Fame is that you played 10 of your 17 seasons at hitter-friendly Coors Field in Colorado. But a lot of times players can’t control where they play, right?

LW: I was in the big leagues, man. Are you she—-in me? You can’t always pick where you go or what happens. You just roll with the friggin’ punches. I was in the dugout trying to beat the other 25 guys in the dugout beside us. That’s all I tried to do. I can’t control where I’m at and the numbers that go up. Every ballpark has its quirks.

If you read something in the paper or a magazine or hear something on TV, whether it’s negative or positive, people tend to want to go that way with it. If what was being printed all this time was ‘Walker deserves the [Hall of Fame nod], he’s going to make it,’ I bet my percentage would be a lot higher. But all you hear about is Coors Field. That’s all I’ve heard since my first game in Denver [in 1995].

Repoz Posted: January 20, 2012 at 05:51 AM | 51 comment(s)
  Beats: expos, hall of fame, history, rockies

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Fergie Jenkins still emotionally invested in Cubs, keeping an eye on Epstein

Clumsy.

Ferguson Jenkins takes a wait-and-see attitude towards Theo Epstein’s appointment as president of baseball operations of the Chicago Cubs.

...The Cubs hired Epstein in October. Jenkins is holding off on giving Epstein his full endorsement.

“I really don’t know what to take of him yet,” Jenkins said Thursday in Calgary. “I tried to get a meeting with him and he was really busy.

“He’s young. He’s never put a jockstrap on though. See that’s the thing. I tell people all the time ‘this guy reads about the game and has seen it on TV or in stadiums,’ but he’s a pretty smart individual. He knows talent and that’s what it’s all about.

“People sit back and say ‘you know he never played’ but he watches and recognizes what individuals can do what and where they can play.”

Repoz Posted: January 19, 2012 at 10:20 PM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: cubs, fantasy baseball, hall of fame, sabermetrics

The Platoon Advantage: Jack Morris is going to be a Hall of Famer, and that’s OK

BTW…I’m compiling a (H/T Moral Idiot) massivo (HA!) list of BBWAA ballotears for their Pro-Bonds/Clemens (9 as of now) ~ Anti-Bonds/Clemens (12 as of now) promised HOF ballots.

For a second thing: it’s getting to be a cliche by now, but it’s absolutely true that 2013 is going to be completely unlike any ballot that has come before. Jaffe’s reasoning is that “Morris probably won’t move up enough because it is such a strong batch of new guys.” I don’t think so. There are certainly a lot of should-be slam dunks coming in, but the only new guy who figures to finish particularly strong in the voting is Craig Biggio, and he’s far from a first-ballot lock. By and large, the guys interested in voting for Morris aren’t the same ones who might be tempted to bump Morris off because they’re voting for Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens and Biggio, and/or some combination of deserving first-timers or holdovers like Mike Piazza, Sammy Sosa, Curt Schilling, Kenny Lofton, Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmeiro and Edgar Martinez. If anything, the vast majority of them will bump any of those guys off (even Bonds or Clemens, maybe especially Bonds or Clemens) in favor of the presumptively “clean” Morris, who won’t have the fourteen shots left most of these guys will (assuming they get 5% of the vote, which I think will be a problem for Lofton and possibly Palmeiro).

Rather, the real 1999-like year, in terms of players the voters are actually likely to want to enshrine, is the following year, 2014: Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, and Frank Thomas are all pretty close to first-ballot shoo-ins. You might as well think of 2013 as Morris’ last year on the ballot, because he’s not going in with those dudes.

So, that’s why I think Morris goes in next year. As amazing as the talent on the 2013 ballot is, it’s not going to pull many votes off of Morris, thanks to the “PE"D questions and because it’ll be viewed as his last realistic shot. It’s 2013 or nothing…and for 75%-plus of the voters, it’s going to be 2013. He’s going in. Might as well get used to it.

Repoz Posted: January 19, 2012 at 06:01 AM | 193 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, history, projections, sabermetrics

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Genetti: Lack of black players will open baseball HOF doors to others

This anti-Jeter gunk has got to stop!

Lee Smith, Tim Raines, Fred McGriff, Bernie Williams and Willie McGee aren’t in the Hall of Fame.

But they will be.

...The last thing baseball is going to want is some statistic come out showing a small number of blacks inducted into the Hall of Fame over a certain amount of time, so the next thing — which will more than likely happen — is well-deserving black players will be inducted here and there over time.

Perhaps it’s a stretch to have this thought, but if you look at the great white and Hispanic players that have dominated the game over the last couple of decades, there’s really no outstanding black players to get excited over. That’s why this lack of African-American players in baseball will give those currently on the ballot a bigger opportunity. Even at this moment the only black player who is baseball Hall of Fame-worthy is Prince Fielder.

Don’t get me wrong, this is not going to be done out of sympathy, I just believe the powers that be are going to conserve these players so there’s no absence of African-Americans going into Cooperstown over the next 10 or more years.

All of the players I’ve mentioned are very much worthy of the Hall of Fame, I just hope they’re inducted sooner rather than later.

Repoz Posted: January 17, 2012 at 11:24 PM | 241 comment(s)
  Beats: fantasy baseball, hall of fame, history

BPP: An interview with Robert Creamer

Creamer: His Life and Times. Terrific interview with Womack. (answers shortened here to save site/brain from exploding)

Who’s the greatest baseball player you covered?

Willie Mays. Period.

I seem to remember that Bill James, using his fabulous, desiccated statistics, demonstrated that Mickey Mantle, who was Willie’s almost exact contemporary, was actually the better player, and I’m not equipped to argue with Bill, although I’ll try. And there are DiMaggio, Williams, Musial, Barry Bonds, Albert Pujols, Alex Rodriguez – no, wait. I didn’t cover DiMaggio, who retired after the 1951 season — I didn’t start with Sports Illustrated until 1954. But that’s still a pretty impressive collection of players to put Willie on top of.

You’ve written biographies on Casey Stengel and Babe Ruth. If steroids had been a part of the game when Stengel and Ruth were players, do you think they would have used?

Sure. Yes. Absolutely. Hell, for decades before the big scandal about steroids in baseball, clubhouses used to have plates or dishes filled with little candy-like pills players gulped or chewed on routinely. My mind is gone – I forget what they were called.. Uppers? Bennies? I can’t recall. But that was standard. Athletes are always looking for an edge and that was a way to get them fired up. I have never been as upset by steroid use as the moralistic holier-than-thou baseball writers who vote on the Hall of Fame. What a bunch of self-important phonies!

I mean, you’d think all an ordinary player would have to do is take steroids to hit 70 home runs or bat .350. But I think McGwire was telling the truth — he took steroids to hold back distress, to make him physically able to play the game. Steroids don’t make a player good. Think of the hundreds, even thousands of players who have been in and out of the major leagues and who may have dabbled in steroids and think how few have hit 50, let alone 60 or 70 homers.

Repoz Posted: January 17, 2012 at 05:41 AM | 59 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, history, media, steroids

Monday, January 16, 2012

THT: Jaffe: The possible upcoming Cooperstown ballot apocalypse

What should happen? Well, among non-Bonds/Clements voters, Biggio should get around 85 percent. With the others, he’ll get less in what’s already a crowded ballot for people willing to support PED-rs. I’d guess he gets 65-70 percent of their vote. Maybe less.

Upshot: Biggio has a very good shot to get in. Assuming he gets 85 percent of the non-Bonds/Clemens guys (and he really should, given the clustering of Molitor/Winfield/Murray right at 85 percent), and assuming Bonds and Clemens get about 40 percent of the vote, Biggio needs only 60 percent of the votes from the supporters of Bonds and Clemens. That should happen.

Actually, I find this a bit surprising. A week ago, I assumed that Biggio was doomed on this messy ballot. That would set off the real nightmare, because if everyone from this year’s vote went into next year, it would be that much harder for anyone to rise up.

But Biggio should go in next year. No one else should. If Fisk couldn’t get elected as the fourth-best new guy in 1999, Piazza won’t in 2012. Schilling will finish further down, and Sosa may be under 10 percent. As for the backloggers, Morris probably won’t move up enough because it is such a strong batch of new guys. I think he’ll get close but ultimately have to go to the VC.

VC = Viva Caputo!

Repoz Posted: January 16, 2012 at 02:17 PM | 48 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, history, projections, site news

CAPUTO: Why I won’t vote for Bonds, Clemens or Sosa for the Hall of Fame

Former Tigers pitcher Jack Morris was named on the second-most ballots - nearly 67 percent.

In the aftermath, Peter Gammons, one of the preeminent baseball writers of all time, talked on MLB Network about how he put Morris on the ballot the first three years he was eligible, but stopped because another baseball writer had displayed extensive statistical proof to him that Morris’ 3.90 ERA was “not because he pitched to the score” but rather because he lost a lot of leads.

Right then I decided this coming year, the first time they are eligible for election to the Hall of Fame, I am not voting for Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens or Sammy Sosa.

...Gammons said Bagwell is like a hockey player (whatever that means) and was one of those 10-to-12 hour per day in the weight room guys, who lost weight later in his career (ala Pudge Rodriguez) because he had a shoulder injury that prevented him from lifting. It’s the type of thinking that was prevalent from many baseball writers during the steroids era. Always buying the story. Unfortunately, I was one of them. I’d like to think I’ve learned my lesson.

...But if Hall voters are going to be so picky about the career ERA of Jack Morris, why not about possible PED use?

I strongly feel this: If Morris gets in, it will still be the Hall of Fame.

If Bonds, Clemens and Sosa are inducted, it would become

(Yanks out Rogers’ Dictionary of Cliches ~ Looks for entry form)

the Hall of Shame.

Repoz Posted: January 16, 2012 at 05:40 AM | 37 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, history, media, steroids, tigers

Friday, January 13, 2012

BBPro:  Heartburn Hardball - Jack Morris in Motion

Morris, who was the face of the Detroit Tigers’ pitching staff for the entirety of the eighties before spending the early nineties hopping between the Twins, Blue Jays, and Indians, has every right to be thrilled at the news. And the rest of us, especially those who were too young to see him pitch, have every right to ask…why Jack Morris? Why now?

To answer that question, I decide to watch the most famous performance of his career, the game that proved once and for all that he was a true ace and a true winner.

....

The Twins will win 1-0 in the bottom of the 10th, winning the second World Series title in franchise history and solidifying Jack Morris’s place in baseball history.

And when it’s over, I will be more convinced than ever that Jack Morris is not a Hall of Fame pitcher.

 

 

Completely Unbiased 3rd Party Lurker Posted: January 13, 2012 at 01:39 PM | 83 comment(s)
  Beats: braves, hall of fame, tigers, twins

BPP: Darowski: The Small Hall (of wWAR)

Erardiabolical!

Joe recently wrote a post called To the BBWAA: Focus on the Great, Not the Very Good. In the post, Joe explains his “small Hall” stance. It’s not a stance I agree with, but I’ve been intrigued by the idea of a “small Hall” since coming up with my system to rank Hall of Famers (via Weighted WAR and the Hall of wWAR). To get a “small Hall” by wWAR, you just have to pick a higher cutoff than I use for my Hall.

So, let’s see what a Small Hall of wWAR would look like.

Center Field

  Ty Cobb (305.5)
  Willie Mays (298.8)
  Tris Speaker (247.9)
  Mickey Mantle (228.4)
  Joe DiMaggio (145.7)
  Billy Hamilton (118.6)
  Duke Snider (115.0)

There are not very many center fielders in the Hall of wWAR. But gosh is the position top-heavy. Look at that. Four guys above 200 (225, even). And that doesn’t even include Joltin’ Joe and the Duke. Who’s next? There’s a huge 20 wWAR drop-off before we get to Jimmy Wynn (95.1). Then there’s Richie Ashburn (84.8) and 19th century stars George Gore (82.9) and Paul Hines (78.3). Exiting the Hall would be Ashburn, Hugh Duffy, Larry Doby (again, just because this is purely statistical), Earle Combs, Kirby Puckett, Edd Roush, Earl Averill, Hack Wilson, and Lloyd Waner.

Repoz Posted: January 13, 2012 at 12:59 PM | 65 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, history, sabermetrics

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