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Thursday, December 18, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-18-2014

Rock Island Argus, December 18, 1914:

Naming of Clarence Rowland, manager last year of the Peoria Three-Eye league club, as head of the White Sox for the coming year has caused a profound sensation in Chicago baseball circles. Discussing the subject the Chicago Tribune today says…
...
“Rowland’s previous experience has been with teams in smaller leagues, where his success has been such as to attract the attention of the master of the White Sox, who began his career in Dubuque before the new manager of the team was out of knickerbockers.”

Rowland reacts to his appointment as manager:

The opportunity I have been striving to obtain, the chance of handling a major league ball club, has been realized, and to say that I am pleased is entirely too mild an occasion. I’m tickled to death.

It was a surprise hire, but it was a great one. The Sox improved by 23 games in Rowland’s first season and won the World Series in his third year in charge. A slow start in year four in addition to disagreements with Comiskey led to the end of Rowland’s managerial career. He went on to serve as an American League umpire, president of the Pacific Coast League, and was named the top executive in minor league ball as the president of the 1944 Los Angeles Angels.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 18, 2014 at 08:53 AM | 2 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, pants rowland, white sox

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-17-2014

Grand Forks Daily Herald, December 17, 1914:

One interesting fact about John Evers never has been known except to his intimate friends has become public property through his illness. This is that John is inordinately fond of candy.

“Evers has eaten so much candy and for so many years that his stomach is in pretty bad shape as a result of pneumonia,” said Dr. Herrity. “His wife tells me it was a common thing for him to start the day with a pound of candy for breakfast and to keep nibbling sweets until bedtime. Not always high-priced chocolates either. In fact, like all true candy devotees, Evers likes taffy and such simpler confections as well as he does bonbons.

Nah, this isn’t new information. We knew three and a half years ago about his fudge orgies and nicotine sprees.

And I’m not a doctor, but I’m pretty sure pneumonia doesn’t cause your stomach to be in bad shape.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 17, 2014 at 09:38 AM | 22 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, fudge orgies, history, johnny evers, nicotine sprees

Monday, December 15, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-15-2014

Toledo News-Bee, December 15, 1914:

ALTHOUGH NOT OFFICIALLY ANNOUNCED, RUPPERT IS THE NEW OWNER OF THE YANKS

President Ban Johnson of the American league on Tuesday carefully dodged confirming Col. Jacob Ruppert’s announcement that he and his associates have bought the New York Yanks for about $450,000, but intimated that the transaction is about to be closed.

Johnson could not suppress some feelings of amusement over the fact that Moguls Gilmore and Weeghman of the Federal league paid railroad fare to French Lick Springs, Ind., only to be told by Ruppert that he had decided to cast his fortunes with Johnson’s organization.

Things turned out pretty well for Ruppert in the Bronx, I’d say.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 15, 2014 at 08:19 AM | 40 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, jacob ruppert, yankees

Friday, December 12, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-12-2014

The Daily Missoulian, December 12, 1914:

“Chief” George Johnson, the Indian Federal league pitcher who defied the authorities at Winnebago [Nebraska] to arrest him and made his escape after an accidental shooting, which resulted in an injury to a bystander, was placed in custody [yesterday]. He is charged with disturbing the peace and resisting an officer. He gave his bond for appearance in court later.

I can’t seem to find any other information on this incident, so I don’t know who fired the shot that injured the bystander.

Anyway, the George Johnson story (unfortunately) ends about like you’d expect. He drank his way out of pro ball, wound up touring the Midwest running his own medicine show, and was shot to death at age 36 in an argument over $2.50 worth of alcohol.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 12, 2014 at 08:01 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: chief johnson, dugout, history

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-11-2014

Topeka State Journal, December 11, 1914:

The Federal league is ready to give Rube Marquard back to the New York Giants. President R.B. Ward of the Brookfeds, who signed Marquard for his team has written a letter to that effect to President H.N. Hempstead of the Giants.
...
In his letter to President Hempstead Mr. Ward takes occasion to demonstrate that the Federals are making much greater efforts to play the game fairly than is the Giants management. He instances the case of William Ritter and says that player was actually under contract to the Brookfeds when the Giants signed him away from the Ward team by using influence with his father.

Mr. Ward also discloses that Marquard sought the Federals instead of having been kidnapped by them. He says that the Rube literally came to the Brookfed camp with his hat in his hand begging to be signed up and assured the Wards that he was under absolutely no obligation to the Giants.

Ward wasn’t quite as worried about fairness when Phillies pitcher Tom Seaton, who led the National League in wins, innings pitched, and strikeouts in 1913, jumped to the Brookfeds for the 1914 season.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 11, 2014 at 10:08 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, hank ritter, history, rube marquard

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-10-2014

Milwaukee Journal, December 10, 1914:

When the last game of the [postseason exhibition] interleague series in St. Louis was completed Prexy Britton of the Cardinals handed [Ivey] Wingo a check for $900 or thereabouts—his share of the bonus promised the Cards for finishing in third place.

With the slip of paper in his pocket, Ivy (sic) walked from the Cards’ office, met the newspaper men, and announced that he was a Federal leaguer henceforth. Next day the backstop slipped around to the bank to get his $900, but lo, and behold, payment had been stopped on the check.

D’oh.

Wingo never did play in the Federal League. Instead, St. Louis traded the catcher to the Reds and he got a ~45% pay raise to stay in the National League. He was a pretty good ballplayer, and his total of 14.1 career WAR puts him in the vicinity of Mike LaValliere, Sandy Alomar, Ron Hassey, and the immortal Matt Wieters.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 10, 2014 at 08:48 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, ivey wingo

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-9-2014

Washington Herald, December 9, 1914:

White Sox Pay $50,000 for Eddie Collins

In his pocket [Charles Comiskey] bears a bill of sale for Eddie Collins, star second baseman of the Athletics, and he has left behind $50,000 in real money.
...
Comiskey has contracted to pay Collins $10,000 a year for five years, and it is reported that this is so much more than Mack actually was paying him…that Collins is tickled to death to think he is going to the White Sox.

According to the salary data at BB-Ref, Collins actually made $15,000 a year over the course of this contract. That’s more than twice his reported 1913 salary.

Also, I imagine Collins was happy to join the White Sox. The Athletics, having sold or waived virtually their entire roster over the past two months, were a sinking ship in December 1914.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 09, 2014 at 08:07 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, eddie collins, history

Monday, December 08, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-8-2014

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, December 8, 1914:

Fred Blanding, former University of Michigan mound star, native of Birmingham, Mich., and for several years a pitcher on the Cleveland club, says he will not pitch for the Naps next year if Joe Birmingham continues as manager of that club. Blanding is sore on Birmey and says that he was badly treated last year.
...
He does not threaten to join the Federals, nor does he ask for more pay, he simply says he won’t play another year under Birmingham.

Blanding wasn’t kidding. He retired rather than report to Spring Training in 1915, then never played another professional baseball game.

Blanding was a pretty good pitcher. He wasn’t a superstar, but a career ERA+ of 102 and back to back 15+ win seasons is a useful guy to have around, particularly if you’re coming off a season in which you lost 102 games and finished 48.5 games out of first.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 08, 2014 at 07:51 AM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, fred blanding, history

Friday, December 05, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-5-2014

Milwaukee Sentinel, December 5, 1914:

Charlie Swain, outfielder for the Seattle club of the Northwestern league, never will play ball again. His right leg was amputated on Friday. Since the season closed, Swain has been working [in San Francisco] as a telephone lineman. Last week he fell off a truck and it ran over him, crushing his leg so badly as to necessitate an operation. He was to have played in 1915 with the Minneapolis team of the American Association.

Swain was a pretty good ballplayer who wouldn’t have been a star in the big leagues, but probably would have been cromulent. He hit .285 with power in two seasons in the PCL at ages 29 and 30. In Swain’s final season, at age 31 in the Class B Northwestern League, he hit .310 with 69 extra-base hits.

Swain’s luck didn’t get any better after he left baseball. He died of influenza in the 1918 pandemic, at age 36.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 05, 2014 at 08:28 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: cy swain, dugout, history

Thursday, December 04, 2014

Rich Allen and the Ebonistics

While “The Wampum Walloper” — who was the National League’s Rookie of the Year in 1964, and the American League’s MVP in 1972 — is best-known for his prodigious fence-clearing blasts and his often-fractious relationship with the press, [Dick] Allen was also a genuinely talented singer. Unfortunately, the only remaining evidence we have of his abilities on the mic is “Echo’s of November,” the 1968 single he cut as Rich Allen with the Ebonistics, his fabulously named vocal group, for Philadelphia’s Groovey Grooves label…

one might expect his lone recording foray to have been a funky declaration of individualism, à la James Brown’s “Say It Loud — I’m Black and I’m Proud,” which was also released in riot-torn 1968.

But… [it’s] an achingly lovely doo-wop ballad, a dreamy throwback to the days over a decade earlier when vocal groups like The Penguins, the Platters, and the Harptones ruled the charts, and a young man in Wampum, PA kept his ear glued to the late-night radio transmissions coming out of Philly.

The District Attorney Posted: December 04, 2014 at 04:56 PM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: dick allen, history, music, phillies

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-4-2014

Chicago Tribune, December 4, 1914:

CHICAGO FEDS SIGN WALTER JOHNSON FOR TWO YEARS

JOHNSON SIGNS WITH “FEDS”; TO PLAY WITH TINX

Manager Joe Tinker of the Chifeds landed the biggest fish yet drawn out of organized baseball in a Federal league net when he signed Walter Johnson, former leading pitcher of the American league, to a two year contract yesterday at the home of the tall blonde pitcher in Coffeyville, Kan.

Announcement of the successful completion of the deal was made by President Weeghman of the Tinx after a couple of long distance telephone talks with the manager. Coupled with the news which set north side fandom buzzing with excitement was the announcement that Johnson was signed to pitch for the Tinx and not for any other team in the league. The terms of the contract were withheld.

Washington owner Clark Griffith personally traveled to Coffeyville and made a successful counteroffer in order to keep the Big Train in DC.

Also, the “Tinx”! I really like that.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 04, 2014 at 10:14 AM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, federal league, history, walter johnson

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

The Jay Dunn Hall of Fame Ballot

As many homers as Lou Gehrig and 10 more RBI than Joe DiMaggio- how could anyone not vote for Fred McGriff?

TJ Posted: December 03, 2014 at 08:42 PM | 26 comment(s)
  Beats: history

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-3-2014

Connie Mack responds to Eddie Plank signing with the Federal League, Richmond Times-Dispatch, December 3, 1914:

“I wish him the best of luck,” said Connie Mack [last night], when told that Eddie Plank had signed a Federal League contract.

“Are you sorry to see him go?” Mack was asked.

“Oh, no,” he replied. “I was through with him. He was after the money, and he was willing to go to the Federals…He was a wonderful pitcher and he is a good one yet.”
...
Mack startled the baseball world shortly after the world’s series by announcing he had asked waivers on Plank, [Chief] Bender, and [Jack] Coombs.

Plank, as you might expect, dominated the inferior talent in the Federal League in 1915, winning 21 games while leading the league in ERA+, FIP, WHIP, HR/9, BB/9, and K/BB ratio.

Gettysburg Eddie still had it when the Federals imploded and he came back to the American League as a 40-year-old, putting up a 125 ERA+ in 366.2 innings in two seasons before retiring.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 03, 2014 at 08:50 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: connie mack, dugout, eddie plank, history

Tuesday, December 02, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-2-2014

Washington Times, December 2, 1914:

The most cruel cut of all for the Feds was the headline “Feds Will Try to Rival Naps in Cleveland.”

Cleveland baseball: More than a century of being a punchline.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 02, 2014 at 07:52 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, indians

Monday, December 01, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-1-2014

Washington Herald, December 1, 1914:

A baseball trade between the New York and Philadelphia American League clubs, involving Ray Caldwell, of the Yankees, and Rube Oldring and Jack Lapp, of the Athletics, is under consideration, according to reports published [in New York yesterday].

President Ban Johnson, of the American League, is said to have urged Connie Mack while on a recent visit East to arrange the deal with the double purpose of saving Caldwell from the Federal League, with which he is reported to have signed for next season, and of strengthening the New York club for the good of the circuit.

The trade never happened, but Connie did spend the winter of 1914-1915 strengthening other ballclubs. The Athletics, winners of four pennants and three World Series between 1910-1914, suddenly dumped virtually their entire roster and lost 109 games in 1915.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: December 01, 2014 at 08:16 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: connie mack, dugout, history, jack lapp, ray caldwell, rube oldring

Friday, November 28, 2014

Cobb Comes Home - Pages from Baseball’s Past by Craig R. Wright — Kickstarter

Click the link to learn more about Craig R. Wright’s self-publishing project.

Following in the tradition of my grandfather, I have been entertaining folks with baseball stories for over 30 years. During my career working in major league baseball I had a hobby where I researched and wrote the stories for a pre-game radio show “A Page from Baseball’s Past,” which was on the air for 26 seasons. After the bottom fell out of radio advertising, in 2008 I took the story series to a subscription print version called “Pages from Baseball’s Past.” Among the dedicated group of subscribers is Bill James, the well known baseball historian and Senior Baseball Operations Advisor for the Boston Red Sox. He recommended the story series his readers describing it as “...  just excellent. I learn a lot from reading it.”

Jim Furtado Posted: November 28, 2014 at 08:14 PM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: history

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-28-2014

Washington Times, November 28, 1914:

Connie Mack is said to be willing to trade this big slugger, J. FRANKLIN BAKER, because he is not working in harmony with the other members of the Athletics. Larry Gardner and a pitcher was asked from the Red Sox, but Bill Carrigan turned down the offer. A sneaking rumor has it that Baker has seen his best days, and is on the down grade.

According to Baker’s SABR bio, the third baseman wanted to renegotiate his contract as a result of Mack selling off most of the team’s stars, but Mack refused. Neither would budge, so Baker went back home to his farm in Maryland and spent all of 1915 playing for local clubs in the area.

Eventually, Mack sold Baker’s contract to the Yankees in time for the 1916 season and the stubborn slugger returned.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: November 28, 2014 at 07:54 AM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, home run baker

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-26-2014

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, November 26, 1914:

The baseball series for the championship of the world will consist of 11 games next year instead of seven and prices will be lower, according to B.B. Johnson, president of the American League, when he made public tonight a letter he had received from August Herrmann, chairman of the National Baseball Commission.

Milwaukee Sentinel, November 26, 1914:

Chairman August Herrmann of the national baseball commission Wednesday night denied that he had ever written to President Ban Johnson of the American league advocating that the number of games in the world’s series be changed from seven to eleven, and the prices reduced.

“I certainly wrote no such letter,” Herrmann said.

Bummer. More baseball > Less baseball.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: November 26, 2014 at 08:09 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-25-2014

Milwaukee Journal, November 25, 1914:

Connie Mack opines the reason he did not congratulate George Stallings after the world’s series was fear that Stallings would hit him on the nose. His fears were useless. Stallings hit a more vital spot—the pocketbook.

Stallings did threaten to punch Mack in the nose before the series.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: November 25, 2014 at 08:39 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: connie mack, dugout, george stallings, history

Monday, November 24, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-24-2014

El Paso Herald, November 24, 1914:

A letter from [Texas] league headquarters to the [San Antonio] boss is to the effect that abbreviated games cut short through any agency than the elements of nature—meaning rain—are illegal under baseball law and should not be counted as championship contests.
...
It was by the throwing out of [seven inning] games that honors in the pennant race were even between the [Waco] Navigators and [Houston] Guffs, whereas had they been counted Houston would have been awarded the flag. Now that the law is made plain let it be hoped there will not be a repetition of such a farce.

Texas League Commissioner Ignatius J. Reilly went on to call seven-inning baseball games “a crime against theology and geometry”.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: November 24, 2014 at 08:35 AM | 15 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Friday, November 21, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-21-2014

Rock Island Argus, November 21, 1914:

“Rabbit” Maranville of the Boston Braves and his bride left Boston yesterday for George Stallings’ plantation in Georgia.

The “miracle man” of the Boston team cleared the way for the honeymoon trip by means of a check sent to Secretary Herman Nickerson of the Braves, taking care of all expenses on the route to Haddock, Ga.

This latest present from his chief was a distinct surprise to Maranville and means that his entire honeymoon expenses will be taken care of by the big chief…

I like my boss. I think he’s a good guy. I wouldn’t be terribly excited about spending my honeymoon at his house.

Still, a really nice gesture by Stallings.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: November 21, 2014 at 08:26 AM | 48 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history, rabbit maranville

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-20-2014

Milwaukee Sentinel, November 20, 1914:

President Weeghman of the Chifeds on Thursday advanced $15 to a National league manager “on account.”
...
On Thursday Weeghman received a telephone call from Terre Haute, Ind.

“This is Miller Huggins, manager of the Cardinals,” said the voice at the other end. “I had quite an experience last night while on the train. I was touched for everything I had while asleep and need some money to get out of town.”

Weeghman…wired “Miller Huggins” $15, identification waived. Later Weeghman began to feel skeptical.

“It is beginning to dawn on me that some one has made a goat of ‘yours truly,” he said.

“...and I’m beginning to think that maybe that guy who sold me the Brooklyn Bridge was full of it.”

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: November 20, 2014 at 10:26 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-19-2014

Pittsburgh Press, November 19, 1914:

William Neill, scout of the Phillies…is confident that the Phillies have landed in Dave Bancroft a man who should will the hole at shortstop.
...
“Bancroft looked mighty good to me,” said Scout Neill. “I watched him play in a dozen games. He has a wonderful pair of hands and is as quick as a flash…You can never tell what a young fellow will do when he comes up to the majors, but Bancroft certainly has the ear-marks of a man who will develop fast.”

Shaky Veteran’s Committee selection or not, there’s a plaque hanging in upstate New York that suggests Neill got this one right.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: November 19, 2014 at 08:50 AM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: dave bancroft, dugout, history

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-18-2014

Toledo News-Bee, November 18, 1914:

Charles W. Murphy, former president of the Cubs, and credited with still holding a large interest in the club, announced on Wednesday that the deal by which Charles Weeghman, owner of the Chicago Federals, was to purchase the Cubs, is off.

...meaning another year of the Federal League-Organized Baseball war. But you all know that already.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: November 18, 2014 at 09:01 AM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: cubs, dugout, federal league, history

Monday, November 17, 2014

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 11-17-2014

Milwaukee Journal, November 17, 1914:

The ever-present trouble-finding small boy got his [in Porterville, California] yesterday. A cluster of youngsters climbed to the roof of the dressing room where the touring all-star teams of the Americans and National leagues were housed and were peering between loose shingles at the diamond stars. Something besides shingles were loose, however, and the roof collapsed, injuring three youngsters. One was severely hurt. The game which followed the accident ended in a ten-inning tie, 5 to 5. Bush opposed Tesreau on the mound.

What a weird lede. The kids got theirs? One of them was severely injured.

Jeez, 1914 people. Not cool.

Dan Lee is some pumkins Posted: November 17, 2014 at 08:13 AM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: dugout, history

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