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Joe Posnanski Newsbeat

Friday, April 22, 2016

Posnanski: The Hobgoblin of an Unoccupied Mind

That might be harsh — I’m sure Schilling has friends in and around the game — but it has never been hard to find people annoyed or infuriated by Schilling. Well, he’s a loudmouth. That’s something he readily admits. He says insensitive, uninformed stuff all the time, and it splits people — many are offended, others race to his defense. Sometimes he apologizes. Sometimes he doesn’t. This time — after posting clueless and nasty anti-transgender stuff on his Facebook page — he’s not apologizing. That led to him getting fired at ESPN. Maybe he saw that coming. Maybe he didn’t.

Either way, he was defiant on his blog as he explained himself: “If you get offended by ANYTHING in this post, that’s your fault, all yours.”

Defiant … and, yes, thoroughly disingenuous. I mean, even in that one sentence, he sounds terribly offended by anyone that would be offended.

Why does he insist on saying these things that he has to know will hurt and offend a lot of people and, inevitably, will bring a wicked backlash back at him? I mean — he knows the drill. He’s been through it enough times. Why does he keep going there? And the obvious answer is: I don’t know. I never studied psychoanalysis. He explains it like this: “I’m loud. I talk too much. I think I know more than I do … but I’m OK with my flaws, they’re what make me, me.”

There’s more, but I’m going to stop right here because that is one of the dumbest things I’ve ever read. It isn’t our flaws that define us. He can’t possibly believe that. Don’t our best attributes define us? Isn’t it how how we deal with our flaws, how we try to overcome them or at least improve them, that defines us? Would we ever tell our children: “OK, listen, you have these flaws, you’re selfish and mean, you’re insensitive and jealous, you have a bad temper and you like to take shortcuts, embrace those, they are what make you, you?”

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 22, 2016 at 10:30 AM | 82 comment(s)
  Beats: curt schilling, joe posnanski

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

Teams are striking out more than ever, and that’s not a bad thing

These are just factors though. The overriding cause, as Bill James says, is that the incentives of the game point to more strikeouts. From the pitching side, well, it’s obvious that to win you want pitchers who strike people out. The best pitchers are, with very few exceptions, strikeout pitchers. You look at the best pitchers in the game now — Clayton Kershaw, Max Scherzer, Chris Sale, Jake Arrieta, Madison Bumgarner, David Price — all finished in the Top 10 in strikeouts last year. Zack Greinke finished just out of the Top 10. It’s POSSIBLE to be an effective pitcher without a lot of strikeouts, but you wouldn’t want to try it.

So, that’s easy: To prevent runs, you want more strikeouts.

But the opposite is not true. The best hitters often strike out a lot. Mike Trout led the league in strikeouts in 2014. Both of last year’s MVPs, Bryce Harper and Josh Donaldson, struck out 130-plus times. Early season sensation Trevor Story leads the league in strikeouts. And this is true historically. Mike Schmidt struck out a lot. Mickey Mantle struck out a lot. Babe Ruth struck out a lot.

So while teams try to find pitchers who strike people out, teams do NOT try to find hitters who avoid the strikeout. There’s your one-way street. Strikeouts keep climbing.

Will the rise ever end? Right now, an average game will see 16 or 17 strikeouts. That’s a lot of strikeouts. Can that number possibly go up? Will we soon see 20 strikeouts per game? Then 22? More?

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 20, 2016 at 08:03 AM | 59 comment(s)
  Beats: joe posnanski, strikeouts

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Posnanski: Its Time to Fix Manager of the Year voting

Was it actually Ned who was the Yost with the most?

1. Vote on the Manager of the Year AFTER the playoffs. This seems so obvious, it’s hard to believe that it needs to be said. The Baseball Writers in the olden days started voting for their awards before the playoffs because … there were no playoffs. There was only a World Series, and that was considered separate from the rest of the game. Voting at the end of the regular season made some sense then.

But now, the playoffs are the whole game. The 162-game season is secondary. Ten out of 30 teams make the postseason, and greatness is defined in October. Bruce Bochy has not won the Manager of the Year award for the Giants because the award is voted for BEFORE he led three teams to World Series titles. This is pure lunacy.

2. Vote on Manager of the Year every two years. We talk about small sample sizes a lot in baseball. Well, with managers, one season is just too small a sample size. In 2003, for instance, Kansas City’s Tony Pena won Manager of the Year, and that included my vote. Hey, I thought he did an AMAZING job inspiring a spectacularly limited team. They were somehow in first place for four months.

But four months is … just not very long in baseball terms. The Royals fell apart toward the end of the year, and they were horrendous the next year, and Pena quit early the following year, and as much fun as that 2003 season was, let’s be honest, Tony Pena was not Manager of the Year. He might have won Manager of the Month a couple of times.

If this year’s vote had been over the two years, we could have avoided that Matt Williams award in 2014 along with some of the other unfortunate choices, like Tony Pena.

 


 

 

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