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Friday, July 25, 2014

Hurdles remain in Mets-Rockies deal for Tulowitzki, Gonzalez

The Rockies and Mets would seem to be perfect trade partners.

Colorado has star players at the very two positions the Mets need in shortstop Troy Tulowitzki and left fielder Carlos Gonzalez, and it needs to think about retooling things after another year fighting and losing the altitude/injury battle.

The Mets have a stash of young pitching prospects, just the sort Colorado so badly needs.

And, in fact, Rockies people have identified the Mets as one of the teams—perhaps the perfect team—that could potentially make a trade of at least one or of their two cornerstone players work. Colorado likes the Mets’ young pitchers, according to people familiar with their thinking, in fact much more than they like some other teams that have shown interest in Tulo and CarGo.

No surprise, the Mets have checked in again with Colorado, as Joel Sherman of the New York Post reported, and as expected the teams will talk again about Tulo and CarGo.

The two teams should have some interesting conversations since they do seem to be such a positional match. However, the chances of a deadline deal involving Tulo and Cargo still seem remote, at best.

You don’t say?


Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Rubin: deGrom for NL rookie of the year?

Curtain risin’ on a new age
See deGrom’s still waitin’...

Jacob deGrom for rookie of the year?

Why not? It’s not like there is a runaway candidate this year.

So far, the monthly NL rookie of the month winners have been Arizona’s Chris Owings, St. Louis’ Kolten Wong and Cincinnati’s Billy Hamilton.

DeGrom limited the Seattle Mariners to one run on five hits in seven innings in a 3-1 win Tuesday. He improved to 4-5 with a 3.01 ERA.

Showing no ill effects from a nine-day layoff because of the All-Star break, deGrom now has a 1.59 ERA in six starts since June 21. He has not allowed a home run in his last 52 2/3 innings.

“He’s always flown under the radar. He still is,” Terry Collins said. “This guy has got numbers to match up with any rookie in the league, and you never hear his name mentioned.”

 

 

Repoz Posted: July 23, 2014 at 07:31 AM | 37 comment(s)
  Beats: mets

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Journal News: Recap of Derek Jeter Retirement Gifts

The big 2nd half issue at BBTF is likely to be the retirement gifts The Captain receives as he completes his Final Journey. To provide perspective, the LoHud Yankee Blog reviews the 1st half:

May 25 — White Sox
Once a powerful hitter for both the Yankees and White Sox, retired slugger Ron Kittle built Jeter’s U.S. Cellular Field retirement gift. Kittle created a bench made of baseball equipment with bases as the seat, bats as the back and arm rests, and baseballs used for decoration and spacing. Long time White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko also presented Jeter with clay removed from the shortstop position at U.S. Cellular, plus a $5,000 donation to Jeter’s Turn 2 Foundation.

Looks like it wouldn’t be difficult for Furtdao to top the Cubs effort on behalf of BBTF.


Monday, July 14, 2014

New York Post:  Familar Cry of ‘Ya Gotta Believe’ Begins to Ring out Again

The Mets’ pythagorian record right now is 50-45.  Are they secretly good, or is there a talent-related reason they are so far below that record at 45-50?  Wright, Granderson, and D’Arnaud have all begun to live up to expectations. Murphy is better than expected.  Lagares has continued to perform at a high level. The starters have been solid, though oversold as a team strength.

Conventional wisdom is that with a record so divergent from the run differential, we should expect a strong second half.  Has Sandy been unfairly vilified?

Arbitol Dijaler Posted: July 14, 2014 at 09:49 AM | 44 comment(s)
  Beats: mets

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Tom Veryzer, shortstop for Tigers and Indians, dies at 61

Former Tigers and Indians shortstop Tom Veryzer, who played in the big leages for 12 years, died Thursday at the age of 61, according to The Oakland Press.

Veryzer was drafted by the Tigers with the No. 11 overall pick in the 1971 MLB Draft and was the team’s starting shortstop from 1975 to 1977. Detroit traded him to the Indians that offseason to make room for Alan Trammell. He played for Cleveland until 1981 before ending his career with stints with the Mets (1982) and Cubs (1983-84).

He hit .241/.283/.294 with 14 homers in 996 MLB games.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: July 09, 2014 at 02:44 PM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: cubs, indians, mets, obituaries, tigers, tom veryzer

Monday, July 07, 2014

Keith Hernandez: Starlin Castro ‘too unreliable’

You know I am only teasing. I love you slackers out there—always have!

With the Chicago Cubs now flush with shortstops, count Keith Hernandez among those not in favor of the Mets attempting to acquire incumbent Starlin Castro.

Castro, 24, is hitting .287 with 11 homers and 51 RBIs in 342 at-bats for Chicago this season.

...“We’ve seen enough of Castro to know that he’s just too unreliable, too loose,” Hernandez said during Sunday’s Mets-Rangers telecast on SNY.

When partner Gary Cohen noted that Castro also does not exactly subscribe to the Mets’ hitting philosophy, Hernandez added: “That aside, he’s too lackadaisical in the field for my liking. I want the Mets to get guys that are hard-nosed, come to the ball yard every day and put their 100 percent in. And I don’t think Castro does that. I’ve seen enough of him.”

Repoz Posted: July 07, 2014 at 01:25 PM | 112 comment(s)
  Beats: cubs, mets

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Pearlman: Trading for George Foster…Frank Cashen’s Best Move

Was Lee Mazzilli overrated at the time of the deal?

One thing that, to me, stands out about Cashen: When folks try and figure out the biggest trade of his 12 years with New York, they focus upon Keith Hernandez being lifted from the Cardinals for two pitchers, or Gary Carter coming via Montreal in exchange for Hubie Brooks and a bunch of mediocre youngsters. They’ll mention David Cone’s acquisition from Kansas City for Ed Hearn; maybe even Ron Darling and Walt Terrell being taken from Texas for an overrated Lee Mazzilli.

All those deals were important. No, monumental.

Yet the most groundbreaking swap—the one that truly changed the trajectory of a sad-sack franchise—took place on February 10, 1982, when Cincinnati Red slugger George Foster was sent to New York in exchange for Greg Harris, Jim Kern and Alex Trevino. Shortly thereafter, Foster and the Mets agreed to a five-year, $10.2 million deal—making the outfielder baseball’s first $2 million player.

Did Foster ultimately live up to the billing? Not even close. He hit 13 home runs in his first season, and never slugged more than 28 as a Met. By 1986, he was a clubhouse pariah; an unwanted presence who was released midway through a glorious season. Yet with his addition, Cashen was telling long-frustrated Metropolitan loyalists that the organization now meant business; that the Mets would be players in free agency and contenders for the playoffs. Before long, pieces began filling in around Big George. Young bucks. Free agents. The Mets became a force.

It all started with George.

Repoz Posted: July 01, 2014 at 01:16 PM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: history, mets

Monday, June 30, 2014

Frank Cashen dies at age 88

All bow to Bow-tie Cashen.

Frank Cashen, the architect of the 1986 world champion New York Mets, died Monday, a team spokesman said. He was 88.

Cashen, who died at Memorial Hospital in Easton, Maryland, served as Mets general manager from 1980 through 1991, transforming the organization from a perennial loser into a juggernaut.

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, the Mets owned the best record in Major League Baseball during Cashen’s final eight seasons as they compiled a 743-550 mark from 1984-91.

“On behalf of all of us at the Mets, we extend our deepest condolences to Jean Cashen and her entire family,” Mets principal owner Fred Wilpon said in a statement. “Frank Cashen revitalized our franchise when he took over in 1980 as general manager and helped engineer us to a world championship in 1986.

“I dealt with Frank on a daily basis and he was a man of integrity and great passion. No one had a more diverse career than Frank. He was also a lawyer, sports writer and marketing executive. His accomplishments will always be an integral part of our team history.”

Repoz Posted: June 30, 2014 at 04:36 PM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: mets

Friday, June 27, 2014

Chris Young is Twice as Likely to be Benched After a Good Game Than an Oh-Fer: Why Terry Collins is the Worst

Then, I looked to see what happened after each of those games, at whether Young started or was benched for the next team game.  The results are… perplexing. For the last month, from May 29th to the present, Young has had 8 “good games” and 7 “bad games” where the Mets had a game the next day.

After the “bad games”, he was started 57% of the time and benched 42% of the time.

However after the “good games”, he was started 25% of the time and benched 75% of the time.

 

thetailor Posted: June 27, 2014 at 03:43 PM | 9 comment(s)
  Beats: mets, terry collins

Mushnick: Keith Hernandez goes from insightful to bully in one inning

The FB BULLY Project has 642,873 likes, so let’s keep at it!

But in the next half inning, he went from enlightened analyst to schoolyard bully Nelson “Ha-Ha!” Muntz. SNY presented a photo of Padres pitcher Alex Torres from the night before, wearing a cap that bulged at its sides from a protective liner.

Yes, Torres looked odd. Yet, clearly, if he were determined to diminish the chances of a fractured skull or brain injury from a line drive to the side of his head, his head, if not his cap, was on straight.

Well, Hernandez took a macho, style-over-function stance, mocking Torres for looking “absurd.” (The same was heard when batting helmets arrived then grew larger until they included earflaps and would be worn by base coaches.)

He wasn’t done. He suggested Torres and anyone who would wear such a thing are cowards: “If you’re scared, get a dog.”

Ugh! Either Hernandez was unaware of the dozens of annual, all-levels episodes that have pitchers rushed to hospitals — some with permanent neurological damage — or such episodes have not yet left an impression on him.

In Torres’ case, last year with the Rays, he replaced Alex Cobb after Cobb was nailed in the head with a line drive. After Saturday’s game, Torres recalled he still could hear the crack against Cobb’s head — and Torres was in the bullpen. “I’m glad he’s alive.”

Cobb, depending on how one looks at it, was lucky — he was out just two months.
Good Keith, bad Keith. For better and worse, he keeps both in the game.

Repoz Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:38 AM | 82 comment(s)
  Beats: media, mets

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Kernan: Alderson’s Moneyball plan yet to work as well as Beane’s

Them boys in their high stirrups. Ah, Sandy, their uniforms are so white…and green…and gold.

Sandy’s Mets were supposed to be Billy’s A’s.

They were supposed to become low-budget wonders of the baseball world.

The A’s, under Billy Beane, are just that, again, posting the best record in the majors at 47-29. They have scored the most runs (389) while surrendering the fewest (254).

The Mets were 21st in the majors with 294 runs scored, three below the Yankees, going into Monday night’s action.

The A’s, who visit Citi Field Tuesday and Wednesday, were leading the majors with a 3.02 ERA. The Mets were 11th in runs allowed at 296 and 10th in ERA at 3.54.

...More than anything, Alderson’s credibility is on the line now. His teams have not turned the corner. He was the one who threw out the challenge of 90 victories to this Mets squad that is six games under .500 in a season of baseball mediocrity.

If the Nationals or Braves had played up to expectations, the Mets would be buried. They are fortunate to be in a division where the top team is only four games above .500.

In his fourth season in charge, Alderson’s Mets look a lot like the Padres, which was Alderson’s previous team destination from 2005-09 as CEO.

The Padres were dead last in runs scored with 225 and 13 ¹/₂ back in the NL West.

The Padres fired GM Josh Byrnes on Sunday.

Sandy’s Mets need to turn it around and start playing a bit more like Billy’s A’s.

Repoz Posted: June 24, 2014 at 10:05 AM | 40 comment(s)
  Beats: mets, oakland

Monday, June 23, 2014

Rapoport: Kershaw’s gem was great, but batters feared Nolan Ryan

Hey, Rapoport! I haven’t read you in ages.

Ranking no-hitters may seem like a fool’s errand. Greatness is greatness and this sort of example doesn’t happen very often. Why not leave it at that?

But when a pitcher ascends toward the upper echelon of strikeout potential and pitches a no-hitter as well, the temptation to match him against those who came before becomes irresistible. And since claims are being made that Clayton Kershaw’s no-hit victory over Colorado on June 18 is the most dominant pitching performance ever, it becomes our civic duty to summon up a memory of Nolan Ryan.

...The only mark against Ryan that day was that he issued four walks while Kershaw allowed none. This gives Kershaw the nod, his supporters say. Fair enough, except for this.

Ryan threw the ball harder than Kershaw—his fastball was routinely measured at more than 100 miles per hour—and he therefore didn’t have Kershaw’s ability to control where it went. Walks were such a part of Ryan’s repertoire that he didn’t pitch a complete game without one until he was 36 years old and was no longer throwing as hard.

But I’ve always thought that Ryan’s occasional inability to get the ball over the plate was one of his strengths. The idea that a pitch might get away from him was firmly implanted in hitters’ minds as they approached the plate.

...As Kershaw’s no-hitter in Dodger Stadium was winding down, a television camera peered into the Rockies’ dugout and Vin Scully noted the look of awe on the faces of their hitters. That struck me as about right and points to the essential difference when the subject is domination.

When the Tigers came to the plate against Ryan that day, their main emotion was not awe but fear.

Repoz Posted: June 23, 2014 at 05:53 AM | 53 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, dodgers, history, mets

Saturday, June 21, 2014

NY Post: The challenger to d’Arnaud’s status as Mets’ catcher of future

After a pedestrian April, when he hit just .250 with three extra-base hits for Double-A Binghamton, the 23-year-old [Kevin Plawecki] has been on a tear since the calendar turned to May, hitting .352 with a .946 OPS. His totals for the season stood at .326 with six homers and 41 RBIs heading into Friday. 

Plawecki has caught the eye of an American League scout, who called him a “future All-Star” and “the best catcher in the organization.”

“He can hit, catch, throw,” the scout said. “His mechanical flaws are easily correctable. From level to level, he needs to get [locked] in with his arm action and the arm path, and once he gets that locked down, he’s going to have a better-than-average arm.”

bobm Posted: June 21, 2014 at 07:52 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: mets

Friday, June 20, 2014

As a Clinton staffer, Rahm Emanuel wanted to go after Daryl Strawberry for drugs

Typical spiteful Cubs fan.

The baseball part is his advice about how the Clinton White House should nose itself into baseball and drugs. Not steroids — no one cared about that yet — but about players abusing recreational drugs. Specifically, Daryl Strawberry:

In one 1995 memo, Emanuel even suggested that the president jump into the fray over New York Yankees star Darryl Strawberry testing positive for drugs. He called for Clinton’s drug czar, Lee Brown, to meet with Yankees owner George Steinbrenner and demand that Strawberry perform community service.

Brown publicly stated that the Yankees “have struck out by signing Darryl Strawberry.” But Steinbrenner said Strawberry was “worth saving” and he played for the Yankees for four years.

Pro tip: if George Steinbrenner comes off as the most reasonable guy in your interaction, you got some serious problems.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: June 20, 2014 at 11:05 AM | 5 comment(s)
  Beats: bill clinton, daryl strawberry, drugs, mets, politics, rahm emmanuel

Monday, June 16, 2014

WSJ: At Least the Mets Are Good at One Thing… Bullpen Somehow Excels in Preventing Inherited Runners to Score

You can’t call the Mets “good for nothings.” They’re actually great at something. Entering Sunday, they ranked second-best ever at preventing inherited runners from scoring.

Only 20 of 109 inherited runners have scored against the Mets, a rate of 18.3%. Since Stats LLC began tracking the statistic in 1974, just one team has been better—the 1995 Cleveland Indians (17.7%). The 1988 Mets are third-best at 18.8%.

Too bad they’re 7th of 30 this season in games the relief pitcher pitched in more than one inning.

bobm Posted: June 16, 2014 at 06:44 PM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: mets, relief pitching

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Bellone: Travis d’Arnaud is off to the worst start I have ever seen

So when I look at Travis d’Arnaud, the prized prospect the Mets acquired by trading R.A. Dickey, and think about how his lack of performance at the plate stacks up against the myriad poor performers that my favorite baseball team, the Mets, have put before me, I am considering a historical reference of about twenty years, dating back to 1994. And I can say, with some certainty, that d’Arnaud has been the least exciting, worst hitting, prospect I have ever seen.

Travis d’Arnaud has an OPS+ of 57 through 70 games in the big leagues. He is only 25, having appeared in a mere 257 plate appearances. Obviously, both traditionalists and sabermetricians alike would scream for sample size. ‘Let’s see how he looks over 1,000 plate appearances’, we could say. While that is fair, it doesn’t overlook the fact that in those first 70 games, he has been downright awful. The worst. And if we want to consider how often a player starts their career as slow as d’Arnaud and still turns into a good hitter, we have a starting point by his age and limited plate appearances.

Before we consider how d’Arnaud compares historically across baseball, let’s keep our focus on the Mets. Why don’t I remember a player starting as poorly as d’Arnaud in my lifetime? Well, because literally no Mets player with at least 250 plate appearances by their age-25 season has had as bad of a start at the plate since 1994.

...Travis d’Arnaud is a catcher; we shouldn’t overlook the fact that he has done completely the opposite of what the scouting reports suggested he would do. As bad as he has been swinging the bat, he has been as good framing pitches for the Mets’ staff. There is definite value to a catcher who is defensively sound, but that is not what d’Arnaud was brought to New York to do; he would have to be a defensive genius to justify his meager offense.

After batting .180 on the season, with three home runs and nine RBIs, having played, essentially, everyday, the Mets were forced to send d’Arnaud back to the minors (where he has found some recent success). Having watched him play most of those days, I can tell you that he is one of the least exciting prospects I have ever seen. It turns out the numbers back that up.

Thanks to VY.

Repoz Posted: June 14, 2014 at 10:06 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: history, mets, sabermetrics

Friday, June 13, 2014

GIF: Carlos Torres punches himself in the head after blowing game

Thursday was not a good day for Mets reliever Carlos Torres. The team’s usually reliable relief workhorse entered the game with the score tied in the 12th inning, then allowed four runs on seven hits and a walk to effectively lose the game. It was ugly.

Rather than toss a water cooler or even punch a wall (with his non-pitching hand, of course), Torres opted for self-abuse and punched himself in the head a few times.

I just hope he doesn’t suffer from occasional bouts of ED.

Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: June 13, 2014 at 05:52 PM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: he did what now, mets, mets being mets

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Davidoff: Mets’ fear of tearing it all down puts them behind Astros

As we sit on Thursday, the Astros (30-37) are percentage points ahead of the Mets (29-36). From Opening Day 2009 through the present, the Astros are 342-535, a .390 winning percentage. In the same time period, the Mets are 403-472 (.461). Few would dispute the Astros possess a deeper base of young talent than do the Mets, with rookies Jon Singleton and George Springer joining the club this year and many more coming.

You know why the Astros’ future seems brighter than the Mets’? In my opinion, it’s because the Astros committed to an epic rebuild, while the Mets tried to sort of have it both ways, even as they slashed their payroll at an unconscionable rate.

Earlier this season, I was chatting with a talent evaluator from an American League team, and I asked him if he was as high on the Mets’ organizational pitching as everyone else seemed to be. Yes, the official said, he was.

But then he volunteered: “What I don’t get about the Mets is why they didn’t sell high on guys like Daniel Murphy and Lucas Duda.”

You could reasonably throw Dillon Gee, Jon Niese and Bobby Parnell into that conversation, and Ike Davis, too, back when he was a prized Mets piece rather than the human roller coaster he became.

Ironically, this is an instance in which you can fault Mets ownership for not being cheap enough. In neglecting to look at a bigger picture. And really, I’m not even sure how much we should fault them.

bobm Posted: June 12, 2014 at 06:25 PM | 50 comment(s)
  Beats: astros, mets

Saturday, June 07, 2014

Paul Lo Duca on Mets catchers: I can hit better lefty than those ‘schmucks’

Lo Duca-Durabol strikes again!

“I could hit better left-handed than the schmucks they’ve got there now,” said the righty-swinging Lo Duca, who is also a horse racing analyst and was booked on the show to preview the Belmont Stakes.

D’Arnaud, a top prospect acquired in the R.A. Dickey deal, is hitting .184 and Recker is right on the Mendoza Line at .200. That does make Lo Duca’s two years at Shea — he hit .318 in 2006 and .272 in 2007 – look Ruth-ian.

But Lo Duca, who was named in the Mitchell Report in 2007, saved most of his frustration for Omar Minaya. The former Mets GM acquired the veteran catcher from the Marlins for two minor leaguers before the 2006 season.

“The issue that the Mets have is that after 2006 and 2007, when we all were there … they stuck their hopes in a guy that, let’s be honest, had no clue what was going on,” said Lo Duca, who signed with the Nationals before the 2008 season.

“None. The guy was an idiot. And he ended up making the franchise go backwards. Where the Mets have always made the mistake is they’ve always settled for mediocrity. As a Mets fan, I’m done with it. Besides ’06 and ’07, give me some other years besides 2000 … And then they go build this ballpark that’s mammoth, and your franchise player [David Wright] is a hitting star who has four home runs!”

Repoz Posted: June 07, 2014 at 11:11 AM | 24 comment(s)
  Beats: mets

Wednesday, June 04, 2014

NY Post: Sherman: Mets must seize unexpected opportunity and spend

There are four months of the season left, so maybe the Nationals get their act right. Maybe. Perhaps the Braves’ power bats overcome all. Perhaps. But there is opportunity here for Alderson and the Mets. If the Marlins are trying to get their team better, Alderson should be proactive as well. Ownership needs to stop talking about the money it is willing to spend and open wallets.
Does the front office, for example, think there is still a star player inside Matt Kemp as long as he is liberated from the Dodgers? Will the Rockies auction Carlos Gonzalez? Will the Rays concede and make the versatile Ben Zobrist available?

bobm Posted: June 04, 2014 at 09:43 PM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: meaningful games in september, mets

Tuesday, June 03, 2014

Corcoran: Top studs and duds: The best and worst No. 1 picks in MLB draft history

1. Chipper Jones, SS, Braves, 1990

By career wins above replacement, Alex Rodriguez has been by far the most valuable first-round pick in draft history, but no team ever got more out of the No. 1 overall choice than the Braves got from Chipper Jones. Rodriguez, who went 1/1 in 1993, chased big free agent money at the first opportunity, leaving Seattle after compiling 38 WAR in his team-controlled years. Ken Griffey Jr. (1987) forced a trade to his home city of Cincinnati after 11 years with the Mariners, but Jones, a regional high school shortstop who settled in at third base in the major leagues, spent his entire 19-year, soon-to-be Hall of Fame career with team that drafted him.

“He looks just like you, poindexter!”

Eddo Posted: June 03, 2014 at 05:03 PM | 130 comment(s)
  Beats: braves, draft, mariners, mets, padres, twins, white sox, yankees

Saturday, May 31, 2014

MLB: Alderson says that ‘now’s the time to turn the corner’

Awareness of the Probabilities…pretty sure Bouzouki Joe Records had them on a Turkish Freakout comp.

MLB.com: When you say awareness, how much of the newer metrics do you involve Terry in? Talking to Yankees GM Brian Cashman about it this spring, he said he doesn’t think you can be a manager in the big leagues these days unless you use them to a certain degree.

Alderson: I think that’s fair. There’s so much information out there that it needs to be distilled into something that is usable. There can be information overload whether it’s a manager or a staff or an individual player. People have to go out and perform. That entails more of an subconscious understanding of these things than a conscious, voluntary application. Again, having an awareness of these things is important. Training and preparation are important, but ultimately people have to have the freedom to do as they see fit. As long as there is an awareness of the probabilities, that’s all I care about. In the final analysis, these guys who play the game are human beings. They are not baseball cards.

MLB.com: This is a lot for an older manager, who may be set in his ways, to digest and change.

Alderson: Yeah, well, some people say that the most important thing you can learn in college is how to keep learning. It’s true in baseball. It’s true almost anywhere. If you can’t keep up with new technology, new ways of thinking, if you’re not constantly involving, you’re falling behind. I think the fact that Terry is older suggests that he’s been able to evolve and still has a good relationship with an entirely different generation of players.

MLB.com: Did you have a five-year plan with the Mets? What was your goal and how close are you to reaching it?

Alderson: My goal was not to win 74 games as we did last year. I don’t recall specifically what I wrote down or had in mind. But we’re not there since we haven’t even hit .500. On the other hand, we have had other issues to deal with. This is what I told the fans over the last three years when they asked about the plan, what we are trying to do: acquire and develop talent, create payroll flexibility and win as many games as possible without compromising one and two. So have we been successful in that regard? If you phrase it that way, we’ve definitely made progress. But now’s the time. We’ve acquired more talent. We have more payroll flexibility. Now’s the time to turn the corner and what allows us to turn the corner is eventually our young talent. We’re just about at that juncture.

Repoz Posted: May 31, 2014 at 09:54 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: mets

Friday, May 30, 2014

Noble: Grace in center has Lagares on short Mets list

Confession: I root for Juan Lagares. There, I’ve said it, admitted it. On a regular basis, I do that which is routinely discouraged—even forbidden—in the pressbox. I do not cheer for the Mets center fielder. Can’t; long ago, Jerome Holtzman, the dean of baseball writers in Chicago, not only used “No cheering in the pressbox” as the title of his book, he also demanded it, not that writers’ objectivity had necessarily been called into question. So I don’t ever cheer—for any player or any team. But I root like hell for Lagares any time he steps into the batter’s box.

Now, it should be noted that a proviso exists in this seemingly partisan scenario, lest my own objectivity be questioned. My impartiality remains intact. It is uncompromised despite the “C’mon, Juans” that stop just short of my larynx when Lagares bats. I root for him for one reason, albeit a selfish one. I want him to hit so he will remain an everyday player and, as such, continue to play center field regularly. And play it as it hasn’t been played for a National League franchise in New York City since, well, we’ll get to that.

There’s a pretty big difference between Fangraphs and Baseball Reference wrt WAR. BR has him at 2.5 and FG has him at 1.0.

Russlan is fond of Dillon Gee Posted: May 30, 2014 at 12:24 PM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: juan lagares, mets

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Ron Darling: Keith Hernandez qualified to be a critic of Mets’ hitting philosophy

Keith got 9 IBB’s in 86…so there’s that!.

Fired Mets hitting coach Dave Hudgens used the word “naysayers” when describing the SNY announcers—including Keith Hernandez—who have criticized the team’s batting approach.

SNY announcer Ron Darling had another word Tuesday night to describe Hernandez: Expert.

“If you look at Keith’s career,” Darling told Newsday, “Keith was the poster boy for what they do. He’s already done it. These guys aspire to do it. I think that Keith is probably the best person to talk about how you get on base, but at the same time the aggressiveness with which you can do that. So I don’t know anyone better to speak about it.”

Darling was asked before Tuesday night’s game about comments Hudgens made to Newsday after his Memorial Day firing.

Said Hudgens: “The naysayers, the guys who disapprove of us, the guys who I listen to on TV all the time, those guys that know everything about the game, I’m just amazed at it . . . I just shake my head at the old-school guys that have it all figured out. Go up there and swing the bat. Well, what do you want to swing at? It just confounds me. It’s just hilarious, really. That’s one thing. I’m glad I don’t have to listen to those guys anymore.”

Repoz Posted: May 29, 2014 at 01:09 PM | 35 comment(s)
  Beats: media, mets

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

How much longer before Royals shake things up in dugout, front office?

Robothol’s latest. A lot of good stuff.

An agent, of all people, suggested a perfect replacement for the retiring Derek Jeter: Orioles shortstop J.J. Hardy, who is eligible for free agency at the end of the season.
The agent, who has no affiliation with either player, made an excellent point: Hardy is steady and unassuming, and his low-maintenance personality would make him well-suited to replace a legend.
Hardy, who turns 32 on Aug. 19, missed nearly a month with a strained left oblique earlier this season. He’s batting .304 with a .701 OPS, albeit with no home runs, in 158 at-bats.
His defense remains solid. And his transition could be relatively seamless, considering that this is his fourth season in the AL East.

As a Red Sox fan I highly endorse the Yankees signing Hardy to a five-year contract.

Jim Furtado Posted: May 27, 2014 at 10:34 AM | 68 comment(s)
  Beats: astros, j.j. hardy, mariners, mets, padres, phillies, rangers, royals, yankees

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