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Friday, June 13, 2014

Derrick May & Dave May, Jr: What We Think About When We Think About Dad

DAVID MAY, JR.: Toward the end of his career, Dad tended to be more of a fourth or fifth outfielder, but he gained this reputation for being one of the greatest batting practice hitters in the game. I mean, from what his friends and ex-teammates have told me and what we remember, whenever he wanted to turn it on, Dad turned it on. One of those times was during the All-Star Game in Venezuela. Dave Parker was down there, too. This was during the 1976/1977 offseason. Parker was on the verge of becoming the superstar we all know. So, of the ten players in the contest, it comes down to Cobra and Dad. They go back and forth and Dad finds himself down by seven dingers. He gets into the batters’ box, sets and just goes off on it. He must’ve hit like 15 home runs in a row. Wins the Home Run Derby. It was really here where I understood what guys were saying about his batting practice prowess.

djordan Posted: June 13, 2014 at 02:14 PM | 2 comment(s)
  Beats: brewers, mlb

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Miracles: John D’Acquisto on Dr. Frank Jobe, UCL surgery & Jefferson Airplane

“Do you have a job,” Dr. Kerlan says, very concerned about your answer.


“Yeah,” you reply earnestly, snapping back for a moment, fighting the inevitability of this conversation’s direction as best you can, “Starting pitcher for the San Francisco Giants.”


“No, John,” Dr. Jobe interjects, “That’s not what he means.” Dr. Kerlan repeats himself.


“Do you have a job? There’s only a 40% chance you’ll ever throw a baseball again.”


Dr. Jobe and Dr. Kerlan detail the nuances of the surgery. You don’t hear a damn thing for five minutes.


“You may never play baseball again” is the only phrase playing in your mind right now on an endless, somber loop.


All the joy within you dies, and you start to cry.

djordan Posted: June 12, 2014 at 09:48 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: giants, john d'acquisto, mlb

Monday, June 09, 2014

Dirk Hayhurst’s Minor League Survival Manual

The GM Game is the prediction of the moves that will be made around the organization if YOU were the man in charge. It can look different depending on where you stand and how much information you have, but the above is how it looks if you’re a player.

Don’t play it.

The reason is, if you start trying to figure out why someone else got promoted and you didn’t, you’ll start to get bitter. Professional baseball, for all the joy associated with playing it, can be a very bitter place. That’s thanks in large part to just how crappy minor league life is, and how badly players want to make it to the top. But when you play GM, you start to assign value to your teammates, to yourself, and to your career that might not be accurate. You’ll expect to get promoted based on what little you know, and when it doesn’t happen, you’ll get angry at the situation, your employer, or even your teammates.

djordan Posted: June 09, 2014 at 10:23 AM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: hayhurst, minors, mlb

Thursday, June 05, 2014

If teams were comprised of only players they drafted

fun project by one of the authors at brewcrewball.  thought folks might be interested.  if you are just going to nitpick how the lists were constructed go (anatomically impossible act).

Harveys Wallbangers Posted: June 05, 2014 at 02:38 PM | 79 comment(s)
  Beats: draft, mlb, scouting

Sunday, May 25, 2014

Madden: MLB commissioner Bud Selig has earned right to choose his replacement

...and he also invented The Steering Wheel of Death for the ‘54 Cadillac Eldorado! So let’s hear it for…..

Although Selig has deliberately and steadfastly avoided endorsing any candidate for his successor, it has stood to reason his No. 2 man, MLB COO Rob Manfred, would naturally evolve to the position by virtue of having been the point man for much of Selig’s legacy — as the chief labor negotiator for three collective bargaining agreements that were completed without a work stoppage; the drug sheriff who brokered with the players union the most comprehensive joint drug program in all of professional sports and successively prosecuted all the guilty parties, most notably Alex Rodriguez, in the Biogenesis case last summer; and the commissioner’s emissary who navigated through the courts in the takeaway and sale of the Dodgers from ruinous owner Frank McCourt.

Or as one baseball executive said to me Friday: “We’re coming off nearly 20 years of the most successful commissionership of all time and Rob’s been a very big part of it. If he’s seen as an extension of Bud, what’s so wrong with that?”

Nevertheless, there is a small cadre of owners, headed by White Sox board chairman Jerry Reinsdorf and the Angels’ Arte Moreno, that evidently does not view Manfred as the right and natural choice to succeed Selig.

...Reinsdorf has made no secret of the fact that he wants the owners to take advantage of the seemingly greatly weakened players union, which has lost control of the agents, and push hard for a salary cap in the upcoming labor negotiations. In that respect, however, he has a rather strange bedfellow in Moreno who, more than any owner in baseball other than possibly Detroit’s Mike Ilitch, has contributed to the latest escalation of salaries.

“Believe me,” said another baseball official, “the owners have no stomach for a labor fight. Arte Moreno a champion for a salary cap? What a joke! Who put a gun to his head to give Albert Pujols $250 million and Josh Hamilton $123 million? Even if they got a salary cap — which, even in their present state, the union would never agree to — don’t they realize that would require minimum payrolls of $150 million? How are all those teams like Tampa Bay, Miami, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Kansas City or even Jerry’s White Sox gonna be able to do that?”

Repoz Posted: May 25, 2014 at 07:11 AM | 20 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Snyder: Offensive decline continuing in 2014

Are we having fun yet!?

With a new crop of uber-talented power pitchers, the cyclical nature of the game and, probably—though we couldn’t prove this and pitchers were using the juice, too—the major crack-down on performance-enhancing drugs, offense continues its decline in baseball.

Heading into Tuesday’s action, MLB hitters were posting the lowest batting average and on-base percentage since the 1972 season. That year has some historical significance, which we’ll get to in a bit.

The 4.19 runs per game clip is actually up ever-so-slightly from last season, but both 2013 and 2014 to this point rank as well-below-average offensive seasons in baseball history, post-Dead Ball Era.

This continues a trend we’ve been seeing for the past several years. Offense is clearly in decline as the pitchers become more dominant.

...We should be applying this line of thinking when examining numbers this season, too. If there’s someone hitting, say, .265 and you hear someone scoffing about the guy being “only a .265 hitter,” maybe let that person know this is pretty well above average right now. Meantime, there are 17 starting pitchers with an ERA of better than 2.50. Thirty-four are below 3.00. Only 26 qualifying starters are at 4.50 or worse.

Contrast that to just a decade ago and it’s easy to see how much context the raw stats—rate or counting—need in any given era.

Baseball right now is a hell of a lot closer to the worst offensive season than the best. If things continue on this path, we’ll need to re-adjust how we define the best pitchers and hitters based upon the traditional stats. Again. Because the offensive numbers right now are downright offensive.

Repoz Posted: May 20, 2014 at 01:53 PM | 26 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

Monday, May 12, 2014

Spector: Here’s how to fix MLB’s flawed All-Star voting process

Spector: Power to the people…to vote online!

The American League has a pair of elite third basemen in Josh Donaldson of the Oakland Athletics and Evan Longoria of the Tampa Bay Rays. There is a rising slugging star in Seattle, Kyle Seager. In Baltimore, Manny Machado has returned to action for the Baltimore Orioles. With All-Star voting open, voters have plenty of choices for their Junior Circuit representative at the hot corner.

Plenty of choices, but not enough. The man leading American League third basemen in wOBA and wRC+, two vital advanced batting statistics, Yankees sparkplug Yangervis Solarte, is not on the All-Star ballot. The New York player up for voting at the position is Kelly Johnson.

... It would be easy to fix the All-Star ballot if all voting took place online. Major League Baseball could just set a minimum number of games played at each position, then populate the ballot accordingly. The problem is the paper ballot — that thing that has been teaching American children about hanging chads since long before Bush v. Gore was part of the nation’s history.

The paper ballot is going nowhere for two reasons. One is respectable and also totally not a real reason that a multibillion dollar business does anything: it’s a fun tradition. The real reason is that the All-Star ballot draws corporate sponsorship, putting advertisements in the hands of millions of fans for more than two months. Major League Baseball is not about to give up easy money simply for the benefit of Yangervis Solarte maybe getting a crack at a career highlight or Alex Gonzalez not getting laughed at.

There is a solution that includes the paper ballot, and it is to wait. Push back the start of All-Star voting to Mother’s Day, launching it with a series of commercials in which major leaguers, with their moms, urge fans to vote for them. Make the beginning of All-Star voting into an event, and an adorable one at that. The increased sponsorship exposure would make up for having two fewer weeks of paper ballots circulating, while also allowing the ballot-makers the chance to put out a more valid slate of candidates.

Repoz Posted: May 12, 2014 at 05:37 PM | 48 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

Randy Jones, Al Oliver & Dan Epstein live-blog the 1976 All-Star Game

EPSTEIN: Randy, going back to what you said about staying the Bellevue-Stratford hotel in Philly during All-Star week, and then there’s that breakout of Legionnaires disease two weeks later. How did you feel about hearing that news?

RANDY JONES: Yes I remember that well. That happened a week after we left. Myself and some of the Padre players couldn’t believe our luck at not getting sick. Figured it just wasn’t our time. Very freaky.

AL OLIVER: I remember the Legionnaires disease thing all too well. About two weeks after the All-Star break, I came down with an inner ear problem, balance problems. I was hitting .360 at the break, the best first half of my career-

EPSTEIN: You were leading the league in hitting at the time-

AL OLIVER: That’s right, and soon after that, I came down with the inner-ear problem. Got so bad I had to ask out of a couple games. They ran tests on me but didn’t find anything. Their conclusion was the inner-ear infection was causing my instability. I ended up not qualifying for the batting crown that year. I thought, some way, I got some kind of strain. I just wasn’t the same in the 2nd half.

djordan Posted: May 12, 2014 at 12:09 PM | 3 comment(s)
  Beats: al oliver, all-star game, dan epstein, mlb, randy jones

Sunday, May 11, 2014

Can Troy Tulowitzki hit .400? Can Alexei Ramirez win a batting title?

So we’re just going to drop whether or not Heironymus Merkin can ever forget Mercy Humppe and find true happiness? You might. I won’t!

However, based on his career stats—Tulo is a .295 career hitter—publications like the Washington Post have projected his chances of finishing the season .400 as 1 in 889,710. While that’s obviously not something you’d bet on, is it more or less likely than Alexei Ramirez making it all the way through the season as the best hitter in the American League?

Since 1941, there have been two hitters who have had lower career batting averages than Ramirez’s .280 who have won the AL batting title. The first, Snuff Stirnweiss, was a bit of an outlier. Stirnweiss led the AL in 1945 as a member of the New York Yankees. This was during the last year that saw most prominent players fighting in World War II, and his .309 average is the second lowest to lead the league behind Carl Yastremski’s .301 average in 1968 in that time frame.

The other was Norm Cash, who led the AL as a member of the Detroit Tigers with a .361 batting average in 1961. This was a full 90 points better than his career average, his only season hitting .300 and only one of five seasons where he managed to hit above .270 at all.

And unlike Tulowitzki, there have been players close to Alexei who have won the title, like Fred Lynn and the aforementioned Yaz. In fact, while it’s a different league, as recently as last year, the batting champion in the National League had a career average below that of Alexei and managed to hit .331 to win the title.

That player? Michael Cuddyer of, you guessed it, the Colorado Rockies. And what were the chances of that?

Repoz Posted: May 11, 2014 at 10:52 AM | 21 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

Saturday, May 10, 2014

Yu Darvish Loses Perfect Game On Error, Sparks Argument On MLB Network

Listens…pops batch of Sternbach’s finest.

The Rangers’ official scoring decision of an error—charged to Texas right fielder Alex Rios—sparked a contentious debate on MLB Network, which was simulcasting the game. Emmy-winner Harold Reynolds approached berserk levels as he tried to reason with Mitch Williams, as Reynolds asserted Rougned Odor’s starting position (playing in an extreme shift against David Ortiz) made the play non-routine, while Williams insisted Rios’s failure to call off Odor constituted an error of communication, and thus a “legal” error.

Reynolds wasn’t right, either—he insisted that because the ball never touched a glove, the decision was “garbage.” By the letter of baseball’s rules, sure—it’s an error. But by convention, official scorers almost never assign an error unless a fielder makes a physical mistake in the fielding process (which generally means the fielder touches the ball).

The premise of the argument is legitimate. The way these MLB Network broadcasters go about it, though, is embarrassing. Harold Reynolds, at one point, states the scoring decision is “the worst ruling in Major League Baseball history.”

Repoz Posted: May 10, 2014 at 08:15 AM | 140 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Awful Announcing: Lucia: MLB is Urging iTunes to Pull Team-Related Podcasts (UPDATE)

In one of the more disappointing things we’ve seen out of them lately, MLB is reportedly requesting that iTunes pull several team-related podcasts from their service. Among the affected podcasts are Twins podcast Gleeman and the Geek (hosted by Aaron Gleeman of NBC Sports), Pirates podcast Pirates Prospects, a second Twins podcast in Talk to Contact, Mets podcast Mets Musings, Cubs podcast Bleacher Nation, and Yankees podcast It’s About the Yankees, Stupid, among many others.

Tweets from Aaron Gleeman:

- “Gleeman and The Geek” was removed from iTunes after 144 episodes because we’re told MLB requested several team-related podcasts be removed
- Hopefully it’ll get resolved, but it’s scary that MLB can just tell iTunes to remove a three-year-old show with 15,000 listeners an episode.
- OK, so MLB won’t get back to us and iTunes won’t get back to us. Not sure what to do other than make a big stink about it. So let’s do that.

DJS and the Infinite Sadness Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:59 PM | 55 comment(s)
  Beats: clownshoes, mindblowingidiocy, mlb, mlbam

Monday, April 28, 2014

Awful Announcing:  The MLB Local TV Announcer Rankings

Over the last two weeks, we polled the Awful Announcing readers on their opinions of each local broadcast team around the majors…Each “A” vote received 4 points, 3 points for a “B” vote, down to 0 points for an “F” vote. The total points scored were divided by the total number of votes to calculate what amounts to a GPA for each broadcast booth.

30) Chicago White Sox – 1.37
-Hawk Harrelson (play by play)
-Steve Stone (analyst, play by play – select)
-Aaron Rowand (analyst -select)
-Mike Huff (analyst – select)
-Tom Paciorek (analyst – select)

Most popular grade: F (46% of voters)

puck Posted: April 28, 2014 at 05:52 PM | 123 comment(s)
  Beats: media, mlb

Friday, April 25, 2014

What If All Baseball Players Were Fat?

This is funny.

Jim Furtado Posted: April 25, 2014 at 01:11 PM | 17 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

MLB fixes transfer rule, effective immediately

Baseball Fixer…catch it!

Major League Baseball has adjusted the transfer rule, effective immediately, the league has announced. Things will essentially go back to the way they were before this season. Here’s the announcement:

  Major League Baseball announced today that the Playing Rules Committee has provided its official view of how Umpires should apply the Official Playing Rules when a fielder loses possession of a ball when attempting to transfer it to his throwing hand.
  The Committee’s interpretation of the rule has been discussed and agreed upon by MLB, the MLB Players Association and the World Umpires Association. Beginning with games played tonight, Umpires will enforce the rule according to the standards below.
  The Committee has determined that a legal catch has occurred pursuant to OBR 2.00 (Definition of Terms, “Catch”), or a valid force out or tag has occurred pursuant to OBR 2.00 (Definition of Terms, “Tag”), if the fielder had complete control over the ball in his glove, but drops the ball after intentionally opening his glove to make the transfer to his throwing hand. There is no requirement that the fielder successfully remove the ball from his glove in order for it be ruled a catch. If the fielder drops the ball while attempting to remove it to make a throw, the Umpires should rule that the ball had been caught, provided that the fielder had secured it in his glove before attempting the transfer. The Umpires will continue to use their judgment as to whether the fielder had complete control over the ball before the transfer.
  The Official Playing Rules Committee consists of the General Manager of the New York Mets, Sandy Alderson, who serves as Chair of the Committee; Sam Bernabe, the Chairman of the Pacific Coast League; Hall of Famer Rod Carew, a 19-year Major League veteran; Umpire Brian Gorman, a Crew Chief with over 22 years of experience at the Major League level; John McHale, Jr., MLB’s Executive Vice President of Administration and Chief Information Officer; Terry Ryan, the Executive Vice President and General Manager of the Minnesota Twins; John Schuerholz, the President of the Atlanta Braves; Bill Stoneman, former Vice President and General Manager of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim; and Joe Torre, MLB’s Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations.

Repoz Posted: April 25, 2014 at 12:53 PM | 35 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb, zzzzz

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

MLB takes a swing at the video game business

MLB Advanced Media, the league’s digital arm, has released a baseball video game for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Apple mobile devices. The game itself, RBI Baseball ‘14, is fairly conventional, but its release is not: It marks the first time a major professional sports league has developed its own console game.

“MLBAM has done some games before, but online mobile games,” said Samit Sarkar, reporter for the video game news site Polygon. “It’s something new for a league to do a bigger console title like this.”

Harveys Wallbangers Posted: April 23, 2014 at 08:25 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb, mlbam, video games

Monday, April 21, 2014

Eno Sarris On Young Pitchers’ Declining Velocity

Here’s a nasty open secret about pitching: Young pitchers don’t get better as they age. There is no peak age. As soon as they start firing bullets they start running out of time. They’re born and then they start dying.

djordan Posted: April 21, 2014 at 07:32 PM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: eno sarris, mlb

Morosi: MLB must evolve to let players express themselves without rebuke

Evol not Love.

Sorry, everyone. I must have been busy waiting for Stephen Drew and Kendrys Morales to sign when this transaction came across the wire:

NATIONAL LEAGUE—Named Gerrit Cole as Special Baseball Ethics Instructor to Carlos Gomez, succeeding Brian McCann.

Look, I can’t support everything Gomez does. Sunday’s bat toss and trot to first on what he thought was a home run probably cost the Brewers a run. With his speed, he could have had an inside-the-park homer if he had sprinted out of the box; instead, his potential run was stranded at third base.

It’s also difficult to defend the way Gomez turned a verbal altercation with Cole into a physical one, touching off a benches-clearing melee in Pittsburgh.

But for the most part, Gomez needs to be celebrated—not discouraged—for what he brings to major league baseball. At a time when the sport’s message on instant replay and home-plate collisions has become muddled, Gomez illuminates an even greater concern: Why do major league players take exception to peers who have the audacity to enjoy themselves on a baseball field?

If Gomez’s story sounds familiar, it should. Replace “Carlos Gomez” with “Yasiel Puig” or “Jose Fernandez,” and the basic theme holds true: A Latin American-born player has become a star in the major leagues, and he’s supposed to “tone down” his celebrations and remove the individuality from his game because “we don’t do that here.”

Well . . . why not? Because baseball’s playing, coaching, executive and media establishments don’t remember Joe DiMaggio pimping his home runs? Why do the old unwritten rules apply when there has been such profound change in the demographics of those playing—and watching—the game? Shouldn’t our national pastime mirror the evolving desires of the U.S. ticket-buying public in the social media age?

Repoz Posted: April 21, 2014 at 06:26 AM | 58 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Rosenthal: MLB likely to adjust two rules: plays at home & transfer catches

From the beginning, baseball promised that if its new rules warranted adjustments, those adjustments would be made.

Two such adjustments are likely to occur, according to sources with both Major League Baseball and the players union.

The first, at minimum, would be a guideline in which catchers will be asked to give the runner a lane to the plate in their initial positioning, further reducing the possibility of collisions at home plate.

The second would be a less strict interpretation of the transfer rule, in which umpires would rule on catches the way they did in the past, using more of a common-sense approach rather than following the letter of the law.

Officials from the union met with MLB executives earlier this week to voice their displeasure over what constitutes a catch now that baseball has expanded instant replay, sources said.

Both sides agreed that certain plays are being called incorrectly, and MLB officials will seek to clarify what constitutes a catch in a conference call with members of the umpires union early next week, sources said.

In the first three weeks of the season, umpires and replay officials occasionally called “no catch” on balls that once were considered outs, ruling that the fielder must transfer the ball to his throwing hand cleanly.

The rulebook states that a player must have “secure possession” of the ball in his glove or hand, but the interpretation of the rule changed to include a clean transfer with the inception of expanded replay.

“To say it has been a hot topic with the players would be an understatement,” one union official said.

Thanks to Stenerude Boy.

Repoz Posted: April 19, 2014 at 08:12 AM | 11 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

Friday, April 11, 2014

Seduction of ‘donut contracts’ has MLB players leaving millions on table

Baseball players are underpaid.

In a vacuum, the issue gets a big, fat #richpeopleproblems hashtag. If the MLBPA’s biggest problems revolve around a guy not getting enough millions, whooptie damn do. At the same time, that ignores an important principle, and one the union is stressing as long-term deals swing more and more in favor of teams: Baseball is a $9 billion industry, and every dollar that doesn’t go to the players who make the game what it is funnels straight into the suit pockets of owners who are getting even more stinking rich with every successful long-term deal.

eddieot Posted: April 11, 2014 at 12:03 PM | 42 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb, mlbpa, salaries

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Mad Met: Tommy Davis on the 1967 New York Jazz Scene

See that’s the thing.  I had one of my best years in New York and I think a lot had to do with my mindset.  You look at the back of the baseball card and notice a season that sticks out from the others and you wonder why the guy played so well that one particular year.  I was very happy in New York.  My wife and children were back in L.A. and I missed them terribly, but the ambient, rolling sounds of the subway trains as I fell asleep at my mother’s house after home games, the common harmonies of my youth, soothed my loneliness, like some sweet, nightly lullaby.  I woke up and arrived at Shea Stadium every day with a smile and got to take witness to an extraordinary jazz scene after hours.

djordan Posted: April 10, 2014 at 09:59 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb, tommy davis

Monday, April 07, 2014

Team exec thinks shortening games to seven innings is what baseball needs

Better idea: How about we actually enforce the rule where it’s automatically a ball if the pitcher hasn’t thrown it in whatever-amount-of-time-it-is?

Gamingboy Posted: April 07, 2014 at 04:19 PM | 79 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

Thursday, April 03, 2014

The Chad Curtis Story

This one’s a little tough to take, but Hanlon did a fantastic job reporting on the story. One of the finest published pieces today.

djordan Posted: April 03, 2014 at 02:27 PM | 90 comment(s)
  Beats: chad curtis, mlb

Monday, March 24, 2014

Matinale: Mitch Williams has solution to pitchers being hit in the face: let them do it to batters

Nerve of the Death Twitch!

According to Mitch Williams pitchers get hit in the face because they are not allowed to throw inside.  Really, that’s what he said.

...Williams insisted repeatedly and vociferously that pitchers should be allowed to pitch inside, a euphemism for hitting batters.  Williams never actually stated that pitchers should be allowed to hit batters.  But he complained that batters now wear armor and are not afraid because pitchers are warned my umpires about throwing at batters.  Williams wants pitchers to throw inside with impunity in order to intimidate batters as he seems to think occurred in some undefined old days.  Williams stated that the result has been that batters “dive out over the plate” and pull outside pitches that smash pitchers in the face.

Do I need to dissect the shear stupidity of this?

...I am revolted by the prevalence of the caviler baseball attitude about it being OK for a pitcher to hit a batter.  That it’s OK to “plunk” a batter in the torso.  Drilled or smashed would be accurate descriptions of a baseball travelling at 90 miles per hour (MPH) crashing into a person’s torso.  Pitching inside deliberately means that the pitcher is being irresponsible enough to not care if his accuracy is off just a bit and that inside pitch hits the batter.  That’s depraved indifference, murder two in New York.

Some batters wear some plastic protection.  PLASTIC!  Not armor.  Would Williams put that plastic on his body and shoot a gun at it?  How about throw a ball at it? It’s NOT armor.

...To buttress the contention of Williams they showed an interview with Aldonis Chapman through an interpreter in which Aldonis indicates that he should pitch inside more so that the batters will pull more and he will not get hit.  Maybe he should throw the ball slower than 105 MPH so that batters have more control.  Also, let’s consider that Aldonis was hit in the head just a few days ago.  He’s got an excuse for saying something silly.

The writer Verducci simply gave up stating that players cannot be protected from everything so just do nothing.

The announcer suggested a protective facemask but Williams brushed that off.  At least twice the announcer told Williams that LeBron James had recently scored 62 points in an NBA game wearing a facemask.  Williams insisted that it was impossible for a human being to pitch while wearing a facemask.

Mitch Williams is a moron.  If the MLB Network had any standards Williams would have been fired long ago.

Repoz Posted: March 24, 2014 at 05:56 AM | 25 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Jack McDowell on R.E.M. & managing rookie ball

JACK McDOWELL: The Dodgers asked me to come to Arizona for Spring Training as a special instructor, travel around a few weeks during the summer, you know, five day-trips to high-A, AA and AAA affiliates, just to see what goes on, which I was on board with. Couple weeks later, the organization called up to let me know they had a managerial opening in rookie ball for the Ogden Raptors if I was interested. I ran it by the wife and joked “Remember when I said I was gonna be gone for two weeks? How does six months sound?’’

djordan Posted: March 20, 2014 at 09:12 AM | 154 comment(s)
  Beats: jack mcdowell, mlb

Monday, March 10, 2014

Phil Rogers: Cardinals’ set lineup presents case for DH in NL

Add the designated hitter to the National League!

Wouldn’t you rather see one of these guys hit than continue to watch the Cardinals send the likes of Adam Wainwright, Michael Wacha, Shelby Miller and Carlos Martinez to the plate? I would but maybe I’m biased, because I grew up watching American League games, not worshiping at the altar of the double-switch and that predictable daily double—the No. 8 hitter being walked to get to the pitcher, and the pitcher giving up an out with a bunt.

Will the NL ever seriously consider the DH, or is this just media talk? I’ve been asking executives that this spring, and the trend I’ve found is the younger the general managers, the more open-minded they are about the proposition. It’s not going to happen in the next few years, but it might have a real chance in five to 10 years.

“It’s something that comes up, but I think that’s sort of idle conversation,” Cubs GM Jed Hoyer said. “I don’t know if there’s any real discussion about it. I always kind of look at it that way.

“When Major League Baseball asks our opinions, and it looks like there’s going to be a rule change, it’s at that point we’ll pay attention. But to date, there’s never been anything like that. It’s always been gossipy, and therefore I assume it’s going to stay the way it is.”

...Dodgers GM Ned Colletti doesn’t rule out a change, but he says he doesn’t expect change in the near future—even though his club is like the Cardinals. The four-outfielder formation with Matt Kemp, Andre Ethier, Carl Crawford and Yasiel Puig, as well as the presence of Joc Pederson in the wings, should make it easy for Don Mattingly to write lineups in AL parks.

“That’s a tough question,” Colletti said. “I don’t know. I don’t think so, but it’s always possible. Probably some people would make a strong argument for it, but it’s almost polarized now with one league not having it, one league going to have it. I don’t think it’s going to happen any time soon.”

Thanks to Butch.

Repoz Posted: March 10, 2014 at 05:58 AM | 113 comment(s)
  Beats: mlb

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NewsblogOTP - July 2014: Republicans Lose To Democrats For Sixth Straight Year In Congressional Baseball Game
(2899 - 11:26am, Jul 24)
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NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-24-2014
(3 - 11:20am, Jul 24)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogKorea's Hanwha Eagles have robots for fans who can't attend
(7 - 11:18am, Jul 24)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogBuck Showalter, Tommy Hunter bemoan shrinking strike zone in Orioles loss
(2 - 11:10am, Jul 24)
Last: AROM

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread July, 2014
(375 - 11:10am, Jul 24)
Last: ursus arctos

NewsblogFivethirtyeight: Billion-Dollar Billy Beane
(3 - 10:57am, Jul 24)
Last: 6 - 4 - 3

NewsblogGeorge "The Animal" Steele Mangles A Baseball
(132 - 10:56am, Jul 24)
Last: Dock Ellis on Acid

NewsblogMLB: Tarp problems at Yankee Stadium
(25 - 10:52am, Jul 24)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogGoldman: Eliminating the shift a bandage for a phantom wound
(23 - 10:45am, Jul 24)
Last: Yeaarrgghhhh

NewsblogCSN: Enough is enough — time to move on from Ryan Howard
(48 - 10:42am, Jul 24)
Last: Barry`s_Lazy_Boy

NewsblogYadier Molina serves his brother crackers on a plate — home plate
(3 - 10:37am, Jul 24)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogSports Reference Blog: 1901-02 Orioles Removed from Yankees History
(33 - 9:58am, Jul 24)
Last: Der-K thinks the Essex Green were a good band.

NewsblogAs shifts suppress offense, time has come to consider a rule change
(80 - 9:01am, Jul 24)
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