Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


Contributors

Jim Furtado
Founder & Publisher
Repoz
Editor - Baseball Primer

Syndicate

Pedro Martinez Newsbeat

Thursday, January 08, 2015

Pedro Martinez on Mets fans: They settle for what they have

But don’t we have to settle for settling? Oh, I’m doing it, aren’t I.

Yankee Stadium felt like a modern-day Roman Colosseum when [Pedro] Martinez took the mound. Love him or hate him, you always were entertained.

Across the RFK Bridge, wearing a Mets uniform, Martinez acknowledged that life was different. He spent four years in Flushing, a tenure that began with great promise and ended in ashes—both for the crumbling Mets and the fading embers of his Hall of Fame career.

Asked Wednesday about those two sides of New York, during a news conference at the Waldorf-Astoria, Martinez described the contrast as only he could, with a response that triggered loud laughter.

“I would say Queens is a little bit different than the Yankees fans,” Martinez said. “In Queens, they’re wild. They’re happy. They settle for what they have. Yankees fans cannot. It’s win or nothing.”

Ouch.

The District Attorney Posted: January 08, 2015 at 12:38 PM | 55 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, mets, pedro martinez, yankees

Wednesday, January 07, 2015

Hoynes: Why I didn’t vote for Hall of Famer Pedro Martinez

And that Randy Johnson, I don’t know him very well, but I bet he’s a jerk as well.

I didn’t vote for this year’s Hall of Fame class that will be enshrined in Cooperstown in July 26. It’s the first time I’ve missed since I became eligible to vote in 1994.

It wasn’t a protest over steroid era players or a desire to see the ballot go from 10 to 12 votes per writer. No, it was a screw up on my part. People who know me are really going to be surprised over that one.

Somehow, someway the ballot never got from my mailbox to my eager fingers. Between the curb and my desk, the ballot took a powder. By the time I realized it was really lost, there wasn’t time to get a new one.

Deep down, however, I think there was some Freudian thing at work.

Well before the ballots were released, I was wrestling with the idea of voting for Pedro Martinez. As great a pitcher as he was, I thought he was punk on the mound.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 07, 2015 at 08:03 AM | 42 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, paul hoynes, pedro martinez

Tuesday, January 06, 2015


Monday, January 05, 2015

One man’s ballot

But after asking around, I decided to stick with what Bill James advised: Vote for the 10 best players. “I don’t believe in trying to outsmart the system, no matter what the system is,” Bill said. “I think it backfires on you much more often than it works.”

So, here are the 10 players I voted for:

– Bonds

– Bagwell

– Clemens

– Johnson

– Martinez

– Mussina

– Piazza

– Raines

– Schilling

– Smoltz

I offer deep apologies to Craig Biggio, who might really need my vote. But at the end, it came down to Smoltz, Piazza and Biggio for the final two spots, and Biggio was third of the three for me.

FWIW, here’s the top 10 players on this ballot on his Best of the Rest column a few weeks back: Bonds, Clemens, Johnson, Pedro, Bagwell, Raines, Schilling, Mussina, Biggio, Piazza


Friday, January 02, 2015

MLB’s most interesting people in ‘15

Which executives, managers and players will drive the MLB narrative in the coming season? Here’s a look at the 15 most interesting people in baseball heading into 2015:

1. Rob Manfred
After an extended run as Bud Selig’s most trusted aide, Manfred takes center stage in late January as baseball’s 10th commissioner. He’ll try to maintain the momentum that has made baseball a $9 billion industry while setting an agenda on pace of play, changes in the draft and free-agent compensation system, and MLB’s efforts to reach out to a younger fan base. Manfred also needs to connect with Tony Clark and the players’ association while navigating the usual array of ownership labor hawks and doves in negotiations toward a new collective bargaining agreement in 2016.

2. Alex Rodriguez
Where do we start? A-Rod, who missed the entire 2014 season with a drug suspension, turns 40 in July. He’s six homers shy of tying Willie Mays’ total of 660 and collecting a $6 million bonus on top of the $61 million the Yankees already owe him. But the Yankees just signed third baseman Chase Headley to a four-year deal—yet another sign that they want Rodriguez to go away. Mariano Rivera and Derek Jeter were universally revered at the end of their runs in the Bronx. The reception won’t be quite as fawning when the most polarizing figure in baseball reports to Steinbrenner Field for duty in February.

They don’t always drink beer. But when they do, its Dos Equis. Wait, is that a centaur joke?


Here’s How the 2015 Hall of Fame Voting Will Turn Out

For about three years Pedro was as great as any pitcher ever has been. Just as great as Lefty Grove or Walter Johnson or Bob Feller or Sandy Koufax and maybe even better. He wasn’t as durable (how can you be when you’re that little?) but Pedro was an amazing pitcher who was fun to watch. It’s likely that Martinez’s appearance on the ballot will siphon votes from fellow starting pitchers Curt Schilling and Mike Mussina, contemporaries who suffer by comparison…

Wahoo Sam Posted: January 02, 2015 at 01:00 AM | 5 comment(s)
  Beats: craig biggio, hall of fame, john smoltz, pedro martinez, randy johnson

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Bill James Mailbag - 12/20/14 - 12/23/14

Is it time for the airing of grievances yet?

Bill, Will Myers was just trades to the Padres? Can you think of someone traded TWICE while in the minors and/or their early career and went on to become a great player? The only one I can think of is Sammy Sosa.

The Big Papi. Joe Cronin. Edd Rousch, Paul Konerko, Curt Schilling. Bobby Abreu, maybe.

Gary Sheffield was traded twice by 25.

Right, but he had a big season before the second trade.

Hey Bill, if I’m not mistaken, you referred to Herman Long a long time ago as Herman (Why On Earth Aren’t You in the Hall of Fame) Long. If you still feel that way, could you briefly discuss why you think he belongs, and/or why you’re surprised he hasn’t been elected? If you no longer feel that way, what changed your mind?

I’m 65. I’m not responsible for anything I wrote before I was 40.

In the head-to-head HOF, it’s Pedro v Clemens, and Pedro is winning…

Well, I voted for Clemens. Pedro was pretty good. . ..

Hey Bill, if you had a Hall of Fame vote (by the way, what a joke it is that you don’t) and believed that more than 10 candidates were deserving, how would you proceed? Would you engage in “strategic” voting? (This could take the form of, e.g., not voting for “sure thing” Randy Johnson. Or it could take the form of voting for Johnson to get him in and “unclog” the ballot going forward, while not voting for e.g. Alan Trammell, who seems to have little chance.) Or, would you just vote your top 10?

I would just vote for the ten best players.

Hey Bill, I’m far from a basketball expert, but what struck me about the [Sacramento] Kings considering the 4-on-5 defense is that it would be introduced at the absolute highest level of play. Doesn’t it make more sense for a college team or even a high school team to try such a thing? Or have those teams tried it out, and I just haven’t noticed? It seems like most major strategic overhauls happen at a much lower level of competition, like the Loyola Marymount team that shot a three as quickly as possible, or the Division III football team that decided to go for it every fourth down and never punt. Isn’t that usually where these innovations come from?

I think not. I believe innovation in baseball usually begins at the major league level and flows down. Innovations that try to bubble up from the bottom—like aluminum bats—never make it to the top. Innovations that start at the top—like new fielding gloves or weighted donuts for the bat in the on-deck circle—move quickly downward.


Monday, November 24, 2014

Big Unit, Pedro, Smoltz headline Hall of Fame ballot

There are three players with 100 bWAR and seven with 75 bWAR on the ballot this year. And Tim Raines ranks 10th with 69.1.

And then there are these guys…

Carlos Delgado, who totaled 473 home runs among his 2,038 career hits, is also on the ballot for the first time, along with fellow first baseman Tony Clark, outfielder-first baseman Darin Erstad, pitchers Tom Gordon, Eddie Guardado, Troy Percival and Jason Schmidt, infielders Rich Aurilia and Aaron Boone and outfielders Jermaine Dye, Cliff Floyd and Brian Giles.

 


Saturday, October 18, 2014

Pedro seems talented in everything he tries. | SportsonEarth.com : Matthew Leach Article

For a neutral observer, it’s great to see the Royals in the World Series. But it’s really a shame that the American League Championship Series is over. Not just because the ball was so good—though it was—but because of Pedro Martinez.

Pedro was the breakout star of the 2013 postseason, and he topped himself in 2014. And now we have to do without Pedro on our television screens until 2015.

This is a significant loss. Pedro is as good as it gets in the broadcast booth, much as he was as good as it gets on the mound. As funny and honest as Charles Barkley, as insightful as Cris Collinsworth, as accomplished in his playing career as Shaquille O’Neal, Pedro is practically the perfect broadcaster.

I would like to be as good at one thing in my life as Pedro is at his second career. A career, by the way, which he practices in his second language.

He is, simply, must-watch. Personally, I can stand very little sports talk. I tend not to watch pre- or postgame shows. When Pedro comes on, though, not only do I not turn away. I turn it up.

Jim Furtado Posted: October 18, 2014 at 09:55 AM | 6 comment(s)
  Beats: broadcaster, pedro martinez

Wednesday, October 01, 2014


Sunday, August 17, 2014

Bill James Mailbag - 8/8/14 - 8/17/14

Could we get Elway wrestling, Eisenhower playing quarterback, and Randy Savage as Supreme Allied Commander?

Is there any systematic account available of the changes over the years in player movement and roster utilization, both team to team and majors to minors, both the rules governing this stuff and the actual practices? I know in general terms that things have changed immensely since I was a newbie baseball fan about the same time you were. The tipping point for me came in 2010 when I realized that my Giants were allowed to leave a healthy season-long rotation starter (bad as he was) off the postseason roster. To me, that kind of move, while it might make strategic sense, really subverts the idea of a baseball “team” that we’re supposed to root for. Somehow I doubt that would have happened in 1962.

I’m not aware of their being any such account, but then, I’m a poor resource for that kind of information, since I don’t really study the research the other people do. Generally. I agree that. . .well, you didn’t EXACTLY say this, but. . .I agree that more restrictive rules would be appropriate in some areas. In a perfect game, should not be able to leave somebody who has been a key part of your team all year off your post-season roster unless he’s 80% dead. And I’m CERTAIN that I’m about to hear from somebody that we left so-and-so off our roster in 2007 or something. . ..

June 26 1987 at Yankee Stadium… Schiraldi gave up a walk, a bunt and a single to lose the game in the bottom of the tenth, 12-11. Dave Henderson batted for Gedman in the top of the 10th, which meant that Marc Sullivan caught the tenth. Wonder if that was the highest leverage inning of Sullivan’s “career?”

If Sullivan didn’t have leverage, he wouldn’t have had a career.

An injured Pedro coming in to relieve Bret Saberhagen in a high-scoring game after 3, and then proceeded to mow everyone down. That was beautiful to watch. Pedro recently talked about that for a few minutes in an hour-long podcast with Jonah Keri. Maybe someone can cue it up. Pedro is fascinating to listen to.

He is. I wonder if Pedro has perhaps the highest density of memorable games to total games pitched of anybody who has a Hall of Fame career?

Hey Bill, I was thinking about Derek Jeter. If he wasn’t a Yankee I would look at him and see that he likes beautiful women and baseball. (Not sure of the order) I would like and root for him. What can I do about this? Steve

Yeah, well, I have a neighbor who’s a real nice guy, too, but I don’t feel compelled to stand beside the sidewalk and applaud every time he goes out to pick up his newspaper.

I have also thought since I became aware of Voros McCracken’s papers on pitchers non-effect on batted ballsl that you were 90% of the way there with DER . If it makes you feel better, in this area you are Henri Poincare to Voros’ Einstein.

It was my childhood ambition to someday be compared to Henri Poincare.

John Elway had pretty impressive stats in his one minor league season with the Yankees. In 1982 at age 22, he had 185 plate appearances in low A with a .318 batting average, .432 on-base percentage, .464 slugging percentage. Who is the most promising baseball player (in minors, college) who never ended up playing because he pursued another career, be it football, poetry, or whatever else?

Dwight Eisenhower?

Highest density of memorable games for a non-HOFer with significant games pitched is probably Maglie, right? He wasn’t just in the right places at the right time, but at his peak whenever opportunity arose. I read a book a few years back that showcased the most memorable games. I’m pretty sure Maglie not only had more of them than anyone, but appeared in a stretch of something like four out of five.

I’ll take your word for it. It’s that, ,or cook up a formula. .. ..


Saturday, August 02, 2014

Jonah Keri: Pedro!

Great, great podcast of Jonah Keri talking to Pedro Martinez for an hour. An absolute must if you’re a fan for one of the most interesting players in the last two decades. Keri is alright, too.


 

 

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
phredbird
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOT - Politics January 2015 - Mario Cuomo, New York Governor and Minor League Ballplayer, Dies at 82
(4113 - 9:36pm, Jan 29)
Last: zonk

NewsblogFangraphs: Last Year’s Minor-League WAR Leaders, If That Existed
(6 - 9:33pm, Jan 29)
Last: Joyful Calculus Instructor

NewsblogOT: Monthly NBA Thread - January 2015
(1639 - 9:19pm, Jan 29)
Last: Into the Void

NewsblogMake relievers face more than 1 batter for faster game, more runs | FOX Sports
(207 - 9:17pm, Jan 29)
Last: The Id of SugarBear Blanks

NewsblogPitchfork: Jack White Gets His Own Baseball Card
(192 - 9:13pm, Jan 29)
Last: Rickey! is just here so he don't get fined

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 1-29-2015
(21 - 9:03pm, Jan 29)
Last: Der-K is at full whelm.

NewsblogBaseball Prospectus | BP Unfiltered: People Are Currently Reading The 2015 BP Annual And You Could Be Next
(6 - 8:45pm, Jan 29)
Last: cardsfanboy

NewsblogOT: Soccer January 2015
(375 - 8:29pm, Jan 29)
Last: frannyzoo

NewsblogMontreal threat a reminder of how MLB once touted Tampa | TBO.com and The Tampa Tribune
(44 - 8:23pm, Jan 29)
Last: The Id of SugarBear Blanks

NewsblogTop 100 prospects of 2015 including Kris Bryant, Byron Buxton and more - ESPN ($PAY$)
(19 - 8:18pm, Jan 29)
Last: PreservedFish

NewsblogBaseball's Choice: Change or Die | VICE Sports
(27 - 8:14pm, Jan 29)
Last: Rob_Wood

NewsblogOT: Wrestling Thread November 2014
(478 - 8:14pm, Jan 29)
Last: You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR)

NewsblogHow Has BABIP Held Up as Leaguewide Offense Slides Ever Lower? | Banished to the Pen
(26 - 8:08pm, Jan 29)
Last: bobm

NewsblogOT: NFL/NHL thread
(11703 - 8:05pm, Jan 29)
Last: Howling John Shade

NewsblogTime for hitters to counter defensive shifts | MLB.com
(6 - 7:58pm, Jan 29)
Last: Zach

Page rendered in 1.4123 seconds
102 querie(s) executed