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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Michael Pineda ejected from Red Sox game after pine tar discovered on neck

No pine tar barren episode here.

Yankee pitcher Michael Pineda was ejected from his start against the Red Sox Wednesday night after umpires checked him for a foreign substance at the request of Boston manager John Farrell.

Pineda could face a suspension from Major League Baseball, especially since Joe Torre, MLB’s VP of baseball operations, talked to Yankee GM Brian Cashman after Pineda was spotted with a similar substance on his palm during his last start against the Red Sox on April 10.

Pineda obviously had a brown goop on his neck at the start of the second inning Wednesday. In his previous start against Boston, Pineda had a similar substance on his right palm, but the Red Sox never protested.

Repoz Posted: April 23, 2014 at 08:29 PM | 122 comment(s)
  Beats: red sox, yankees

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Baseball games still take too long. Blame the Red Sox.

With beer going for $9.00 a pop, every extra minute increases concession sales. But more money can’t be the cause. Right?

Jim Furtado Posted: April 22, 2014 at 03:21 PM | 8 comment(s)
  Beats: red sox, time of game, yankees

Baseball games still take too long. Blame the Red Sox.

With beer going for $9.00 a pop, every extra minute increases concession sales. But more money can’t be the cause. Right?

Jim Furtado Posted: April 22, 2014 at 03:20 PM | 1 comment(s)
  Beats: red sox, time of game, yankees

Forbes: Valuing Derek Jeter: NYC v. Middle America

4193, not Jeter’s final hit total but a map reference.

Yet, the view of Jeter outside NYC and baseball’s high profile announcers and analysts, while ranging from appreciative to resentful, sees Jeter as overhyped. I’ve long lived in the intersection of Braves, Cardinals, and Reds territory and followed the Rangers and Astros based on childhood geography. To these fans and others in middle America, Jeter’s a very good hitting, limited-fielding shortstop with great durability and longevity but no better than, and in some ways, not as good as their own Chipper Jones, Barry Larkin, or Craig Biggio. Whereas Biggio will likely make the Hall of Fame, he has already just barely fallen short of the required threshold twice, everyone expects Jeter to be a shoe-in, first-ballot choice.

The data back up the middle America view. With careers overlapping, Jeter and Biggio’s numbers mirror each other both in terms of batting performances that are exceptional and fielding performances that are below average. (Jeter’s advocates love to point out his “Gold Gloves,” but this merely indicts that award rather than legitimizing Jeter’s fielding.) While Jeter played an important defensive position as shortstop, Biggio played across three important positions: catcher, second base, and center field.

Of course, the data analytics quickly become mind-numbing. An interesting summary and monetized value is provided by Imagine Sports – a simulation fantasy league including players from eras where salaries are based on valuations ultimately based on combinations of batting and fielding performance. In this world, Biggio’s value is 62nd overall, currently $14.7 million, while Jeter’s is $14.2 million. Since Jeter and Biggio played different positions, the comparison is a bit apples to oranges. Robin Yount, an immediate predecessor of Jeter as a great-hitting, marginal fielding shortstop, is valued at $14.1 million. Larkin, with slightly lower hitting stats but better fielding at shortstop, comes in at $13.9 million. Larkin entered the Hall of Fame on his third year of eligibility. Yount went on his first with just barely enough votes. Neither attracted anywhere close to the acclaim or attention of Jeter. Larkin, Yount, and Biggio’s MLB championships don’t sum up to Jeter’s, but, then again, they didn’t play with the Yankees.

...In a broader context, the divide between Yankee fans/”big media” and middle America on Derek Jeter stands as symbol of other cultural divides. It is largely a matter of where one lives as to what one thinks.

Repoz Posted: April 22, 2014 at 09:02 AM | 33 comment(s)
  Beats: yankees

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Ivan Nova’s season in jeopardy after tearing elbow ligament

Yankees right-hander Ivan Nova has been diagnosed with a serious elbow injury, the Yankees announced Sunday morning, putting him in jeopardy of requiring season-ending surgery.

bayside627 Posted: April 20, 2014 at 12:52 PM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: ivan nova, yankees

John Torres: Baseball must bag sickening farewell tours

As Lord Byron Browne once noted…“All baseball farewells should be sudde…”

Who started this fairly new trend of farewell tours for retiring baseball players?

I’d like to choke them.

This is the third consecutive year Major League Baseball fans have to endure the nauseating, endless stream of tributes, gifts, videos and photos of opposing retiring players by the teams they root for. First it was Chipper Jones, then Mariano Rivera and now it is Derek Jeter.

Don’t take it the wrong way. As a baseball fan, I admire and respect Jones, Rivera and Jeter. But I also despise how they have dominated the team I root for time and time again. I don’t want to see my team honor them. I think a nice round of applause from the fans should suffice.

I’m not alone. Apparently, Mets fans in New York are marketing the “Jeter Retirement Barf Bag.”

Some of the “directions” on the bag include: “WARNING! Repeated exposure to video clips of Jeter’s last two truly great plays may cause nausea and vomiting (“the flip” vs Oakland in 2001 and “the dive” vs Boston 2004 — note the years”).

Repoz Posted: April 20, 2014 at 04:47 AM | 58 comment(s)
  Beats: yankees

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Baseball Researcher: Some Very Fortunate Footage

Footage of Babe Ruth’s first game back in 1925 is interesting, but perhaps not worth blogging about. However, it was not this portion of the film that excited me. Instead, it was other footage, shot earlier that same day, that caught my attention. This pre-game footage showed Ruth taking batting practice, tossing the ball around and posing for the camera in front of the Yankees dugout. Here’s are a pair of frames from this section of footage [...]

Behind Ruth, at far left, is a familiar Yankees player: Lou Gehrig. The previous season, Lou had a breakout year with Hartford of the Eastern League, batting.369 with 37 homers in 134 games. But at the moment we see Lou on the bench behind Ruth, Gehrig had played just 11 games with the 1925 Yankees, posting a meager .174 average while seeing intermittent action as an outfielder and pinch-hitter.

That afternoon, just two innings after the Ruth ground out captured on film, Gehrig was sent to pinch-hit for shortstop Pee Wee Wanninger. Lou flied out to Goose Goslin in left field.  But more importantly, it was the first game in which he had participated in four days. The next day, Gehrig started at first base, went 3-for-5 at the plate, and didn’t take another day off until May 2, 1939.

bobm Posted: April 19, 2014 at 05:43 PM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: babe ruth, film, lou gehrig, yankees

Cesar Cabral tossed from game, from team

Cesar buried! Unfair shake! Speared in the back! I need a cocktail!

It was a scene straight out of the Steinbrenner Yankees playbook, circa the late 1900s: a young reliever, having suffered through a horrendous outing, suffering one more indignity.

The axe.

That is what fell on Cesar Cabral just moments after the domed roof of Tropicana Field fell in on him Friday night. Less than a half-hour after Cabral had been tossed from the game by home plate umpire Joe West after hitting his third batter in the eighth inning, he was tossed from the Yankees roster.

Just moments after a worried Cabral told ESPNDeportes’ Marly Rivera, “I hope that what I’ve done so far [one scoreless inning in three appearances] merits a place on this team,” pitching coach Larry Rothschild summoned him into the manager’s office. There, Joe Girardi broke the news that the Yankees were designating him for assignment, meaning they have 10 days to trade or release him.

“I can’t believe this,” Cabral said, “but I guess this is baseball.”

It is when you pitch the way Cabral did, allowing singles to the first two batters he faced, hitting Evan Longoria and James Loney in succession, allowing a two-run single to Wil Myers and finally plunking Logan Forsythe, which prompted West to eject him.

“Obviously we’re not trying to hit anyone there and I feel bad that we hit three people,” said Girardi, who was angered that West ran Cabral without a warning. “Obviously, he had no command.”

Cabral said West gave no reason for the ejection. “They know I don’t want to hit anybody,” Cabral said. “I was surprised because [West] don’t tell me nothing.”

Repoz Posted: April 19, 2014 at 08:44 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: yankees

SCD: Bobby Cox Rookie Card Goes from Common Box to Hall of Fame

Cox collecting. Who knew?!

But for Bobby Cox, the cards of him as a player are limited. Topps issued one for him in 1969 (#237) after his only full major league season as a Yankee third baseman and then he disappeared from cards until he became manager of the Braves in 1978.

Cox, who debuted in the big leagues at age 26 after being acquired from Atlanta in December of 1967, was basically was a one-season wonder for the Yankees who used him as a starter in 1968 and then replaced him with Bobby Murcer in 1969 and later with Jerry Kenney. Cox suffered from knee ailments on a regular basis.  He would finish out the 1969 season as a Yankee and would end his professional career shortly thereafter.

Not every player’s cards take big price jumps when they’re elected to the Hall of Fame, but Cox’s election definitely helped the value of his ’69 Topps card, which went from a common not that long ago to a Hall of Famer. NM/MT graded examples have been bringing $55-65 with high quality ungraded examples not far behind.

Cox didn’t have a 1970 card, although there certainly could be one if Topps had wanted to print one, thus the only card issued during Cox’ career showing him as a big league player is a 1969 Topps Card (#237).

Not only is this card the only one to feature Cox in a major league uniform during his playing career it is also a bit of a challenge to find in high grade.

However, if you want a really difficult card of Cox during his playing career, go search for his 1967 Topps Venezuela card in the lowest numbers. These cards are really difficult to come by and some cards in that series are believed to have fewer than ten copies extant.

Cox, of course, is in the Hall because of his managerial success.  He’s fourth on the all-time wins list and a four-time manager of the year whose number 6 has been retired by the Braves.  It’s probably not something he envisioned 45 years ago when he saw himself on a baseball card for the first time.

Repoz Posted: April 19, 2014 at 07:11 AM | 10 comment(s)
  Beats: braves, history, yankees

Friday, April 18, 2014

Mitchell: Now Playing First Base for the Yankees

With nary an Ex-Ray Barker on the horizon.

This all raises the question of why nobody on the Yankees in spring training looked around and saw an injury prone first baseman, three veteran outfielders vying for time in right and DH—center field and left field are occupied by Brett Gardner and Jacoby Ellsbury, two of the Yankees best players—and thought to give one of the veterans a first baseman’s glove. First base is generally considered the least demanding defensive position to play, but it is not easy to play any position competently at the big league level. Nonetheless, Suzuki, Beltran and Soriano, although older and slower than they were a few years ago, are all still relatively athletic and have proven themselves to be decent defenders in the past. With a little work it is likely that any of those three could have learned a decent enough first base.

On many teams the failure to take this step would have been less significant because after Teixeira went down with an injury, the team would have called up a decent hitting first baseman from the minors. The Yankees, however, have one of the weakest farm systems in baseball so were unable to do this. The combined lack of a decent minor league system and unwillingness to make a somewhat obvious move in spring training, put the Yankees in a potentially tough situation less than two weeks into the season. Fortunately, solid starting pitching, particularly from Masahiro Tanaka, one of the Yankees most expensive off-season acquisitions, and Michael Pineda who appears to be healthy and ready to be a good big league pitcher again, and good offense from people like Ellsbury, Beltran and 26 year old heretofore minor league journeyman Yangervis Solarte, have helped get the Yankees off to a good start.

While the Yankees have an unusual situation as they, for reasons not altogether clear, seem to be stockpiling veteran outfielders who could potentially play first base, the absence of outfield to first base conversions is reasonably widespread. This used to be relatively common. Hall of Famer outfielders such as Al Kaline, Mickey Mantle and Henry Aaron spent significant time at first base at the end of their careers, as did players like Cesar Cedeno, Frank Howard and Dwight Evans, all very good players but not quite Hall of Famers. This has been much less common in the last 20-30 years. This is partially due to the designated hitter rule which has provided a place other than first base to put an aging slugger in need of a rest, but that does not explain the unwillingness of teams to innovate, or more accurately go back to an old and smart way of doing things.

Repoz Posted: April 18, 2014 at 09:22 AM | 58 comment(s)
  Beats: yankees

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Gothamist: Yankee Stadium Is Selling Nachos In A Helmet For $20

As Uncle Junior Kennedy once said…“Go shiit in your helmet!”

kiu

We don’t have a $25 cheese-stuffed corn dog but the Yankees are selling something equally expensive, caloric and incredible. Behold the Nacho Helmet, a behemoth portion of chips and florescent “cheese” served inside a plastic bowl shaped like a batter’s helmet. This concoction—which can also be enjoyed with seasoned ground beef, jalapenos, salsa and guacamole—costs $20. God bless America.

As someone with very little regard for the sanctity of her digestive system, I ventured to the Bronx last Friday evening to take in a game, imbibe far too many beers and sacrifice my stomach for the good of the city with a Nacho Helmet of my own. This wasn’t the first time I’d indulged in some stadium nachos; it’s my go-to meal in both sporting arenas and movie theaters. But this was the first time I’d been presented with so many nacho chips and globs of plastic cheese product.

...Would I order the helmet again? Probably not, unless I hadn’t eaten for several days and had no further food ingestion plans for the foreseeable future. Even my seemingly endless capacity to eat cheese was no match for the gargantuan portion; and at $20 for one item, it’s steep even for ball park prices. Once you dump the excess and give it a rinse, you do get a souvenir helmet out of the deal, which would make for easy re-gifting to some kid you don’t care much about. And if you do manage to finish the whole thing, well then I tip my hat to you.

Repoz Posted: April 15, 2014 at 01:40 PM | 72 comment(s)
  Beats: heave, yankees

Joe Torre: John Farrell Will Be Fined By MLB For His Replay Criticism

Unfair to our rights! The hell with Cask’n Flagon call in Cliven Bundy!

Joe Torre, MLB’s executive vice president of baseball operations, told the New York Daily News on Monday that the Boston Red Sox manager will be fined for comments he made after Sunday’s loss to the New York Yankees.

“I’m not going to suspend him. It will be a fine,” Torre said. “I’m sorry about what he said. What I try to do in whatever I do in this job that the commissioner has imported me to do is basically never forget what it’s like to be a player or a manager. Part of that never forgetting are the feelings, especially when you’re dealing with Red Sox-Yankees games. There is nothing that is insignificant about anything that happens in those games.”

Torre also echoed the sentiments of Tony LaRussa, who urged managers Monday to give the system time before passing judgment.

“This (replay system) is a three-year rollout,” Torre said. “It’s probably going to take that long where you get it to where you want it to be. And the only way we’re going to find that out is to do what we’re doing. It’s not perfect.

“I’m not sure it’s ever going to be perfect. We feel for the most part, it’s going to get a lot of the plays right that are going to be game-changers. That could be two-out, nobody on, ground ball to first base. There’s nothing insignificant about any play because it could turn into something.”

Repoz Posted: April 15, 2014 at 12:39 PM | 40 comment(s)
  Beats: red sox, yankees

NY Post: Davidoff: Why the Yankees are using the shift more than ever

Heading into Monday’s action, according to Baseball Info Solutions, the Yankees were tied with four other clubs — the Astros, Brewers, Cardinals and Athletics — with the major league-leading total of two team shift runs saved. Last year, the Yankees tallied three team shift runs saved for the entire season. [...]

The Yankees used the shift 475 times last year, and they’re already at 88 in 2014, second in the majors behind only Houston (137). If they keep this up, they’ll wind up doing so well over 1,000 times.“If you had a crystal ball, if you could conceive of what happens before it happens — if you could jump in your DeLorean and go back in time — you could turn every ball in play into an out,” Eppler said, slipping in an excellent “Back to the Future” reference.

“A perfect opponents’ BABiP (batting average on balls in play) is .000. The average is between .302 and .305. You want to beat that. If you beat that, you’re going to be pleased.” [...]

In an interview with MLB.com last year, Cincinnati lefty slugger Jay Bruce said: “All in all, I believe shifts make sense, especially against guys hitting for power. Not a lot of power-hitting guys hit the ball on the ground on the left side of the infield. But it’s one of those things where I don’t even worry about it or look at it, because it’s not worth it. If I do what I’m supposed to do, it doesn’t matter anyway.”

bobm Posted: April 15, 2014 at 12:07 PM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: shift, yankees

Monday, April 14, 2014

John Farrell: ‘It’s hard to have any faith in the [replay] system’

I sooo look forward to to every team having a Pelekoudas in the announcers booth explaining ####. #DOOM

“We felt that it was clear that the replay was inconclusive,” Farrell told reporters in New York. “The frustrating part is when this was rolled out and explained to us, particularly on the throw received by the first baseman, we were instructed that when the ball enters the glove, not that it has to hit the back of the glove, is where the out is deemed complete. At the same time, any angle that we looked at, you couldn’t tell if the foot was on the bag behind Mike Napoli‘s leg. Where this became conclusive is a hard pill to swallow. On the heels of yesterday, it’s hard to have any faith in the system, to be honest with you.”

Farrell went onto the field to argue the video reversal, prompting his immediate ejection (by rule). The manager admitted that his protest was a reflection of multiple days of dismay.

“I argued the point that it was inconclusive. I know that arguing a challenge play is not allowed, evident by spending most of the game inside. But on the heels of yesterday and today, this is a tough pill to swallow,” Farrell told reporters. “It’s extremely difficult to have any faith in the system, the process that’s being used.

“When you’re talking about something as substantial as replay being brought into the game, there’s going to be a learning curve and everybody becoming familiar with it. You would think that video replay would be conclusive — or there’s plays where it’s not conclusive, which is [Sunday night],” Farrell added. “Unfortunately we’re on the wrong side of it both times. … As much as they’re trying to help the human element inside this system, it seems like it’s added the human element at a different level.”

Repoz Posted: April 14, 2014 at 08:50 AM | 83 comment(s)
  Beats: red sox, yankees

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Fine for Yankees being considered in tampering case with Mike Trout

Commissioner Bud Selig is considering whether to fine the New York Yankees for tampering, the result of an investigation triggered by Yankees President Randy Levine’s comment last winter that he would offer Angels outfielder Mike Trout a 10-year contract.

The potential fine was disclosed by two people with knowledge of the matter but not authorized to comment about it. The amount of the possible fine was not disclosed.

The Angels were furious Levine dropped Trout’s name into a December interview about why the Yankees declined to match the 10-year contract the Seattle Mariners offered to 31-year-old second baseman Robinson Cano.

“If it was Mike Trout, I’d offer him a 10-year contract,” Levine told reporters in New York. “But for people over 30, I don’t believe it makes sense.”...

Levine apologized to the Angels for his remarks on the day he made them, telling the New York Daily News he realized they “could be misconstrued.”...

In October, Dodgers co-owner Magic Johnson said his free-spending team would not bid for Cano.

“I can’t talk about the other guy, the guy in New York. He’s going to get paid—not by us, but he’s going to get paid,” Johnson said. “When you’re a superstar, you get paid. We understand that.”

It is believed that the Dodgers were not disciplined—Johnson was a rookie owner and not the team’s chief executive—but Johnson was asked to be mindful of the effects his public comments could have.

The polite way of saying Magic is an “owner” like Paula Abdul was a “singing judge.”

The District Attorney Posted: April 13, 2014 at 06:13 PM | 28 comment(s)
  Beats: angels, mike trout, yankees

Derek Jeter sitting out a second straight game

Tight quad my ass! They’re just trying to protect Jeter’s .3123 career BA and keep him ahead of Manny Ramirez’s .3122!

Jeter is 39 years old and played in only 17 games last season. Girardi’s thinking is pretty understandable.

Also there’s this, from MLB.com Yankees beat writer Bryan Hoch …

Girardi: Jeter’s quad got tight on Friday. Had yesterday off. He’s getting today off because of it too. No tests scheduled.

Repoz Posted: April 13, 2014 at 05:36 PM | 13 comment(s)
  Beats: yankees

Bill Madden: Ooh, my arm! Yankees and Mets caught up in thick of injury epidemic in baseball

Woo-eee! Bill Madden hasn’t been this worked up since Richard Crooks’ Hollywood Walk of Fame Star went missing!

Aaaarrrghhhh!

Such is the resounding cry again being heard throughout baseball as pitcher after pitcher comes walking off the mound grabbing his elbow and position player after position player suddenly comes up lame with a hamstring, groin, calf, wrist, oblique, lat or quad injury. It’s an epidemic, like all the strikeouts, that’s getting worse and worse in baseball.

After the first 12 days of the baseball season there had already been 124 players put on the disabled list for a total of 1,411 days lost to injury. This was right on pace with a year ago when 127 players had gone on the DL, with a loss of 1,349 games. And, with Tampa Bay Rays lefty Matt Moore and Pirates top pitching prospect Jameson Taillon joining the blown-out elbow brigade last week, that makes 14 pitchers alone so far this season who may be going under the knife for Tommy John surgery. It is getting to a point where maybe every ballpark in baseball should be equipped with both an MRI room and a surgeon on call. Thus, when a pitcher comes off the mound grabbing his elbow in pain, he can simply report directly to the MRI room and if the exam shows a tear in the ligament — as they almost always do now — he can then go right next door, where the surgeon is waiting to perform the Tommy John procedure. This way, pitchers can eliminate the obligatory trip to Dr. Andrews in Birmingham, Ala., and get the clock started immediately for their recovery. And since so many pitchers are now having Tommy John surgery in college and even high school, it would stand to reason those who do should have extra value in the draft, no?

... Or as every Yankee fan from the Bronx to Bogota could be heard screaming last week: “How in the hell does David Robertson — a pitcher for goodness’ sake! — strain his groin?”

“I can’t ever remember any pitchers when I played going on the disabled list with leg injuries, and that was before the designated hitter, when all the pitchers had to bat and run the bases every game,” said Ralph Branca, who won 88 games in the big leagues, mostly with the Dodgers, from 1944-54. “I can only surmise that was because we all ran. . . and ran. (Don) Newcombe and I were both big guys and before games on days we weren’t pitching we’d play pepper for a while and then run 8-10 laps from first base to center field and walk back. That’s what all the pitchers did, the reason being you needed to strengthen your legs for pitching off the mound. In spring training, we ran every day.”

Repoz Posted: April 13, 2014 at 08:28 AM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: mets, yankees

Friday, April 11, 2014

Steve Goldman: To the Mats with Eduardo Nunez hate mail

Sorry Ma, Forgot to Take Out the Trashy Yankee Fans…till now.

I’m withholding names, because the intention is education, not mockery. At least, that’s my intention. I’m not perfect, and neither , as we will see, is Yogi Berra, master of time, space, dimension, and seven secret spices. Finally, all typos are from the originals.

1. “Nunuez: 270-game conspiracy pretending that he was a major league player”
Nunez hit .267 over that time. Only a completely ignorant person would say that is pretending to be a major league player. That’s the problem with the internet, people who were not even good enough to play little ball well can pretend to be some sort of expert on the game.  Yogi Berra had great praise for Nunez. So, who knows more about the game, Yogi Berra or some nerdy douche bag who probably doesn’t know how to hold a baseball? I’ll stick with Yogi’s opinion as that of an expert. Go play some video games, that’s the extent of your baseball knowledge.—Cy

Yogi Berra had great praise for Nunez.

“Appeal to authority” is a fallacious form of argument that says “Yogi Bear says that blueberry pies are the best pies. Yogi Bear knows a lot about pies. As such, blueberry pies are definitely the best pies, the pies you like be damned.” Sometimes, Yogi Bear’s opinion is not definitive, even in his field, or in truth he’s speaking outside of his area of expertise, in this case the undefinable area of personal taste. Like all of us, Yogi Bear has days when he’s just wrong.

Yogi Berra played, coached, or managed in roughly 3,240 professional games and obviously has a great deal of expertise about the game, or at least experience, which isn’t always the same thing. Either way, citing his opinion rather than actual evidence proves nothing. Further, when you are going on 89 years old and your job is to make the odd goodwill appearance at Yankee Stadium, no one is really asking you to render an honest critical judgment of any player, and it’s not remotely in one’s interest to do so given that if you show up and say, “Good Lord, Al Douglas is terrible,” then they stop asking you to come around and cut back your honorarium.

Repoz Posted: April 11, 2014 at 01:27 PM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: yankees

Frank Deford: Bud Selig and Derek Jeter: Time To Root, Root, Root For Final Innings

Don’t experiment…just buy Deford!

It should be Derek Selig and Bud Jeter. After all, the Yankee captain - listed as the 11th greatest leader in the world by Fortune magazine, in what is surely the most asinine poll ever concocted - is the ultimate buddy. Everybody loves him, even Yankee haters. He can doeth no wrong.

But really, like the commissioner, Captain Jeter is not so much a traditional leader as he is a cohesive force. He succeeded Cal Ripken as the perfect counterpoint to all the muscle-bound brutes who poisoned baseball. He’s not a slugger, not ever controversial. He’s polite, handsome and like Selig, Jeter - to use an old-fashioned term - is old-fashioned.

Yes, Selig was lucky that a better kind of ball yard was constructed in Baltimore. If Yankee Stadium was the house that Ruth built, Camden Yards would become the smaller, new condominium model for the sport all across the country. And yes, Selig was blind to steroids for far too long. But give him his due: When at last the mote fell from his eye, he acted with vengeance.

But then, too, Jeter caught on faster about something else. When Selig’s first wife left him, she told the court: From the day that Bud became involved in baseball, he divorced me and married baseball. Jeter, meanwhile, continues to romance a succession of beautiful women, but it is only to shortstop that he has ever been wed. For one more season: Take me out to the ballgame.

Repoz Posted: April 11, 2014 at 07:25 AM | 41 comment(s)
  Beats: yankees

Thursday, April 10, 2014

PHOTOS: Is Michael Pineda using pine tar to shut down Red Sox?

zzz

So, as you read this, Yankees right-hander Michael Pineda is dominating the visiting Red Sox in a big way. However, is he doing so with pine tar illegally smeared all over his pitching hand? Check out the visual evidence from Thursday night’s game ...

Thanks to Wormeye.

Repoz Posted: April 10, 2014 at 09:03 PM | 91 comment(s)
  Beats: red sox, yankees

Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Orioles center fielder Adam Jones vocal about fans running onto the field

Don’t tase me br"O”!

As two fans who ran onto to the field interrupting Tuesday’s Orioles game against the New York Yankees were escorted off through the outfield fence at Yankee Stadium, Orioles center fielder Adam Jones had some choice words for them.

And after the game, Jones was just as vocal in expressing his disdain for fans who run onto the field, saying that they should be subject to harsher penalties.

“I think it’s idiotic for people to run on the field, and I think the punishment needs to be a lot harsher, and they should let us have a shot to kick them with our metal spikes on because it’s stupid,” Jones said. “You look like an [idiot] when you run on the field.”

...Jones didn’t find the humor in the incident.

“We don’t go to any other events,” Jones said. “We don’t go to other sporting events and do that to their jobs, but they come to ours and do that. I get it, you’re drunk and you want to be on SportsCenter. Your [butt] is going to jail with a fine, and you might not be allowed to come back to the ballpark.

“I remember a couple of years ago, one dude broke his ankle in Baltimore. I was laughing at him. I wish he shattered his femur because it’s stupid. It’s just plain old stupid. Anybody who does it, I wish the cops tase the [hell] out of them. I wish that.”

Repoz Posted: April 08, 2014 at 07:15 PM | 32 comment(s)
  Beats: orioles, yankees

Monday, April 07, 2014

Jeffrey Maier: How Catching a Derek Jeter ‘Home Run’ Changed My Life Forever

NOTE: Insert GIF of Jeffrey Maier, 2.0 dude.

As I write this, Derek Jeter is about to embark on his 18th season in the big leagues.  He has won five world championships, amassed over 3,300 hits and has created a legacy that all young players strive towards.  In addition, his attention to raising money and awareness through his Turn2 Foundation has impacted the lives of thousands of children.

While the shortstop position will be filled and someone new will stand between second and third base next year, there will remain an irreplaceable gap in the locker room, in the fan base and in the community on a day-to-day basis.

I wish Derek all the best in the pursuit of his passions and interests in his life after playing baseball, and thank him for his contributions to the greater baseball community both on and off the field.

The new replay system in baseball makes me stop and think. What if I had the chance to go back in time and apply it to that infamous play? Would I erase this moment from ever happening?

The simple answer is no. I wouldn’t change a thing that has happened in my life after robbing that home run.  All life events happen for a reason, and you grow from every experience.

There have been ups and down along the way, but that day in 1996 helped shape who I am today—so I will never look back on it with any regrets.

Repoz Posted: April 07, 2014 at 05:28 AM | 12 comment(s)
  Beats: yankees

Sunday, April 06, 2014

Newsday: Ike Davis could be answer for Yankees

Commenter: “they should have drafted a lot more mat harvey’s”

The Yankees and Mets haven’t made a trade since 2004 (Mike Stanton to the Yankees, Felix Heredia to the Mets).

But this is one that would make sense for both teams: Ike Davis to the Yankees. Dellin Betances to the Mets.

That’s just an idea for starters. It doesn’t have to be Betances. But he’s the hard-throwing young bullpen arm the Mets desperately need. The Yankees need a first baseman after the increasingly brittle Mark Teixeira hit the disabled list again Saturday with a hamstring injury…

This whole Davis/[Lucas] Duda thing has not been the Mets’ finest hour. It’s been clear for some time that the front office favors Duda, but the team has never committed to him… If the organization truly believes Duda is the better option, it needs to maximize Davis’ value by trading him for something more necessary than a lefty bat off the bench…

Make the call, Sandy [Alderson]. If not to the Yankees, then to another team that will give you something you truly need. That’s more important than giving Davis a chance for occasional glory.

The District Attorney Posted: April 06, 2014 at 11:48 AM | 75 comment(s)
  Beats: dellin betances, ike davis, mets, yankees

Saturday, April 05, 2014

Yankees place Mark Teixeira on DL

Time to trot out…Mike Francesa: “The day the Yankees signed Mark Teixiera is the day the Yankees distanced themselves from the Red Sox for the next decade.”

The New York Yankees placed first baseman Mark Teixeira on the 15-day disabled list with a strained right hamstring.

The Yankees made the move prior to Saturday afternoon’s game against the Toronto Blue Jays. Catcher Austin Romine was recalled from Triple-A Scranton to replace Teixeira on the roster.

Teixeira suffered the injury during Friday night’s game in Toronto. The two-time All-Star will undergo an MRI on Monday to determine the severity of the injury, but Yankees manager Joe Girardi said Saturday that he did not believe Teixeira had a “bad strain.”

Repoz Posted: April 05, 2014 at 12:41 PM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: yankees

Friday, April 04, 2014

NYT: Kepner: Era of Squiggles

“In the ‘80s, we started to have people basically say, ‘Oh, handwriting’s not important, because in five or 10 years everything in the world will be computerized,’ ” [handwriting instructor Kate] Gladstone said. “But I don’t think we’re yet at the stage of typing our names onto baseballs.”

Kepner adduces Harmon Killebrew as a model signer of baseballs, and I happen to have one signed by him on my desk – a very legible autograph, for sure, but suspiciously similar to a dozen other 1970 Twins on the same ball.  Perhaps it was only the clubhouse boys of yore who were well-trained in cursive? :)

BDC Posted: April 04, 2014 at 09:26 AM | 1 comment(s)
  Beats: collecting, memorabilia, twins, yankees

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