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Thursday, June 27, 2019

385 Feet To Center? It’s Going to be a Blast

Have you ever been to London? What are you most looking forward to there?

Marcus Walden, Red Sox relief pitcher: No. The biggest thing that I would never really do, but I’m going to do, is The Eye, the big ol’ carousel thing. That’s something I rarely do. I don’t like heights. I don’t like doing it, but my wife said I have to go. That’s the one thing I would never do but I’m gonna do. I don’t know a whole lot about London. Walking around is going to be cool. My cousin is married to a professor at Oxford. She gave me a list of things that I need to go see. It’ll be cool to have her come into the game and have them show us around.

Just some conversations ahead of the London Series with players on both teams.  Some fun bits of humanity in here.

Jose is an Absurd Time Cube Posted: June 27, 2019 at 09:24 AM | 69 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: london, red sox, world champions, yankees

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   1. Itchy Row Posted: June 27, 2019 at 11:53 AM (#5856360)
Marcus Walden talks like every guy who sits next to you at a bar.
   2. The Yankee Clapper Posted: June 27, 2019 at 02:19 PM (#5856420)
385 in center isn’t even to the warning track at Yankee Stadium. Could be interesting. Of course the game itself would be overshadowed if Queen Elizabeth catches a foul ball. Will she bring her glove?
   3. The Mighty Quintana Posted: June 27, 2019 at 03:17 PM (#5856468)
Could be the reason Joe Keefe hasn't posted lately - he is Marcus Walden!
   4. SandyRiver Posted: June 27, 2019 at 04:34 PM (#5856504)
385 in center isn’t even to the warning track at Yankee Stadium.

But probably 5 times as much foul territory as Fenway, maybe 10X. What's the over/under for foul pops caught?
   5. Walt Davis Posted: June 27, 2019 at 05:15 PM (#5856528)
Foul territory? What's that?
   6. stevegamer Posted: June 27, 2019 at 05:43 PM (#5856535)
385 in center isn’t even to the warning track at Yankee Stadium. Could be interesting. Of course the game itself would be overshadowed if Queen Elizabeth catches a foul ball. Will she bring her glove?


She normally wears gloves on both hands. I'd keep her away from the brainwashed slugging rightfielder.
   7. Walt Davis Posted: June 27, 2019 at 08:18 PM (#5856560)
Seriously just like there's a DH in AL parks and not one in NL parks, if we're gonna play in London, then everything is in play. It's just a couple of games, teams equally disadvantaged, let's have some fun.
   8. Infinite Yost (Voxter) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 10:36 AM (#5856656)
They found at least three guys who have never been to London before. I guess ballplayers tend be pretty young, but if I played MLB ball, one of the great advantages of the high salary and long offseason would be that I could spent a month every year wandering the globe. I'd probably go to London every year just to eat Indian food.
   9. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 10:43 AM (#5856658)
I'd probably go to London every year just to eat Indian food.

Funny, I'd travel to another continent to avoid eating Indian food. ;-)
   10. Traderdave Posted: June 28, 2019 at 11:17 AM (#5856665)
One of the best meals I've ever had in my life (and I am a serious foodie) was Indian in London. We just googled "best indian food" and picked the nearest location. It was here: Trishna London


It was a prix fixe chef's menu, something like 8-10 small dishes and we joyfully ate every course. So different from curry on rice that is the standard in the US. I wish I had saved the receipt because I can't recall the names of the dishes, but damn that meal is solidly in my lifetime top 10.
   11. manchestermets Posted: June 28, 2019 at 11:48 AM (#5856673)
Trishna is excellent, as are many other of the top-end Indian restaurants in London - Cinnamon Club is a personal favourite. There are some terrific cheap places too, but a huge amount of absolute dreck in the middle. There are many who say that the best Indian food in the UK is to be found outside London, in Birmingham or Bradford.
   12. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 12:08 PM (#5856677)
I ate at Cinnamon Club 10 years ago. They had a special game menu, so it was venison and pheasant and such. Tremendous, and a beautiful setting too.

Indian cuisine is marvelously large and diverse, and really exciting. While most places in the US have a standard sort of Indian restaurant with a standard sort of menu (which can still be awesome), the tradition easily has room for hyper-detailed haute cuisine, super cheap quick eats, and everything in between.
   13. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 12:50 PM (#5856685)
Indian cuisine is marvelously large and diverse, and really exciting.

Do they have any variants that completely avoid ghee and curry?
   14. Ziggy is done with Dominican discotheques Posted: June 28, 2019 at 01:00 PM (#5856688)
I can't claim to have eaten at the Cinnamon Club, but good Indian food is one of the main reasons to live. I'd love to visit India and see what it's actually like. Alas, I usually travel for work, and that's unlikely to take me to India.
   15. Ziggy is done with Dominican discotheques Posted: June 28, 2019 at 01:01 PM (#5856689)
Do they have any variants that completely avoid ghee and curry?


Try some dosa.
   16. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 01:06 PM (#5856690)
Do they have any variants that completely avoid ghee and curry?


I'm not expert enough to know if there are regions where ghee is used less often than others, but I suspect so.

As for curry, if you're referring to the heavily spiced gravy-like substance, the answer is yes, there is a ton of non-curry food. Curry is just one element of Indian cuisine - associated mostly with the erstwhile Muslim elite of the North - it just happened to be what the Brits fell in love with.
   17. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 01:22 PM (#5856698)
I'm not expert enough to know if there are regions where ghee is used less often than others, but I suspect so.

I shared an office with an Indian guy at one job, and ghee was what he suspected was turning my stomach every time I ate Indian.

All I know is I am two for two at getting really sick, and not intending to go for 3 for 3.
   18. Traderdave Posted: June 28, 2019 at 01:29 PM (#5856703)
I'd love to visit India and see what it's actually like.


I just got back from my first visit to Mexico, a few days in CDMX and a few days on the Gulf coast. The food was the best I've ever enjoyed on a vacation. I'll never bother with Americanized Mexican food again.

One of the best was fish tacos al pastor. I had only ever heard of the pork variety so I tried it on a lark. It wasn't all combined in the gyro-like way that pork version often is, each ingredient was separate, and conspicuously fresh. It was sublime.



   19. Traderdave Posted: June 28, 2019 at 01:31 PM (#5856704)
I shared an office with an Indian guy at one job, and ghee was what he suspected was turning my stomach every time I ate Indian.



Does butter make you ill also? Ghee is clarified butter, basically butter with the water removed.

Edit: I was wrong. Just googled, it's butter with water and some milk solids removed via heating.
   20. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 01:53 PM (#5856715)
Ghee is usually browned slightly, which can give it a mild nutty flavor. But yeah, it's basically just butter.

Curries can also include an improbable amount of heavy cream. IIRC snapper isn't a fan of dairy in general.

Some people also seem to have a psychosomatic belly-turning response to heavy spicing. I have family members that are absolutely repelled by Indian food. I think it's one of the world's marvels.
   21. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:07 PM (#5856725)
Does butter make you ill also?

No, butter is fine. This is all basically guessing. I'm going off a very small sample.

Some people also seem to have a psychosomatic belly-turning response to heavy spicing. I have family members that are absolutely repelled by Indian food.

I have that reaction to the smell of curry. It's probably something about how one's body reacts to those heavy spices, maybe even genetic. The human body is pretty good at telling you what you should or shouldn't be eating.
   22. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:08 PM (#5856726)
(nevermind, striking off-topic comment)
   23. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:17 PM (#5856733)
It's probably something about how one's body reacts to those heavy spices, maybe even genetic. The human body is pretty good at telling you what you should or shouldn't be eating.

I find this an unlikely explanation. I think it's overwhelmingly likely that had you and your DNA grown up surrounded by those same heavy spices, you'd love them today.

I don't think the human body is very good at telling you what you should or shouldn't be eating. In a pre-agriculture world where famines were routine, and some berries and mushrooms killed and others didn't, the wisdom of the elders was surely cherished as one of the most vital community belongings. You can't just trust your gut out there.

Salmonella, e. coli, etc - these are all tasteless and imperceptible. But the bacteria that drive rancidity - the stuff that makes you retch and throw old fish into the trash - generally doesn't make you ill.

I think if you were to swallow a pill of Garam Masala - that is, if you were to ingest these heavy spices without triggering your taste buds - you wouldn't get sick.

Do the heavy spices in a gingerbread cookie make you retch?
   24. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:29 PM (#5856740)
I don't think the human body is very good at telling you what you should or shouldn't be eating.
No ####. A lot of human bodies say "yeah, go ahead, eat that mayonnaise."

In a pre-agriculture world where famines were routine, and some berries and mushrooms killed and others didn't, the wisdom of the elders was surely cherished as one of the most vital community belongings. You can't just trust your gut out there.
Although in fairness, dying is the most effective way your body tells you not to eat something. Just not the most efficient.
   25. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:37 PM (#5856743)
   26. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:38 PM (#5856744)
Do the heavy spices in a gingerbread cookie make you retch?

I dislike the smell of gingerbread, yes. I dislike the smell of most heavily spiced cuisines, and the same cuisines tend to be unkind to my digestive system. Maybe I've learned to dislike them, because they make me ill frequently.

Of course heavy spices mostly entered cooking to cover the taste of food that had turned, so it's not altogether irrational to have that association. In any case, I see no reason to revisit things that have made me ill, and smell like dirt and BO to me.

Edit: just thought of something that may be connected. I'm very sensitive to the smell of milk turning. I'll throw out milk two full days before my wife thinks it's bad.
   27. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:43 PM (#5856746)
Of course heavy spices mostly entered cooking to cover the taste of food that had turned, so it's not altogether irrational to have that association.


I believe this is a myth.

"Professor Paul Freedman in Out of the East: Spices and the Medieval Imagination says ‘This compelling but false idea constitutes something of an urban legend, a story so instinctively attractive that mere fact seems unable to wipe it out.’ "

"Professor Terence Scully in The Art of Cookery in the Middle Ages says rather optimistically given the Weir statement: ‘With our increased knowledge about medieval cookery it is no longer necessary to refute that tired old, utterly groundless statement that spices were used to mask the flavour of spoiled meat."

https://elizabethchadwick.com/blog/the-myth-about-the-medieval-spicing-of-rotten-meat/
   28. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:46 PM (#5856749)
We cannot continue down this path of appeasement. Mayonnaise will not stop until it has subjugated the entire world.
   29. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:46 PM (#5856751)
In any case, I see no reason to revisit things that have made me ill


I don't doubt that you hate these foods and they make you feel ill, I just think you may have the causality backwards.
   30. Itchy Row Posted: June 28, 2019 at 02:49 PM (#5856754)
Fact: Mayonnaise was invented by Mayo Smith when he was trying to murder Denny McLain for being such a horrible person. It didn't work because Mickey Lolich ate all the mayo and, years later, all the Mayo.
   31. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:03 PM (#5856760)
I believe this is a myth.

Then what's the reason? To make bad cuts of meat palatable?

Because no one in their right mind is going to take a nice sirloin or filet and slather it in curry or chili peppers?
   32. jmurph Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:05 PM (#5856762)
Because no one in their right mind is going to take a nice sirloin or filet and slather it in curry or chili peppers?

But you're operating from the assumption that people dislike the flavor of curries and chilies, and what if I told you that (roughly) billions of people disagree?
   33. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:07 PM (#5856764)
But you're operating from the assumption that people dislike the flavor of curries and chilies, and what if I told you that (roughly) billions of people disagree?

They still don't normally put it on good cuts of meat. Now chicken, sure, do whatever you want to it, it's basically flavorless.

I'm also perfectly fine asserting that billions of people have bad taste. It's the only way to explain pop culture.
   34. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:07 PM (#5856765)
It tastes good, dingus.
   35. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:09 PM (#5856767)
It tastes good, dingus.

That's clearly a matter of opinion, no? To me curry tastes like dirt and BO. My wife likes it. Go figure.

Now eating food that's so spicy it causes you pain is just daft.
   36. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:10 PM (#5856769)
To me curry tastes like dirt and BO
How much BO have you tasted in your life?
   37. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:14 PM (#5856774)
How much BO have you tasted in your life?

Ha, ha. Taste is mostly smell.
   38. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:14 PM (#5856776)
Because no one in their right mind is going to take a nice sirloin or filet and slather it in curry or chili peppers?
But plopping a bunch of mayo on a beautiful filet and calling it Bearnaise, that's totally sophisticated and French and stuff.
   39. jmurph Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:18 PM (#5856779)
That's clearly a matter of opinion, no?

Sure, fine, but the vast majority of people across the globe disagree with you, it seems worth acknowledging that they might be on to something.
   40. The Yankee Clapper Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:25 PM (#5856785)
I’m at a loss for why folks insist on discussing food, rather than whether the Queen will wear a Red Sox or Yankee cap at the game.
   41. manchestermets Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:26 PM (#5856789)
Try some dosa.


Yeah, this is what I was talking about when I mentioned the good stuff at the cheap end of the market. Drummond Street has numerous South Indian vegetarian restaurants where you'll eat very well and cheaply until it's swallowed up by the forthcoming rail station redevelopment.

EDIT: Oh, and the flat-pack Indian restaurant is the UK's finest export.
   42. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:32 PM (#5856791)
Amusingly, they’ve found that spicy food has pathogen-killing properties. Don’t trust your gut, snapper.
   43. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:32 PM (#5856792)
I presume the queen will wear one of those "house divided" style caps with parts of both logos. You know, diplomacy.
   44. Traderdave Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:33 PM (#5856794)
I'm also perfectly fine asserting that billions of people have bad taste. It's the only way to explain pop culture.


And light beer.
   45. jmurph Posted: June 28, 2019 at 03:40 PM (#5856798)
EDIT: Oh, and the flat-pack Indian restaurant is the UK's finest export.

Google fails me, what does "flat-pack" mean?
   46. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 04:10 PM (#5856808)
Then what's the reason? To make bad cuts of meat palatable?

Because no one in their right mind is going to take a nice sirloin or filet and slather it in curry or chili peppers?


"Sirloin or filet" makes up like .01% of the calories consumed by the western world. Not sure what point you think you're winning here. Spices were used for more than just the handful of most tender cuts of a certain single animal.

I agree that great beef doesn't need much flavor added - although black pepper is a notable exception! - and I think the world mostly agrees with you, as the European use of these exotic spices seems mostly to survive in pastries and stews.

I do think Bearnaise sauce is fantastic on lean beef. Filet is marvelously tender but it's not super flavorful and it has little fat. The combination makes plenty of sense.
   47. PreservedFish Posted: June 28, 2019 at 04:18 PM (#5856812)
There are few hard and fast rules in cooking. Lamb is even more flavorful than beef, and I wouldn't have said that a good lamb chop needed much fancy elaboration - a nice tangy salsa verde or chimichurri, sure, but not much beyond that. Then I ate the "Muslim Lamb Chop" at Fu Run in Flushing - it is a Dongbei Chinese restaurant - and I changed my mind.

You should try it snapper. I know that making long uncomfortable journeys to try exotic new foods is right up your alley!
   48. manchestermets Posted: June 28, 2019 at 04:21 PM (#5856816)
Flat-pack is what we'd call self-assembly furniture - IKEA, basically - and the term has extended to informally cover any other identikit product, such as the Indian restaurants with identical decor and menus that you'll find in any medium sized city in North America and Europe now. They started in England - there's at least two of them in any small English town, and at least one is always called <Town Name> Tandoori.
   49. jmurph Posted: June 28, 2019 at 04:36 PM (#5856826)
Flat-pack is what we'd call self-assembly furniture - IKEA, basically - and the term has extended to informally cover any other identikit product, such as the Indian restaurants with identical decor and menus that you'll find in any medium sized city in North America and Europe now. They started in England - there's at least two of them in any small English town, and at least one is always called <Town Name> Tandoori.

Ahh, thanks. And so then I definitely co-sign your above post: I'm a vegetarian, what you're describing is basically my favorite thing.
   50. The Yankee Clapper Posted: June 28, 2019 at 06:14 PM (#5856850)
Marly Rivera, ESPN Writer

MLB announced that Prince Harry will be attending the Red Sox-Yankees game on Saturday, June 29th. The Duke of Sussex is attending the first game of the series in support of the Invictus Games Foundation, a partner of the series.

Well, that certainly suggests that The Queen herself won’t be attending the ballgame. An obvious Royal Snub to Rob Manfred, and a missed opportunity to solidify relations with the UK’s most important ally by sitting around in shorts & a tank top while enjoying a hot dog & a beer.
   51. Sunday silence Posted: June 28, 2019 at 07:56 PM (#5856861)

I have that reaction to the smell of curry. It's probably something about how one's body reacts to those heavy spices, maybe even genetic. The human body is pretty good at telling you what you should or shouldn't be eating.


Snapper is not wrong from what I understand. Some people are allergic or at least repelled by Cilantro and there is a genetic component from what I understand. But I dont think cilantro is what is giving him the problem in Indian food.

FOR other example, I think it is well known that many people cannot tolerate milk and i think that is genetic. There are people who apparently are allergic to onions and things like rice. I have a friend who believes that she is very sensitive to mold and reacts to bread that is slightly old. so "yes' many people can have rare food allergies.

As for indian; i used to work with an indian lady and she did mention that some people were repelled by certain spices. I think one of them might be Asafoetida. It is very prevalent but I dont think its in every dish.
   52. Sunday silence Posted: June 28, 2019 at 08:08 PM (#5856863)

Then what's the reason? To make bad cuts of meat palatable?


Herbs have many uses; among them killing germs. They act as biocides. From what I recall a study was done the herbs with highest biocidal properties were Thyme, garlic and peppermint, followed by many others. It was an interesting list what surprised me was that thyme and peppermint were so high up there because they seem like fairly benign herbs. Anyone could guess that garlic might have something going on cause it has a very pungent, some say nasty smell. but peppermint? Apparently so.

My guess is that in the old days, if you were going to an open air market these vendors would lay their food out there in the open air for long periods. Covering that food with a pile of say garlic or thyme would have been found to be remarkable at keeping it palatable despite flies and other, more invisible pests.

THyme is a great example of my theory cause when you first eat it, you're like "Thyme what the hell?" I mean thyme does not seem to add much, its not very strong and there's nothing really great about its taste. But its tons of dishes from greece to italy and the mid east. WHy? No one would have chose it for its fine taste, and its not strong so why would it be so prevalent? There has to be something more going on.

heres a study involving fennel, peppermint and caraway:

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03235400500094340?mobileUi=0&journalCode=gapp20

that's perfect. I mean why fennel? The first time I had fennel I didnt get it. There's nothing about fennel the first time you eat it you think wow. Right? Its pretty odd. And how about caraway. Caraway is also very prevalent from Poland to mid east as far as I know. And why ? Again when you are a kid and you start eating this stuff there's nothing about it that tastes great at first.

Also tumeric seems to have the ability to keep chopped fruits from turning brown. Tumeric is very prevalent in Indian cooking.

THere's also spiritual and medicinal uses for herbs. Places like Germany and much of asia have long history of treating illness with certain herbs. Hyssop leaves used to be laid on the floors of hospitals. St John's Wort in germany has a long history thought to help brain function.

My guess though is that herbs arose first as to kill bacteria on food laying in the open.

herbs being of such particular odd taste, it would not seem that would have arisen out of taste considerations alone. They are not the first things one would reach for to make something tasty, they usually have odd, sometimes off putting taste/aroma.
   53. bobm Posted: June 28, 2019 at 08:25 PM (#5856866)
How much BO have you tasted in your life?


Ha, ha. Taste is mostly smell.


And smells are particulate.
   54. My name is RMc and I feel extremely affected Posted: June 29, 2019 at 11:36 AM (#5856981)
I'd think I'd rather watch whatever British channel (BBC?) is covering the game than FOX...
   55. Rally Posted: June 29, 2019 at 02:22 PM (#5857013)
Neither SP can make it out of the first. This should be a long one. Not surprised the Queen is not in attendance. After all, Reggie Jackson still has some kind of consulting role with the Yankees, doesn’t he? And Frank Drebbin is dead and not available to save the day.
   56. Nasty Nate Posted: June 29, 2019 at 02:31 PM (#5857016)
her majesty's a pretty nice girl but she changes from day to day
   57. Eric L Posted: June 29, 2019 at 03:58 PM (#5857032)
It's a certainty that many food aversions are biological. PF kind of overdid it there. Then again, Snapper has shown an aversion to almost anything new. I'm not surprised PF pushed back.
   58. Omineca Greg Posted: June 29, 2019 at 04:22 PM (#5857036)
Because no one in their right mind is going to take a nice sirloin or filet and slather it in curry...

Well, you're not entirely wrong about that.
   59. Man o' Schwar Posted: June 29, 2019 at 04:22 PM (#5857037)
Some people are allergic or at least repelled by Cilantro and there is a genetic component from what I understand.

I have a friend like this. To him, cilantro tastes like very strong dish soap.

His wife was convinced he was making it up, so she tried slipping little bits of it into different things she would make without telling him. He detected it every time.
   60. . . . . . . Posted: June 29, 2019 at 05:37 PM (#5857083)
Is something weird about the mound? All the pitchers seem to be struggling to throw strikes.
   61. Ziggy is done with Dominican discotheques Posted: June 29, 2019 at 05:48 PM (#5857086)
What a terrible affliction. Cilantro is great stuff. This game on the other hand...
   62. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: June 29, 2019 at 05:51 PM (#5857087)
On Cilantro - it tasted like soap for me for years (well before I knew that was a thing) and then, one day, that stopped. (I also now like it.) Why would that be?
   63. Benji Gil Gamesh VII - The Opt-Out Awakens Posted: June 29, 2019 at 06:02 PM (#5857092)
His wife was convinced he was making it up, so she tried slipping little bits of it into different things she would make without telling him. He detected it every time.
Seems like a super healthy marriage. ;)
   64. Ziggy is done with Dominican discotheques Posted: June 29, 2019 at 06:17 PM (#5857095)
Maybe you just started liking the taste of soap? Ever try a bite of Oil of Olay? Maybe it's time for a test.
   65. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: June 30, 2019 at 12:18 PM (#5857241)
A friend of mine is apparently allergic to 3 foods that AFAICT have nothing particular in common other than being green -- avocados, green beans & bell peppers (IIRC). WTF?
   66. The Rare Albino Shrieking Goat of Guatemala. Posted: June 30, 2019 at 12:41 PM (#5857242)
o me curry tastes like dirt and BO. My wife likes it. Go figure.


You're Snapper?

She's not?

Checks out to me.

If RayRay didn't exist, we'd have to pencil you in.

How are you with throwing lanes?
   67. The Rare Albino Shrieking Goat of Guatemala. Posted: June 30, 2019 at 01:04 PM (#5857244)
Also, The Difference Between Cilantro And Coriander, Explained

There’s a lot of confusion surrounding this polarizing herb. Whether you love it or hate it, it’s time you got it all straight: coriander and cilantro are just two different words for the same exact plant.

That herb pictured above is fresh coriander. Fresh coriander is used for its fragrant, citrusy leaves. It’s popular in Asian and South American cuisine. And fresh coriander is sometimes called by its Spanish name: cilantro.

Coriander is the term English speakers in the U.K. use to describe the herb ― it comes from the French word for this herb, coriandre. In the U.S., however, fresh coriander is referred to as cilantro. Folks have speculated that this is because the herb was made popular in the States through Mexican cuisine, where it is naturally called by its Spanish name. What we know for sure is that cilantro and coriander are two names for the same herb ― and both are correct.
   68. The Rare Albino Shrieking Goat of Guatemala. Posted: June 30, 2019 at 01:19 PM (#5857250)
She normally wears gloves on both hands. I'd keep her away from the brainwashed slugging rightfielder.


I came here for a I must kill the Queen reference, I am not disappointed.
   69. Hysterical & Useless Posted: June 30, 2019 at 05:42 PM (#5857355)
The human body is pretty good at telling you what you should or shouldn't be eating.

Then yours is doing it wrong, mate :-)

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