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Friday, August 23, 2019

Alex Rodriguez shares painful details of MLB suspension on Danica Patrick’s podcast

Alex Rodriguez has been open about his season-long MLB suspension five years ago and his personal growth and path to redemption, particularly this summer with his popularity and success reaching new levels. The former New York Yankees slugger has taken responsibility for his actions, including violating MLB’s performance-enhancing drug policy, which led to his 162-game suspension in 2014.

And as the first guest on retired race car driver Danica Patrick’s new podcast, Pretty Intense, A-Rod explained that he thought his baseball career was over with the suspension.

“I made mistakes, I doubled down and as a result of that, I served the longest suspension in Major League Baseball history for PED use,” Rodriguez told Patrick. “That just literally took me to my knees in tears and said, ‘Oh my god, I just completely [expletive] up my entire life.’”

When she asked him if he thought at the time that his baseball career was over, he replied: “100 percent. I knew baseball was done. It was the darkest time of my entire life.”

One would think that A-Rod and race-car drivers (no matter how mediocre) would be arch-rivals, for obvious reasons….

 

QLE Posted: August 23, 2019 at 03:05 AM | 30 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: arod, podcast, suspension

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   1. majorflaw Posted: August 23, 2019 at 09:01 AM (#5873692)
“ . . . has taken responsibility for his actions . . . “

No, he really hasn’t. Other than admitting the simple fact that his own actions caused his suspension rather than some plot by MLB. While it may not be written into his ESPN contract that’s probably the bare minimum he needed to say to work a MLB game.

It could be useful for Arod or someone similarly situated to be completely honest abou his PED use: ‘This is what I took, this is how much and how often.’ Might be able to learn something about what PEDs can and can’t do. But it appears unlikely that Arod or anyone similar will be really coming clean and accepting responsibility any time soon.

Understood that this is what they are coached to say, ‘Don’t want to live in the past, dwell on my mistakes’ etc but once they stop playing they no longer get to set the agenda.
   2. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 23, 2019 at 09:06 AM (#5873694)
Indeed. Repeatedly trying to cheat and getting caught is not “making a mistake.”
   3. villageidiom Posted: August 23, 2019 at 09:07 AM (#5873695)
(Insert horsepower joke here)
   4. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 23, 2019 at 09:11 AM (#5873696)
Danica Patrick’s new podcast, Pretty Intense
Lemme guess...because she’s intense and she’s pretty? Clever, that.
   5. PreservedFish Posted: August 23, 2019 at 09:41 AM (#5873700)
One would think that A-Rod and race-car drivers (no matter how mediocre) would be arch-rivals, for obvious reasons….


He's a centaur, not a horse. Centaurs would never have deigned to participate in races for human amusement.
   6. The Duke Posted: August 23, 2019 at 10:17 AM (#5873713)
Doubling down is kind of the opposite of learning from ones mistakes
   7. villageidiom Posted: August 23, 2019 at 11:37 AM (#5873749)
Understood that this is what they are coached to say, ‘Don’t want to live in the past, dwell on my mistakes’ etc but once they stop playing they no longer get to set the agenda.
You don't get to set the agenda, either.

So "taking responsibility" in your mind is admitting he did it instead of blaming others, and... providing an itemized list? And not having provided an itemized list - to you - is somehow dishonest? You're kind of on "he didn't pee in a cup for me, so obviously he has something to hide" territory.

IMO his taking responsibility would need to be several things:

1. Not fighting the suspension. Take it.

2. Admitting what caused the suspension. Own it as his actions.

3. Talking about it often. Not every waking moment, not every time he has a camera and a microphone. But when people with a camera or microphone ask him about it, not shying away or deflecting or "just trying to move forward, the past is the past" BS. Actually say how much he regrets it, etc.

4. Accepting his HOF fate, and other impacts to his life and career as warranted. (TBH, the Sunday Night Baseball gig is to me a sign that his career has been impacted. I mean, for someone of his level of accomplishment in baseball that gig is 100 steps down. He was the best shortstop in the history of the modern game, and now he's a younger Harold Reynolds!) Don't argue to get in the HOF, or to have anything restored or forgiven.

5. Make amends with people he hurt in the process.

From what I can tell, he's done at least the first 4. And the 5th is between him and those people, so I'll likely never know.

He hasn't done all this throughout his career, mind you. He was avoiding responsibility for a long time. But IMO for the last few years he seems to have consistently taken responsibility.
   8. . Posted: August 23, 2019 at 11:54 AM (#5873752)
It's amazing how the narrative while they were playing was that Jeter was a super swell guy and A-Rod was a douche but the reality all along was that Jeter is a douche and A-Rod is way closer to super swell.(*) The reality of Jeter started to peek through a little bit during his grotesquely money-grubbing retirement tour -- at least to the grounded and perceptive among us -- but not close to entirely.

Jeter was never even close to the weird myths that surrounded him. The mythmaking machine and the public it panders to are rather ... odd.

(*) Though certainly not entirely there.
   9. RoyalFlush Posted: August 23, 2019 at 11:57 AM (#5873753)
Lemme guess...because she’s intense and she’s pretty? Clever, that.


I think it's just the term "pretty intense". I really didn't get that she's commenting on her own looks. Maybe I'm just naive.
   10. . Posted: August 23, 2019 at 12:02 PM (#5873755)
Danica Patrick has always thought she was hotter than she actually is. And the type of the person who would reference her "hotness" in a podcast name.
   11. RoyalFlush Posted: August 23, 2019 at 12:08 PM (#5873756)
Danica Patrick has always thought she was hotter than she actually is. And the type of the person who would reference her "hotness" in a podcast name.


Wow.
   12. Lassus Posted: August 23, 2019 at 12:53 PM (#5873772)
Jeter was never even close to the weird myths that surrounded him.

Being 6th all-time in hits is actually somewhat close.


Danica Patrick has always thought she was hotter than she actually is. And the type of the person who would reference her "hotness" in a podcast name.

Why not refer - again - to how smart you are, SBB.
   13. salvomania Posted: August 23, 2019 at 12:53 PM (#5873773)
Danica Patrick has always thought she was hotter than she actually is. And the type of the person who would reference her "hotness" in a podcast name.

I'm amazed how often she's always talking about how hot she is. It's all you ever hear from her. The media, NASCAR, and her sponsors tried to downplay that aspect, though, and nobody would ever have even heard about her maybe being hot if she weren't always bringing it up.

If you read the article you'll learn that the producers of the podcast wanted to call it "Stories with Athletes featuring Danica Patrick" but she wanted to call it "Hot Times with Danica"; they eventually compromised on "Pretty Intense."
   14. My name is RMc and I feel extremely affected Posted: August 23, 2019 at 02:32 PM (#5873795)
Danica Patrick’s new podcast, Pretty Intense

Lemme guess...because she’s intense and she’s pretty? Clever, that.


Better than, say, "Pretty Fast"...
   15. Walt Davis Posted: August 23, 2019 at 06:30 PM (#5873899)
Moreover ...

1) What makes you think ARod knew what he was taking, in what quantities? He was following a schedule put out for him by the crooked doctor and his son. FFS, these guys were supplying roided gummy chews and you think ARod knows which chemical was in there and in what quantity and remembers how often he popped them?

2) From the prosecution, etc. we've got a pretty good idea what those guys were supplying, in what quantites, on what schedule.

3) Same for BALCO.
   16. vortex of dissipation Posted: August 23, 2019 at 06:52 PM (#5873905)
One would think that A-Rod and race-car drivers (no matter how mediocre)


Danica Patrick won an IndyCar race. Mediocre drivers don't win IndyCar races.
   17. PASTE, Now with Extra Pitch and Extra Stamina Posted: August 23, 2019 at 07:03 PM (#5873908)
It's a helpful reminder that the worst player in MLB is athletically so far beyond even the very best player in a very good rec league that he may as well be a different species.

Danica wasn't good enough a driver to stick at the highest level. But that's a standard far, far beyond the dreams of mere mortals who fancy themselves pretty damn handy at the wheel on I-95.
   18. Cowboy Popup Posted: August 23, 2019 at 08:10 PM (#5873931)
(TBH, the Sunday Night Baseball gig is to me a sign that his career has been impacted. I mean, for someone of his level of accomplishment in baseball that gig is 100 steps down. He was the best shortstop in the history of the modern game, and now he's a younger Harold Reynolds!)

You lost me here, VI. Joe Morgan was on SNB forever.
   19. bobm Posted: August 23, 2019 at 08:51 PM (#5873943)
And as the first guest on retired race car driver Danica Patrick’s new podcast, Pretty Intense, A-Rod explained


Putting the horse before the car...
   20. Rob_Wood Posted: August 23, 2019 at 09:17 PM (#5873959)
What's the Bill James quote on Joe Jackson for the Hall of Fame? Something like after they put in every player in major league history who was not accused of throwing ball games, after they put in every person who worked in any capacity for any major league team, and after they put in every vendor and every janitor who worked at any major league park, only then will I consider Joe Jackson for the Hall of Fame.

That's how I feel about Alex Rodriguez on a Danica Patrick podcast. After I get done listening to every episode of every podcast ever created on any topic whatsoever, only then will I consider listening to this podcast.
   21. majorflaw Posted: August 23, 2019 at 10:57 PM (#5873994)
“So “taking responsibility “ in your mind is admitting he did it instead of blaming others . . .”

Well, yes, that’s a start.

“ . . . and providing an itemized list?”

While an itemized list would be desirable I’d settle for something along the lines of ‘from 2007-2014 I injected myself with Winstrol, a substance I knew I was not permitted to use’ or similar. Simply saying that he made a mistake without ever describing the mistake doesn’t cut it for me. YMMV.

“And not having provided an itemized list-to you-is somehow dishonest?”

No, claiming that he has taken responsibility, come clean, addressed those issues already, and the like is dishonest. Some would even call any such a claim a “lie.”

“You’re kind of on (sic) “he didn’t pee in a cup for me, so obviously he has something to hide” territory.”

One would have to ignore quite a bit of history to get there. I’m more in ‘he lied about it repeatedly in the past so why should I believe him now’ territory. The only change from 2015 to now is that now he is represented by a PR firm rather than a law firm.

“IMO his taking responsibility would need to be several things:

1. Not fighting the suspension. Take it.

2. Admitting what caused the suspension. Own it as his actions.”

You are arguing that suing both MLB and the MLBPA constituted “not fighting the suspension” and “own(ing) it as his actions”? Let’s just say I disagree.

“3. Talking about it often. . .”

Appears to me he talks about it as rarely as he can manage, with as little detail as possible, much as one would expect.

While he has done a better job of avoiding telling obvious lies he has done nothing remotely resembling telling the truth.
   22. MuttsIdolCochrane Posted: August 24, 2019 at 05:28 AM (#5874032)
At least he talked about his use with a degree of honesty. I wish David Ortiz had 1/10th the small amount of honor Arod does.
   23. Jose is Absurdly Unemployed Posted: August 24, 2019 at 09:51 AM (#5874047)
Jeter was never even close to the weird myths that surrounded him. The mythmaking machine and the public it panders to are rather ... odd.


I don’t think it’s odd at all, it’s perfectly normal for all people. I’ll use myself as an example. For whatever reason people seem to like me. I’ve never understood it, I’m not a particularly nice guy and I tend to be pretty selfish but for whatever reason people tend to be very kind to me and respond positively to me. The fact is the person we are perceived as and the person we really are is often vastly different for all of us.

When it comes to public figures that gets exacerbated by the fact that we think we “know” them but really it’s just a crafted image. Crafted in part by the way they are covered by the press and in part by how they carry themselves. Add in the element of sports that if the player is good at the game we tend to give personality credit to that and it’s perfectly normal for Jeter (or any other athlete) to be perceived the way he is.

Think of every time you see a serial killer’s neighbor on the news “oh he was always such a nice boy, I never thought something like this would happen.” The person we are and the person we are perceived as are two vastly different things and I wouldn’t expect that perception error to be any different for professional athletes.
   24. pikepredator Posted: August 24, 2019 at 10:26 AM (#5874053)
At least he talked about his use with a degree of honesty


Um . . . it took him years to get there. I don't know that his "scorched-earth against everybody" approach - until broken down by irrefutable evidence, forcing him into a corner from which he only had one escape, counts as honor.

My belief is that steroid/PED/etc use is prevalent in sports, in wide-ranging forms and degrees (from maxing out performance to injury recovery to long seasons wearing players down and everything in between), and has been for many decades. That a certain segment are being singled out, targeted, and tarred and feathered is as confusing and frustrating for them as if we suddenly started charging every person who speeds in a Lexus (and only Lexus drivers) with reckless endangerment or attempted murder. If I drove a Lexus I would be pissed off and confused as to why everybody else isn't getting targeted to the same degree I am.
   25. majorflaw Posted: August 24, 2019 at 01:26 PM (#5874088)
“My belief is that steroid/PED/etc use is prevalent in sports, in wide-ranging forms and degrees . . . and has been for many decades. That a certain segment are being singled out, targeted, and tarred and feathered is as confusing and frustrating for them as if we suddenly started charging every person who speeds in a Lexus (and only Lexus drivers) with reckless endangerment or attempted murder. If I drove a Lexus I would be pissed off and confused as to why everybody else isn't getting targeted to the same degree I am.”

I’m with you part of the way. Seems quite plausible that PED-taking technology has advanced to the point that players may be able to cycle their use to mostly avoid getting caught. Not saying that this is happening, but it might be and we simply do not know enough to tell yet. A prominent piece of evidence in support of that theory would be ARod himself; the longest non-lifetime suspension for PED use was given to this player who did not fail his drug test. If MLB didn’t have independent evidence that he purchased PEDs he’d have been good to go. Think about what that says about the reliability of MLB’s testing program in general and perhaps you’ll see why I want ARod to tell the truth.

But the rest is kind of odd. ARod and others who have been punished for PED use weren’t singled out for random conduct like driving a particular brand of car. They were punished as a foreseeable result of actions that they, as grown up adults, chose to take, similar to your choice to speed. While there may well be a degree of luck involved in who gets busted, both for speeding and for PED-ing, that’s just a risk users assume.

And, just to be clear, PED use itself isn’t disqualifying for me, if ARod, Bonds, Clemens, et al were elected to the HoF tomorrow they would be far from the biggest dirtbags enshrined. Just don’t appreciate when someone chooses to be a lying sack of crap about it.



   26. Tom Nawrocki Posted: August 24, 2019 at 01:50 PM (#5874092)
When it comes to public figures that gets exacerbated by the fact that we think we “know” them but really it’s just a crafted image. Crafted in part by the way they are covered by the press and in part by how they carry themselves. Add in the element of sports that if the player is good at the game we tend to give personality credit to that and it’s perfectly normal for Jeter (or any other athlete) to be perceived the way he is.


Jeter has always reminded me of DiMaggio in this respect. DiMaggio on the field managed to be both hard-working and flashy, consistently excellent, always kept his mouth shut and did his job. With some help from the press, he got credit for having a mystique. After he'd been retired for a while, it became apparent that DiMaggio just didn't have a personality.
   27. pikepredator Posted: August 24, 2019 at 02:32 PM (#5874095)
But the rest is kind of odd. ARod and others who have been punished for PED use weren’t singled out for random conduct like driving a particular brand of car. They were punished as a foreseeable result of actions that they, as grown up adults, chose to take, similar to your choice to speed. While there may well be a degree of luck involved in who gets busted, both for speeding and for PED-ing, that’s just a risk users assume.


Yeah, I see what you're saying . . . It seems like (which could be just my perception, or a function of media coverage?) it's big names who are vilified for their denials (Which are partially a function of increased pressure to confess).

Then again, with great power comes great responsibility.
   28. Howie Menckel Posted: August 24, 2019 at 10:40 PM (#5874228)
After he'd been retired for a while, it became apparent that DiMaggio just didn't have a personality.

I have mentioned that I was at Jeter's locker for a few postgame interviews.

professional - of course. but the idea that he had plenty on his mind, but was savvy enough to keep his answers bland?

major sample size issues - but let's just say that I didn't exactly smell any wood burning or hear any wheels spinning.

:)
   29. cardsfanboy Posted: August 24, 2019 at 10:59 PM (#5874240)
I have mentioned that I was at Jeter's locker for a few postgame interviews.

professional - of course. but the idea that he had plenty on his mind, but was savvy enough to keep his answers bland?

major sample size issues - but let's just say that I didn't exactly smell any wood burning or hear any wheels spinning.

:)


most around here think that Jeter had a cultivated image that he carefully crafted to avoid any potential of scandal.. He was known to have parties and insists on guests handing over their cellphones at the door type of thing. There has never been an interview with Jeter where he actually said anything of substance or even insightful... and we have long picked up on that on this board. He's a cardboard cutout at best, he has the personality of a koala....meaning as long as you don't actually know anything about him, he seems harmless and cute. It works...and it's something that if I was in charge of the mlbpa... I would make every member try to emulate(heck if I was in charge of any situation in which a person was going to be famous... I would make them emulate or, at least learn from it)


At the same time, there is a hint of insincereness to it. In some respects Stan Musial did this, but at the same time, people believed it from him. I don't think anyone outside of 14 year old New York girls believed the Jeter hype fully.
   30. QLE Posted: August 25, 2019 at 12:22 AM (#5874255)
After he'd been retired for a while, it became apparent that DiMaggio just didn't have a personality.


It can't help that what hints we got of whatever personality he might have had (the need to be billed everywhere as "the greatest living ballplayer") aren't exactly the sort that a neutral observer would find endearing......

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