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Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Barry Bonds among athletes who flee “crazy” Wine Country fire scene

Former Giants outfielder Barry Bonds wound up shuttling guests who did not have rides away from Mayacama when the villas at the course were evacuated. Longtime Kansas City pitcher Bret Saberhagen left his golf clubs in the parking lot in order to fit Olympic speedskater Dan Jansen and his wife into his rental car. And onetime Dodgers closer Eric Gagne raised the alarm at a second hotel to which the celebrities were sent, pounding on doors to make sure occupants were out.

esseff Posted: October 10, 2017 at 02:37 PM | 33 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: barry bonds, bret saberhagen, eric gagne

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   1. LA Podcasting Hombre of Anaheim Posted: October 10, 2017 at 09:55 PM (#5549379)
And onetime Dodgers closer Eric Gagne raised the alarm
Gagne taking the fireman role seriously!
   2. Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: October 10, 2017 at 09:59 PM (#5549386)
*golf clap*
   3. Howie Menckel Posted: October 10, 2017 at 10:11 PM (#5549407)
Mrs Howie reported tonight on two of her clients who lost multi-million dollar homes in the area over this.

as she knows them personally, she of course is upset.

my blue collar roots tend to go to "are they literally homeless?"

my mom's family was, for extended periods in The Depression, and my dad's family wasn't a whole lot ahead of that. yet my upbringing was smoother than Mrs Howie's.

I might be a monster for just thinking:
survive
have enough money to move on without financial distress



people I worry about
   4. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2017 at 10:17 PM (#5549412)
I have many friends in the area - my Facebook right now is just a long series of "we've been evacuated" and "I think my home is safe but I'm not sure." Wow. What a shame.
   5. Gold Star - just Gold Star Posted: October 10, 2017 at 10:40 PM (#5549423)
This has the potential to wipe entire towns off the map.

Whoops, there goes Healdsburg.

Oh no, we lost St. Helena.
   6. Howie Menckel Posted: October 10, 2017 at 10:49 PM (#5549426)
and those right there are people I worry about.

damn

whatever one's political or environmental beliefs, stuff is happening - and assessing one's own future safety has to be a priority. and damn, check those insurance policies if you can still get one....
   7. shoewizard Posted: October 10, 2017 at 11:46 PM (#5549453)
Do they know for certain the origin and cause of the fires ? I can't help but wonder if setting wild fires isn't next on the "bad guys" list of ways to attack our country , economy, and safety.
   8. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: October 11, 2017 at 12:54 AM (#5549471)
My brother in-law's brother(Frank) lived in Santa Rosa. They came knocking, he grabbed his cat and that was it. The house was gone like an hour later. Dude is 67 years old and has to start all over. He's living with my sis and brother in-law in Fresno for who knows how long. Spoke to my sis today and they took him out to get stuff like underwear and a toothbrush.
Just heartbreaking. Frank has just been catatonic ever since.

#7. Not sure about Cal as it's been a long time since I lived there, but here in Sydney, and Aus. in general, we get some pretty wicked fires nearly every year and they estimate close to 80% are lit by pyros. It's a real sh*t thing to do people.

   9. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: October 11, 2017 at 07:48 AM (#5549495)
I've seen failing power lines and arson as two suspected causes, given the number of fires caused during a particular time window, which of course were fueled by the high winds.
   10. manchestermets Posted: October 11, 2017 at 08:33 AM (#5549510)
they estimate close to 80% are lit by pyros. It's a real sh*t thing to do people.


I generally fall into the bleeding heart liberal category on crime but man, they should lock arsonists up and drop the keys in the San Marianas trench.
   11. No longer interested in this website Posted: October 11, 2017 at 09:29 AM (#5549570)
my blue collar roots tend to go to "are they literally homeless?"


Their homes burned, so yes they are. Just because someone may have more money than someone else, doesn't mean they can't suffer. Losing your home, whether it's a trailer worth $15,000 or a mansion worth $5 million, is a severe heartache. It's traumatic because you are losing the place you feel comfortable and safe, and losing your possessions. So, yes, I think it's sad when anyone loses a home.
   12. bunyon Posted: October 11, 2017 at 10:45 AM (#5549701)
I see both sides of 11. Losing one's home and possessions is terrible, no matter your station in life. OTOH, I see the point that it is a lot worse if you can't afford to rebuild or replace stuff. But, yeah, survival is the key. I heard a flashback interview with Tom Petty a few days after he died and he was talking about losing his house and "stuff". He said he was, at first, deeply worried about the stuff but within a month or two he realized he didn't miss anything but the pictures of his kids. He said it made him reconsider how much "stuff" to buy/keep in his next house.

There is a lot in my house I'd hate to lose. Yet, when I'm separated from it for long periods, I don't really miss it. Stuff is just stuff.
   13. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: October 11, 2017 at 11:03 AM (#5549734)

Their homes burned, so yes they are. Just because someone may have more money than someone else, doesn't mean they can't suffer. Losing your home, whether it's a trailer worth $15,000 or a mansion worth $5 million, is a severe heartache. It's traumatic because you are losing the place you feel comfortable and safe, and losing your possessions. So, yes, I think it's sad when anyone loses a home.

This. It only doesn't apply if you live in a sleeping bag or if your home is a replaceable rented apartment with no significant possessions in it.
   14. dlf Posted: October 11, 2017 at 11:08 AM (#5549743)
My grandfather spent the second half of his life with a number tattooed on his forearm and lost many immediate family members. He often said that a problem is something being wrong with your health or your family, everything else is just finances. I try to live by that motto.

On the other hand, I have a close friend who lives a handful of miles due east from downtown Napa. He and his wife have been evacuated and, as of yesterday afternoon when I spoke with him, don't know the status of the home they have lived in for 25+ years. I certainly don't feel like telling him that it is just finances.
   15. No longer interested in this website Posted: October 11, 2017 at 01:30 PM (#5549940)
I think some people here are still missing it. It's not about the STUFF, the PLASTER, the DRY WALL, etc. It's not about the cost of the home. It's about the PLACE. The emotion of that place that is your HOME.

If I told any of you right now "You can never go back to your house. It's gone." That would be extremely traumatic for you. Not primarily because of the loss of photos and blankets and clothes, etc., but because that was your home. It's sad any time anyone loses a home, regardless of how much money they have in the bank.
   16. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: October 11, 2017 at 01:49 PM (#5549974)
I have a friend who's house burned down with everything the family owned when he was 11 or so. He has basically no memories of his life before that time, he thinks because there aren't any physical artifacts from his childhood to jog his memory. No one was hurt, everything was insured and his family did fine financially, but it's a definite dividing line in his life.
   17. bunyon Posted: October 11, 2017 at 02:01 PM (#5549991)
If I told any of you right now "You can never go back to your house. It's gone." That would be extremely traumatic for you. Not primarily because of the loss of photos and blankets and clothes, etc., but because that was your home. It's sad any time anyone loses a home, regardless of how much money they have in the bank.

No one is saying it isn't traumatic or bad. Yes, if you called me up and told me that right now, I'd be very upset but my first question would be is my wife okay (she works at home). If she is, I'd be really upset about my home being gone. If she isn't, I would never give a passing thought to the place itself. Losing one's home is terrible, no two ways about it. But, it's orders of magnitude less terrible than losing family. As dlf says, there is no way anyone should say that to someone who just lost their house. But those that lost their house WILL recover, though they'll never forget.
   18. Batman Posted: October 11, 2017 at 02:09 PM (#5549999)
Longtime Kansas City pitcher Bret Saberhagen left his golf clubs in the parking lot in order to fit Olympic speedskater Dan Jansen and his wife into his rental car.
"Dan, please tell me you can skate out on the fire! Damn it!"
   19. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: October 11, 2017 at 04:54 PM (#5550266)
Longtime Kansas City pitcher Bret Saberhagen left his golf clubs in the parking lot in order to fit Olympic speedskater Dan Jansen and his wife into his rental car.


So Jansen got stuffed in the trunk?
   20. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 11, 2017 at 05:01 PM (#5550277)
So Jansen got stuffed in the trunk?

Hey, let's not mock Saberhagen's act of heroism. I'm sure he sacrificed some very nice golf clubs so that Jansen and his wife could live.
   21. simon bedford Posted: October 11, 2017 at 05:14 PM (#5550303)
Bonds most likely kept his trunk filled with steroids while trying to tie Dan Jansens wife to a nearby railroad track.
   22. Traderdave Posted: October 11, 2017 at 05:16 PM (#5550308)
I'm 50 +/- miles from the fires, and the smoke is *intense* even at this distance. It makes my eyes burn to go out side. I can't see the Oakland Hills (as 1200-1500 foot ridge, essentially a small mountain range), less than 5 miles away.

This is from 50 miles. It is horrifying to imagine what it's like in the thick of it.

The wind is making the firefighters' containment efforts damn near impossible. It's really scary.
   23. Howie Menckel Posted: October 11, 2017 at 05:53 PM (#5550355)
you guys are getting soft - I could fairly have been ripped to shreds for my dumb Post #3.

my apologies, seriously.
   24. Traderdave Posted: October 11, 2017 at 06:10 PM (#5550373)
I did consider ripping you but I just figured you drank out of Ray's glass. That's usually temporary, humanity returns soon.
   25. phredbird Posted: October 11, 2017 at 06:15 PM (#5550380)

arg, i lived in santa rosa when i first moved to CA and it is a gorgeous, beautiful town.

this is a terrible thing.

the winds really do a lot to make this worse. i drove from L.A. to Palm Springs monday and the wind storms were pushing my van all over the highway. when i got home and saw the news about how the fires had worsened, i was not surprised. we're safe in Palm Springs -- it's too much desert to be threatened by wild fires. but those areas of norcal and environs are just full of dry brush and pine. it's a tinder box this time of year.

the debate about the emotional impact of losing one's home is interesting, it makes me think of the benjaminian concept of 'aura'. one's home, in it's unique combination of time and place, is irreplaceable on numerous levels. so it's disappearance is that much more of a catastrophe of lost 'aura'.

while benjamin posited that new technologies lead to new notions of art, for instance the evolution of photography from a scientific oddity to its own branch of the arts, he still points to aura as a foundational concept of personal/cultural identity. an ansel adams is reproducible, but the one you bought is irreplaceable sitting in your home, on your wall. its gained aura by being hung there. losing that is a real thing.
   26. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 11, 2017 at 06:15 PM (#5550381)
I think some people here are still missing it. It's not about the STUFF, the PLASTER, the DRY WALL, etc. It's not about the cost of the home. It's about the PLACE. The emotion of that place that is your HOME.

I get that a lot of people think that way, but I am more in the other camp. A few years ago, my parents told me they were thinking about selling the home that I grew up in and that they had lived in for 30 years. And I encouraged them to do so -- the house was too big for them without any kids living in it, and my dad can't drive anymore, so they needed to be in a more walkable area.

Ultimately, the house was sold and the new owners did a big renovation that was featured on Property Brothers. Friends who I grew up with were upset to see the place being gutted on tv, but it didn't bother me at all. It's just a house that I was never going to live in again anyway.

I'm sure I would have felt differently if the house had burned down rather than being renovated for use by a new family who will hopefully derive joy from it for many years. And no doubt my attitude is shaped by the fact that I've moved every 2-3 years as an adult, and I'll feel a bit differently once I've lived in my current apartment (the first one we've owned) for an extended period of time and raised a family there. But still, these are just places. They can be replaced. The loss of photos and important mementos is a bigger deal (especially the photos, since I've realized how important those are in my retention of memories).
   27. Ulysses S. Fairsmith Posted: October 11, 2017 at 06:18 PM (#5550387)
I'm so tired of monsters like Barry Bonds helping people escape from a fire.
   28. LA Podcasting Hombre of Anaheim Posted: October 11, 2017 at 06:45 PM (#5550416)
arg, i lived in santa rosa when i first moved to CA and it is a gorgeous, beautiful town.
Santa Rosa museum honoring ‘Peanuts’ cartoonist Charles Schulz safe for now. I've made trips to Santa Rosa four separate times to visit the Charles Schultz Museum, once by myself. I know homes have been lost and lives changed forever, but I feel so deeply relieved that this place is still okay.
   29. phredbird Posted: October 11, 2017 at 08:16 PM (#5550608)

hombre, that is good news. i was afraid to check.
   30. Howie Menckel Posted: October 11, 2017 at 08:19 PM (#5550613)
I did consider ripping you

that's a good sign!
   31. . . . . . . . . . . Posted: October 11, 2017 at 08:26 PM (#5550625)
As someone deeply involved with wine I know tons of people in the region. Many have lost their homes; thankfully, for the most part the wine industry has done OK b/c the wineries generally are constructed of materials that don't burn and vineyards don't burn easy, especially this time of year when there's no cover crop. But all these people losing family homes makes me want to barf.

I never thought fires would make it into the lowlands like this. I mean, I always suspected folks up on Atlas Peak or around Monticello were living on borrowed time, but who ever thought subdivisions in Santa Rosa would burn? Completely nuts. And it looks like much of Calistoga might burn tonight, and Healdsburg is threatened. Unreal.
   32. Hysterical & Useless Posted: October 12, 2017 at 10:35 AM (#5551034)
Unlike Inge (Dave), I have lived a very sedentary life. Not counting college dorm rooms, I think I've only lived in a half-dozen places my entire life, the first of which I don't remember at all because we moved from there when I was only a year old. I sort of miss (a tiny bit) the place where we lived next, where we lived from 1953-63. But the place I really miss is my grandparents house, and I miss that pretty much entirely because of how much I miss my grandparents. I really wish we could've kept their tiny little house in the family, but...finances.
   33. Man o' Schwar Posted: October 12, 2017 at 11:06 AM (#5551076)
I get that a lot of people think that way, but I am more in the other camp. A few years ago, my parents told me they were thinking about selling the home that I grew up in and that they had lived in for 30 years. And I encouraged them to do so -- the house was too big for them without any kids living in it, and my dad can't drive anymore, so they needed to be in a more walkable area.

Ultimately, the house was sold and the new owners did a big renovation that was featured on Property Brothers. Friends who I grew up with were upset to see the place being gutted on tv, but it didn't bother me at all. It's just a house that I was never going to live in again anyway.


There's one difference here - you did it on your own terms. If you had a connection to your house (and maybe you didn't), you would have had an opportunity to get some closure on giving it up. Spend a last few nights there, sit around with your family and reminisce about living there for 30 years, gather up whatever mementos you wanted to keep, and then let it go. These people are having their houses ripped out from under them with (in some cases) no more than 30 seconds to gather everything they can carry to their cars and then flee in the night.

It's kind of the difference between donating something you own to Goodwill vs. having someone break into your house and take it. The outcome is the same - you no longer have the thing - but the ways in which you were divested of it leave a completely different taste in your mouth.

(I work in the North Bay, and I've got a ton of coworkers who live in Santa Rosa. They're all OK, but a lot of people have lost homes, and the ones who haven't are afraid to come to work because a shift in the winds could put their own homes right in the path.)

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