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Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Barry Zito reveals why he rooted against Giants in 2010 World Series

Imagine rooting against your employer after they paid you $18.5 million.

That’s the story Barry Zito is telling.

According to The San Francisco Chronicle, Zito revealed in a new memoir that he rooted against the Giants in the 2010 World Series because they left him off the playoff roster.

“It was really hard to admit,” Zito told The Chronicle’s Ann Killion.

“Yes, my regular-season record was below-average, but what’s that got to do with anything?”

 

QLE Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:52 AM | 63 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: barry zito, giants, world series

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   1. PreservedFish Posted: September 17, 2019 at 08:59 AM (#5879894)
I get it.
   2. Traderdave Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:13 AM (#5879901)
Honesty is usually the best policy, but not always...
   3. PreservedFish Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:38 AM (#5879910)
He's selling a book, so now is the time to come clean!
   4. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:42 AM (#5879913)
I don't think this is an odd sentiment. If one of us got kicked off a project at work, and replaced with someone we consider inferior to us, we'd probably root for the project to fail.

I know if I was a major leaguer, I'd rather be an All-Star on a losing team than a scrub on a World Series winner.
   5. PreservedFish Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:44 AM (#5879915)
I agree, and I don't think players would find this unusual or controversial, although some of Zito's buddies on the team might be a bit hurt.
   6. Traderdave Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:46 AM (#5879917)
He made a show of dressing and sitting in the dugout out of solidarity with his teammates, who he was rooting AGAINST.

As an A's fan I always liked Zito and felt badly for him when he struggled in SF, but wow, what a stupid thing to admit such a stupid emotion out loud.
   7. bunyon Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:50 AM (#5879918)
I'm not sure if those upset by this statement are human or can read.

a) As snapper says, this is a very natural reaction and anyone who's ever been dumped or demoted at work knows they'd have similar feelings.

and

b) He admits it's a poor response and that he was struggling with the shame of poor performance. Which, again, very human if you've ever failed at something.


He's not boasting or saying he should have felt that way. Just that he did. Geez.
   8. Traderdave Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:54 AM (#5879919)
I don't think this is an odd sentiment. If one of us got kicked off a project at work, and replaced with someone we consider inferior to us, we'd probably root for the project to fail.


I would certainly root for the decision maker to fry in the event of failure, but I'd never root for my team to fail. That's just not what being a teammate is.
   9. Jose is an Absurd Time Cube Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:54 AM (#5879920)
I know if I was a major leaguer, I'd rather be an All-Star on a losing team than a scrub on a World Series winner.


I’ve always felt that one of the best gigs in sports was productive middle reliever on a championship team. You make a few million dollars a year, you make a genuine contribution and yet you have a bit of anonymity to your life that a superstar doesn’t. Look at a guy like Mike Stanton. He made a bit more than $30 million in his career, won a few rings that he genuinely made a difference on and he can probably walk down just about any street in America without being recognized.

I will say that given the choices you listed I’d probably prefer to be an All Star on a bad team but as we see on a pretty regular basis those guys try to get themselves traded to good teams when they can.
   10. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:57 AM (#5879921)

I will say that given the choices you listed I’d probably prefer to be an All Star on a bad team but as we see on a pretty regular basis those guys try to get themselves traded to good teams when they can.


Well sure, it's even better to be an All-Star on a good team :-)
   11. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:58 AM (#5879923)
I would certainly root for the decision maker to fry in the event of failure, but I'd never root for my team to fail. That's just not what being a teammate is.

I have loyalty to individual people I like any trust, not to any "team". I get hired, paid, and fired as an individual. I expect most players feel similar.
   12. PreservedFish Posted: September 17, 2019 at 09:59 AM (#5879924)
I too would most like to be a Mike Stanton type, but snapper's point is obvious: the player needs to care about his own career more than the results of the other 24 guys.
   13. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 10:02 AM (#5879927)
I too would most like to be a Mike Stanton type

You'd rather be Mike Stanton than say, Joey Votto or Andrew McCutchen?
   14. PreservedFish Posted: September 17, 2019 at 10:04 AM (#5879928)
Probably. I cherish anonymity and think that I would despise being famous, certainly at the "gets stared at in a restaurant" level.

Then again, $130M is more than $30M. I'd need to do some soul-searching before I could answer that question.

Does Joey Votto get stared at if he's at the grocery store in, say, Los Angeles or Miami? Maybe not. Maybe that would be just fine. I could handle local fame if I felt able to escape it when necessary. And the bigger earnings would make it easier for me to retire to my dream life of having homes in Switzerland and Thailand (or something like that).
   15. WSPanic Posted: September 17, 2019 at 10:29 AM (#5879941)
As an A's fan I always liked Zito and felt badly for him when he struggled in SF, but wow, what a stupid thing to admit such a stupid emotion out loud.


Why criticize him for being honest? It's not a stupid thing at all. It was a obviously an emotional time for him.

I would certainly root for the decision maker to fry in the event of failure, but I'd never root for my team to fail. That's just not what being a teammate is.


Acting like the thoughts in someone's head somehow effect what's happening on the field is about the silliest thing I can think of. He could have done a dozen things to throw a tantrum or make it about himself. What did he actually "do" to not be a teammate?
   16. wjones Posted: September 17, 2019 at 10:45 AM (#5879945)
Like I tell my kids IRT social media, it is not a requirement to post every single thought.
   17. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 10:51 AM (#5879947)
Like I tell my kids IRT social media, it is not a requirement to post every single thought.

He's pushing a book.
   18. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: September 17, 2019 at 11:09 AM (#5879956)
Publisher: "Barry, we need something really good, something that jumps off the page. Something that makes this the must-buy baseball book for 2019. Whadya got?"
Barry: "Well, I don't really have much of anything. I guess, one time, I was kind of pissed for not making the playoff roster in 2010 and kind of rooted against us."
Publisher: "We can make that work!!!!"
   19. TJ Posted: September 17, 2019 at 11:22 AM (#5879961)
I too would most like to be a Mike Stanton type

You'd rather be Mike Stanton than say, Joey Votto or Andrew McCutchen?


How can you say Mike Stanton isn't famous? He's so well known that Giancarlo Stanton changed his name from "Mike" just to avoid the confusion...
   20. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 17, 2019 at 11:38 AM (#5879968)
How can you say Mike Stanton isn't famous? He's so well known that Giancarlo Stanton changed his name from "Mike" just to avoid the confusion...
Actually that's an interesting question that gets at the crux of this discussion: Would you rather be Mike Stanton or Giancarlo Mike Stanton?

Mike Stanton, as PF mentions above: $30 million in career earnings, meaningful role on some championship teams, currently hosts the pregame show for the Astros, probably has near-total anonymity.

Giancarlo Mike Stanton: $30 zillion in career earnings with more to come, physically attractive such that he apparently dates this model, gets stared at regularly in restaurants (I would assume), has played only one healthy season for a good team, and they lost in the Division Series.

I dunno. I can see both sides.
   21. GregD Posted: September 17, 2019 at 11:46 AM (#5879970)
Giancarlo Mike Stanton: $30 zillion in career earnings with more to come, physically attractive such that he apparently dates this model, gets stared at regularly in restaurants (I would assume), has played only one healthy season for a good team, and they lost in the Division Series.
i was sure this was an Albright
   22. wjones Posted: September 17, 2019 at 11:55 AM (#5879974)
He's pushing a book.

This comment does nothing to make me want to buy it.
   23. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 17, 2019 at 11:57 AM (#5879976)
i was sure this was an Albright
Heh. Missed opportunity there, you're right.
   24. Zonk Will Not Get Over It Abusing Its Office Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:09 PM (#5879979)
Does it make the choice easier if I add that rumor has it, the first Mike Stanton is actually carrying on a torrid affair with Albright?
   25. Traderdave Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:21 PM (#5879982)
Why criticize him for being honest? It's not a stupid thing at all. It was a obviously an emotional time for him.


Rooting for one's team to lose is pure anathema in sports. We're all human and we all get crazy emotions from time to time, but the"stupid" here is admitting it out loud.
   26. PreservedFish Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:22 PM (#5879983)
Maybe being famous is terrific. Maybe this is just a lie I'm telling myself.

The only time I've felt "famous" was walking around quiet boring parts of SE Asia as a white guy. Instant celebrity. It was pretty fun sometimes. Everyone wanted to buy me a drink.
   27. billyshears Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:28 PM (#5879985)
I've done the anonymous thing for awhile. It's fine. I'd like the try the star-level pro-athlete celebrity for a bit. I suspect it's better. Puttering around groceries stores uninterrupted isn't that cool. On the other hand, millions of dollars, models and getting most everything you want seems pretty cool.
   28. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:42 PM (#5879991)
Rooting for one's team to lose is pure anathema in sports. We're all human and we all get crazy emotions from time to time, but the"stupid" here is admitting it out loud.

You think when a rookie comes up and takes a vet's job, the vet isn't rooting for him to fail? Do you think a hot prospect who is blocked by an incumbent isn't excited when that guy struggles or gets hurt?

The players being out for #1 is entirely rationale. It's our "rooting for the laundry" that's irrational.
   29. Nasty Nate Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:50 PM (#5879994)
You think when a rookie comes up and takes a vet's job, the vet isn't rooting for him to fail? Do you think a hot prospect who is blocked by an incumbent isn't excited when that guy struggles or gets hurt?

The players being out for #1 is entirely rationale. It's our "rooting for the laundry" that's irrational.
You sound like a great teammate...
   30. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:55 PM (#5879998)
You sound like a great teammate...

I'm not a "teammate", I'm a professional. I do my job, including the parts that require me to help out other people. For people I like and trust, I offer additional help above and beyond my job role.

But if someone at work is a jerk and/or an idiot, you're damn right I root for them to fail, and I'm not going out of my way to prevent it. To the extent I can point out their idiocy, I will. Hopefully it frees a job up for someone competent or at least not an a-hole.
   31. Traderdave Posted: September 17, 2019 at 12:57 PM (#5879999)
You think when a rookie comes up and takes a vet's job, the vet isn't rooting for him to fail? Do you think a hot prospect who is blocked by an incumbent isn't excited when that guy struggles or gets hurt?


Having the feeling is human. Saying it out loud is what's stupid.

Imagine these interviews:

"Yeah, I'm 38 & I'm feeling my age, so I was glad when the kid blew his ACL."
"Sure, he's a hall of famer, but damn I was glad he got beaned and is down for the season."


   32. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:00 PM (#5880003)
Having the feeling is human. Saying it out loud is what's stupid.

Agreed, unless you're retired and trying to sell a book. An active player saying this would be idiotic. But I bet lots and lots of players have had these feelings.

If a HoFer is standing between you and $50M, you damn well do a happy dance when he blows out his ACL. The guy's already a multi-millionaire, no tears required. Is that right, not really, but it's perfectly normal.
   33. Zonk Will Not Get Over It Abusing Its Office Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:06 PM (#5880008)
Did he give his ring back? I mean, teams usually hand them out like candy even to guys that don’t make the WS roster....
   34. Nasty Nate Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:09 PM (#5880011)
If a HoFer is standing between you and $50M, you damn well do a happy dance when he blows out his ACL. The guy's already a multi-millionaire, no tears required. Is that right, not really, but it's perfectly normal.
I'd assume they usually still want their team to win after they get their opportunity because of the ACL injury.
   35. JAHV Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:23 PM (#5880022)
Maybe being famous is terrific. Maybe this is just a lie I'm telling myself.


I would loathe being famous. I hate interacting with people whom I don't know or even whom I know but with whom I'm not good friends. I don't want to be noticed in any way.

I don't know how I would have felt in Zito's position. As a teammate, I feel responsibility to the rest of my team and I want them to succeed, whether I like them or trust them. If they replace me, it's because they felt I wasn't doing my job, and in Zito's case, that was true. If I felt I was unfairly removed from a certain role, I'd be mad at the decision-maker, but I would continue to root for my teammates to succeed. Despite my sentiments above about wanting to be left alone, I can't imagine not developing a bond and kinship with my teammates such that I wouldn't continue to pull for their success. The team is much more important than my personal success.

All that said, bitterness can be powerful, so I can't say for sure that I wouldn't respond like Zito, but I hope I'd continue to root for my teammates.
   36. The Yankee Clapper Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:23 PM (#5880023)
He made a show of dressing and sitting in the dugout out of solidarity with his teammates, who he was rooting AGAINST.
Well, Zito wasn’t applauding in the dugout when the other team got a hit, or trying to high five people when they homered. He just silently formed a preference different from his public posture, although he may be exaggerating this to sell books. Doesn’t seem like a big deal unless he reveals that he actually did something like giving the opponent a scouting report on his teammates or telling them the Giants signs
   37. Jeff Frances the Mute Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:30 PM (#5880025)
Having the feeling is human. Saying it out loud is what's stupid.

I think it is fine to talk about this stuff now that it has been nearly a decade. It would be very stupid and selfish to say this stuff while it was happening or in the immediate aftermath, but over time it no long matters or effects any of his teammates at all.
   38. Blastin Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:41 PM (#5880041)
currently hosts the pregame show for the Astros


Wait, really? I never once saw that guy as having a personality.


As for which Stanton, uh, maybe let's wait for the rest of his career. He's had the individual honors stuff. I don't think it's impossible he gets a ring in the next 55 million years of contract, and it's hardly impossible he is a major October contributor at some point. So he could have both sides!


It would depend, too. Like, do I want a ring or a contract or an MVP or an All-Star game or whatever whatever. Each person will be different.

I'm not sure I'd WANT my teammates to lose, but I'm also not as competitive as a pro athlete so I can't relate. My wife, who was a killer athlete in her day, might feel differently.
   39. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:44 PM (#5880044)

As for which Stanton, uh, maybe let's wait for the rest of his career.


Really? $300M vs. $30M seems like it ends the conversation. Even if you don't have expensive tastes, you could do a lot of good with $200M.
   40. Blastin Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:50 PM (#5880048)
Really? $300M vs. $30M seems like it ends the conversation. Even if you don't have expensive tastes, you could do a lot of good with $200M.


I agree, but some people are different.
   41. Tom Nawrocki Posted: September 17, 2019 at 01:52 PM (#5880053)
Sometimes I wonder if the people who assume ballplayers constantly get stared at in restaurants are the same people who complain that baseball doesn't have any marketable stars anymore.
   42. Cris E Posted: September 17, 2019 at 02:03 PM (#5880057)
I'm way more in PF's camp than snapper's. For one thing I'm not sure if a normal job is directly comparable to six or seven months of travel and extended time spent in close community every day. But beyond that I'm more of a team guy even in an office setting.

Also, I'm willing to try the superstar supermodel super rich life for a while then switch over the the simple life of mere tens of millions of dollars for a few years. I promise I'll let you know how it goes. Anyone know how to set up a kickstarter?

   43. Tin Angel Posted: September 17, 2019 at 02:13 PM (#5880068)
But if someone at work is a jerk and/or an idiot, you're damn right I root for them to fail, and I'm not going out of my way to prevent it.


You really are a good Christian.
   44. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 02:38 PM (#5880078)

I don't think this is an odd sentiment. If one of us got kicked off a project at work, and replaced with someone we consider inferior to us, we'd probably root for the project to fail.

He wasn't replaced by an inferior player, he was left off because teams don't need 5 starters in the postseason and he was the worst of the 5 they had. And it sounds like he knew it and that's what drove his reaction.

Anyway, I agree that this is an understandable but not admirable emotion, that Zito recognizes it as such, and that it's ok to talk about it a decade later. The people trying to defend the underlying sentiment are off-base. I remember silently rooting against my team when I got benched during a soccer tournament when I was 12 years old. When I said something to that effect to my parents they gave me a short lecture about how that wasn't the right way to react to the situation. They were right -- it was immature, and the way you might expect a 12-year-old to react.
   45. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 02:46 PM (#5880080)
You really are a good Christian.

I missed the commandment that says "Thou shalt help incompetent a-holes succeed and prosper over more qualified people."

I any case, why bring religion into this?
   46. JAHV Posted: September 17, 2019 at 03:01 PM (#5880087)
I missed the commandment that says "Thou shalt help incompetent a-holes succeed and prosper over more qualified people."

I any case, why bring religion into this?


It is rather incongruous. "Love your enemies" and "the last shall be first" are definitely in there. Maybe you think the latter isn't applicable in this situation, but the former certainly is. The Bible never makes any distinction between "qualified" people; most of the guys Jesus picks to start his church are ridiculously unqualified.

I'm not perfect and have been bitter at people before, but I don't think it's a Christian attitude and do my best not to harbor those feelings.

Unless those people are affiliated in some way with the Red Sox. Jesus is cool with hating the Red Sox and their fans.
   47. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 17, 2019 at 03:07 PM (#5880089)
It is rather incongruous. "Love your enemies" and "the last shall be first" are definitely in there. Maybe you think the latter isn't applicable in this situation, but the former certainly is. The Bible never makes any distinction between "qualified" people; most of the guys Jesus picks to start his church are ridiculously unqualified.

I'm not perfect and have been bitter at people before, but I don't think it's a Christian attitude and do my best not to harbor those feelings.


I'm sure I'm a bad Christian in lots of ways, but I see no problem in rooting for justice in this world, i.e. good things to happen to good people, and bad things to happen to bad people. If I were to do something to actively sabotage the bad people, that would be very wrong. But the amount of help I have to offer is limited, giving that to the people who actually deserve it is the right thing. Just like when giving to charity, we should take pains to ensure the people we give to aren't scammers, or planning to blow the money on booze or drugs.
   48. Tin Angel Posted: September 17, 2019 at 03:26 PM (#5880094)
Yes, who could forget Jesus recommending to give to the poor, unless they spend it on something you don’t personally agree with. In that case, #### them. A very moving passage.
   49. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 17, 2019 at 03:31 PM (#5880098)
most of the guys Jesus picks to start his church are ridiculously unqualified.
And yet here we are 2000 years later, so apparently they did a decent job. They must have been the old market inefficiency.
   50. flournoy Posted: September 17, 2019 at 03:45 PM (#5880105)
Every single major leaguer has experienced being in competition with his teammates (with respect to playing time, minor league promotions, spring training, postseason roster, etc.), and they've all secretly been rooting against the other guys. (If not rooting for failure, then rooting for "less success.") The notion of rooting against your teammates sounds scandalous, but I imagine most of Zito's actual teammates get it and don't care. I don't think Zito's reaction was immature. It was just his natural reaction, and it's not like he can actively choose how he feels about things. He can choose how he behaves, though, and he seems to have behaved professionally and respectfully.
   51. Nasty Nate Posted: September 17, 2019 at 03:51 PM (#5880107)
The notion of rooting against your teammates sounds scandalous, but I imagine most of Zito's actual teammates get it and don't care. I don't think Zito's reaction was immature.
I don't think rooting against individual teammates is the same as rooting against the team.
   52. ajnrules Posted: September 17, 2019 at 03:58 PM (#5880109)
If anything I'm sure Barry Zito has learned one important lesson from this incident:

Rooting for the Rangers is an exercise in futility.
   53. Traderdave Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:10 PM (#5880112)
I don't think rooting against individual teammates is the same as rooting against the team.


Rooting against your team *IN THE WORLD SERIES* is uncomfortably close to Black Sox. If you dislike a co-worker or get in an argument with your boss, is pulling for the firm to go bust a defensible position?
If a soldier was passed over for a medal, would you be OK with him rooting for the enemy? Not the same, but leans that direction.


Feeling frustrated, feeling shat upon, being pissed at (perceived) unfairness, not giving a damn, wanting out, -- all of that I get and those are all feelings that we have all had. But rooting for your team -- your teammates, your employer, an institution for millions of fans -- to lose just crosses a line for me.
   54. Dog on the sidewalk has an ugly bracelet Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:14 PM (#5880116)
It's not the kind of feeling that one can really control. I'm sure he didn't want to want his teammates to fail. And it sounds like he acted professionally in the moment despite what was going on in his head. That's good enough for me.
   55. Traderdave Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:19 PM (#5880119)
Yes, he did outwardly behave professionally, but that he even for a moment wanted his team to fail takes him down a few notches in my book.

He's a religious guy so perhaps he sees some value in confessing, and in the excerpt he owns up to it being ego driven. But publicly admitting doesn't seem like a smart move to me.
   56. Rally Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:21 PM (#5880121)
“You'd rather be Mike Stanton than say, Joey Votto or Andrew McCutchen?”

When I was a kid I wanted to be Nolan Ryan. Totally could have pulled it off if I had:

1. 30 mph more on my fastball
2. 2 more feet of break on the curve
3. An indestructible arm that could handle 200 pitches in a game, 40 starts a year, with no ill effects of such workload until my late 40s

But I’m lazy, so now when I think about it I’d much rather be a reliever. Mo Rivera ideally, but nothing wrong with settling for Troy Percival. Show up to the game, relax a while, get loose in the 8th, 3 outs in the 9th and a day’s work is done.
   57. flournoy Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:24 PM (#5880123)
What would you have had him do, apart from continuing to keep quiet about it? It's not like he made a conscious decision about who to root for. If he had said to himself, "I should be the bigger man and root for my teammates regardless," it wouldn't have changed the way he actually felt.
   58. caspian88 Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:32 PM (#5880125)
I suppose if I were a professional athlete, I'd be rooting for myself to perform so well that the team has no choice but to find a job for me, regardless of how well my teammates are performing.
   59. Walt Davis Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:36 PM (#5880126)
If #20 is correct, I will not be staring at Giancarlo Stanton when he is out at the restaurant.

Also, with $30 M much less $300 M, what are you guys doing at the grocery store?

I was thinking Brandon Morrow was the guy to be -- $35 M, you get to watch the game at home, don't have all that travel and all you have to do is throw 10 pitches on the flat three timea a year ... but then I saw that for his $35 M he has had to work nearly 2/3 as much as Mo Rivera and that just seems like too much effort for so little cash.
   60. Baldrick Posted: September 17, 2019 at 04:47 PM (#5880129)
Rooting against your team *IN THE WORLD SERIES* is uncomfortably close to Black Sox.

It's really really really really really really really really not.

Really.
   61. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: September 18, 2019 at 11:44 PM (#5880621)
"Drop it." (1:39)
   62. Hysterical & Useless Posted: September 19, 2019 at 02:01 AM (#5880630)
I have never been famous. Not even close. However, once, long ago, when I was in college, one summer I worked going door-to-door doing market research surveys. A guy stopped me on the street and complimented me on my performance in a show he'd seen a couple of months before (Orsino in 12th Night).

I had a huge smile on my face for the rest of the day.

No, I don't think he was trying to pick me up.
   63. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: September 19, 2019 at 12:43 PM (#5880763)
Does Joey Votto get stared at if he's at the grocery store in, say, Los Angeles or Miami?

How many Major League players these days would get recognized in a crowd outside of their current or past home team cities? Maybe Aaron Judge or Bryce Harper or Mookie Betts or Aroldis Chapman or Justin Turner, since they're highly promoted superstars with fairly distinctive looks and lots of national TV exposure, but how many others meet that criterion? Even an all time great like Mike Trout looks like any one of a million other guys his age, albeit with a bit less fat and a bit more muscle.

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