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Friday, January 22, 2010

Baseball Picture of the Day: 1903 World Series Group Photo

27 day until Pitchers and Catchers!

Today’s image is all sorts of cool: both teams from the 1903 (inaugural) World Series. I suggest you look at it in it’s original size.

According to the FLICKR page:

The Pirates: (Top, left to right)- second baseman Claude Ritchey, catcher Harry Smith, catcher Eddie Phelps, outfielder Ginger Beaumont, pitcher Deacon Phillippe, pitcher Sam Leever, pitcher Bucky Veil, pitcher Gus Thompson, outfielder Tommy Leach, outfielder Jimmy Sebring, pitcher Brickyard Kennedy, catcher Fred Carisch and shortstop Honus Wagner. Middle: Pirate manager and outfielder Fred Clarke. Boston players: third baseman-manager Jimmie Collins, outfielder Chick Stahl, pitcher Bill Dineen, outfielder Buck Freeman, first baseman Candy LaChance, outfielder Patsy Dougherty, pitcher George Winter, catcher Duke Farrell, outfielder Jack O’Brien, pitcher Long Tom Hughes. Bottom: shortstop Fred Parent, catcher Lou Criger, second baseman Hobe Ferris,

I guess Cy Young was camera-shy.

This image is in the public domain.

Tomorrow: Another Picture!

Gamingboy Posted: January 22, 2010 at 01:11 PM | 46 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: special topics

Reader Comments and Retorts

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   1. depletion Posted: January 22, 2010 at 02:52 PM (#3443920)
The cop on the left looks like my grandfather who was a cop in Boston around that time. Is this picture in Pittsburgh or Boston?
   2. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: January 22, 2010 at 02:54 PM (#3443922)
Not exactly the happiest looking group of guys I've ever seen.
   3. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: January 22, 2010 at 03:05 PM (#3443934)
Is this picture in Pittsburgh or Boston?
I would guess it is Boston, because according to this the Red Sox wore the caps with the little stripe on them at home but not on the road.
   4. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: January 22, 2010 at 03:06 PM (#3443937)
The cop on the left looks like my grandfather who was a cop in Boston around that time. Is this picture in Pittsburgh or Boston?


Wow. I'm 46 and my Grandfather was born in 1916.
   5. depletion Posted: January 22, 2010 at 03:22 PM (#3443951)
1903 may be pushing it for Grandpa Murphy. He was in the Boston Police Strike (1919), I believe, and Dad was born in 1917.
   6. RJ in TO Posted: January 22, 2010 at 03:42 PM (#3443984)
Wow. I'm 46 and my Grandfather was born in 1916.


I'm about a decade less than 46, and one of my Grandfathers was born in 1895.
   7. TerpNats Posted: January 22, 2010 at 03:49 PM (#3443996)
From the uniform shading, I'm guessing it's at the Huntington Avenue Grounds in Boston.
   8. Hack Wilson Posted: January 22, 2010 at 03:50 PM (#3443997)
I know little about my father's family, he was born around 1912. I met recently on this internet thingee one of my cousin's sons, who informed me that my grandfather was a Chicago cop who was shot in a bank robbery.

I learned this while at work and I told my boss, "I just learned my grandfather was shot." She said, "oh my God, when?" I told her sometime in the '30s. She wouldn't give me a bereavement day.
   9. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 22, 2010 at 03:51 PM (#3443998)
I'm 58, one grandfather born in 1875, one in 1898. I'm about grandchild 25 out of 35 on the one side, 4th out of 35 on the other.
   10. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 22, 2010 at 03:57 PM (#3444008)
The king of all this is John Tyler, 10th president of the US. He has a grandson living.
   11. Repoz Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:05 PM (#3444017)
My grandmother was a dancer/prosti who didn't know who my grandfather was and then married a Mafia big-wig that ran all the junkyards/whore houses in Scranton.

He once played catch with me.

Then had an ice cream parlor fire-bombed.
   12. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:06 PM (#3444019)
The king of all this is John Tyler, 10th president of the US. He has a grandson living.


Yeah. if this was old primer, I would post as Harrison Tyler and say "I'm 81 and my grandfather was born in 1790."
   13. bunyon Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:20 PM (#3444029)
Wow. I'm 46 and my Grandfather was born in 1916.

To chime in, I'm 38 and one grandfather was born in 1879* and the other in 1920. I'm grandchild 2 of 3 for the latter and last of a whole bunch for the former. My father was born when my grandfather was 55 and I was born when my father was 37. I tell my wife I have 20 years before I really need to start thinking about having kids. She is not, usually, amused.


* Like Hack Wilson's, my paternal grandfather was also shot. He was a sheriff, shot in the line of duty. He survived (good for me because it was 15 years before my father was born). I can't tell if Hack's did or not.
   14. dazzle Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:23 PM (#3444032)
What were the roster sizes in 1903? I count 14 players on each squad.
   15. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:27 PM (#3444034)
Tyler has two living grandchildren. That's quite something. Shame he wasn't a better President.
   16. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:29 PM (#3444035)
What were the roster sizes in 1903? I count 14 players on each squad.


Well, the Red Sox had 20 players play for them in 1903, 5 of whom played fewer than 20 games. The Pirates had 32, but 18 of them played fewer than 20 games. So, ~ 14 man rosters for the World Series seems about right.
   17. Nasty Nate Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:29 PM (#3444036)
The king of all this is John Tyler, 10th president of the US. He has a grandson living.


Julio Franco?
   18. Cris E Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:30 PM (#3444038)
There are only ten guys identified of the eleven Red Sox in the middle row. Outrage!

Also, I loove these names. Here's the full list:

PIT
Clause, Harry, Eddie, Ginger, Deacon, Sam, Bucky, Gus, Tommy, Jimmy, Brickyard(!), Fred, Honus, Fred (again)

BOS
Jimmie, Chick, Bill, Buck, Candy, Patsy, George, Duke, Jack, Long Tom, Fred (three), Lou, Hobe
   19. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:31 PM (#3444041)
Not to stray too far from the path, but Tyler was a perfectly fine president, easily in the upper half.
   20. Cris E Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:33 PM (#3444042)
Oh, and I'm 44 and my grandfather was born in 1899, but my dad was the youngest in his family by a stretch. My mom was the oldest so my other grandfather was 20-some years younger. (Just let me know if you want to hear other inane stuff from my past.)
   21. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:34 PM (#3444045)
Bit of a disappointment. Duke Farrell is the only one with a stereotypical period moustache.

Despite his nickname, Ginger Beaumont seems to have quite dark hair.

Who's that guy on the left wearing a lab coat? A ball boy? Carrying...a box of balls? And is he wearing an adjustable cap backwards? I didn't think the adjustable cap had been invented at this time.
   22. Hack Wilson Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:35 PM (#3444046)
I can't tell if Hack's did or not.

He was shot in the leg, and, apparently, did desk duty thereafter. I don't remember him ever standing, he died when I was about 4.
   23. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: January 22, 2010 at 04:48 PM (#3444062)
Not to stray too far from the path, but Tyler was a perfectly fine president, easily in the upper half.
I wonder if a political thread will get nuked if the politics in question are from the 1840s.

I'm not a big fan of Tyler's late life Confederate shennigans, so he's docked from me there. More generally, he's not a "name" President, whereas a Lincoln grandson would get a lot more coverage.
   24. Home Run Teal & Black Black Black Gone! Posted: January 22, 2010 at 05:00 PM (#3444083)
Candy LaChance. What a porn name.
   25. bunyon Posted: January 22, 2010 at 05:01 PM (#3444084)
I wonder if a political thread will get nuked if the politics in question are from the 1840s.

Shut up, you ####### Whig!



More generally, he's not a "name" President, whereas a Lincoln grandson would get a lot more coverage.

He'd likely either be an insufferable jackass or be a haunted recluse.
   26. Home Run Teal & Black Black Black Gone! Posted: January 22, 2010 at 05:02 PM (#3444086)
There's Taylor, there's Tyler, there's Fillmore and there's Hayes; there's William Henry Harrison (I died in thirty days!)

We are the adequate
Forgettable
Occasionally regrettable
Caretaker presidents of the
U
S
A!

My favorite low balled prezes are Harding, The Cleve, and the grandaddy of underrated presidents, James K. Polkadots.
   27. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: January 22, 2010 at 05:06 PM (#3444092)
Shut up, you ####### Whig!
Shove it up your ass. You Jacksonians are ruining this country! Ruining it!
   28. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: January 22, 2010 at 05:10 PM (#3444099)
54-40 or fight, b!tches!
   29. Rodder Posted: January 22, 2010 at 05:20 PM (#3444127)
Perhaps Tyler's most significant legacy is setting the precedent for a VP taking over for a deceased president. When he took over there was a lot of question about how it would be handled, as the constitution provided that the VP take over, but it didn't say for how long. Is a new election called? Do you continue with the same cabinet? We take it all for granted now, but I can imagine the shenanigans that were trying to be pulled following the death of Harrison.
   30. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: January 22, 2010 at 05:25 PM (#3444137)
While this is going to sound like BS, it ain't...

I'm 49, my father was born in 1892. My paternal grandfather, 1868, my maternal grandfather, 1880.

Yeah, doing my family tree was rather interesting.
   31. OsunaSakata Posted: January 22, 2010 at 06:32 PM (#3444244)
Who's that guy on the left wearing a lab coat?


Victor Conte's grandfather.
   32. Cabbage Posted: January 22, 2010 at 06:50 PM (#3444265)
Shut up, you ####### Whig!

If you start up that nullification claptrap again, Van Buren and I are going to go Old Hickory on your ass!
   33. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: January 22, 2010 at 07:22 PM (#3444329)
While this is going to sound like BS, it ain't...

I'm 49, my father was born in 1892. My paternal grandfather, 1868, my maternal grandfather, 1880.


And then there's my neighbors, who first became great-grandparents in their 40's
   34. Mefisto Posted: January 22, 2010 at 07:42 PM (#3444352)
Not to stray too far from the path, but Tyler was a perfectly fine president, easily in the upper half.


Not too many agree with you on that.
   35. Mom makes botox doctors furious Posted: January 22, 2010 at 08:16 PM (#3444398)
"I'm 49, my father was born in 1892. My paternal grandfather, 1868, my maternal grandfather, 1880."


I'm in the ballpark: 49, grandmother born in 1880.
   36. esseff Posted: January 22, 2010 at 09:02 PM (#3444460)
Interesting how little stadium seat design has changed in 107 years.
   37. jwb Posted: January 22, 2010 at 09:37 PM (#3444505)
Interesting how little stadium seat design has changed in 107 years.
To be fair, the modern retro stadium craze is trying to evoke the look of older stadiums without the view-obstructing support columns. You may have had a different opinion in 1975 during they heyday of multiuse stadiums.

Edit: The Americans and the Pirates used 13 and 14 players respectively in the WS.
   38. Delorians Posted: January 22, 2010 at 10:20 PM (#3444546)
Interesting info in Mefisto's link (post 34):

Only 4 presidents were unanimously ranked in the bottom quartile, and three were Lincon's immediate predecessors (also Harding).
All five presidents from 1932-1968 rank in the top half, mostly in the top quartile.
Only six not ranked in top quartile or bottom quartile by anyone: JQAdams, Van Buren, Cleveland, Taft, GHWBush, Clinton.
I agree with the top six from the WSJ 2005 poll: Washington, Lincoln, FDR, Jefferson, Roosevelt, Reagan.
   39. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: January 22, 2010 at 10:24 PM (#3444553)
Then had an ice cream parlor fire-bombed.


Mmm, baked Alaska.
   40. Rich Rifkin Posted: January 22, 2010 at 10:40 PM (#3444568)
Wow. I'm 46 and my Grandfather was born in 1916.

I'm 45 (born in 1964) and three of my four grandparents were born in the 1880s. My parents were 42 (mom) and 45 when I was born. I am, of course, the baby.

My dad (born in 1919) was the youngest of 5 kids. My paternal grandfather, born in 1880, was 39 when my dad was born. His wife, my grandmother (who lived to age 96), was born in 1883.

My mom (born in 1922, now 87) was the second of three kids. Her mom was just 29 when my mother was born. But her dad, who arrived in the U.S. in 1915 and then went off to WW1, was 36. He was born in Poland in 1886. He lived to 94.

My maternal grandfather, who grew up learning to design, cut and sew garments as the son an apparrel manufacturer, had a very interesting life. He and his dad would travel by train to Germany to buy second-hand ladies' dresses in Berlin, taking them back to a shtetl near Warsaw, where the family tore them apart and created new outfits. He also is a part of one of the best "it's a small world stories" ever:

In 1903, when he was 16 going on 17, Benjamin was "drafted" into the Russian army. (Russia controlled Poland, back then.) The Russians were building up their military at the time in order to fight the Japanese, largely over the control of Korea and the Siberian coast. Before the Czar needed him in Siberia, he was sent to fight "the Turks" in Chechnya. (Yes, even then, the Russians were killing Chechens.)

Somewhere around late 1904, early 1905, my grandfather was sent to Siberia. He told the story of walking (in the freezing cold) from the southern tip of Lake Baikal to Harbin, China. Harbin, then, was owned by the Russians. It was home of a major army base and the place in which units were formed into divisions, battallions, armies and so on to go off to fight the Japanese. As a Jew and a Pole, my grandfather was treated brutally by the Russians. He was underfed and underclothed for that weather. One night, with a handful of other Jews, he bolted.

Eventually, he made his way to Shanghai, settling in a German-speaking neighborhood*. (My grandfather grew up speaking Yiddish, Polish and German, and he studied Hebrew in Heder.) In China, he tried to become a textile trader, buying Chinese fabric and selling it to foreigners in the ports, who sold it to apparrel manufacturers back in Europe or the U.S. He failed in that business, but over the course of 3-4 years, learned to speak some Chinese, which was unusual among white people living in China, then.

When his textile trading business failed, he got a job in the U.S. merchant marine as a tailor. His job on ships was to design and fabricate uniforms for the officers and the crewmen. He learned to speak English during the next 5-6 years; and he stopped off to live ashore for a time in Jakarta, Sydney, Colombo (Ceylon), Capetown and Buenos Aires. He crossed through Panama (by train, not through the Canal) in 1915 and finally got to America late in 1915, settling in San Francisco.

In 1917, he was drafted into the U.S. Army and sent to France to fight against the Germans. (His job in the Army was as a tailor, making uniforms for Cavalry officers, though somehow he did get shot.) When he got back to the U.S. in 1919, he met my grandmother (oddly enough, she was a Jewess who had grown up in Hanoi, French Indochina), got married and started a family.

Here is the small world bit: There was a terrible recession in 1920-21. Looking for work, he moved down to Los Angeles and got a job as a tailor in the Garment District in East L.A., where lots of poor, immigrant Jews had settled. A few weeks after he arrived in L.A., a woman a few years younger than he was heard him speaking Yiddish on the street. She asked him if he was Benyumin Iuniwlotzky (I'm not sure of that spelling) and he said he was, who are you? She was his niece. She told him she recognized his voice.

He had no contact with his family by letters after he went AWOL from the Russian Army. In the interim, his parents and other family members (save a few brothers and sisters who were later murdered in the Holocaust) moved to New York. After WW1, they moved to L.A., where my great-grandfather opened a sweat-shop. As it turned out, my grandfather was living two blocks away from his mother and father and two of his sisters and their kids. But for hundreds of chance events, he never would have seen his family again. But ... it's a small world after all.

*He told my uncle, his son, that he spent a week once in Tsingtao, which was then a German colony. I don't know if he drank Tsingtao beer, but I would guess he did. He was not an alcoholic, but he was a drinker.
   41. Best Regards, President of Comfort, Esq. Posted: January 22, 2010 at 10:44 PM (#3444573)
Hey, I can see Harveys in the stands!
   42. Traderdave Posted: January 22, 2010 at 11:02 PM (#3444604)
Great story, RR, thank you.
   43. Rich Rifkin Posted: January 23, 2010 at 05:54 AM (#3444779)
I guess Cy Young was camera-shy.

This is a picture of CY in a Boston uniform. I'm guessing, based on how old he looks and how fat he is, it was taken near the end of his Boston days, probably 1907 or 1908. I suppose it was taken when he was warming up inside the Huntington Avenue Grounds.
   44. BoSoxFanChick Posted: March 31, 2011 at 05:35 AM (#3782005)
WOW!!! Just found this forum!!!
@Teal & Black is Puffin on Arctic Plumes: George "CANDY" LaChance was my Uncle. He got the nickname cause he was a tough SOB who had a short temper and bad disposition. The nickname was sarcastic.... NOT a porn star (but probably a man whore LOL). Very PROUD of my blood connection to Boston! He played 1B for the Boston Americans (later known as the Red Sox)during 1902-1905. For the time period, he had great stats (no steroids needed), and was known as one of the best fielders Boston had. ;-)
   45. BoSoxFanChick Posted: March 31, 2011 at 05:36 AM (#3782006)
   46. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: March 31, 2011 at 06:10 AM (#3782013)
My Dad's dad was born in 1910. He made most of the really old signs that are still around in Dubuque, Iowa - painted and neon, because he kept up with the technology - and he also used to paint the numbers on the town clock. He was incredibly strong from working with his hands his whole life; even in his 70's, his flexed biceps looked like a softball. After badly injuring his right hand on a job, he taught himself to write with his left, and when he'd write in his diary he'd just switch back and forth when his hand got tired.

My Mom's dad was born in 1912, I think. He was an Army cook and a terrific dancer, who specialized in getting promoted, then cussing out a superior officer and getting demoted again. He was in his late 30's when he had an argument with my Mom (then a teenager), went for a walk to cool his temper, and dropped dead of a heart attack or stroke, can't remember which. Mom's last words to him: "I hate you!" Heck of a thing for a teenage kid. Grandma stayed in Mobile and raised their five kids on her own.

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