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Thursday, January 23, 2014

Billy Joel coming to Nats Park, Mike Rizzo is a fan

Seen the Lights Go Out on Michael Broadway…

The Washington Nationals, in partnership with Live Nation, announced on Thursday in a press conference at Nats Park that Grammy-winner Billy Joel will perform at the stadium on July 26. After headlining the first ever concert at the venue in 2009, Joel is back for another summer stop.

The event was announced just 24 hours prior and featured Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo, as well as D.C.’s deputy mayor Victor Hoskins. The Billy Joel part was kept as a surprise for a full day before Hoskins revealed the news.

Rizzo was in attendance to represent the team, but also as a fan of Joel. He made a brief speech on stage after Hoskins spoke.

Here is what he said:

  I’m just so excited to have Billy Joel back at Nationals Park. Not only is he a Hall of Fame-caliber entertainer, I just like the fact that he’s a very attractive bald man with a goatee. We gotta stick together.

Repoz Posted: January 23, 2014 at 05:05 PM | 284 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: nats

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   101. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: January 24, 2014 at 03:31 PM (#4645837)
   102. Lassus Posted: January 24, 2014 at 03:53 PM (#4645856)
What else should I be listening to from the '70s to get a better appreciation for the decade?

Tom Waits.
   103. Karl from NY Posted: January 24, 2014 at 03:57 PM (#4645864)
Me and my whole sixth-grade class thought We Didn't Start The Fire was the coolest thing in the world. And a few years later it was everybody's first song on Napster. Memorizing it was something of a rite of passage for my particular generation of geek. Damn glad that millennium is over. This song transcends the concept of goodness or awfulness. It's just there. You may as well dislike the sky.

Joel made corporate radio sellout rock without even selling out. He never had any artistic integrity to compromise. The pap like Uptown Girl really was what he was driven to create and the peak of his talent. Billy the Kid is decently crafted, but aside from that and "Fire", there's no there there.

And of course Piano Man is the most annoying singalong in history, where everybody belts out this cynical and depressing song like it's some kind of celebration. If it's celebrating anything, it's how pathetic the wannabe singalonger is too.

Anyone else see parallels between Joel and Meat Loaf? They both built careers on beating you over the head with songs with marginally clever premises but stretched out way too far with manufactured catchiness.
   104. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 03:58 PM (#4645865)
And this song.


I have no great objection to that song, per se, but what always strikes me as astounding when I watch footage of standard bore rock bands from that era is how lifeless and staid they are on stage. Would it kill Mott The Hoople to act like they actually want to be performing?
   105. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:01 PM (#4645869)
   106. Lassus Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:09 PM (#4645873)
What else should I be listening to from the '70s to get a better appreciation for the decade?

The Sweet. The Kinks.
   107. Karl from NY Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:12 PM (#4645877)
What else should I be listening to from the 70s to get a better appreciation for the decade?

How many bullets will fill me in the ten seconds after I say Rush?
   108. Benji Gil Gamesh Rises Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:13 PM (#4645878)
I don't get it, he seems to be saying that they had had it already before they even got married.
I'm guessing that you have not been divorced?

I read it pretty simply as they were done for from the start, they just didn't know it.
   109. rr Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:15 PM (#4645880)
Tom Waits.

I have taught Kentucky Avenue in classes a few times.
   110. Lassus Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:15 PM (#4645881)
Anyone else see parallels between Joel and Meat Loaf? They both built careers on beating you over the head with songs with marginally clever premises but stretched out way too far with manufactured catchiness.

Billy Joel had a vicious decline phase (which included and was exemplified by "Fire"), but if if his peak songcraft seems equal to Meatloaf in length and breadth to you, I can't really agree in the slightest. If you count "Uptown Girl" as Joel's peak, that doesn't seem to make sense either.
   111. BDC Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:27 PM (#4645888)
Would it kill Mott The Hoople to act like they actually want to be performing?

I believe narcotics may have been involved :)

Anyone else see parallels between Joel and Meat Loaf?

Well, I don't think Billy Joel has ever gone ape#### on Gary Busey. Maybe he's done so in his heart, of course.
   112. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:28 PM (#4645889)
A former member, Jason Isbel, released what I think is the best album 2013, a more traditional country thing called "Southeastern."

Are you Matt Besser?

I know she's not exactly alt-country anymore, but I really liked the most recent Case album.

Elvis Costello's first few albums (well, albums 2-5 in particular) are my pick for highest peak in pop/rock history. (Going only by personal preference, mind you.)

He does listen to new music, he just doesn't like what he hears and finds himself going back to music from 5-10 years ago

I'm doing some of this as well (I'm 40), though I almost feel like my head is full of tunes and that I need to clear out space for new ones (which is an odd feeling and imprecise description, but...) So when I hear new music, my normal reaction is 'oh, that's solid (or bad or whatever)', but no real desire to hear it (or not) again.
Do feel like I'm starting to shake it, though / connect again...
   113. esseff Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:31 PM (#4645892)
What else should I be listening to from the 70s to get a better appreciation for the decade?


10cc, before Kevin Godley and Lol Creme quit, especially "Sheet Music."

It ain't pounding rock, but it's clever stuff from four guys who were all songwriters, all vocalists and all multi-instrumentalists.
   114. Baldrick Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:32 PM (#4645895)
So I tried to turn him onto stuff I thought he might like- Chvrches, Parquet Courts, Savages, Smith Westerns, etc. And he basically rejected all those bands. Finally, I threw up my hands and gave up. I dunno, I found a lot to like in 2013.

2013 was a GREAT year for music. Just packed full of awesome stuff across many many genres.

Obligatory self-promotion. My blog posts on my favorite music of the year:
Top 30 Albums of 2013
Top 50 Songs of 2013
   115. Swoboda is freedom Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:41 PM (#4645899)
Obligatory self-promotion. My blog posts on my favorite music of the year:
Top 30 Albums of 2013
Top 50 Songs of 2013



I only have even heard of 5 or 6 of those bands. I have about 3 of the songs on my Ipod.
   116. esseff Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:43 PM (#4645903)
A couple of others I enjoyed quite a bit in the '70s: the Geordie band Lindisfarne and English folk band Strawbs.
   117. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:48 PM (#4645908)
10cc


This gives me a chance to talk mention Animalympics, for which 10cc did the soundtrack in about 82 or 83. It's been thirty years, and though some of the references have dated a little (Cosell is dead, Keith Jackson retired, the USSR no more), it's still a very funny sendup of sports broadcasts and American culture, and some of the voices behind it (Billy Crystal when he was still funny, Gilda Radner when she was still alive) have real bona fides.
   118. Manny Coon Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:50 PM (#4645912)
The purpose of continually engaging new music, new artists and new sounds, even as it gets more difficult as you age out of scene after scene after scene, is to keep your mind and heart malleable and functioning as a real human being; to avoid late career onset of Middle Aged Automatonia. If all you ever listen to now is what you listened to 20 years ago, you're no longer living; you're just dying the slow decay.


I'm not that old yet, but I'm old enough that a lot of friends from when I was younger are listening to same crap from when we were in high school in the 90's, and I think about how it stinks how much good stuff they've missed out on. I think anyone who says there is no good music these days or music is getting worse is full of it, it might be harder find but if you're willing to put in the effort it's out there. I understand why my dad listens to the same music from 60's as discovering new stuff when he was my age was about 100 times more difficult, without the internet it would be tough find time learn about new music or whatever art after being shackled to a desk all day and chasing children all night.

Hell even if you don't like any new music coming out now, it's also easier to find interesting music form 80 years ago, that you likely have never heard before.
   119. Kurt Posted: January 24, 2014 at 04:57 PM (#4645913)
How many bullets will fill me in the ten seconds after I say Rush?


Better save a few for me - I think their 80's output was better.

The fun thing about the 70's is you have the birth of so many genres - prog, heavy metal, punk, disco, funk, wimp rock...

Honestly, if you wanted to check out 70's prog I think the best "gateway" band is Genesis - Foxtrot, Selling England by the Pound, etc. Even people who can't stand Rush, Floyd or Yes I think could fing something to like about Genesis.
   120. Manny Coon Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:01 PM (#4645917)
Do you ever go through that thing where you hate a musician/band, really hate them, and then you start to see them as humorous, and as a result you start loudly singing along when you hear the songs, and this continues for a little while, and then maybe you actually acquire some of their music to play at select times, and then maybe you listen by yourself just to chuckle, and at some point you cannot tell if you're still being ironic or if you actually like them? That's happening with me and Billy Joel.


Not quite the same thing, because I never hated it, just thought it was silly, but funk/soul from the late 70's/early 80's as a whole. Some of those songs just completely ridiculous at first glance, especially if you're a white guy who heard it well the time period, but they end up being super catchy and the musicians tend to be really good.

   121. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:01 PM (#4645918)
How many bullets will fill me in the ten seconds after I say Rush?


Why shoot a man that is already clearly dead?
   122. The Kentucky Gentleman, Mark Edward Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:02 PM (#4645919)
Obligatory self-promotion. My blog posts on my favorite music of the year:
Top 30 Albums of 2013


Good list, a lot of stuff I haven't heard.

I will say that Desire Lines is probably my least-favorite Camera Obscura album, but even a mediocre CO album is mostly enjoyable.

Okkervil River had a really strong bounce-back album too.

FWIW, my top 5 goes something like: My Bloody Valentine- m b v; Neko Case- The Worse Things Get...; A$AP Rocky- Long.Live.A$AP; Chvrches- The Bones of What You Believe; Kanye- Yeezus.
   123. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:06 PM (#4645920)
If we're self-promoting, here's my top 25 albums from 2013. I still owe the editors write ups, but I'm notoriously lazy about doing those these days.
   124. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:07 PM (#4645922)
Honestly, if you wanted to check out 70's prog


Find a club with a punk rock band. Go there. Drink until this desire for 70's prog passes, or until you do.
   125. Kurt Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:10 PM (#4645924)
Oh yeah? Prog fans don't have to drink themselves silly to have a good time!
   126. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:13 PM (#4645926)
Oh yeah? Prog fans don't have to drink themselves silly to have a good time!


Prog fans wouldn't know a good time if I transcribed the process for having one into 11/9 time signatures and had Neil Peart drum it out in Morse code for them.
   127. The Kentucky Gentleman, Mark Edward Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:16 PM (#4645927)
Lorde? C'mon Sam, there were like 15 other acts that did a better version of her schtick last year.
   128. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:19 PM (#4645930)
Lorde? C'mon Sam, there were like 15 other acts that did a better version of her schtick last year.

This sort of rhetoric is utterly meaningless and useless.
   129. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:20 PM (#4645931)
Lorde? C'mon Sam, there were like 15 other acts that did a better version of her schtick last year.


Mayhap have been. I acquired, listened to, and quite enjoyed Lorde. I have no shame about my occasional foray into pop, and "Pure Heroine" was a great listen.
   130. Nasty Nate Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:26 PM (#4645933)
I like the Truckers, and the first time I saw them Isbell was in the band, so I should probably check out 'Southeastern.'
   131. The Kentucky Gentleman, Mark Edward Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:28 PM (#4645934)
This sort of rhetoric is utterly meaningless and useless.


Rhetoric? It's boring.

Royals is catchy though. And the first song on the album.
   132. God Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:28 PM (#4645935)
A former member, Jason Isbel, released what I think is the best album 2013, a more traditional country thing called "Southeastern."


This. The Jason Isbell record is easily the best album of 2013 for me.
   133. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:35 PM (#4645940)
Hell even if you don't like any new music coming out now, it's also easier to find interesting music form 80 years ago, that you likely have never heard before.


Once I had kids, latching on to new music was very tough because it requires time and effort. Groups come and go pretty quickly, just like in my day; you have to be young and nimble just to keep up. :)

Funny, just today, I heard 7 Nation Army on the way in, and thought "that's the bass riff they play at football games". While I have some familiarity with the White Stripes through my kids, I didn't know the song until I caught the lyrics nor knew who the artist was.

But going backwards, yeah, I've done that for a long time. All the way back to the Hot Five/Seven in jazz, Hildegard von Bingen in classical. There's a treasure trove. Heck, you can get lost in Miles Davis for a couple of years. I've picked up some Afro-pop. Very little country though, for me, a little goes a long way, even if I love the titles.
   134. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:38 PM (#4645942)
I like the Truckers, and the first time I saw them Isbell was in the band, so I should probably check out 'Southeastern.'


You really should. It's fantastic. Isbell's solo offerings have always disappointed to date. They'd have a really good song or two ("Dress Blues," etc) but it was never more than a fifth of the album and the rest was pretty mediocre filler most of the time. (Patterson and Cooley, the two other songwriters from the Truckers, also have this problem on their solo releases.) But "Southeastern" is pretty much flawless, start to finish. A full album of superb traditional country/Americana songs. I loved pretty much the entire thing.
   135. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:42 PM (#4645946)
Funny, just today, I heard 7 Nation Army on the way in, and thought "that's the bass riff they play at football games". While I have some familiarity with the White Stripes through my kids, I didn't know the song until I caught the lyrics nor knew who the artist was.


Seven Nation Army if Jack White had soul.
   136. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:47 PM (#4645951)
Seven Nation Army if Jack White had soul.


Holy #### that's incredible.
   137. The Adam Dunn Effort #44 Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:47 PM (#4645952)
I feel so young when I go to Billy Joel concerts.
   138. Ivan Grushenko of Hong Kong Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:51 PM (#4645956)
What else should I be listening to from the '70s to get a better appreciation for the decade?

I don't know whether no one has named these because they're too obvious but:

Parliament -- Mothership Connection, Funkentelechy vs the Placebo Syndrome, Up for the Down Stroke, Chocolate City, Osmium, and Motor Booty Affair
Funkadelic -- Uncle Jam Wants You, Cosmic Slop, Maggot Brain, One Nation Under a Groove, Funkadelic plus early singles
Stevie Wonder -- Songs in the Key of Life, Innervisions, Talking Book, Music of My Mind, Where I'm Coming From, Fulfillingness's Last Finale
Curtis Mayfield -- Superfly, Curtis Mayfield, Roots, There's No Place Like America Today
Al Green -- Call Me
Bill Withers -- Live From Carnegie Hall
Bobby Womack -- I Don't Know What the World Is Coming To
Earth Wind and Fire -- Earth Wind and Fire, Head For the Sky, Gratitude, That's the Way of the World
Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes -- Black and Blue, Wake Up Everybody
Isley Brothers -- 3+3, Heat is On
Marvin Gaye -- What's Goin' On, Let's Get It On
O'Jays -- Back Stabbers
Miles Davis -- ####### Brew, Live-Evil, On the Corner
David Grisman Quintet
Dolly Parton -- Coat of Many Colors, Jolene
George Jones -- We Can Make It, The Best
Merle Haggard -- Hag
Vassar Clements -- Hillbilly Jazz
Waylon Jennings -- The Taker/Tulsa, Honky Tonk Heroes, Lonesome, Orn'ry and Mean
Jaco Pastorius
Woody Shaw -- Rosewood, Live at the Village Vanguard
Junior Murvin -- Police and Thieves
Max Romeo -- War Ina Babylon
Congos -- Heart of the Congos
Meditations -- Message from the Meditations
Mighty Diamonds -- Right Time
Burning Spear -- Marcus Garvey, Dry and Heavy
Toots and the Maytals -- Funky Kingston, Reggae Got Soul
Jimmy Cliff -- Jimmy Cliff, Struggling Man
Big Youth -- Screaming Target
Black Uhuru -- Sinsemilla, Red, Chill Out
Jacob Miller -- Dread Dread
   139. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:53 PM (#4645958)
Holy #### that's incredible.


There is a SHITTON of great music coming out on Bandcamp.com these days. I try to dedicate a couple of hours every Sunday to listening to their "Bandcamp Weekly" mix and just jotting down tracks that blow me away. Then I'll give the full albums a listen (via the same website) and buy them from the artist if it strikes me as a "need to own" type release.
   140. Baldrick Posted: January 24, 2014 at 05:59 PM (#4645960)
If we're self-promoting, here's my top 25 albums from 2013. I still owe the editors write ups, but I'm notoriously lazy about doing those these days.

I don't agree with you about much in terms of baseball, but great taste in music!

That Isbell album is truly fantastic. He was always (by far) my favorite Trucker, and I'm a bit more favorably inclined to his other solo work (I think the hit/miss rate is closer to 50/50). But Southeastern is just great from top to bottom.

I will say that Desire Lines is probably my least-favorite Camera Obscura album, but even a mediocre CO album is mostly enjoyable.

I felt precisely the same way about My Maudlin Career.
   141. God Posted: January 24, 2014 at 06:04 PM (#4645962)
I'm glad we have Jason Isbell's great solo work to listen to, but man, I do miss that lineup the Drive-By Truckers had when he was with them. Three lead guitarists who all write and sing their own (great) songs and it really fit together cohesively. That was the best band of the first decade of this century IMO. The Dirty South is basically a perfect album.
   142. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: January 24, 2014 at 06:04 PM (#4645963)
Some of those songs just completely ridiculous at first glance, especially if you're a white guy who heard it well the time period, but they end up being super catchy and the musicians tend to be really good.

IOW, "Tower of Power."

Check out some YouTubes of them from the last 10 years or so. They're playing 40 year old songs that sound better now than when they were initially recorded because the players in the band are so much better.... and they were damned good in the 70's.

Another sentimental vote here for The O'Jays too. I've played a few shows in the horn section with them in the last couple of years when they've come through my part of the country. They still have 2 of the 3 originals and sound as good as ever. Eddie Levert may be in his 70's, but the crowd still goes nuts when he starts humping his mic stand while talking about lovin' his woman.

   143. Nasty Nate Posted: January 24, 2014 at 06:23 PM (#4645972)
I'm glad we have Jason Isbell's great solo work to listen to, but man, I do miss that lineup the Drive-By Truckers had when he was with them. Three lead guitarists who all write and sing their own (great) songs and it really fit together cohesively. That was the best band of the first decade of this century IMO. The Dirty South is basically a perfect album.


Was there tension between Cooley and Isbell?

With him in their band their shows had a LOT of guitar - not that that's a bad thing...
   144. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 06:28 PM (#4645975)
I'm glad we have Jason Isbell's great solo work to listen to, but man, I do miss that lineup the Drive-By Truckers had when he was with them. Three lead guitarists who all write and sing their own (great) songs and it really fit together cohesively. That was the best band of the first decade of this century IMO. The Dirty South is basically a perfect album.


I'm not sure I'd sign up for "band of the decade" for DBT, but I wouldn't be aghast at taking a long look at that vote either. I think I'd probably go with Decoration Day as their best release, but it's probably a matter of taste at that point. I was a little miffed that TDS included "Lookout Mountain" which they'd been playing live since at least the Gangstabilly release party at The Star Bar, back in the day. I also thought the album version wasn't nearly good enough to do justice to the live instance of that song. But again, tastes and "hipster" prejudice probably doing some work for me on that topic.

I do love "The Day John Henry Died" as a song. Of course, the songs that Isbell contributed to the Truckers during the height of their run were all just amazing.

I also love that his tour, at least to start (before "Southeastern" sort of took off as a big time release the second half of the last year) was called the "Quit ####### Around And Play Outfit Tour."
   145. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 06:30 PM (#4645976)
Was there tension between Cooley and Isbell?


I never heard much about tension between any of the three majors in the band. Jason always wanted to run his own band, and it was assumed that he would spin out solo eventually. What tension there was, to my understanding, was between Jason and Shonna Tucker, his wife at the time, and the touring bassist for the Truckers for a while there. A lot of "Southeastern" is Isbell coming to terms with his drug and alcohol problems and owning up to being a pretty big shitheel when it came to his treatment of Shonna.

With him in their band their shows had a LOT of guitar


Live, the coda to "Outfit", where all three of them just kick fully into layer upon layer of amplified guitar noise... God. The album release show for Southern Rock Opera, 40 Watt in Athens... Some shows are religious experiences.
   146. Nasty Nate Posted: January 24, 2014 at 06:46 PM (#4645980)
I didn't even know Shonna was out of the band. I think she was a full-fledged member for a while, not just a touring bassist.

They play near me in the near future. I've missed them the last few tours but it might be time to see them again.
   147. God Posted: January 24, 2014 at 06:54 PM (#4645982)
Yeah, Shonna Tucker was a full-fledged member of the band and she was married to Isbell. They got divorced, which is why he left the band. After that the Truckers started having Shonna do vocals on one or two songs per album, which didn't really work out all that well. Now she's left the band, too, so Jason, if you ever want to go back...
   148. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 06:59 PM (#4645983)
I've heard good things about Shonna Tucker and Eye Candy's debut. Haven't spun it in depth.
   149. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 07:00 PM (#4645984)
I've heard good things about Shonna Tucker and Eye Candy's debut. Haven't spun it in depth.
   150. Perry Posted: January 24, 2014 at 07:14 PM (#4645988)
What else should I be listening to from the 70s to get a better appreciation for the decade?


Late to the party here, but if you're still reading I'll chime in. I was age 15-25 in the 70s; this is stuff from that decade I still find worth listening to. Off the top of my head, I'm sure I'm forgetting some great stuff.

Elvis Costello's first 4 albums (through Get Happy)
Clash - London Calling
Joe Ely -- anything. Criminally underrated.
Bob Dylan -- Blood on the Tracks.
Dylan & Band -- the Basement Tapes
Van Morrison -- From Astral Weeks (68) right up through Into the Music (79).
Rod Stewart -- a joke now, but Gasoline Alley, Never a Dull Moment, and Every Picture Tells a Story are wonderful.
Springsteen -- everything he did in the 70s was great. Actually I'd extend that to the mid-80s, through Tunnel of Love.
Joni Mitchell -- anything
Talking Heads -- everything up through Remain in Light.
John Prine -- first few albums, anything through Bruised Orange. Criminally underrated.
Ry Cooder -- Paradise & Lunch, Boomer's Story, Into the Purple Valley
Jackson Browne -- anything (don't listen to him any more but loved him then).
Layla
English Beat -- (were they 70s? Possibly 80s)
Who's Next
   151. SoSH U at work Posted: January 24, 2014 at 07:19 PM (#4645990)
Baldrick and Sam,

As the Primates whose musical taste most mirrors my own, is there a specific place you go for new stuff? My old go-to site has gone-went, and I really haven't found something to replace it that works.

   152. Baldrick Posted: January 24, 2014 at 07:39 PM (#4645996)
Baldrick and Sam,

As the Primates whose musical taste most mirrors my own, is there a specific place you go for new stuff? My old go-to site has gone-went, and I really haven't found something to replace it that works.

1. Music blogs. I don't read as many of these as I used to, since a bunch of the good ones from 2005-2008 are now gone. But I still regularly check Knox Road, I Guess I'm Floating, Hits in the Car, Music for Ants, etc.
2. Pitchfork, AV Club, Paste, American Songwriter, Metacritic, etc. I don't really rely on the reviews from these places. Mostly they just provide a few central aggregators that let me know when new stuff comes out.
3. NPR. Their podcast is pretty solid. They're close enough to my wheelhouse that I usually like a fair amount of things, and diverse enough that it picks up some stuff I wouldn't otherwise have heard.
4. Soundcloud/Bandcamp. I use the former more than the latter, but both are pretty awesome resources.
5. Recommendations. My reach is a bit wider on this, since I get sent promotional stuff (a lot of which is bad, but some of which is really great). But I also just listen to what my friends are raving about. Or check in on conversations like this very one we're having. The Rutabega (my #9 album of the year) was a rec from our very own Phil Coorey, for example.

One other thing that's made a big difference for me in the past couple years is Spotify. Now, I HATE trying to use Spotify as my standard interface for music. But it does serve a really useful sorting purpose. Whenever I come across a new record that seems worth exploring, I can just stick it in a playlist, so I can come back to it later. Five years ago, I would often hear one great song but never get around to hearing the whole record. These days, if you like one song, the rest of the record is just a few clicks away. A lot of the time, you'll only like the one song. But some of the time, you'll get an entire fantastic record.
   153. Go-Kart Mozart Posted: January 24, 2014 at 08:13 PM (#4646004)
agree with costello, nick lowe, dave edmunds (and rockpile of course). for bombastic rock, my favorites are quadrophenia and physical graffiti. exile on main street is a great album. for the record, billy joel's turnstiles album is really really good. i like him a lot, but i know why people don't.
   154. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 08:59 PM (#4646014)
Hmmmm.

For general indie releases I consult popmatters.com.

For more twang and southeastern oriented stuff I trust PasteMagazine.com.

For more mainstream power pop/pop punk I troll AbsolutePunk.

I spin thru Stereogum occasionally. As I said earlier I love Bandcamp as a immersion search venue. Soundcloud is also really awesome for new self released singles.

I also have some carryover email lists from the old criticism days. Get some interesting promos occasionally. That's how I found criminal hygiene and restorations.

And I can't oversell the value of friendships and conversations. From my old evilsponge pals to the guys that book venues around ATL to Repoz. You can never replace human networking. Ever.

I avoid pitchfork. But that's about me more than them.
   155. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 09:08 PM (#4646015)
Of course, a running "OTP: Music" thread wouldn't be out of place on the sidebar here, and it would keep me even further out of the Politics debacle.

Ted Leo and Aimee Mann, as "Both," a new supergroup...
   156. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 24, 2014 at 09:24 PM (#4646022)
And finally, before I close out the intarwebs for the night; the ####### Rock*A*Teens are doing reunion shows in June at The EARL (East Atlanta) probably in prep for a show or two at MergeFest 2014 in Chapel Hill later this summer. The Rock*A*Teens were, hands down, the best garage rock/rockabilly/swamp rock/tent revival stomp the 1990s had to offer. They were a force of nature. They are to this day the single greatest band the city of Atlanta has ever produced, and if you are anywhere near a venue they're playing at this summer, get your ass out the door and go.
   157. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 24, 2014 at 10:52 PM (#4646041)
1970s, trying not to repeat anything:
The Bee Gees had three distinct periods, each great, and the 1971-74 one ("Trafalgar," "To Whom It May Concern" and "Mr. Natural") is the least known. The Cars' self-titled debut is song-studded and "Candy-O" is very good. The Raspberries are best represented by a Greatest Hits album. So is Al Green. So is Blondie. So is T. Rex. James Brown is best represented by the 1970s section of the "Star Time!" box. I prefer Tom Verlaine's first solo album to Television's second album. Hope someone mentioned Neil Young, David Bowie, Paul Simon and the Sex Pistols. "The Pretenders" was released even later in 1979 than traditional Last Album Of The 1970s "London Calling." The Buzzcocks collection is unstoppable. Add "The Modern Lovers," "New York Dolls," S&G's "Bridge Over Troubled Water," and "Tapestry" by Carole King. The Derek & the Dominoes album has strong material. Nick Drake's "Bryter Later" is wonderful. So are Big Star's "#1 Record" and "Radio City."
   158. Roger McDowell spit on me! Posted: January 24, 2014 at 11:04 PM (#4646046)
Woah...OK. I never though of Atlanta as a summer vacation spot, but I will have to think about it...
   159. Roger McDowell spit on me! Posted: January 24, 2014 at 11:08 PM (#4646050)
I was just going to mention Big Star since no one had yet. I think most other things I'd mention have already been listed, except maybe the Undertones first record.
   160. Roger McDowell spit on me! Posted: January 24, 2014 at 11:21 PM (#4646056)
And since people are doing their favorites of 2013, here's my favorite song: Scud Mountain Boys - Do You Love the Sun
   161. PreservedFish Posted: January 24, 2014 at 11:26 PM (#4646059)
Of course, a running "OTP: Music" thread wouldn't be out of place on the sidebar here, and it would keep me even further out of the Politics debacle.


It makes at least as much sense as OTP: computer games.
   162. SoSH U at work Posted: January 24, 2014 at 11:28 PM (#4646060)
I'll give a nod to Warren Zevon, whose absence from any of these 70s recs is a little perplexing.

   163. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: January 24, 2014 at 11:42 PM (#4646066)
And of course Piano Man is the most annoying singalong in history, where everybody belts out this cynical and depressing song like it's some kind of celebration.

There's a weird sub-category: "Songs People Love without Ever Actually Listening to Them."
For example, weddings featuring "I Will Always Love You" or "It Started with a Kiss" make me think somebody wasn't really paying attention.
   164. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: January 24, 2014 at 11:48 PM (#4646068)
There's a weird sub-category: "Songs People Love without Ever Actually Listening to Them."
For example, weddings featuring "I Will Always Love You" or "It Started with a Kiss" make me think somebody wasn't really paying attention.


I think the king of this is "Born in the USA".
   165. Ivan Grushenko of Hong Kong Posted: January 24, 2014 at 11:56 PM (#4646073)
I think the king of this is "Born in the USA".

Brown Sugar (Rolling Stones not d'Angelo) is also in this category for some people. For others the lyrics just make it more awesome.
   166. Repoz Posted: January 25, 2014 at 12:11 AM (#4646078)
Bandcamp/Soundcloud are as essential as the ever churning Aussie punk box was at Pier Platters.

Other MP3 sites Fuzzbook, Tony Alamo Christian Ministries Music, BarryGruff, Mackeral, RSTB, Styrofoam Drone, Gimme Tinnitus, My Flabby Groin, and just anything Zombotron gets involved with.

Oh, and YORCHH rulz or sumthin.
   167. God Posted: January 25, 2014 at 02:57 AM (#4646103)
I think the king of this is "Born in the USA".


It really applies to a lot of Springsteen songs. Dancing in the Dark, Promised Land, Radio Nowhere, Born to Run, etc., are all prime examples of anthemic music mixed with introspective, downbeat lyrics.
   168. OsunaSakata Posted: January 25, 2014 at 07:07 AM (#4646109)
I like Billy Joel and I understand why people don't like him. But I don't get why some think he's the worst ever.

If you have the time, I would recommend latching onto the local music scene. Assuming your city is big enough, there should be a band or singer you will love and who will totally appreciate your support. Here are my personal favorites from living in the Washington-Baltimore area: Pop - Margot MacDonald. Ambient - Star FK Radium. Jam Band - Jesters of Kindness. And I guess Star FK Radium is a sports joke in that it's a spoonerism of the former home of the Senators and the Nationals.
   169. OsunaSakata Posted: January 25, 2014 at 07:08 AM (#4646110)
There's a weird sub-category: "Songs People Love without Ever Actually Listening to Them."
For example, weddings featuring "I Will Always Love You" or "It Started with a Kiss" make me think somebody wasn't really paying attention.


You forgot the king of misinterpreted songs played at weddings: "Every Breath You Take".
   170. michaelplank has knowledgeable eyes Posted: January 25, 2014 at 09:02 AM (#4646115)
Re: the 70s, I don't think anyone has mentioned Pink Floyd or Steely Dan. As basically a non-fan of both, I've got to admit they've both got deep catalogs with plenty of highlights. Plus, they're surely representative of many aspects of the decade.

All the same could be said of the Eagles, I suppose, but I'm with the Dude here -- I've had a really rough night and I hate the $:@&?/) Eagles.
   171. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: January 25, 2014 at 10:02 AM (#4646121)
Pink Floyd was, for the most part, all that was terrible about 70s music. Dark Side of the Moon is good, if dated, but everything they did after that other than the song "Wish You Were Here" is trash-heap stuff.

And there's no need to engage with the Eagles on any level.
   172. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: January 25, 2014 at 10:27 AM (#4646130)
This gives me a chance to talk mention Animalympics, for which 10cc did the soundtrack in about 82 or 83. It's been thirty years, and though some of the references have dated a little (Cosell is dead, Keith Jackson retired, the USSR no more), it's still a very funny sendup of sports broadcasts and American culture, and some of the voices behind it (Billy Crystal when he was still funny, Gilda Radner when she was still alive) have real bona fides.


Wow, there's a movie I hadn't thought about in years. Animalympics was the first movie I ever saw in a theatre. I would have been 8 or 9 when it came out and I remember seeing an ad for it in the newspaper on the last day it was playing in K.L. and throwing an absolute fit until my mom gave in and made our amah take me to see it.

8 or 9 year old me loved that movie ...
   173. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 25, 2014 at 12:04 PM (#4646170)
Much like Billy Joel, The Eagles depend exclusively on how much I've had to drink and if I'm gonna be an angry drunk or a sing-along and embarrass my table mates drunk that night.

On the issue of Joel, The Eagles, and "most hated bands," Chuck Klosterman (who is himself a bit of a lightning rod for strong opinions) did a really fantastic bit (at the much maligned Grantland) where he went to a doubleheader of Nickelback and Creed shows in the same night.

Over the past 20 years, there have been five bands totally acceptable to hate reflexively (and by “totally acceptable,” I mean that the casual hater wouldn’t even have to provide a justification — he or she could just openly hate them and no one would question why). The first of these five acts was Bush (who, bizarrely and predictably, was opening for Nickelback that very night). The second was Hootie and the Blowfish, perhaps the only group ever marginalized by an episode of Friends. The third was Limp Bizkit, who kind of got off on it. Obviously, the last two were Creed and Nickelback. The collective animosity toward these five artists far outweighs their multiplatinum success; if you anthologized the three best songs from each of these respective groups, you’d have an outstanding 15-track album that people would bury in their backyards.

Or maybe only I think like this. Maybe the only kind of person who thinks like this is the kind of person who doesn’t really care, which is probably the person I am. Maybe I’m looking at this in the least meaningful way possible.
   174. Graham & the 15-win "ARod Vortex of suck" Posted: January 25, 2014 at 12:25 PM (#4646178)
I don't think I saw anyone mention Neil Young. He had a number of good albums in the 1970s -- After the Gold Rush, On the Beach, and Tonight's the Night are just three.
   175. Kurt Posted: January 25, 2014 at 12:38 PM (#4646183)
Another quintessential 70's band nobody's mentioned - Queen. Surprisingly deep catalog.
   176. Avoid running at all times.-S. Paige Posted: January 25, 2014 at 12:51 PM (#4646194)
Anyone mention T-Rex?
   177. The Adam Dunn Effort #44 Posted: January 25, 2014 at 01:05 PM (#4646206)
"New York, New York, New York, 42nd Street. Hustlers rustle and pimps pimp the beat" (The only band that matters)
   178. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 25, 2014 at 01:20 PM (#4646212)
No one ever mentions T-Rex.
   179. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: January 25, 2014 at 05:13 PM (#4646279)
Great tip on Bandcamp. Hadn't heard about it before, but I go to their site & immediately see a long appreciation (with music!) of Cecil Taylor.
So it's not just for indie-pop kind of stuff? Looks like I'll be spending a LOT of time there.
   180. billyshears Posted: January 25, 2014 at 05:14 PM (#4646280)
You forgot the king of misinterpreted songs played at weddings: "Every Breath You Take".


I vote for "We've got Tonight".
   181. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: January 25, 2014 at 05:35 PM (#4646292)
I vote for "We've got Tonight".

I used to know a couple who would get all doe-eyed at each other over "For the Good Times."
Y'ALL AIN'T LISTENIN'!
   182. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 25, 2014 at 05:51 PM (#4646297)
Has no one in the 70's appreciation sub-thread mentioned the Allmans? Because seriously. How can you talk about the 70s and not the Allmans?
   183. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 25, 2014 at 06:45 PM (#4646310)
I thought of the Allmans last night but my 60s-addled brain couldn't hold the thought long enough to log it. Actually it was 70s-addled brain, in reality.
   184. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 25, 2014 at 07:36 PM (#4646334)
I hate jam bands and jam songs with the passion usually reserved for, say, Bryce Harper, but even I recognize the greatness of "Eat A Peach."
   185. depletion Posted: January 25, 2014 at 08:03 PM (#4646339)
the 1970's.
Rolling Stones up to but not including Goat's Head Soup. Then add Some Girls.
The first few Grateful Dead LP's.
Jethro Tull's 2nd or third LP.
aforementioned Steve Wonder
1st Mahavishnu Orchestra LP.
Sex Pistols
Ramones
Iggy and the Stooges Raw Power or Metallic KO if you like abuse
Pink Floyd Dark Side of the Moon
Rod Stewart Every Picture Tells a Story and Never a Dull Moment.
Allman Brothers
Isley Brothers Fight the Power
   186. depletion Posted: January 25, 2014 at 08:04 PM (#4646340)
By the way, Billy Joel sucks, has always sucked and will continue to suck.
   187. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 25, 2014 at 08:06 PM (#4646341)
I'm still somewhat confused by the "who should I listen to from the 70s?" line of questioning. That's like asking "which Penn State coordinator should I leave my kids with?"
   188. Howie Menckel Posted: January 25, 2014 at 09:10 PM (#4646353)

I gained respect for Billy Joel years ago when he did an interview and basically said that he was good at first, then he went too far - and that he hates a lot of his hits as much as the rest of us do.

Meatloaf I can actually listen to on occasion. Granted he was a performer and not the writer, but take a song like "For Crying Out Loud" for dramatic changes in pacing. Pretty entertaining.

http://www.lyricsfreak.com/m/meat+loaf/for+crying+out+loud_20091241.html

of course, you have to grin and bear it through some lyrics like

"Oh I know you belong
Inside my aching heart
And can't you see my faded Levis
Bursting apart"

I wish I couldn't, Meat...

   189. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 25, 2014 at 09:17 PM (#4646354)
SO... EvilSponge is looking for writers. Basically, you either write up the things you love (shows, albums, movies, whatever) or you pull down some of the promos they get every month and take those for a test drive.
   190. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: January 25, 2014 at 09:37 PM (#4646358)
To call back a page, I got a couple of Franz Ferdinand discs from the library and I think that they fit in with the kind of music I'm looking for. Thanks, Sam.
   191. ellsbury my heart at wounded knee Posted: January 25, 2014 at 11:31 PM (#4646379)
Y'ALL AIN'T LISTENIN'!


I feel like "Fortunate Son" belongs in this category, too. I'm amazed that people seem to think it's some kind of proud patriotic song. THE GUY DOESN'T LIKE WAVING AN AMERICAN FLAG!
   192. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 26, 2014 at 12:46 AM (#4646387)
And Creedence, who released "Travelin Band," "Lookin Out My Back Door," "Run Through the Jungle," "Up Around the Bend," "Who'll Stop the Rain," "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," "Long As I Can See the Light," "Have You Ever Seen the Rain," "Hey Tonight" and "Molina" in 1970 alone, have been a glaring omission to the Good Stuff In the 70s suggestfest.
   193. Howie Menckel Posted: January 26, 2014 at 12:50 AM (#4646388)
"It really applies to a lot of Springsteen songs."

A guy called the Sirius XM Bruce channel line once and said that for he and his wife, "that's our song" - and seemed to mean it in an upbeat, romantic way.

it's a great song, but tough to dance to

"Then I got Mary pregnant
and man that was all she wrote
And for my 19th birthday, I got a union card and a wedding coat
We went down to the courthouse
and the judge put it all to rest
No wedding day smiles, no walk down the aisle
No flowers, no wedding dress"

but at least the kicker is hopeful (?)

"Now those memories come back to haunt me
they haunt me like a curse
Is a dream a lie if it don't come true
Or is it something worse"


schadenfreude, maybe?
   194. Jose Molina wants a nickname like "A-Rod" Posted: January 26, 2014 at 02:03 AM (#4646396)
For the '70's I'd add:

Harry Nilsson
Dolly Parton
Boston

I don't get the Boston hate. Is it because it's overplayed? The music, of course, became very popular, but I really don't think it's populist schlock. I really do think Tom Scholz is doing something quite unique.
   195. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 26, 2014 at 02:32 AM (#4646397)
Tom Scholz is definitely unique, quite the innovator. I'm guessing there aren't that many MIT grads as successful as he was in musical performance. Not bad for an engineer. I think the Boston hate is more Brad Delp related.
   196. Esoteric Posted: January 26, 2014 at 02:43 AM (#4646398)
Can
David Bowie
Elvis Costello & The Attractions
Faces (just check out the boxed set, arguably the greatest ever released by any group or artist)/Rod Stewart (first four albums)
The Who
Yes
Genesis
King Crimson (the Lark's Tongues In Aspic/Starless & Bible Black/Red/U.S.A. version)
Roxy Music
Brian Eno
Neil Young
Neu!
Elton John (up to Captain Fantastic)
The Jam
Joy Division
Van Morrison (everything from Astral Weeks to Veedon Fleece)
Magazine
Stevie Wonder
Mott The Hoople
Fleetwood Mac
Richard & Linda Thompson
Talking Heads
XTC
Steely Dan
Al Green
Bruce Springsteen
Wire
Jethro Tull (from This Was to Living In The Past)
The Clash

There you go, that's a solid start.
   197. Manny Coon Posted: January 26, 2014 at 03:04 AM (#4646400)
I think part of the Boston hate is kind of like part of the Pearl Jam hate, where a good amount of it is about the really crappy bands around the same that borrowed heavily from their sound and didn't do it nearly as well but dominated radio play for a while. Foreigner and late 70's/early 80's Journey are partially Boston's fault.
   198. PreservedFish Posted: January 26, 2014 at 03:14 AM (#4646402)
I didn't know that there were people that knew the names of the members of Boston. The problem with Boston is not the imitators of Boston. The problem with Boston is Boston.
   199. GregD Posted: January 26, 2014 at 03:45 AM (#4646405)
Faces are amazing

Debris is one of the great rock n roll songs ever
   200. Swoboda is freedom Posted: January 26, 2014 at 11:11 AM (#4646428)
You forgot the king of misinterpreted songs played at weddings: "Every Breath You Take".

Not as popular as song, but Altered Images "I could be happy". It sounds all sweet but it is about a girl who wants to get away from an abusive relationship.
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