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Thursday, January 23, 2014

Billy Joel coming to Nats Park, Mike Rizzo is a fan

Seen the Lights Go Out on Michael Broadway…

The Washington Nationals, in partnership with Live Nation, announced on Thursday in a press conference at Nats Park that Grammy-winner Billy Joel will perform at the stadium on July 26. After headlining the first ever concert at the venue in 2009, Joel is back for another summer stop.

The event was announced just 24 hours prior and featured Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo, as well as D.C.’s deputy mayor Victor Hoskins. The Billy Joel part was kept as a surprise for a full day before Hoskins revealed the news.

Rizzo was in attendance to represent the team, but also as a fan of Joel. He made a brief speech on stage after Hoskins spoke.

Here is what he said:

  I’m just so excited to have Billy Joel back at Nationals Park. Not only is he a Hall of Fame-caliber entertainer, I just like the fact that he’s a very attractive bald man with a goatee. We gotta stick together.

Repoz Posted: January 23, 2014 at 05:05 PM | 284 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: nats

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   201. TerpNats Posted: January 26, 2014 at 11:39 AM (#4646433)
Foreigner and late '70s/early '80s Journey are partially Boston's fault.
Foreigner has it all over Boston. Lou Gramm was a terrific vocalist; songs such as "Blue Morning, Blue Day" and "Double Vision" are excellent.
   202. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 26, 2014 at 11:54 AM (#4646437)
The early work from Van Halen, before they jump the shark with, well, "Jump," was pretty good. VH I and II are both "70s" releases and I'd include probably everything up to "Diver Down" as part of their initial "before it all went sideways" phase of worthwhile production.
   203. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 26, 2014 at 11:56 AM (#4646438)
And I can see where some folks like the gritty realisim of "The River" as a love song of sorts. Not all relationships are built on treacle and Sparklepony kisses.
   204. Posada Posse Posted: January 26, 2014 at 12:39 PM (#4646453)
Foreigner and late 70's/early 80's Journey are partially Boston's fault.


Journey late '70's and early '80's are two distinct bands, IMO. I actually enjoy Journey from the late '70's, which was more of a hard rock band with some actual grit, as exemplified by songs like "Any Way You Want It", and an emphasis on Neal Schon's guitar. In the early '80's they went more new wave/pop with Jonathan Cain's keyboards, with pap like Don't Stop Believin' that we know and hate. It all went downhill after Gregg Rolie left the band and was replaced by Cain....
   205. BDC Posted: January 26, 2014 at 01:03 PM (#4646462)
70s music newsflash: the Captain and Tenille are getting a divorce! after 39 years. Love kept them together for a while, anyway.
   206. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 26, 2014 at 01:08 PM (#4646466)
Tenille always freaked me out.
   207. BDC Posted: January 26, 2014 at 01:26 PM (#4646471)
I also do not think that the Captain has any nautical credentials.

Looking up the Captain (Daryl Dragon) I see that he's the son of Carmen Dragon, a fairly arty (if not very cutting-edge) arranger and conductor who (among other things) did a really nice album of standards with Helen Forrest in 1950, when the big-band sound was losing its dominance and she was looking for new directions.

OK, that's all the digression I'm good for this weekend.
   208. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: January 26, 2014 at 01:28 PM (#4646472)
Looking up the Captain (Daryl Dragon) I see that he's the son of Carmen Dragon,


And the brother of a member of the Surf Punks, IIRC, who for some inexplicable reason showed up in Urgh! A Music War.
   209. PreservedFish Posted: January 26, 2014 at 01:41 PM (#4646475)
more of a hard rock band with some actual grit, as exemplified by songs like "Any Way You Want It"
   210. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 26, 2014 at 04:19 PM (#4646516)
Count 'Crash Into Me' (DMB) as another tune where girls sing along romantically, oblivious to the lyrics.
   211. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: January 26, 2014 at 04:57 PM (#4646520)
Prog is awesome. Metal is awesome. Best of 2013 for me was probably Ayreon's The Theory of Everything, though I'm not too attached to it.

I'm getting married in 4 months and they only thing we haven't taken care of yet is the DJ. I have very...strong opinions about music and we don't want a lot of the standard wedding crap. We DO want to play "Every Breath You Take" precisely because we know what the song is actually about and we would find it hilarious.
   212. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: January 26, 2014 at 06:56 PM (#4646549)
Congrats in advance, Biff!

Unasked for 2 cents:
- Live music beats dj
- I had similarly strong feelings about music going into the big day and we spent a lot of time and energy planning that piece. That said, it was the last thing on our minds by the day of. Yes, your music choice says something about you and is a part of your memories of the day, but giving other people a good time ought to be key here.
End unasked for opinion blast.
   213. Howie Menckel Posted: January 26, 2014 at 07:44 PM (#4646553)

I got married in Chicago months after the end of the Jordan era. We entered to a jaunty Irish tune that includes my surname (don't let the pseudonym fool you), and the crowd went wild. Then the wedding party was introduced with the Bulls' intro music in the background as if a ballgame was about to start. Wilder.

We could have had a kazoo/ukelele 2-man band play after that, and the musical portion still would have been remembered fondly years later.

Enter strong, and the rest takes care of itself...

   214. Chokeland Bill Posted: January 26, 2014 at 07:57 PM (#4646554)
Prog is awesome. Metal is awesome. Best of 2013 for me was probably Ayreon's The Theory of Everything, though I'm not too attached to it.


Pretty much sums up the year 2013 in metal. A lot of good, but little great. Don't know if I'd put Ayreon #1, but it does get better each listen.
   215. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 26, 2014 at 08:10 PM (#4646558)
Pretty much sums up the year 2013 in metal. A lot of good, but little great.


Concur. I spent a lot more time with hardcore than metal in 2013.
   216. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: January 26, 2014 at 08:32 PM (#4646562)
Pretty much sums up the year 2013 in metal. A lot of good, but little great. Don't know if I'd put Ayreon #1, but it does get better each listen.

Yeah, if The Theory of Everything were released in any of the last...oh, 15 years or so (at least) before 2013 it wouldn't have been #1 in any of those years.

I had similarly strong feelings about music going into the big day and we spent a lot of time and energy planning that piece. That said, it was the last thing on our minds by the day of. Yes, your music choice says something about you and is a part of your memories of the day, but giving other people a good time ought to be key here.
End unasked for opinion blast.


Unasked for, but welcome. Others have been saying similar things. I figure what it will come down to is we'll pick a DJ, tell him a few bands/artists specifically NOT to play, and that will probably be it.
   217. Manny Coon Posted: January 27, 2014 at 12:59 AM (#4646611)
According to the Grammys the best rock album of the past year was by Led Zeppelin, Paul McCartney wrote the best wrote song and the best metal song was by Black Sabbath, they are definitely up to date with the hottest acts of 1970.
   218. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: January 27, 2014 at 01:59 AM (#4646620)
The best wedding I ever went to had a DJ, but - what made it the best ever - the actual ceremony was maybe a half-hour, and the reception party was 4+ hours, with an open bar. This would be my own unsolicited advice: keep the ceremony very short, and (related) do not let anyone read poetry.
   219. esseff Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:26 AM (#4646626)
According to the Grammys the best rock album of the past year was by Led Zeppelin, Paul McCartney wrote the best wrote song and the best metal song was by Black Sabbath, they are definitely up to date with the hottest acts of 1970.


And a best new artist that's been around for years, but I guess that's pretty standard.
   220. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:35 AM (#4646628)
The best wedding I ever went to had a DJ, but - what made it the best ever - the actual ceremony was maybe a half-hour, and the reception party was 4+ hours, with an open bar.


I had few 'says' in my wedding, since it was my wife's parents dime, although I wasn't that interested in calling the shots. 1. Open bar, way too many WI natives were coming, you don't have an open bar, that's gonna be a problem. 2. 'Ecstasy of Gold' was our wedding party intro song. Re: the DJ, yeah, tell him a handful of things not to play and then don't worry about it.
   221. Alex meets the threshold for granular review Posted: January 27, 2014 at 04:43 AM (#4646631)
I'm gonna throw Emmylou Harris into the 70s mix here. Pieces of the Sky, Elite Hotel, Luxury Liner, Quarter Moon in a Ten-Cent Town are all excellent.
   222. Mom makes botox doctors furious Posted: January 27, 2014 at 08:12 AM (#4646634)
The 70s

- LITTLE FEAT
- BONNIE RAITT

And I don't think YES has been mentioned; they are worth at least a token listen, if just for the Fragile album (and that tweaks your fiddle, keep working through their catalogue)

And ... Rikki Lee Jones' debut is a gem

I repeat: LITTLE FEAT
   223. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2014 at 09:07 AM (#4646636)
And a best new artist that's been around for years, but I guess that's pretty standard.

I caught some of the broadcast. A shit-ton of dreck, but Pink and Nate Ruess absolutely killed it.
   224. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 27, 2014 at 09:22 AM (#4646637)
Re: the DJ, yeah, tell him a handful of things not to play and then don't worry about it.

At our wedding (1983), the DJ said that everyone has the Rocky theme when they entered the reception. My wife said "No, we are not having the Rocky theme." The a-hole played it anyway and my wife (faster trigger than me) went apeshit on the guy.
   225. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: January 27, 2014 at 09:41 AM (#4646646)
I caught some of the broadcast. A ####-ton of dreck, but Pink and Nate Ruess absolutely killed it.

I didn't watch, but someone linked to the Imagine Dragons/Kendrick Lamar performance and that was pretty awesome.
   226. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: January 27, 2014 at 09:54 AM (#4646651)
t really applies to a lot of Springsteen songs. Dancing in the Dark, Promised Land, Radio Nowhere, Born to Run, etc., are all prime examples of anthemic music mixed with introspective, downbeat lyrics.


"Glory Days", too. U2's "one" is another.
   227. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 27, 2014 at 11:13 AM (#4646687)
Scanning the clips from last night's awards show debacle, my primary takeaway is that Madonna can no longer even approximate carrying a tune.
   228. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2014 at 11:23 AM (#4646689)
Scanning the clips from last night's awards show debacle, my primary takeaway is that Madonna can no longer even approximate carrying a tune.

Yeah, she was godawful, and appeared also not to even be trying. John Legend, however, was incredible.
   229. BDC Posted: January 27, 2014 at 11:31 AM (#4646691)
The 70s

- LITTLE FEAT
- BONNIE RAITT


Every spring in East Lansing, when I was in college, there was a free outdoor concert with some legitimate big names. In 1979 (unless I'm fabulating and conflating :) Bonnie Raitt was scheduled to open for Little Feat. We all trooped out to the big lawn and it started raining like #### and neither act played a note.
   230. zonk Posted: January 27, 2014 at 11:41 AM (#4646695)
t really applies to a lot of Springsteen songs. Dancing in the Dark, Promised Land, Radio Nowhere, Born to Run, etc., are all prime examples of anthemic music mixed with introspective, downbeat lyrics.



"Glory Days", too. U2's "one" is another.


Badlands, Born in the USA, and the most recent We Take Care of our Own are kind of like the great Springsteen trilogy of misunderstood songs... What's fascinating is that he keeps making the lyrics less and less obtuse, while also paring back the music -- and people still miss it entirely.

Badlands is a great song with lyrics that still belie a good deal of hope, sung over a jaunty anthem.

BITUSA is another great song with lyrics almost bereft of hope, but still holding some defiance, sung over what amounts to a chant.

WTCOOO is another great song with lyrics that almost suicidally depressed, sung over a hymnal.

If there's a 4th -- I'm pretty sure it's just gonna be all profanity over a dirge.

... and frat bros and fat politicos will still probably pump their fists to it.
   231. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 27, 2014 at 11:41 AM (#4646696)
Yeah, she was godawful, and appeared also not to even be trying. John Legend, however, was incredible.


I've never really paid much attention to her live show. It was always more pop spectacle than musical act to me. But I have to believe that at some point; perhaps before she got the horse-man cooties from that Arod stint; she could at least pretend to sing a clear note? It's rare that my first thought of any musical performance is "AUTOTUNE THAT #####!!!"
   232. zonk Posted: January 27, 2014 at 11:44 AM (#4646698)
Pink -- or should I say P!NK -- is quite talented... A part of me wants to say that she's wasted on teen girls but then I think about it a bit and realize that no, she'd actually be wasted on people like me if her music were more the taste of my demographic.
   233. GregD Posted: January 27, 2014 at 11:58 AM (#4646707)
Pink -- or should I say P!NK -- is quite talented... A part of me wants to say that she's wasted on teen girls but then I think about it a bit and realize that no, she'd actually be wasted on people like me if her music were more the taste of my demographic.
Absolutely on all accounts. She is terrific. Learn to Love Again is literally a perfect radio song. I'm not the target audience but it cheers me to think that some of the stuff being made for that target audience is that good.
   234. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 27, 2014 at 12:01 PM (#4646709)
Learn to Love Again is literally a perfect radio song.


Is that the duet with Nate Reuss? Because I heard that and thought "man, Pink can't sing for ####." Then again, all I know of Pink is that she has a habit of doing rope dances at her shows.
   235. BDC Posted: January 27, 2014 at 12:14 PM (#4646718)
"Songs People Love without Ever Actually Listening to Them."

Another familiar example is John Lennon's "All You Need is Love." "Love, love is all you need," which is nice, but the verses between that refrain are full of a relentless airbrushing of reality that ends up Stepfordizing everybody: "Nothing you can say but you can learn how to play the game. It's easy." Chilling, honestly.
   236. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2014 at 12:18 PM (#4646721)
"man, Pink can't sing for ####."

If you thought that, then you don't know singing. It requires more than a beard.
   237. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: January 27, 2014 at 12:24 PM (#4646727)
If you thought that, then you don't know singing. It requires more than a beard.


What does Sam's sham of a marriage have to do with anything?
   238. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 27, 2014 at 12:33 PM (#4646732)
If you thought that, then you don't know singing. It requires more than a beard.


Wasn't comparing her to one of the bearded hipsters. Was comparing her to Nate Reuss. She comes across as amateur hour at the Apollo on that duet.
   239. esseff Posted: January 27, 2014 at 12:45 PM (#4646742)
Add misunderstood music: The Green Day song popular at graduations that people don't realize is titled "Good Riddance."
   240. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 27, 2014 at 12:46 PM (#4646743)
Speaking of Bonnie Raitt, I saw her as an opener for Stephen Stills and Manassas. Bonnie was phenomonal, then Stills came out drunk and positively sucked. Worst performance I ever saw.
   241. PreservedFish Posted: January 27, 2014 at 01:12 PM (#4646758)
Add misunderstood music: The Green Day song popular at graduations that people don't realize is titled "Good Riddance."


I remember watching one of those VH1 documentaries on Green Day. The end of the story was the release of that song. They very clearly considered it to be the heap of schmaltz that it appears to be. They said something ridiculous like, "in a way, that was the most punk thing we could have possibly done."
   242. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2014 at 01:16 PM (#4646763)
Wasn't comparing her to one of the bearded hipsters. Was comparing her to Nate Reuss. She comes across as amateur hour at the Apollo on that duet.

No. On the issue of empirical quality and accuracy in comparison to Russ, you are definitively incorrect here. Ruess - who is awesome - waffled at least one and maybe one or two more high notes off-pitch. He was not superior to Pink in this duet.
   243. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 27, 2014 at 01:18 PM (#4646764)
No. On the issue of empirical quality and accuracy in comparison to Ruess, you are definitively incorrect here. Ruess - who is awesome - waffled at least one and maybe one or two more high notes off-pitch.


Are you talking about the live set last night? Because I haven't seen that video. I'm talking about the recorded track.
   244. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2014 at 01:22 PM (#4646767)
Are you talking about the live set last night? Because I haven't seen that video. I'm talking about the recorded track.

Yes, last night. I've heard the track at work about a billion times. I'll listen again, but in the case of a recorded track, I'm even more doubtful. I think you're working with tone quality (literal definition) bias here, but I'll give it another listen.
   245. zonk Posted: January 27, 2014 at 01:22 PM (#4646768)
Add misunderstood music: The Green Day song popular at graduations that people don't realize is titled "Good Riddance."


I think that depends on what one thinks of graduation generally... Give the kids some credit - there are more Freaks & Geeks folks than Saved by the Bell Folks, and if you throw this stuff out to a vote -- the former outnumber and outvote the latter...
   246. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:01 PM (#4646785)
What else should I be listening to from the '70s to get a better appreciation for the decade?

Blondie.

(I'm seriously catching up. Cokes on my tab, s'il vous plait.)
   247. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:03 PM (#4646789)
Do you ever go through that thing where you hate a musician/band, really hate them, and then you start to see them as humorous, and as a result you start loudly singing along when you hear the songs, and this continues for a little while, and then maybe you actually acquire some of their music to play at select times, and then maybe you listen by yourself just to chuckle, and at some point you cannot tell if you're still being ironic or if you actually like them?

ABBA wins this one, going away.
   248. PreservedFish Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:06 PM (#4646792)
SBB, as I wrote that I was also thinking about ABBA. At this point, though, I just admit that I actually like ABBA.
   249. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:09 PM (#4646795)
Prog fans wouldn't know a good time if I transcribed the process for having one into 11/9 time signatures and had Neil Peart drum it out in Morse code for them.

I wouldn't want to draw too close a connection, but I've always sort of seen bands like Yes and King Crimson and ELP as honorary founding fathers of sabermetrics.
   250. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:11 PM (#4646800)
SBB, as I wrote that I was also thinking about ABBA. At this point, though, I just admit that I actually like ABBA.

As do I -- I gave up the "irony" bit with them long ago.(*) Liked them then, like them now. Not all of it, but certainly several of their songs.

(*) As should everybody else. Nobody's being fooled anymore.
   251. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:17 PM (#4646803)
Prog fans wouldn't know a good time if I transcribed the process for having one into 11/9 time signatures

It's going to have to be 11/8, not even Peart could keep time in a signature that won't exist.
   252. PreservedFish Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:26 PM (#4646809)
Not with that attitude.
   253. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:29 PM (#4646812)
Hall and Oates:

I like "She's Gone" and I kind of like "Rich Girl."

There, I said it.
   254. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:30 PM (#4646814)
It's going to have to be 11/8, not even Peart could keep time in a signature that won't exist.


Unbelievers will be burned.
   255. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:37 PM (#4646821)
Another quintessential 70's band nobody's mentioned - Queen. Surprisingly deep catalog.

Yes, this. Very much so, this.
   256. BDC Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:42 PM (#4646825)
255 posts on '70s music, and it is to our credit that nobody has recommended the ######' Eagles.
   257. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:45 PM (#4646826)
I don't get the Boston hate. Is it because it's overplayed?

Boston has aged better than all the "corporate" bands of that era combined, to the ears of this listener. Still voluntarily put them in the ol' earbuds, and did so a mere week ago.

I've actually willingly pulled up Barry Goudreau's "Dreams" within the last 6 months.
   258. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:48 PM (#4646828)
255 posts on '70s music, and it is to our credit that nobody has recommended the ######' Eagles.

Never really liked them, and now Knicks owner Jim Dolan's silly, shitty "blues" band is opening up for them on their latest geezer tour and it's all the buffoon can talk about, so now I'm rooting for them to be terminated by pickaxe.
   259. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:53 PM (#4646831)
Scanning the clips from last night's awards show debacle, my primary takeaway is that Madonna can no longer even approximate carrying a tune.

The clip I saw of "Open Your Heart" was gross and disgusting, in all particulars.
   260. billyshears Posted: January 27, 2014 at 02:55 PM (#4646832)
I remember watching one of those VH1 documentaries on Green Day. The end of the story was the release of that song. They very clearly considered it to be the heap of schmaltz that it appears to be. They said something ridiculous like, "in a way, that was the most punk thing we could have possibly done."


I saw that, but I came away with a different impression. At the time, Green Day's music was seen as a sell-out of their punk roots, and they were always defending themselves against that charge. Good Riddance came out before Green Day's reemergence, and I interpreted that interview as them saying that they were done trying to prove themselves to the punk community because the rules of punk rock promoted conformity just as much as the rules of mainstream pop radio. I didn't get the sense that they didn't like the song.
   261. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:07 PM (#4646838)
I like "She's Gone" and I kind of like "Rich Girl."
Ixnay on Rich Girl, thank you, but She's Gone is terrific blue-eyed soul. "Fall in Philadelphia" is very early folky stuff that holds up well.

About 15 years ago, my then 10 year old son won tickets to a H&O/Chicago doubleheader, in an outdoor venue. H&O surprised the heck out of me, putting on a great show. We watched the black clouds approach from the west (I do miss those midwest storms) that were angled at about 75 degrees as H&O left the stage. I said, "Sorry, son, were booking, these people who are sitting on the top of a hill on the grass are being stupid." We just got in the car when all hell broke loose. I had no desire to see Chicago (I guess their good stuff was all in '69?) and lucked out.
   262. Mom makes botox doctors furious Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:26 PM (#4646849)
Hall & Oates are just fine. Abandoned Luncheonette is a 70s must listen - their later stuff, not so much my liking, but they managed extremely well in the early MTV era for a couple of Philly boys.

More 70s that for better or worse help define the decade are The Steve Miller Band and Peter Frampton. I saw Framptom at the height of the Comes Alive massive fame along with Yes and the dream weaver guy .. and the Mummers ... with 100,000 other people in 76. Great thrills, through and through.

Ahh youth ...

Don't miss For Everyman... It's Jackson Browne's The Wild, The Innocent and the E-Street Shuffle. That said, Greetings From Asbury Park is one of the biggest Big Promise debuts of the early 70s. Check out that youthful Growing Up ... mercy ...

No one has mentioned The Doobie Brothers, so I won't either :-)

"Doobie" Brothers .... sheesh ......
   263. villageidiom Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:34 PM (#4646853)
I interpreted that interview as them saying that they were done trying to prove themselves to the punk community because the rules of punk rock promoted conformity just as much as the rules of mainstream pop radio.
Billie Joe Armstrong now has an album of duets, with Norah Jones, all on a bunch of Everly Brothers tunes. If Good Riddance didn't break those rules, that surely will.
I had no desire to see Chicago (I guess their good stuff was all in '69?) and lucked out.
Over time I've learned to appreciate a tight horn section. That's the main, if not the only, reason to listen to Chicago. Frankly, '70s music was the peak of the horn section, and by missing out on '70s music that's what one is missing the most.
   264. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:34 PM (#4646854)
I saw that, but I came away with a different impression. At the time, Green Day's music was seen as a sell-out of their punk roots, and they were always defending themselves against that charge. Good Riddance came out before Green Day's reemergence, and I interpreted that interview as them saying that they were done trying to prove themselves to the punk community because the rules of punk rock promoted conformity just as much as the rules of mainstream pop radio. I didn't get the sense that they didn't like the song.


You can pick up a copy of Billie Joe and Norah's "Foreverly" at any Starbucks near you...
   265. Mom makes botox doctors furious Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:39 PM (#4646859)
And NO ONE ... Has mentioned The Grateful Dead

Shame on you, BBTF
   266. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:42 PM (#4646861)
Over time I've learned to appreciate a tight horn section. That's the main, if not the only, reason to listen to Chicago. Frankly, '70s music was the peak of the horn section, and by missing out on '70s music that's what one is missing the most.

During my time as a high school basketball player, we played in a pretty nice gym with quite a few people, and as we ran out of the locker room for warmups, the band would start off with the fight song and then break into Chicago's "25 or 6 to 4." Then they'd play another song or two. Can't remember a note of the fight song, or a note of any other song they ever played, but their version of the Chicago song is emblazoned in my brain to this day.
   267. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:45 PM (#4646867)
And NO ONE ... Has mentioned The Grateful Dead


We are grateful they are dead. Does that count?
   268. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:49 PM (#4646874)
Frankly, '70s music was the peak of the horn section, and by missing out on '70s music that's what one is missing the most.


Earth, Wind, and Fire.
   269. Mom makes botox doctors furious Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:57 PM (#4646885)
Ohio Players
   270. Mom makes botox doctors furious Posted: January 27, 2014 at 03:57 PM (#4646886)
Marvin Gaye says hello
   271. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 27, 2014 at 04:06 PM (#4646889)
The Buckinghams were true pioneers!
   272. Kurt Posted: January 27, 2014 at 04:27 PM (#4646909)
Hall & Oates are just fine. Abandoned Luncheonette is a 70s must listen - their later stuff, not so much my liking, but they managed extremely well in the early MTV era for a couple of Philly boys.


I'm the opposite; I like their 80's stuff more than their 70's stuff.

On a lower level, the same is true of the J. Geils Band. Their 80's pop stuff is okay, the blues-rock bar band stuff they did in the 70's was just god-awful.
   273. Kurt Posted: January 27, 2014 at 04:30 PM (#4646912)
and as we ran out of the locker room for warmups, the band would start off with the fight song and then break into Chicago's "25 or 6 to 4." Then they'd play another song or two. Can't remember a note of the fight song, or a note of any other song they ever played, but their version of the Chicago song is emblazoned in my brain to this day.


"What are they doing to this song? It *was* Chicago's 25 or 6 to 4, but now it's totally unrecognizable."
   274. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: January 27, 2014 at 04:50 PM (#4646920)
Frankly, '70s music was the peak of the horn section, and by missing out on '70s music that's what one is missing the most.

Van Morrison. Dude had a real knack for great horn charts: "Jackie Wilson Said," "Into the Mystic," "It Fills You Up," "Wild Night," all of the live "It's Too Late to Stop Now." And other than maybe "Hard Nose the Highway," all of his 70's albums are good-to-all-time-great.
   275. billyshears Posted: January 27, 2014 at 04:51 PM (#4646921)
You can pick up a copy of Billie Joe and Norah's "Foreverly" at any Starbucks near you...


Sure, but Good Riddance came out in 1997, and I believe that interview was pre-2000.
   276. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 27, 2014 at 04:55 PM (#4646925)
The Buckinghams were true pioneers

Ah, bringing back fond 9th grade memories of pigeon-toed but otherwise lovely Marcie Norris, Buckinghams-lover, with whom I spent a wonderful afternoon at the mall while my best friend and her best friend went off to make out. Marcie moved to Cleveland the year before and was back visiting. We more knew of each other than knew each other prior, but just talked and talked for a couple of hours. We exchanged letters for a couple of years before I got lazy.

I hadn't thought of her in years.
   277. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: January 27, 2014 at 05:07 PM (#4646935)
Van Morrison. Dude had a real knack for great horn charts: "Jackie Wilson Said," "Into the Mystic," "It Fills You Up," "Wild Night," all of the live "It's Too Late to Stop Now." And other than maybe "Hard Nose the Highway," all of his 70's albums are good-to-all-time-great.

I'm partial to "Into the Music."

Here's what Wikipedia says about those albums and horns:

After the release of Into the Music and before his next release, Common One, in 1980, Morrison appeared at the Montreux Jazz Festival with a fully fleshed-out big band. He performed two of the songs from the album, "Troubadours" and "Angeliou". These two songs featured Morrison interacting with the brass section composed of Pee Wee Ellis and Mark Isham. Erik Hage describes this musical relationship between Morrison and the two brass musicians as "simply stunning".
   278. PreservedFish Posted: January 27, 2014 at 06:42 PM (#4646980)
I saw that, but I came away with a different impression. At the time, Green Day's music was seen as a sell-out of their punk roots, and they were always defending themselves against that charge. Good Riddance came out before Green Day's reemergence, and I interpreted that interview as them saying that they were done trying to prove themselves to the punk community because the rules of punk rock promoted conformity just as much as the rules of mainstream pop radio. I didn't get the sense that they didn't like the song.


Sorry, I agree with this. They were being "punk" by doing something totally unexpected. That unexpected thing was to release a sappy acoustic song. They didn't say that the song sucks. That's just what I think. But the song was first brought up as another wildly misinterpreted song, which I don't believe it is. It's not a secretly cynical or nasty song. It sounds sappy and it is sappy.
   279. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 27, 2014 at 08:00 PM (#4647017)
They were being "punk" by doing something totally unexpected.


Yes, because nothing sticks it to the man and his expectations like releasing radio friendly acoustic ballads that will be a certified unit shifter.
   280. depletion Posted: January 27, 2014 at 09:01 PM (#4647036)
dream weaver guy

Gary Wright.
And NO ONE ... Has mentioned The Grateful Dead

Shame on you, BBTF

I did. Just after the Stones at number two on my list.
The Eagles are not without merit. Already Gone is a pretty good hard rocker. Points lost for too many mushy songs and ripping off Jethro Tull when they wrote Hotel California.

Others I should have mentioned: The Who, CCR, ABBA, the Jackson 5.
   281. depletion Posted: January 27, 2014 at 09:03 PM (#4647038)
One month to Spring Training games.
   282. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 27, 2014 at 10:49 PM (#4647067)
Steely Dan was mentioned on an earlier page, but I have to note, I was somewhere recently where there 18-24 year olds and they were talking about their discovery of Steely Dan. One of the more recent times where I start to feel old (my parents were big fans of Steely Dan, as am I, with no fear of retribution).
   283. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2014 at 10:50 PM (#4647068)
Well, I listened to it again, a few times. I'm not hearing anything that puts Pink at some identifiable, stark lesser vocal performance than Ruess. I mean, Pink's opening is melancholy and plaintive vs. Ruess's aggressive rebuttal, stronger vocal that follows. One of her higher notes is grainier vocally, and whether she's playing an aggrieved role or it's the quality of her voice is pretty immaterial, considering the strength at 2:35 and 2:45.

Ultimately, Sam, "Apollo amateur hour" is way oversell, and I think I know your posting slightly well enough to differentiate between the hyperbole of cancer to the children of umpires and more heartfelt music criticism. You want to give Ruess a 9 and Pink an 8? I'll cop to that. Otherwise, no.
   284. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 27, 2014 at 10:51 PM (#4647069)
I know they formed pre-'70, but Traffic deserves praise for their 70's work (Low Spark.. and John Barleycorn Must Die)
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