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Thursday, January 09, 2014

BleacherReport | Washington Nationals’ Adam LaRoche Kills Mountain Lion, Poses with It

offseason fun!

Coot Veal and Cot Deal's cols=“100” rows=“20” Posted: January 09, 2014 at 12:46 PM | 95 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: adam laroche, hunting, nationals, teddy roosevelt

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   1. Jose Molina wants a nickname like "A-Rod" Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:26 PM (#4634701)
Because as a mulch-millionaire he needed to do this for food and/or protect his family. He wasn't killing another highly sentient being for the mere sport of it.
   2. Davo Dozier Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:29 PM (#4634705)
Love the teddy-roosevelt tag.

That's one helluva picture. Always nice to be reminded that these guys have hobbies outside of baseball.
   3. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:30 PM (#4634707)
I don't hunt, but unless you're a vegetarian who doesn't use any leather or fur products, or any products tested on animals, you don't really have standing to say it's immoral.
   4. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:32 PM (#4634710)
I don't hunt, but unless you're a vegetarian who doesn't use any leather or fur products, or any products tested on animals, you don't really have standing to say it's immoral.


This shares a nice logical consistency with your claim that it's the belief in the eternal soul that forces you to regard humans as better than cattle.
   5. Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:36 PM (#4634717)
Grew up around this culture - but rejected it completely - the act itself is bad enough, but the picture...barf.

   6. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:39 PM (#4634722)
I don't hunt, but unless you're a vegetarian who doesn't use any leather or fur products, or any products tested on animals, you don't really have standing to say it's immoral.

Huh? Shooting a mountain lion for sport is a little different from using a cow for food or clothing.
   7. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:40 PM (#4634724)
Because as a mulch-millionaire he needed to do this for food and/or protect his family. He wasn't killing another highly sentient being for the mere sport of it.


Unless this was a canned hunt, I have a hard time getting upset about this. If he had a legal tag for a mountain lion, awesome. And he did it with a freaking bow.

It's too bad there wasn't more info about where he hunted this thing. At least here in CA, the DFW issues tags for population control.
   8. Davo Dozier Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:41 PM (#4634725)
I'm the only vegan who thinks that's an awesome picture?
   9. Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:43 PM (#4634728)
Huh? Shooting a mountain lion for sport is a little different from using a cow for food or clothing.

But you could have had a salad and knitted together some clothing out of leaves and bark. So you chose to kill that cow, just the same as LaRoche chose to overcompensate for his, sorry, I mean kill that lion. And away we go.
   10. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:49 PM (#4634734)
This shares a nice logical consistency with your claim that it's the belief in the eternal soul that forces you to regard humans as better than cattle.

I try to be intellectually consistent. All good philosophy/theology has to be logical.
   11. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:51 PM (#4634737)
Huh? Shooting a mountain lion for sport is a little different from using a cow for food or clothing.

I'm not seeing it. Assuming it's a legal hunt, the state licenses the appropriate number of kills to keep the population of animals sustainable. Given the elimination of most other natural predators, if humans don't hunt, many, many species will suffer from over-population, and mass deaths from starvation/disease.
   12. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:57 PM (#4634742)
I'm not a hunter though I'm certainly no vegan either. I get that food and clothing that I use is often from once living things that were killed. With that said the whole killing for fun thing seems a little sick to me. I mean if you want to hunt for food, hell, go for it. But hunting just to say you killed something seems a little troubling.
   13. Boxkutter Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:57 PM (#4634743)
Buck Commander, who posted this photo of LaRoche on Facebook Tuesday, says that the first baseman killed the animal with a bow.


No arrows? He's a badass.
   14. Ned Garvin: Male Prostitute Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:00 PM (#4634752)
I'm not seeing it. Assuming it's a legal hunt, the state licenses the appropriate number of kills to keep the population of animals sustainable. Given the elimination of most other natural predators, if humans don't hunt, many, many species will suffer from over-population, and mass deaths from starvation/disease.


Well, overpopulation of animals IS a problem (mostly because they create an imbalance in the ecosystem), primarily ,as you say, caused by elimination of predators. But he killed a mountain lion, that IS the predator. We need MORE mountain lions (and wolves, and bears, etc.) - they are the solution to overpopulation, not the problem.
   15. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:02 PM (#4634755)
I'm not a hunter though I'm certainly no vegan either. I get that food and clothing that I use is often from once living things that were killed. With that said the whole killing for fun thing seems a little sick to me. I mean if you want to hunt for food, hell, go for it. But hunting just to say you killed something seems a little troubling.

I think it could say something troubling about someone, but doesn't necessarily have to.

Most hunters I know always use the meat from their kills (or donate it). In our town, we have a dinner at the K of C every year for Mardi Gras which serves game that local hunters have killed. All of the hunters I know do it for the challenge of the hunt, and are perfectly normal, non-bloodthirsty people.
   16. PreservedFish Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:03 PM (#4634756)
I'm the only vegan who thinks that's an awesome picture?


I think it's sad, but I am definitely impressed.

A year ago I read this book: The Man-Eaters of Kumaon. It was written by a man that was hired by the British government to track down and kill tigers that had become man eaters. Totally awesome. Hunting will never be the activity for me, but that has more to do with how cold and quiet and boring it is than the moral issues.
   17. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:03 PM (#4634757)
Well, overpopulation of animals IS a problem (mostly because they create an imbalance in the ecosystem), primarily ,as you say, caused by elimination of predators. But he killed a mountain lion, that IS the predator. We need MORE mountain lions (and wolves, and bears, etc.) - they are the solution to overpopulation, not the problem.

Again, I have to assume the state game commission knows what they're doing in setting the quota for tags.

If it was an illegal kill, that's clearly wrong.
   18. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:03 PM (#4634758)
I'm not a hunter though I'm certainly no vegan either. I get that food and clothing that I use is often from once living things that were killed. With that said the whole killing for fun thing seems a little sick to me. I mean if you want to hunt for food, hell, go for it. But hunting just to say you killed something seems a little troubling.


But see, that's the problem with making a story about a picture like this. I don't know if LaRoche is going to eat it or not, but you can google mountain lion recipes and get a decent amount of results. We don't know if LaRoche was trophy hunting, doing a canned hunt, or a had a tag from the state.
   19. Bitter Mouse Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:06 PM (#4634766)
I look forward to the day of vat grown meat, so I can eat meat and be less hypocritical in my loathing for this sort of activity.

Still it is neither illegal nor hugely immoral. I find hunting predators to be distasteful (and as I said personally loathsome), but since I do eat meat and so on, so mostly I shrug, say it is not for me, and move on with my life.
   20. Tim Wallach was my Hero Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:11 PM (#4634773)
I have no issue whatsoever with hunting. I myself have been on a lot of hunting trips up north and I have killed and cut a seal. I work with Inuit whose diet is still composed of 80% meet these days and I have many friends who hunt moose and deer in Southern Canada.

However, I do feel a malaise over trophy hunting. If you kill an animal, eat it or abstain.
   21. Davo Dozier Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:20 PM (#4634793)
A year ago I read this book: The Man-Eaters of Kumaon. It was written by a man that was hired by the British government to track down and kill tigers that had become man eaters. Totally awesome.
I'm familiar with that one. His boat got shipwrecked and he and Fay Wray were stranded on Count Zaroff's island.
   22. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:30 PM (#4634809)
A year ago I read this book: The Man-Eaters of Kumaon. It was written by a man that was hired by the British government to track down and kill tigers that had become man eaters.


Yes, that's the other Jim Corbett, the one who couldn't box. His exploits have been a bane to my research efforts for years.
   23. Spectral Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:31 PM (#4634812)
At this point, I feel like I read internet hunting threads solely to be amused by the selective indignation of anti-hunters. I am rarely disappointed.
   24. McCoy Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:37 PM (#4634826)
If you really want to be indignant you should read about the fishing and hunting exploits of Ted Williams. That man put a severe dent in the population of wildlife of this planet and he did it mostly for sport.
   25. 'zop sympathizes with the wrong ####### people Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:40 PM (#4634833)
That's an awesome picture, and mountain lions are no easy kill, let alone with a bow. I'm impressed.
   26. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:49 PM (#4634845)
Gross. I understand hunting and fishing all that, but killing a mountain lion is just gross. There's no point in it but vanity.
   27. spike Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:58 PM (#4634860)
I feel like I read internet hunting threads solely to be amused by the selective indignation of anti-hunters. I am rarely disappointed.

They come as a set with the with poorly recited defenses of hunting from non-hunters with an agenda.

   28. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:58 PM (#4634861)
The skill required to do this was likely impressive, but I can't help but be saddened when I see the photo.
   29. The Yankee Clapper Posted: January 09, 2014 at 03:59 PM (#4634864)
Perfectly legal behavior. End of story.
   30. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 04:04 PM (#4634875)
Perfectly legal behavior. End of story.


There are lots of things that are perfectly legal, but still unpleasant. Deliberately sneezing on doorknobs, for instance.
   31. The Good Face Posted: January 09, 2014 at 04:05 PM (#4634880)
Not something I'd be interested in doing, but I'm assuming the Fish & Wildlife department wherever he shot it knew what they're doing if they're issuing tags. Also, that's a pretty great picture.
   32. Davo Dozier Posted: January 09, 2014 at 04:09 PM (#4634889)
There are lots of things that are perfectly legal, but still unpleasant.
Reading the comments on internet message boards.
   33. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: January 09, 2014 at 04:34 PM (#4634927)
There are lots of things that are perfectly legal, but still unpleasant. Deliberately sneezing on doorknobs, for instance.

Taking steroids in the DR.
   34. SandyRiver Posted: January 09, 2014 at 04:36 PM (#4634933)
Well, overpopulation of animals IS a problem (mostly because they create an imbalance in the ecosystem), primarily ,as you say, caused by elimination of predators. But he killed a mountain lion, that IS the predator. We need MORE mountain lions (and wolves, and bears, etc.) - they are the solution to overpopulation, not the problem.


Except that "solution" seems untenable in modern society. The classic example is with whitetail deer, which get along very nicely with people in suburbia, where wolves and mountain lions might not be welcomed. Where legal deer hunting is eliminated, fenders (plus poachers and occasional roaming dogs) take over.

Deermeat is my favorite among all red meat, but I'll admit to enjoying all parts of the hunt, though my feelings at the actual kill are much more of satisfaction at legally obtaining this resource than of any "thrill". Low fat, chemical free meat that caused no demands on our agriculture system - it's all good. Those who don't wish to hunt and/or who don't eat meat deserve to have their views respected, but when the small segment of that population seeks to demonize hunters (and I haven't really seen any of that on this thread), my respect tends to disappear.

McCoy: TW did his share of hunting, but fishing was one of his three true passions in life - the others being flying and hitting a baseball. I've never looked into how much of his catch was kept or released, and doubt that he put a truly significant dent (in the sense of causing a noticable decrease in any particular species) in wildlife populations. It's hard for any one man to do that; even Bill Cody had lots of fellow participants in slaughtering bison.
   35. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 04:55 PM (#4634965)
Except that "solution" seems untenable in modern society. The classic example is with whitetail deer, which get along very nicely with people in suburbia, where wolves and mountain lions might not be welcomed. Where legal deer hunting is eliminated, fenders (plus poachers and occasional roaming dogs) take over.


There's a bit of an elk population problem in Estes Park, Colorado where I lived for a while. The elk are so numerous in the absence of bears and other predators that they're literally a traffic nuisance, routinely clogging up the town's main drag (the aptly-named Elkhorn Drive) and the two roads leaving town to the east. Obviously there's been lots of discussion over how to deal with the critters - sterilization, hunting, relocation, etc. Of course I don't have any issues with hunting per se, any more than I have an issue with fighting per se, but I'm all about fairness. I think anyone should be able to hunt and kill an elk in Estes Park any time of the year, with the caveat that the only weapon they're allowed to use is a 2x4 board with no more than 3 nails in it. I think this provides a nice balance of sporting challenge and lethality while still giving the elk a chance to defend itself fairly. The town council was not amused with the proposal.
   36. spike Posted: January 09, 2014 at 05:02 PM (#4634975)
The classic example is with whitetail deer, which get along very nicely with people in suburbia

Like hell they do. Car accidents (and worse motorcycle accidents) involving deer are severe and frequent. Deer destroy crops and landscaping. They are in fact 6'+ tall 200+ pound horned animals that either in rut or through exposure to unarmed people can and will f you up.
   37. SoSH U at work Posted: January 09, 2014 at 05:07 PM (#4634981)
Like hell they do. Car accidents (and worse motorcycle accidents) involving deer are severe and frequent. Deer destroy crops and landscaping. They are in fact 6'+ tall 200+ pound horned animals that either in rut or through exposure to unarmed people can and will f you up.


I think he meant they don't mind us, not the other way around.
   38. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 05:10 PM (#4634988)
I think he meant they don't mind us, not the other way around.

Hell, they love us. We kill all the wolves, and chop down the dense forest, creating exactly the kind of thin woodlands they like. Plus we plant all sorts of vegetation.
   39. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 05:18 PM (#4635002)
Plus we plant all sorts of vegetation.


Much of it very tasty, at that.
   40. McCoy Posted: January 09, 2014 at 05:28 PM (#4635019)
McCoy: TW did his share of hunting, but fishing was one of his three true passions in life - the others being flying and hitting a baseball. I've never looked into how much of his catch was kept or released, and doubt that he put a truly significant dent (in the sense of causing a noticable decrease in any particular species) in wildlife populations. It's hard for any one man to do that; even Bill Cody had lots of fellow participants in slaughtering bison.

Hyperbole is sometimes used in internet conversations.
   41. Sunday silence Posted: January 09, 2014 at 05:35 PM (#4635030)
At this point, I feel like I read internet hunting threads solely to be amused by the selective indignation of anti-hunters. I am rarely disappointed.


Cant I just have respect for all sentient beings, and aspire to a world where all of them can live happily?
   42. Lassus Posted: January 09, 2014 at 05:48 PM (#4635056)
I'd be fine if he tracked and killed it with his bare hands. I'll allow him to wear clothes as a sole bit of help. Otherwise, weak.
   43. Joey B.: posting for the kids of northeast Ohio Posted: January 09, 2014 at 05:52 PM (#4635066)
Over/under on the number of PETAphiles who will be protesting the Nationals first home game? I'll say ten.
   44. McCoy Posted: January 09, 2014 at 06:02 PM (#4635084)
Headline should have been "Adam LaRoche Bags Cougar While On Vacation with Buck Commander".
   45. Spectral Posted: January 09, 2014 at 06:29 PM (#4635114)
Cant I just have respect for all sentient beings, and aspire to a world where all of them can live happily?


Not if you're even remotely realistic or honest about the natural world. Have you scolded any mountain lions for viciously mauling prey recently?
   46. Publius Publicola Posted: January 09, 2014 at 06:44 PM (#4635129)
The skill required to do this was likely impressive


As a Nats season ticket holder and fan, there are other skills of LaRouche I'd rather be impressed by.
   47. Davo Dozier Posted: January 09, 2014 at 06:47 PM (#4635132)
Over/under on the number of PETAphiles who will be protesting the Nationals first home game? I'll say ten.
0.5, and I'll take the under.
   48. AT-AT at bat@AT&T Posted: January 09, 2014 at 07:19 PM (#4635163)
That's a very nice headlion !
Only two alternatives I can think of would make it more awesome:

Washington Nationals' ...Kevin Youkilis Mountain Lion...etc. !

Washington Nationals' ... Adam LaRoche... Poseys with it ! (The Mountain Lion's leg would have to be broken or something though !)

Only thing better than with a bow would be "via bunting" !
   49. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: January 09, 2014 at 07:25 PM (#4635166)
tastes just like chicken
   50. SandyRiver Posted: January 10, 2014 at 09:52 AM (#4635516)
I think he meant they don't mind us, not the other way around.


Exactly, and said more nicely and succinctly than I would have.

Hyperbole is sometimes used in internet conversations.


Understood; I merely was trying (too hard, evidently) to ensure others also understood.
   51. Traderdave Posted: January 10, 2014 at 10:27 AM (#4635548)
As a bowhunter myself I respect the achievement. Lions, themselves the ultimate hunters, are very difficult to bag.

It is illegal to hunt them here in CA*, not because qualified biologists have determined that the population is at risk, but becuase of a ballot initiative a few years back, courtesy of our hugely dysfunctional initiative system. In parts of the state the deer population has crashed because the lion population has risen since hunting them is banned. Action/reaction, unintended consequences, etc.


*Save the occasional deprivation permit, which I'm told are nearly impossible for ranchers to secure.
   52. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 10:46 AM (#4635564)
As a bowhunter myself I respect the achievement. Lions, themselves the ultimate hunters, are very difficult to bag.


That's because you zhoo-zhitsu weak my fren. Mata Leao take care of lion, is no lie, bow for man no know zhoo-zhitsu, man know zhoo-zhitsu always have weapon.
   53. Traderdave Posted: January 10, 2014 at 10:47 AM (#4635566)
If that's a joke, it went over my head. Care to clarify?
   54. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 10:55 AM (#4635577)
Is no joke fren, man learn zhoo-zhitsu, make you weapon. No lie, you do google Mata Leao, learn zhoo-zhitsu, come train.
   55. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: January 10, 2014 at 10:59 AM (#4635581)
As a bowhunter myself I respect the achievement. Lions, themselves the ultimate hunters, are very difficult to bag.

When hunting a predator like this (or African lions and the like), how does the hunter ensure that he won't be attacked himself? Or is the risk part of the hunt?
   56. Traderdave Posted: January 10, 2014 at 11:06 AM (#4635592)
When hunting a predator like this (or African lions and the like), how does the hunter ensure that he won't be attacked himself? Or is the risk part of the hunt?


It varies. Least risky is to be in a tree stand over a bait pile, which is very low risk, if any. Most risky is stalking on foot, which is very dangerous, and typically would only be done with a buddy or a professional guide backing you up with a firearm. Even with backup, stalking a lion to 20 or 30 yards takes more balls than I'll ever have.
   57. Bitter Mouse Posted: January 10, 2014 at 11:16 AM (#4635601)
typically would only be done with a buddy or a professional guide backing you up with a firearm


The Maasai are not impressed and do not want to sign up for your newsletter. Seriously though, yeah, pretty dangerous.

In parts of the state the deer population has crashed because the lion population has risen since hunting them is banned. Action/reaction, unintended consequences, etc.


Not an expert in ecosystems, but I believe most predator/prey pairs go through crash cycles fairly commonly. I don't think a deer population crash is all that unexpected. A Lion crash follows, and then the deer population rebounds - step repeat. Statis equilibriums are pretty rare, dynamic equilibria are much more common, but much harder to model and describe and so get short shrift.
   58. DL from MN Posted: January 10, 2014 at 11:25 AM (#4635617)
Low fat, chemical free meat that caused no demands on our agriculture system


Deer eat out of the same cornfields as we do in MN. That's hardly "chemical-free" and it takes a small bite out of the corn crop.
   59. Morty Causa Posted: January 10, 2014 at 11:30 AM (#4635623)


I don't know. Would a cow have a reason to exist if we weren't using it? Would it exist?
   60. Joey B.: posting for the kids of northeast Ohio Posted: January 10, 2014 at 11:37 AM (#4635638)
I love general manager Mike Rizzo's comment on the matter:

“I’ve never been hunting in my life, so I don’t know what he sees in it and what they get out of it,” said Rizzo. “But it was an impressive mountain lion, and I’d like to think he shot the mountain lion because the mountain lion was gonna attack him. That’s how I’m playing it in my mind.”

“I hope Rochey’s lifting more than mountain lions this offseason,” he continued.

Hey genius, you signed him to a new contract and he's your player. Why don't you try talking to the guy and getting to know him a little better?
   61. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 11:41 AM (#4635643)
Not if you're even remotely realistic or honest about the natural world. Have you scolded any mountain lions for viciously mauling prey recently?

Obligatory/damn funny.

http://www.theonion.com/articles/brave-mountain-lion-fends-off-group-of-hikers,2526/
   62. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 11:42 AM (#4635646)
double post
   63. McCoy Posted: January 10, 2014 at 12:18 PM (#4635703)
One of my employees is from Africa and in his younger years before he came to America he would hunt lions for food and money. Well, one day the lions chased him and his buddy up a tree where he stayed for 3 days before people went looking for him and found him. Unfortunately for him his buddy fell from the tree on the first day and was eaten by the lions. So he had to stay up there for 3 days while his buddy was getting eaten down below and then got to look at his carcass for another two days.
   64. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 12:41 PM (#4635733)
One of my employees is from Africa and in his younger years before he came to America he would hunt lions for food and money. Well, one day the lions chased him and his buddy up a tree where he stayed for 3 days before people went looking for him and found him. Unfortunately for him his buddy fell from the tree on the first day and was eaten by the lions. So he had to stay up there for 3 days while his buddy was getting eaten down below and then got to look at his carcass for another two days.

Are you sure he's not pulling your leg?
   65. Traderdave Posted: January 10, 2014 at 12:45 PM (#4635737)
African lions are relatively easier to hunt than American ones because they are so confident and fearless. When they see, smell or hear you approaching, they typically stay put and don't bother to hide, or they come charging after you. OTOH American lions 99.99% of the time will quietly slip out of the area. That is why sighting of lions is so rare in CA and other states despite their growing numbers. Going after an African lion with a bow is extremely dangerous, far moreso than an American one.

(I have no actual experience in either, just what I've read)
   66. DL from MN Posted: January 10, 2014 at 12:48 PM (#4635739)
Why don't you try talking to the guy and getting to know him a little better?


The GM is an executive, why would he worry about the employees?
   67. SandyRiver Posted: January 10, 2014 at 12:51 PM (#4635743)
Deer eat out of the same cornfields as we do in MN. That's hardly "chemical-free" and it takes a small bite out of the corn crop.


And given the juxtapoasition of corn availability and hunting season, the critters' chemical content is probably near its max when they're being reduced to possession. However, even when the corn is handy the deer eat a variety of foods, and compared to livestock which eat mainly human-prepared food (at least immediately prior to slaughter) and receive medications, the deer should be relatively clean even in corn country. Of course, the "chem-free" comment came from one who lives in a state that's 90% forested. YMMV

The prey-predator cycle can be messy when starving lions switch to sheep or other livestock. Predator-caused crashes of whitetail pops are uncommon, due to the deer's fecundity. Generally there are other factors involved, for instance in N.MN where wolves are involved and N.Maine where it's coyotes, severe winters are also limiting.
   68. Joey B.: posting for the kids of northeast Ohio Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:00 PM (#4635755)
Are you sure he's not pulling your leg?

McCoy is pulling your leg. Making up these kinds of ridiculous stories is his specialty.
   69. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:01 PM (#4635756)
Plus we plant all sorts of vegetation.

Much of it very tasty, at that.

Grow your own damn vegetables, Vlad.
   70. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:04 PM (#4635759)
American lions/cougars are only distant relatives of African lions. The former is a small cat, the latter a big cat.

I don't like the idea of killing a cougar for sport, but at least they're not endangered. Killing an african lion is awful.
   71. 'zop sympathizes with the wrong ####### people Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:04 PM (#4635762)
and N.Maine where it's coyotes



To be accurate, coyote-wolf hybrids.

I remember the first time I encountered an eastern coyote when hiking alone. Peaceable towards humans, but a hellofalot bigger than the little fellas you get used to seeing everywhere out West. If they wanted to cause trouble, lord knows they could.
   72. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:14 PM (#4635772)
Would a cow have a reason to exist if we weren't using it?


Jesus, man, I'm not even sure I have a reason to exist.
   73. McCoy Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:22 PM (#4635783)
McCoy is pulling your leg. Making up these kinds of ridiculous stories is his specialty.

The only "story" I've ever made up is the Danny Glover died story. Everything else is true and factual as far as I know.
   74. DL from MN Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:24 PM (#4635786)
the deer eat a variety of foods


Yeah, they like my wife's hostas and the grass at the golf course too.
   75. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:33 PM (#4635793)
The only "story" I've ever made up is the Danny Glover died story. Everything else is true and factual as far as I know.


And to be fair, you'll eventually be right about that one, too.
   76. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:43 PM (#4635803)
I don't like the idea of killing a cougar for sport, but at least they're not endangered. Killing an african lion is awful.


But they have no souls.
   77. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: January 10, 2014 at 01:54 PM (#4635810)
The classic example is with whitetail deer, which get along very nicely with people in suburbia, where wolves and mountain lions might not be welcomed.

My 12 year old boy bagged his first whitetail about 2 weeks ago on our lease near Lampasas, TX. There are so many in the area that on our way home from dinner one night, we counted 8 in people's yards just off the main drag in this very small town (population < 7000) eating the grass, shrubberies, and what have you, and that was just on the one road out of town that we were on.

She's going to make some damn fine sausage and jerky when we get her back in a few weeks.
   78. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 02:08 PM (#4635820)
It varies. Least risky is to be in a tree stand over a bait pile, which is very low risk, if any. Most risky is stalking on foot, which is very dangerous, and typically would only be done with a buddy or a professional guide backing you up with a firearm. Even with backup, stalking a lion to 20 or 30 yards takes more balls than I'll ever have.


This. My folks are retired in WY and they defintiely say the mountain lion is definitely to be feared due to their stalking nature. They are known to stalk man, who are often out hunting elk or deer. Outfitters that take people hunting for mountain lion typically and often travel mountainside in ATVs and other vehicles seeking tracks (usualy Nov-Feb) and then bring out the hounds to follow the tracks. It is a pretty expensive hunt, maybe not as much as big horn sheep, but defintiely $5-$8k for a week. I've probably spent 300 days in Wyoming and have never seen a mountain lion.
   79. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 02:11 PM (#4635823)
They are in fact 6'+ tall 200+ pound horned animals that either in rut or through exposure to unarmed people can and will f you up.


Centaurs have horns now?
   80. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 02:56 PM (#4635856)
Centaurs have horns now?

Well, that didn't take too long.
   81. SoSH U at work Posted: January 10, 2014 at 03:06 PM (#4635868)
Are you sure he's not pulling your leg?


Nah. He showed McCoy a picture from his phone.

   82. SteveM. Posted: January 10, 2014 at 03:17 PM (#4635876)
I almost bagged a deer last week. Sadly though it was with my Saab on the dirt road leading to my house.
   83. Rickey! On a blog from 1998. With the candlestick. Posted: January 10, 2014 at 03:27 PM (#4635887)
I almost bagged a deer last week.


It's demeaning to call them "booth babes" any more.
   84. jmurph Posted: January 10, 2014 at 03:30 PM (#4635891)
I'm reasonably sure there is no such thing as an "American lion." Ahh, I see there was several thousand years ago. You people are confusing me with your "lion" this and your "american lion" that.
   85. SandyRiver Posted: January 10, 2014 at 04:51 PM (#4635939)
To be accurate, coyote-wolf hybrids.

I remember the first time I encountered an eastern coyote when hiking alone. Peaceable towards humans, but a hellofalot bigger than the little fellas you get used to seeing everywhere out West. If they wanted to cause trouble, lord knows they could.


Genetic studies have confirmed that some wolf DNA entered the coyote population as it expanded east, though it's but a small part of the overall critter's genetics, and the eastern subspecies is something like 25% larger than its western cousin. Many canids can interbreed and produce viabnle, fertile offspring. There also have been coy-dog rumors, though the DNA is mostly lacking. One problem with the latter is that domestic dogs' ramdom estrus timing carries over to the offspring, such that the crossbreed females may come into heat at inopportune times, with pups born in midwinter, or late summer, or some other season that would severely reduce survival.
   86. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 05:11 PM (#4635954)
So, which baseball players would you bet on in The Hunger Games?
   87. The Yankee Clapper Posted: January 10, 2014 at 05:35 PM (#4635977)
I've had as many as 6 deer in the backyard - just a relatively standard suburban subdivision of mostly .33 to .50 acre lots, perhaps a bit more wooded than most. There are reportedly more deer now than in the Colonial Era.
   88. Ricky Posted: January 10, 2014 at 05:39 PM (#4635979)
Genetic studies have confirmed that some wolf DNA entered the coyote population as it expanded east...


Wolf: Do you have some wolf in you?
Coyote: No, why?
Wolf: Do you want some?
   89. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: January 10, 2014 at 05:41 PM (#4635981)
So, which baseball players would you bet on in The Hunger Games?

Prime Pedro. He could kill you from 60 feet away with a 95 mph rock, he's small and quick, and he can throw you to the ground if you charge him.
   90. Swedish Chef Posted: January 10, 2014 at 06:27 PM (#4636005)
So, which baseball players would you bet on in The Hunger Games?

Ugueth Urbina
   91. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 06:37 PM (#4636008)
So, which baseball players would you bet on in The Hunger Games?


No one was ever hungrier than El Guapo.
   92. boteman is not here 'til October Posted: January 11, 2014 at 06:15 AM (#4636165)
I'd pay big money to see David Samson hunt a mountain lion. Unarmed.
   93. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: January 11, 2014 at 06:34 AM (#4636166)
Tree stand over a bait pile...that's candy arse. The poor mountain lion doesn't even stand a chance. If you're hunting a predator, you should have to stalk it on the ground, get within 30 metres and try to finish the job. No way some stinking, noisy human gets anywhere near any a healthy predator.
Hunting for food, no problem. Hunting for sport where the odds are so stacked the hunted has no chance, sorry I think it stinks.
   94. Gonfalon B. Posted: January 11, 2014 at 09:48 AM (#4636172)
So, which baseball players would you bet on in The Hunger Games?

Ted Williams. Ornery attitude, battle experience, can catch fish, can start fires while smelling his bat, will be proven to survive temperatures of -230 degrees.
   95. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: January 11, 2014 at 12:17 PM (#4636227)
Tree stand over a bait pile...that's candy arse. The poor mountain lion doesn't even stand a chance.


Is that what he did? Christ, he might as well have just dropped a bowling ball on its head.

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