Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Boswell: Greg Maddux: A Hall of Fame approach that carried an average arm to Cooperstown

In theory, the Hall of Fame vote could be used an opportunity to talk about how great some players are.

First, Maddux was convinced no hitter could tell the speed of a pitch with any meaningful accuracy. To demonstrate, he pointed at a road a quarter-mile away and said it was impossible to tell if a car was going 55, 65 or 75 mph unless there was another car nearby to offer a point of reference.

“You just can’t do it,” he said. Sometimes hitters can pick up differences in spin. They can identify pitches if there are different releases points or if a curveball starts with an upward hump as it leaves the pitcher’s hand. But if a pitcher can change speeds, every hitter is helpless, limited by human vision.

Monty Predicts a Padres-Mariners WS in 2016 Posted: January 08, 2014 at 02:35 AM | 53 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: braves

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. Bitter Mouse Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:30 AM (#4633107)
Good article, and worth the read. I think saying his arm was "average" undersells it, but still very neat. Of course I am a huge Maddux fan, so there is that.
   2. bunyon Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:37 AM (#4633121)
I'm with Mouse. Saying he had an average arm is crazy. He had a very above average arm. Probably not HOF caliber "arm" but an arm that when combined with a HOF caliber approach made him an inner circle all time great.
   3. SoCalDemon Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:39 AM (#4633124)
In 10 years, Greg Maddux will be throwing up 55 mile per hour beach balls, and hitters will be swinging 3 times to strike themselves out on one pitch. To say that Greg Maddux at his peak had just an average arm is just the incoherent ramblings of a man living in a post-cthuluian universe.

Edited for incoherent rambling.
   4. Joey B. has reignited his October #Natitude Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:40 AM (#4633125)
I love the comment made by some wag that Maddux and Glavine's plaques should be six to eight inches wider than all the other pitchers' plaques.
   5. SoCalDemon Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:44 AM (#4633132)
Now if we are talking about the Greg Maddux who put up an 108 ERA+ from 2003-6, then we can start talking average arm with superior approach. I actually loved seeing Greg Maddux pitch his last two years because he really was clearly working on fumes, with well below average stuff, but somehow managed to make it work to the tune of a league-average or close enough pitcher (94 ERA+). But the Maddux who had a 190+ over 7 years...his arm was pretty good.
   6. Publius Publicola Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:45 AM (#4633133)
In 10 years, Greg Maddux will be throwing up 55 mile per hour beach balls


How can he even fit them in first?
   7. SoCalDemon Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:48 AM (#4633135)
Uninflated?
   8. AROM Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:53 AM (#4633140)
Maddux had average velocity. In his later years he had below average velocity.

The ability to control your pitches and not tip the hitter as you change speeds is exceptional. The ability to rack up 200+ inning seasons every year for 20+ years without injuries puts his arm among a small handful of elites.
   9. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:58 AM (#4633147)
I think it's fair to say that he had an "average" arm by HOF standards. But even that's underselling him. IMO, "arm" isn't just about velocity, and an average arm doesn't have pinpoint control or great movement.

Edit: Coke to AROM.
   10. Publius Publicola Posted: January 08, 2014 at 11:04 AM (#4633156)
I always thought the key to Maddux was his movement. He either started his pitch in the zone and finished out of it or vice versa.
   11. bunyon Posted: January 08, 2014 at 11:10 AM (#4633166)
Right, he threw at, or maybe slightly above, the average MLB starter's velocity with exceptional movement. That, to me, is a great arm. I think a lot of people compare Maddux to Clemens and Johnson rather than "average" MLB starter. Yes, Clemens and Johnson (and Pedro) had far superior "stuff". But Maddux vs. most people just on "arm"? No contest.
   12. jmurph Posted: January 08, 2014 at 11:20 AM (#4633176)
I'm not willing to concede any definition of "average arm" that is capable of throwing complete games on 76 and 84 pitches.

I'm also vaguely remembering a regular season shutout against the Yankees where he only went to a 3 ball count once or twice... anyone remember that? I'm not good with the game logs. I'm thinking 97 or 98.
   13. jmurph Posted: January 08, 2014 at 11:27 AM (#4633181)
Aha! It was the aforementioned 84 pitch shutout on July 2, 1997. I'm counting one three-ball count, in the first inning. That's frankly stupid.
   14. maven of all things baseball Posted: January 08, 2014 at 11:28 AM (#4633182)
I seem to remember a quote from Maddux back when he was with the Braves (probably late '90s) where he said that the key to (his) pitching was making strikes look like balls and balls look like strikes. It may be apocryphal, but when put into the context of his career, it sounds like it could have come from his mouth.
   15. Hang down your head, Tom Foley Posted: January 08, 2014 at 11:44 AM (#4633207)
I remember Maddux being referred to as a "fireballer" when he was coming up. He had a great arm among prospects. Among 350-game winners, he suffers a little.
   16. Ray (RDP) Posted: January 08, 2014 at 11:53 AM (#4633219)
"Average arm" seems to refer to velocity compared to other major leaguers.

I didn't watch Maddux pitch a whole lot, but it seemed to me that his pitches had incredible movement, and late movement, and that his control was pinpoint. Isn't that what separated him from the pack? And he wasn't a strikeout pitcher but he got his share of strikeouts; he wasn't Bob Tewksbury. He was striking out 6-7 batters per 9 at his peak, even a little more, which is an above average K rate.

The thing is that his control was so good (led the league in BB/9 nine times). I know BB/9 and K/9 aren't the best ways to measure this but they're good enough for a quick and dirty look.

And his home run rate allowed was low also (four times led the league).

Velocity and hits allowed weren't anything special, but a good K rate, a very good HR allowed rate, and an excellent BB rate -- while keeping hits allowed in check -- is the end result, I think, of having such good movement and control.

   17. flournoy Posted: January 08, 2014 at 11:55 AM (#4633223)
I want to say that Maddux could hit mid-nineties back in the late eighties when he first came up, but didn't pitch that way because he obviously found a different approach that was more successful.
   18. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:04 PM (#4633232)
Maddux's 1994-1995 is insane. This is the start of the silly ball era, and he posts back-to-back sub 2.00 ERAs, gives up a combined TWELVE home runs in 400 innings of work and walks a combined 54 hitters over that time. Reliever Todd Jones gave up 52 walks and 8 HR in 1995 alone in just 99 innings of work.

Maddux was one of those guys I'll tell my kids about. "You just had to see it to believe it."
   19. Avoid running at all times.-S. Paige Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:05 PM (#4633234)
I always thought the key to Maddux was his movement. He either started his pitch in the zone and finished out of it or vice versa.


Probably was scuffing the ball. Cheater.
   20. Ray (RDP) Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:11 PM (#4633246)
Batters hit 250/291/358 against him (649 OPS). In 1994-1995 his OPS allowed was .502 and .482, respectively.

His career BABIP of .286 was around the league average, IIRC. (Doesn't the league generally hit .290 on balls in play?)

In 1994 his BABIP was .256 and .248. I'd have expected it to be lower.


   21. dlf Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:18 PM (#4633253)
I enjoyed Boswell's article, but he seems to suggest that no one else changes speeds or has a consistent arm slot and release point. Maddux's colleague on this very same ballot did the same thing; what differs between Glavine and Maddux is movement on the fastball / change (Glavine's was great; Maddux's unfreaking believable) and precision control.

A question for older readers. One of my favorite quotes when I was growing up was from Whitey Ford who would often say that he had the batters' front foot on a string and, by changing speeds, he could pull that string any time he wanted. Was Ford's approach similar to Maddux's?
   22. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:25 PM (#4633255)
His career BABIP of .286 was around the league average, IIRC. (Doesn't the league generally hit .290 on balls in play?)


I think the average is closer to .300. According to BBREF, it was .295 over Maddux's career.
   23. puck Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:39 PM (#4633266)
Usually when people refer to an "arm" as "average" etc. they're just talking about strength, not necessarily whether they can throw with accuracy and all that.

But maybe this is another one of those regional dialect differences.
   24. zonk Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:40 PM (#4633270)
Put me in the above average arm/above average velocity camp...

Remember that he was drafted out of HS --
Here's his HS scouting report -- specifically citing his FB as a 6 (current) 8 (potential) and his curve as a 5 (cur), 7 (pot). Report likewise mentions a FB consistently in the 86-89 range (remember -- this is in HS) with good movement. Ironically - it's his change that gets average marks.


this scouting report says that he lacked the "strength" (as in stamina) to be a SP, but specifically calls his arm "good".

When Maddux came up, he consistently worked in the low 90s and sure, his movement wasn't Pedro-esque (whose is), but he always had plus stuff.

I'm all for lauding Maddux - and absolutely, I would agree that his arm/stuff was clearly a notch below Clemens/Pedro/Randy Johnson.... However, the guy's arm and stuff was every bit the equal of say, a Kevin Appier, or other HoVG SP. I would absolutely concur that his approach -- and extraordinary health/durability -- is what took him from fringey HoFer or HoVG to no doubt about it HoFer, perhaps even inner circle RHP HoFer.... but let's not pretend he had Doug Jones stuff.... or even Rick Mahler stuff.
   25. plim Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:48 PM (#4633281)
Maddux was never about stuff, he was the Realtor: location, location, location.
   26. Chris Needham Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:48 PM (#4633282)
I think what's funny about this is that we have a 20-post comment thread debating the use of the word 'average', which appears only in the headline, and likely wasn't added by the writer.
   27. Joey B. has reignited his October #Natitude Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:51 PM (#4633284)
Yeah, headline writers are just about at the bottom of the media totem pole, and that totem pole is already lying down on the ground to begin with.
   28. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 08, 2014 at 12:54 PM (#4633290)
or even Rick Mahler stuff.


He couldn't even grow Rick Mahler's mustache. Advantage, Mahler.
   29. Good cripple hitter Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:01 PM (#4633295)
Here's his HS scouting report -


You can also find more scouting reports on the HOF's amazing Diamond Mines website.
   30. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:03 PM (#4633301)
Right, he threw at, or maybe slightly above, the average MLB starter's velocity with exceptional movement. That, to me, is a great arm.


I don't think that's how baseball people use the term "arm." Movement is generated by grip and fingertip pressure. Location is driven by mechanics and release point. Velocity is generated by a "big arm." Clemens had a big arm. Randy Johnson had a big arm. Maddux had a good arm - high 80s, mid 90s max on his fastball - but not the high 90s of "big arm" pitchers. Maddux made his living on touch and feel (hand/fingers, not arm), location and control (mechanics) and being about 7000 times smarter than anyone else on the field. He was a notorious card counter and had a memory for what batters did three years ago in a similar situation that astounded everyone who got to see it (Cox, Glavine, Mazzone, Ernie Johnson, etc.)
   31. Avoid running at all times.-S. Paige Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:03 PM (#4633302)
Does the greatness of a pitcher like Maddux point to the importance of athleticism for a pitcher. I guess my question is, if you had to choose between a pitcher with a decent arm and great athleticism as opposed to a pitcher with a great arm but below average athleticism, wouldn't you choose the first one?

Edit: I'll defer to Rickey! here since he obviously watched him a bunch but wasn't Maddux's athleticism second to none? I associate a pitcher's athleticism with his command over his form and thus his ability to throw consistently in the way he wants to.
   32. spike Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:03 PM (#4633303)
I do take some issue with this bit of CW - Maddux didn’t want swings and misses for strikeouts, but preferred weak defensive contact and easy outs.

Maddux had 7 Top 10 finishes in K's (6 of them Top 5). He could and did go for the K regularly.


As an aside, I was fortunate enough to be a season ticket holder in Atlanta for Greg's career here - as much a part of his success as changing speeds was, to me it seemed like his ability to get movement to either side of the plate was just as crucial.
   33. Mickey Henry Mays Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:11 PM (#4633313)
The one stat that encapsulates Greg Maddux is assists. He led the league 12 times and that's exactly what I expected to find.
   34. Srul Itza Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:23 PM (#4633337)
From the article:

if a pitcher can change speeds, every hitter is helpless, limited by human vision.

“Except,” Maddux said, “for that [expletive] Tony Gwynn.”



Gwynn against Maddux: 107 PA, .415/.476/.521/.997

Wow.
   35. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:26 PM (#4633345)
I do take some issue with this bit of CW - Maddux didn’t want swings and misses for strikeouts, but preferred weak defensive contact and easy outs.

Maddux had 7 Top 10 finishes in K's (6 of them Top 5). He could and did go for the K regularly.


The thing that made Maddux game-historical was the fact that he did *both.* When you swung, you made weak contact and were retired either 1-3 or 4-3. (Maddux and Glavine both made rather run of the mill defensive second basemen look all-time great by inducing weak grounders to the 2B hole.) When you didn't swing, he cut the fastball back in on you and you K'd looking. He never reared back and "muscled one by you." He made you look stupid with an 88 MPH cutter that you stood up on to "get out of the way" that slid back onto the black at the last minute.

To Paige's question at 31, no one ever confused Greg Maddux with an athlete. He was pudgy and doughy. He was called "The Professor" because he was a four eyed geek on the mound who was just light years smarter than the rest of the people on the field.
   36. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:29 PM (#4633352)
Gwynn against Maddux: 107 PA, .415/.476/.521/.997


Yep. Gwynn was the perfect foil to Maddux. He didn't swing through pitches. He didn't get himself out. And he was smart enough as a hitter to hang with Maddux on the mound. And sometimes guys just see a pitcher really well. At least it was Tony Gwynn. Tom Glavine's nemesis was Mike Redmond. It's just embarrassing to be owned, lock stock and barrel, by Mike Redmond.
   37. flournoy Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:39 PM (#4633365)
Maddux also had a famously tough time with Benito Santiago.
   38. dlf Posted: January 08, 2014 at 01:42 PM (#4633368)
To Paige's question at 31, no one ever confused Greg Maddux with an athlete. He was pudgy and doughy.


And yet he was a scratch golfer and I've seen him juggle five balls. Maddux wasn't big, strong or fast, but had amazing hand-eye coordination and fast reflexes. Maybe athletic isn't the right word, but its awfully close.
   39. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 08, 2014 at 02:10 PM (#4633408)

And yet he was a scratch golfer and I've seen him juggle five balls. Maddux wasn't big, strong or fast, but had amazing hand-eye coordination and fast reflexes. Maybe athletic isn't the right word, but its awfully close.

Right, Maddux never struck me as pudgy or doughy until later in his career. I always thought the multiple Gold Gloves and the fact that he was a pretty good hitter for a pitcher implied that he was a solid all-around athlete.
   40. zonk Posted: January 08, 2014 at 02:20 PM (#4633422)
Maddux was plenty athletic --

The knock on him was always size and frame. He's not/wasn't a 'small' guy -- he was just a smallish guy for someone that was a great SP. He didn't have enormous Nolan Ryan tree trunks, he wasn't Big Unit tall, he wasn't Clemens beefy.

The sort of problem was that he wasn't wispy enough to be a Pedro marvel either -- so he tended to get tagged as unathletic (and I'm betting, this is also what leads to so many calling his arm 'average') because physically, he looked like a pretty average guy. Maybe a bit taller than the average male -- but probably shorter than the average pitcher. Maybe a wee bit more muscular than the average male -- but certainly not than the average major leaguer.

Great pitchers either get noted for being "built" like great pitchers -- Clemens... or they get noted for being so extraordinarily unlike other pitchers physically (Pedro -- or Roy Oswalt is another). Maddux was neither. Size-wise, he was probably slightly below average... but not so noticeably so that people would marvel at it.
   41. AROM Posted: January 08, 2014 at 02:30 PM (#4633435)
Report likewise mentions a FB consistently in the 86-89 range (remember -- this is in HS) with good movement.


Scouts can upgrade a fastball for having great movement, so Maddux can be a 6 while another pitcher with the same velocity on a straight fastball is a 5 or even a 4. High School prospects, on average, I don't think they gain a lot of velocity. So do, but others actually lose velocity as they enter pro ball.

Just on velocity alone, I don't think a pitcher showing 86-89 would get even a 5 present grade today, but in 1984 they might. 95+ MPH major league arms have become common (especially in the bullpen). 30 years ago they were very rare.
   42. toratoratora Posted: January 08, 2014 at 04:44 PM (#4633865)
IIRC, Maddux threw 92-94 when he was first signed and around 92 at his peak.

As for scuffing, I clearly recall seeing Maddux in an interview way back when he was a young kid, maybe even still a Cub. The interviewer was talking about Mike Scott and scuffing balls. He essentially asked Greg if he could ever see himself doing that and Maddux responded something to the extent of, "You bet."
If for nothing else than the refreshing honesty, I always kinda liked Maddux after that moment
   43. Ron J2 Posted: January 08, 2014 at 05:31 PM (#4633967)
#11 From an old usenet post:

From the 1992 Scouting Report:

"Maddux doesn't consider himself a power pitcher, yet his variable speed fastball (reaching 90 MPH) is his most common offering."

1995 Scouting Report

"He throws a variet of pitches including a 90-MPH fastball"

1997 Scouting Report

"His hardest fastball approaches the high-80s"

The book Scouting Reports has both the Major League Scouting Bureau's report and the Mets'.

They did a fine job on Maddux. From the Scouting Bureau's report.

"Doubt if he'll be overpowering type, but should throw a lot of ground balls. Pot. to be front line pitcher".

From the Mets:

"Good live arm - Gd del. Throws with very little effort. F.B. has avg. or better vel. 84-89. Curve is sharp 74-76 change shows
promise. Good control for H.S. pitcher".

At the time he was 18 and weighed 160 lbs. Both reports mentioned that he would probably fill out and add velocity.

Both reports grade his fastball as major league average *at that moment* and both projected it to be above average in the future.

Other comments:

Good competitor. Throws with very little effort. Should use change more.

   44. Del B. Vista Posted: January 08, 2014 at 06:52 PM (#4634063)
I heard Tim Kurkjian tell a story the other day on a radio show about Maddux. Maddux went to his catcher with three starts left in his final season and told him, I'm at 999 walks, and I'm not walking anybody else. And he didn't.
   45. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: January 08, 2014 at 09:39 PM (#4634182)
I heard Tim Kurkjian tell a story the other day on a radio show about Maddux. Maddux went to his catcher with three starts left in his final season and told him, I'm at 999 walks, and I'm not walking anybody else. And he didn't.

Last unintentional walk served up by Maddux went to Brian Giles.

And - fun fact! - Maddux walked "that [expletive] Tony Gwynn" eleven times, without ever striking him out.
   46. Steve Sparks Flying Everywhere Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:14 PM (#4634196)
http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/LAN/LAN200608130.shtml

Saw Maddux pitch in this game. One of those games I'll tell my kids about one day. Hell of an ending.
   47. Davo's Favorite Tacos Are Moose Tacos Posted: January 08, 2014 at 10:25 PM (#4634204)
I heard Tim Kurkjian tell a story the other day on a radio show about Maddux. Maddux went to his catcher with three starts left in his final season and told him, I'm at 999 walks, and I'm not walking anybody else. And he didn't.
RDF! That's a good one!

(And looking up the box-scores, he only had 2 3-ball counts in those final three starts!)
   48. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: January 08, 2014 at 11:58 PM (#4634258)
I probably saw Maddux and Glavine pitch in person 10-12 times. In person. Obviously I watched a lot more of their starts on the superstation. There are few things in this world better than an early summer day game at Turner Field with Maddux on the mound dealing. Before the swelter of the deep summer sets in. I always respected Glav more than I loved him as a fan. (I have always more or less detested John Smoltz.) Watching Maddux pitch was a form of meditation. It was simply sublime. Those two guys are big parts of the reason I have such a sense of casual, arrogant entitlement as a Braves fan. The world is not as it is meant to be unless future HOF starters go back to back to back in a 3 game set on our way to another consecutive division...
   49. zonk Posted: January 09, 2014 at 12:22 AM (#4634264)
I have to admit that my two biggest Maddux memories are this one -- his opening day start against the Cubs the first season after he jumped ship. 8 1/3 scoreless innings -- but not actually a typical Maddux start (he walked 3 and it took him a 125 pitches). It was freezing as hell and I remember his first AB, he fouled a couple pitches into the stands and those got thrown back.

The other was this one -- just to show how long grudges can be held... Unlike most games, where the little bloops and dinks were always caught, every single flare found OF grass and every little dribbler escaped the IF. At the time, it was glorious... The Braves and Maddux had knocked the Cubs out of the playoffs the year before and it just felt so unfair throwing Kevin Tapani, Steve Traschel, and Mark Clark against Glavine, Smoltz, and the traitor (well, there was Wood... but you could almost feel him an inch away from getting hurt). I still remember several 'WTF!' looks on Maddux's face as yet another little blooper dropped in. 14 hits in 7 innings... at the time, it was just delicious.
   50. silhouetted by the sea Posted: January 09, 2014 at 02:02 AM (#4634306)
I was visiting my brother once in Atlanta and we went to a game Maddox was starting. They had a spot above the bullpen where you could watch pitchers warming up and I mentioned that he did not look all that impressive. My brother said watch the catchers glove and I swear I did not once see him move it to catch a pitch.
I also remember reading a story about a bet on whether a catcher could catch a Maddox pitch blindfolded. Someone yelled as he released the ball and the first pitch hit the glove but he did not close it in time. He caught the second pitch.
   51. Dr. Vaux Posted: January 09, 2014 at 06:46 AM (#4634330)
Someone should sign this Maddox guy to a contract.
   52. maven of all things baseball Posted: January 10, 2014 at 11:54 AM (#4635664)
Maddux's 1994-1995 is insane. This is the start of the silly ball era, and he posts back-to-back sub 2.00 ERAs, gives up a combined TWELVE home runs in 400 innings of work and walks a combined 54 hitters over that time. Reliever Todd Jones gave up 52 walks and 8 HR in 1995 alone in just 99 innings of work.


Here are a couple of other factoids from that 1994-1995 span of 53 starts. He gave up MORE unintentional walks (48) than doubles and triples COMBINED (45). He gave up THREE more extra-base hits (57) than total walks (54). He faced over 1,500 batters and only 12 managed to a HR off of him. That's just absurd...
   53. PASTE Thinks This Trout Kid Might Be OK (Zeth) Posted: January 10, 2014 at 12:32 PM (#4635724)
zonk (40): Absolutely right. Part of Maddux's charm is that he always LOOKED like a very average guy; you could watch him befuddle major league hitters for eight innings and think "hey, he doesn't look all that different from me." But Maddux was an extremely good athlete. It's all over his scouting reports from high school up through the end of his career. His balance and fluidity of movement were second to none.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Sheer Tim Foli
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogJosh Byrnes seen as a leader for job under Dodgers president Friedman - CBSSports.com
(2 - 12:32am, Oct 20)
Last: ReggieThomasLives

NewsblogOT: Politics, October 2014: Sunshine, Baseball, and Etch A Sketch: How Politicians Use Analogies
(2518 - 12:23am, Oct 20)
Last: Misirlou's been working for the drug squad

NewsblogBrisbee: The 5 worst commercials of the MLB postseason
(94 - 12:12am, Oct 20)
Last: Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip

NewsblogOT: Monthly NBA Thread - October 2014
(259 - 12:06am, Oct 20)
Last: steagles

NewsblogAngell: Gigantic
(32 - 11:55pm, Oct 19)
Last: Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip

NewsblogCould the Yankees ever be Royals? Young and athletic K.C. is everything that Bombers are not - NY Daily News
(8 - 11:30pm, Oct 19)
Last: Zach

NewsblogDombrowski told that Iglesias 'will be fine' for 2015
(17 - 11:28pm, Oct 19)
Last: Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer

NewsblogOT:  October 2014 - College Football thread
(436 - 11:16pm, Oct 19)
Last: Howie Menckel

NewsblogCardinals proud of fourth straight NLCS appearance | cardinals.com
(30 - 10:52pm, Oct 19)
Last: SoSHially Unacceptable

NewsblogJoe West named ALCS crew chief
(44 - 9:55pm, Oct 19)
Last: tfbg9

NewsblogSielski: A friend fights for ex-Phillie Dick Allen's Hall of Fame induction
(51 - 9:06pm, Oct 19)
Last: stevegamer

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread, September 2014
(824 - 9:02pm, Oct 19)
Last: ursus arctos

NewsblogESPN: Brian Roberts retires
(20 - 8:47pm, Oct 19)
Last: toratoratora

NewsblogProgressive Pitch Projections | Community – FanGraphs Baseball
(5 - 8:43pm, Oct 19)
Last: 'zop sympathizes with the wrong ####### people

NewsblogOT: NFL/NHL thread
(8354 - 7:58pm, Oct 19)
Last: Harveys Wallbangers

Page rendered in 0.6093 seconds
53 querie(s) executed