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Thursday, March 21, 2013

Bryce Harper Gets Free Chipotle Burritos for Life, World Domination to Follow

Bryce Harper gets free Chipotle burritos for life.

I will let that fact marinate with you for a second as you consider how horrible your own life is now by comparison.

Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:42 AM | 327 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: nationals

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   1. Gotham Dave Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:19 PM (#4393594)
Just like those damn Oscar gift bags. Rich people get all the free stuff!

edit: The custom-made card itself is cool, though. Decidedly non-transferable!
   2. SG Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:31 PM (#4393607)
Shouldn't we get a warning when we are being sent to Bleacher Report?
   3. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:32 PM (#4393608)
Never been to a Chipotle's, but I see from their website that one is supposedly coming here soon. How do they compare to, say, Moe's (which we already have, & which I find perfectly OK, probably mainly because they offer tofu)?
   4. hee came hee seop'd he choi'd Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:33 PM (#4393609)
a lifetime supply of diarrhea
   5. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:39 PM (#4393617)
I would rank Chipotle ahead of Moe's and Qdoba, because the meat does not as closely resemble blobs of goo. Moe's has better rice though.

Also, blah blah, no real human would ever eat something from a chain when they could eat something real, blah blah, makes a mockery of REAL MEXICAN FOOD, or possibly makes a mockery of REAL SAN FRANCISCO FOOD because the SAN FRANCISCO BURRITO is something ENTIRELY different from the original burrito, blah blah, etc. Now we can skip that part of the thread.
   6. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:42 PM (#4393621)
Moe's has better rice though.


That's disappointing. I mean, Moe's rice is perfectly satisfactory, but it doesn't really compare to garden-variety rice at any actual Mexican place I can think of.

I've never done it, but there have been times I felt like going to a Mexican restaurant & ordering about 10 sides of rice & nothing else.
   7. Rants Mulliniks Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:42 PM (#4393622)
I just made Barbacoa rip-off burritos for supper last night, damn those things are good.
   8. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:47 PM (#4393630)
Also, blah blah, no real human would ever eat something from a chain when they could eat something real, blah blah, makes a mockery of REAL MEXICAN FOOD, or possibly makes a mockery of REAL SAN FRANCISCO FOOD because the SAN FRANCISCO BURRITO is something ENTIRELY different from the original burrito, blah blah, etc. Now we can skip that part of the thread.

Sir, you have just performed a genuine public service.
   9. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:49 PM (#4393632)

Shouldn't we get a warning when we are being sent to Bleacher Report?


Yes, but you have to click through ten pages before you get to the warning.
   10. Sonic Youk Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:51 PM (#4393635)
Never been to a Chipotle's, but I see from their website that one is supposedly coming here soon. How do they compare to, say, Moe's (which we already have, & which I find perfectly OK, probably mainly because they offer tofu)?


Any major city will have a hundred better burrito places, but they're pretty darn good for a chain fast food place. Sort of the Five Guys of Mexican food.
   11. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:53 PM (#4393638)
I think Pittsburgh has one better burrito place.
   12. CWS Keith plans to boo your show at the Apollo Posted: March 21, 2013 at 01:56 PM (#4393642)
Unrelated, but anyone care to share any information/advice about buying a wok? The main questions I have are -- is it a functional piece of kitchen equipment? In other words, can I get good use out of it outside of dishes akin to stir-fries (although given the variations I can do with stir-fries, it's not necessary if I'm basically only using it for that)? Also, can I get by with using one with only a standard stove (i.e. my burners are, I imagine, nowhere near restaurant quality)? And, if I do eventually buy one, any suggestions on particular features to look for?
   13. CFBF Is A Golden Spider Duck Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:00 PM (#4393648)
Not a big fan of Chipotle's. The burritos are pretty massive, so that's nice, but I find the meat tough and unappealing.

I haven't had Moe's in a while (since college, actually), but I loved them at the time. The athletic department where I worked used to have Moe's cater baseball games from time-to-time and the sportswriters nearly killed each other in the stampede to get a burrito.
   14. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:03 PM (#4393654)
I started using my wok again a couple of weeks ago after discovering that I could stir-fry using water rather than oil (I can't eat fried stuff in general). Was pleasantly surprised a few years back that it works just fine on my stove's electric burners. (I'd prefer gas, but I wouldn't prefer to buy a new stove.)

I don't think I've ever bought one that wasn't the cheapest in the store ... maybe around $8?

I think that pretty much as long as you're buying one made of steel, rather than aluminum (assuming that's even a choice), you're good.
   15. Cris E Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:04 PM (#4393655)
Unrelated, but anyone care to share any information/advice about buying a wok?

We're getting deeper into spring training, and posters here at BTF are sharpening their segue skills to mid-season form. I love this place.
   16. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:07 PM (#4393657)
Get a flat bottomed wok. An expensive all clad or the equivalent is your best bet, but if you want a cheap one there are plenty of carbon steel woks that will work.

I think Chipotle is great, and I've had plenty of real mission burritos. It's not the BEST burrito you'll ever have, but the quality is damn good and very consistent.

I just read a book on the history mexican food in the US that was pretty good: Taco USA.
   17. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:12 PM (#4393660)
Get a flat bottomed wok.


Aren't those called skillets?
   18. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:16 PM (#4393663)
Flat bottomed woks sit flush against the burner. Traditional rounded woks sit over an open flame, but almost no one in the US has that type of burner at home.

here's an example:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/hammered-14-inch-wok/

   19. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:21 PM (#4393665)
Hmmm. The ones I've owned -- 3 at the most, but probably just 2 (I dimly recall that the first one went with my first ex-wife) -- came with little rings that you sat the wok on, over the burner.


Edit: As pictured, I see, in that link's first 2 "Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed" photos.
   20. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:27 PM (#4393668)
Those can work if you have a really good gas burner.
   21. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:29 PM (#4393670)
Maybe I'm not just a very exacting cook, but I've never had anything but a garden-variety gas stove. And as noted a few minutes ago, I don't even have that these days, but the wok works fine (to my pleasant surprise) with electric burners.

Then again, I've never aspired to anything above garden-variety stir-fry, either.
   22. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:30 PM (#4393671)
Never been to a Chipotle's, but I see from their website that one is supposedly coming here soon. How do they compare to, say, Moe's (which we already have, & which I find perfectly OK, probably mainly because they offer tofu)?


Don't know about Moe's (never eaten there) but I find Chipotle's a good cut below Baja Fresh. None of their meats are particularily flavorful, their 1! kind of salsa is serviceable at best; I guess I'd call them the apex of assembly-line Mexican food ...
   23. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:32 PM (#4393675)
Montgomery is an extremely mediocre excuse (in just about every aspect) for a small city (population right at 200,000), at least compared to Little Rock, where I lived previously (& which most people aren't likely to confuse with New York or Los Angeles), & Shreveport, not too terribly far from where I grew up. Looks like Birmingham has at least a couple of Chipotle's, as well as various other chains (like P.F. Chang, which I know nothing about but have heard of) that people here probably only dream about. As far as culinary & other sociocultural offerings go, I'd say the city ranks fourth among the four Alabama cities of any size, which is to say behind not only Birmingham but also Huntsville & Mobile. Not sure why that is (apparently, before I moved here in 11/01, the city had been handicapped for a couple of decades by an ultra-powerful, reactionary pig of a mayor who had a morbid fear of anything new), but nevertheless it is.
   24. zack Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:38 PM (#4393682)
I am addicted to chipolte's rice, mostly because I friggin' loce cilantro. Since there's none near me, I've been trying to make my own, but so far nothing has hit the spot.
   25. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:40 PM (#4393686)
I am addicted to chipolte's rice, mostly because I friggin' loce cilantro.


Now I'm intrigued again.
   26. steagles Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:40 PM (#4393688)
I've never done it, but there have been times I felt like going to a Mexican restaurant & ordering about 10 sides of rice & nothing else.
rice is actually really, really easy to make if you do it right. i basically just put the uncooked rice in a baking dish, add boiling water, cover with foil and bake in the oven for an hour. the rice gets done perfectly every time and it actually stores pretty well for a couple of days, too.
   27. Ok, Griffey's Dunn (Nothing Iffey About Griffey) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:44 PM (#4393692)
None of their meats are particularily flavorful, their 1! kind of salsa is serviceable at best;


Where are you? Our Chipotle's have mild (tomato), medium (a green sauce and also a corn salsa), and a hot (red sauce). Plus, they have multiple varieties of tabasco (chipotle tabasco on Chipotle burritos kicks ass).
   28. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:46 PM (#4393693)
I got very lazy (even more than usual) a year or so ago & bought a rice cooker, but I learned the hard way that those tend to give out after a few uses, or at least the two cheap ones (one Rival, the other Black & Decker) I had did. Now I use a microwave version.
   29. haven Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:52 PM (#4393703)
the free salsa bar at moes is what keeps drawing me in. especially the green salsas. i am basically having salsa with a side of burrito. chipotles is closer to my house, but they only give you the salsa on the burrito. i don't see much difference in meat/beans/rice from either to be honest. moes will also put fresh cilantro on the burrito.
   30. Bhaakon Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:53 PM (#4393706)
rice is actually really, really easy to make if you do it right. i basically just put the uncooked rice in a baking dish, add boiling water, cover with foil and bake in the oven for an hour. the rice gets done perfectly every time and it actually stores pretty well for a couple of days, too.


That's not the rice you get at Mexican restaurants, though. It usually has tomato in some form, stock in place of water, onion and other stuff depending on the source.
   31. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:56 PM (#4393709)
I got spoiled about 3 decades ago with regard to salsas & such by a place in Tempe, Ariz., called Restaurant Mexico. The sauce they used on their enchiladas was green, but it was by no means the standard tomatillo-based salsa verde that I've always encountered everywhere else. After that, as well as the red salsas they served with chips, no other salsa has impressed me enough to make much of a difference to me.
   32. Canker Soriano Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:56 PM (#4393711)
I got very lazy (even more than usual) a year or so ago & bought a rice cooker, but I learned the hard way that those tend to give out after a few uses, or at least the two cheap ones (one Rival, the other Black & Decker) I had did. Now I use a microwave version.


I had a friend who worked at Williams-Sonoma, and with her 40% employee discount I didn't feel bad shelling out for the Panasonic programmable one. I wonder now how I lived my life without it. The best feature is that I can program it to start cooking when I'm not home, so that as I'm walking in the door the rice is about 10 minutes from being done - just enough time to saute up some chicken and vegetables and have a meal.

There's a lot of appliances and other conveniences in my house I'd give up before I let that one go.
   33. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 02:57 PM (#4393712)
That's not the rice you get at Mexican restaurants, though. It usually has tomato in some form, stock in place of water, onion and other stuff depending on the source.


Yeah. That's what I'd love to be able to replicate.

Or maybe not, since it's not like I really need to have any of that on hand whenever I want it.
   34. dlf Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:00 PM (#4393715)
gef ~ With your dietary restrictions, it doesn't really matter, but some of the absolute best fried chicken anywhere in the south is at Martin's in a little strip mall near the Montgomery Country Club. But beyond some pretty good meat & three places, the options are incredibly limited. Is Corsino's on Court street near I85 still open? Looks like a dive, and its in a questionable neighborhood, but reasonably authentic Italian. Olive Room downtown was pretty good and a funky atmosphere but it closed too.
   35. Tripon Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:05 PM (#4393727)
Chiptole's pretty good, especially in an area where immediate Mexican dining is limited. One of the cooler things about Chiptole is that they're one of the few places that try to serve their beef medium, leaving a nice shade of pink instead of over nuking the beef to well done like most places. As a person who likes the meat rare, I really like that.
   36. Manny Coon Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:16 PM (#4393743)
My wife's doctor put her on a fairly restrictive diet and Chipotle is one of the better fast food places to fit her diet, so long as it's one of their salads or brown rice bowls, the burritos not as much. It's a lot harder to eat healthy at a tastier taco shop, especially if your processed carbs are restricted.
   37. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:16 PM (#4393745)
Rosa Mexicano's cookbook has some good flavored rice recipes (yellow, green, red).
   38. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:19 PM (#4393750)
gef ~ With your dietary restrictions, it doesn't really matter, but some of the absolute best fried chicken anywhere in the south is at Martin's in a little strip mall near the Montgomery Country Club.


I actually have eaten their fried chicken, when I feel up to suffering the consequences, & it's worth it. Great stuff. I love their cornbread, too.

I haven't been to Corsino's in forever, but yeah, it's pretty darned good, or at least was. (Not sure if it's still there).

Out here at Maxwell, we're all still trying to deal with the closures of not only Tony's Pizza (maybe 4 years ago) but also, quite recently, the Wagon Wheel.
   39. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:27 PM (#4393758)
Where are you?


SoCal.

I should clarify, I meant the pico de gallo-ish salsa that they hand out with the chips (which, of course, are extra).

I can't remember if the local Chipotle's has bottles of tabasco or not, I'm not really a fan of vinegar-based hot sauces, so I probably just overlooked it ...

   40. booond Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:30 PM (#4393762)
If you don't have good mexican, or are in a rush, then Chipotle's not bad. Since I live in SoCal, I'm covered.
   41. Moeball Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:35 PM (#4393766)
I am addicted to chipolte's rice, mostly because I friggin' loce cilantro.


Seconded. The Chipotle Tabasco also complements the rice quite nicely.

Recognizing that Chipotle started off as a spin-off from McDonald's, I guess (I think Mickey D's got bought out of their holdings, didn't they?), it was considered quite an upgrade from usual fast food fare, particularly by McDonald's standards.

When a new Chipotle store opened a couple blocks from my house a few years ago, I was one of their very first customers which has had some perks along the way. I also bailed them out one time when they ran out of Chipotle Tabasco and I went to the Vons grocery store next door and bought some for them to restock. The manager was just stunned when I handed him the extra bottles of Tabasco. I told him it was absolutely unacceptable for them to be out of Chipotle Tabasco. For the last six months or so since then I have received a lot of free burritos from Chipotle. I usually go about once a week, so call it 4 times a month - a couple times a month the manager will see me walk in and tell the cashier this one's on the house - the free burritos I've received have long since exceeded what it cost me to buy the Tabasco. I guess the manager understands the benefits of establishing good will with the public but I'm a loyal customer. It's not free burritos for life or even a year, but it's still pretty cool.
   42. Sonic Youk Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:40 PM (#4393770)


I can't remember if the local Chipotle's has bottles of tabasco or not, I'm not really a fan of vinegar-based hot sauces, so I probably just overlooked it ...
they do, including the chipotle flavor, which I don't see that often. I admit I swipe a bottle every time I'm there.
   43. Ok, Griffey's Dunn (Nothing Iffey About Griffey) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:44 PM (#4393771)
Recognizing that Chipotle started off as a spin-off from McDonald's, I guess (I think Mickey D's got bought out of their holdings, didn't they?), it was considered quite an upgrade from usual fast food fare, particularly by McDonald's standards


Chipotle started off as an independent company, was bought by McDonalds, then the original owner didn't like the direction McDonald's was going to take the chain and he bought it back. At least, that's what I've heard...

edit: http://nutritionwonderland.com/2009/06/does-mcdonalds-own-chipotle-mailbag/
   44. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:55 PM (#4393775)
I am now very hungry.

I also now have $3 & change in my checking account (pay day is tomorrow).

That juxtaposition of facts is not at all promising.
   45. BDC Posted: March 21, 2013 at 03:55 PM (#4393776)
I ate at Chipotle's once, it was forgettable: an unusual amount of rice seemed to have been piled on whatever I ate. I don't avoid them, I just don't eat or cook a lot of Tex-Mex. And not to channel #5, but there are better storefront places just as cheap and convenient, if you live in Texas, at least.

Back to the wok, though: I've had a thin, carbon-steel, cheap wok for a very long time, and it's been ideal and next to indestructible. You can't go far wrong; just avoid electric, non-stick, or heavy woks. The whole idea is for the bottom to heat very quickly indeed; thick metal defeats the design.

There are lots of things you can make in them aside from stir-fry. You can braise in them; you can get a couple of stackable bamboo steamers and steam a considerable amount of food over very little water. You can also "velvet" food in a wok (Google some instructions for that). Traditionally this is done with oil, but I've also done it with water. You very slightly cook, say, chopped chicken, over rather tepid heat, and then recook it in sauce. Sounds like half-hearted deepfrying, but done correctly, the food doesn't absorb a lot of the oil, and it is a wonderful preparation.
   46. Flynn Posted: March 21, 2013 at 04:00 PM (#4393778)
I'm from San Francisco so I am required to say I loathe Chipotle or blahblahblah, but I live in London now and honestly, it's nice to go there and know I'm going to get a burrito that at least approximates what I would get at home. It's also responsible for a surge in interest in burritos in London, as there's now quite a few different places to get them at.

I mean, I wouldn't have it in a million years in SF, because there's great taquerias all over the City. But it's a good thing to have over here.
   47. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: March 21, 2013 at 05:01 PM (#4393808)
Chipotle rice is lightly sauteed with vegetable oil, lime juice and cilantro prior to cooking with water. Also, they use basmati rice instead of the regular cheap stuff.

When I was in college I ate at a Chipotle (without exaggeration) at least four times a week. I moved somewhere without a chipotle and hunted far and wide for copycat recipes. We are getting one in my town this summer and I am PUMPED. It blows the other chain burrito joints out of the water IMO but the salsa is a real weakness. I love a good salsa verde.
   48. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 05:08 PM (#4393815)
Also, they use basmati rice instead of the regular cheap stuff.


Good to know. I guess basmati is my rice of choice; I have a 5(I think)-lb. bag, minus whatever I've used over the last few weeks, at the house even as I type.

Though it's all good, I guess, as long as they're not using instant rice. I know people who insist that there's no difference in taste between that stuff & the real thing, & I think they're insane.
   49. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: March 21, 2013 at 05:27 PM (#4393823)
Chipotle is considerably better than Moe's, IMO - very much including the rice. I do like Baja Fresh more still, but those two are different enough that I can "get" liking either more than the other.
That said, chipotle is the closest fast food Mexican to my house and I always drive a few miles extra for local options...
**
48: They are insane, yes. Favorite rice is nishiki, but basmati is up there.
I don't eat rice often, but I made sure to buy a decent rice steamer. Wonderful kitchen tool.
   50. chisoxcollector Posted: March 21, 2013 at 05:47 PM (#4393839)
I'm a bit surprised by the poster upthread saying Moe's has better rice than Chipotle. The rice is what really sets Chipotle apart from their competitors. It's fantastic! Cilantro-Lime rice, and you can actually taste the Cilantro and Lime. Their chicken and barbacoa are both quite excellent as well.

Chipotle is actually my favorite national fast food chain, and it isn't much of a contest. Also, as a poster mentioned earlier, you can eat quite healthy there. I lost 65 pounds over a 4 month span 2 years ago, and 90% of my lunches during that time were Chicken Burrito Bowls from Chipotle.
   51. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: March 21, 2013 at 05:58 PM (#4393842)
I bought a $25 rice cooker about 10 years ago and it still works perfectly. I think there's something to be said for either going really high end and getting a fancy model that has lots of features and is really well made, or going in the opposite direction and getting something that's totally basic. Mine has one button and no features, but it does a good job.
   52. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: March 21, 2013 at 05:58 PM (#4393843)
As long as there are Tijuana Flats in the area, I can pass on Chipotle.
   53. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: March 21, 2013 at 06:05 PM (#4393844)
51 - agreed.
I spent a bit more as I pretty much only make brown rice and wanted to start it in the morning and not have it be too dried out when I made everything else that night - so, $40-50? If you're a rice fiend, get a fuzzy logic or induction cooker I guess, but I get extremely consistent quality with my midrange one.
   54. Vailsoxfan Posted: March 21, 2013 at 06:09 PM (#4393848)
The original Chipotle started at 8th and Colorado in Denver right across from where my wife went to grad school at the CU Health Science Center. It was started by a guy from SF who went to culinary school. His father was a rich investment guy and his dad said he would finance a restraunt start up for him. He started a burrito shop and his dad nearly flipped but went ahead helping him anyway, eventually selling a stake to mickey Ds. He didnt care for it so bought it back.

Its also nice because they are sourcing all their pork and maybe beef from independent farmers not the factory feed lots. He is very into trying to make a fast food place that supports more than just himself.
   55. McCoy Posted: March 21, 2013 at 06:25 PM (#4393858)
Any major city will have a hundred better burrito places, but they're pretty darn good for a chain fast food place. Sort of the Five Guys of Mexican food.

Please rattle off 100 better burrito places in DC. This place is crap when it comes to burritos.
   56. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: March 21, 2013 at 06:48 PM (#4393869)
I agree with McCoy. Chipotle probably has the best burritos in DC. It's not a mexican food town. (Although a few tacquerias are starting to pop up.)
   57. Canker Soriano Posted: March 21, 2013 at 06:54 PM (#4393871)
I spent a bit more as I pretty much only make brown rice and wanted to start it in the morning and not have it be too dried out when I made everything else that night - so, $40-50? If you're a rice fiend, get a fuzzy logic or induction cooker I guess, but I get extremely consistent quality with my midrange one.

The rice cooker I had before my Panasonic one was a basic Black and Decker model that I bought for probably $25 at Target. I had it for about 15 years, and it made perfect rice every time. Alas, it finally gave out, and they didn't still make a version similar to the one I had, so I shelled out for the upgrade (mostly for the timed cooking feature, which really has been invaluable).
   58. Tripon Posted: March 21, 2013 at 06:59 PM (#4393873)
Speaking of Chipotle, I just visited Gogi's, which is a Korean take on Chipotle. (Assembly line food, can make Tacos, etc. But with Korean ingredients.)

The thing is, you get unlimited choices of sides, so you get way more food at Gogi's than at a typical Chipotle for the same price. My waist and budget are both going to expand.
   59. cardsfanboy Posted: March 21, 2013 at 06:59 PM (#4393874)
Any major city will have a hundred better burrito places, but they're pretty darn good for a chain fast food place. Sort of the Five Guys of Mexican food.


I just don't get five guys. Overpriced food, barely edible fries and nothing spectacular. The Whopper is a better burger than that, Heck the McDonald's Angus burger is better than five guys. Everyone talks about it like it's special, and it just doesn't do it for me.

   60. CrosbyBird Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:17 PM (#4393878)
The CEO of Chipotle is slowly opening a second chain that is sort of a Asian-equivalent, but there are only three locations (one in Santa Monica and two in DC).

http://shophousekitchen.com/
   61. CrosbyBird Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:23 PM (#4393880)
I just don't get five guys. Overpriced food, barely edible fries and nothing spectacular. The Whopper is a better burger than that, Heck the McDonald's Angus burger is better than five guys. Everyone talks about it like it's special, and it just doesn't do it for me.

I think Five Guys is one of the better fast-food burgers, and in a totally different class than anything served at McDonald's or BK or Wendy's. I like their fries too, although there everyone is a distant second from McDonald's.

There are fast-food places I prefer in NY, like New York Burger Co. and Shake Shack, but Five Guys is consistently good. Lucky's makes a pretty good fast-food burger too.
   62. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:23 PM (#4393881)
I just don't get five guys. Overpriced food, barely edible fries and nothing spectacular. The Whopper is a better burger than that, Heck the McDonald's Angus burger is better than five guys. Everyone talks about it like it's special, and it just doesn't do it for me.

I don't understand this at all, although, to be fair, I've heard that the quality control outside of DC stinks.
   63. Greg K Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:27 PM (#4393882)
On gas vs. electric burners:

I grew up with electric and now live in a country which apparently only uses gas. What are the relative benefits? I've gotten over the fear and confusion of literally lighting gas on fire every time I cook, but I think I still prefer electric. Maybe it's just my aparatus, but the lowest setting is still too hot for simmering. If I'm making a chili or a stew I have to actual stand there stirring the whole time (rather than popping in every 10-15 minutes or so) or else it burns to the bottom of the pot. I'm not exactly a gourmet chef, so I'm sure there is some subtlety I'm missing out on, but for me gas seems to be a mild nuisance to start, and delivers a mildly worse cooking experience.
   64. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:35 PM (#4393886)
I think cfb is an outlier here.

Iirc, McCoy has spoken up for gas - I could recite what I've read (better at regulating heat, able to reach target immediately) but am no chef.
   65. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:37 PM (#4393889)
I just don't get five guys. Overpriced food, barely edible fries and nothing spectacular.


This, although I'd call the fries average-to-good. Went for lunch with wife and stepkid a few weeks ago and ordered 3 bacon cheeseburgers, 3 reg. fries and 3 sodas and the bill was slightly over $40.
   66. Joey B. has reignited his October #Natitude Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:39 PM (#4393891)
The Whopper is a better burger than that, Heck the McDonald's Angus burger is better than five guys.

Good grief. Your assessment of food quality is about as good as your assessment of Bryce Harper last year.
   67. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:44 PM (#4393893)
I just don't get five guys. Overpriced food, barely edible fries and nothing spectacular. The Whopper is a better burger than that, Heck the McDonald's Angus burger is better than five guys. Everyone talks about it like it's special, and it just doesn't do it for me.


I think Five Guys is one of the better fast-food burgers, and in a totally different class than anything served at McDonald's or BK or Wendy's. I like their fries too, although there everyone is a distant second from McDonald's.

There are fast-food places I prefer in NY, like New York Burger Co. and Shake Shack, but Five Guys is consistently good. Lucky's makes a pretty good fast-food burger too.


Question: Is there any remaining fast food chain where you can actually get an honest-to-God blood gushing RARE hamburger any more? Or have government regulations put the kibosh on it? When some dump called "Cheeburger Cheeburger" was flooding the DC area with ads a few years ago bragging about the quality of their hamburgers, I went on their website, and it said that all of their hamburgers are served medium. What is the ####### story with this? Is Cheeburger Cheeburger run by a bunch of religious nuts, or is this one of those cases where it really is "the government" that's to blame?
   68. Tripon Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:46 PM (#4393894)
Speaking of a guy who loves In&Out;, 5 guys burgers are just way to greasy, and differs from location to location. Also, I wish burger places grill their tomatoes. Raw tomatoes just suck.
   69. Tripon Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:47 PM (#4393896)
Question: Is there any remaining fast food chain where you can actually get an honest-to-God blood gushing RARE hamburger any more? Or have government regulations put the kibosh on it? When some dump called "Cheeburger Cheeburger" was flooding the DC area with ads a few years ago bragging about the quality of their hamburgers, I went on their website, and it said that all of their hamburgers are served medium. What is the ####### story with this? Is Cheeburger Cheeburger run by a bunch of religious nuts, or is this one of those cases where it really is "the government" that's to blame?


In&Out; will cook your burger rare if you order it.
   70. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:48 PM (#4393897)
I believe Fuddruckers will serve you a rare burger. Since I prefer my ground meat medium-well (and my steaks medium-rare), I'm not really sure about others.

My stepson likes his burgers rare and seems to be happy with the ones we get at Smokey Bones.
   71. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:53 PM (#4393902)
In&Out; will cook your burger rare if you order it.

That's good to know, though unfortunately their closest location to DC seems to be in Dallas.

The most unbelievable exception in retrospect to the current Scorched Earth policy of cooking fast food burgers was that when the Roy Rogers chain first opened up in the DC area, rare was the default method of frying their burgers, and they were actually very good. It lasted about 5 years and then they were no different than McD's or Hardees, all overcooked all the time.
   72. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 21, 2013 at 07:55 PM (#4393903)
I believe Fuddruckers will serve you a rare burger.

The only time I was in a Fuddruckers (in Minny) it was indeed very good for hamburgers, but aren't those sit-down restaurants with waiters/waitresses rather than stand in line to order?
   73. Tripon Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:00 PM (#4393906)
Yeah, In&Out; is a rare corporate business, where the goal is to control all aspects of their stores. They don't franchise, every store has to be within a day of a meat processing plant. They own their own meat processing plants, and since its a private company, nobody(i.e. shareholders) are telling them that they have to quickly expand like most companies. The founding family was also deeply religious, and they include bible verses on all of their packaging. The one day rule is the main reason why Arizona was the furthest outpost for years before the Texas expansion. In&Out; had to set up their own processing plant for the Texas region.

So uh, don't expect any east coast stores anytime soon.
   74. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:08 PM (#4393911)
Could be gov't in your neck of the woods as well, Andy - it (med or plus) was the law in NC until recently.
   75. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:09 PM (#4393912)
I'd put up with John 3:16 quotes and the 2nd amendment plastered all over the menu, as long as they cook their hamburgers nice and bloody.
   76. Chokeland Bill Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:10 PM (#4393914)
I eat at Chipotle quite often, and think it's better than Qdoba and Baja Fresh, but here on the western side of the country there is another chain called Cafe Rio that I think is quite a bit better. More menu options, way better tortillas, and really better ingredients in general.

Just from looking at the menu options, I want a ShopHouse to open in Vegas.

   77. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:12 PM (#4393916)
Could be gov't in your neck of the woods as well, Andy - it (med or plus) was the law in NC until recently.

It was also the case in a Northern Virginia sports bar that I was at a year or two ago, at least according to the waitress who wouldn't take my order for a rare burger. This is one of those times when "nanny state" is a fitting description.
   78. Howling John Shade Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:15 PM (#4393917)
The original Chipotle started at 8th and Colorado in Denver right across from where my wife went to grad school at the CU Health Science Center. It was started by a guy from SF who went to culinary school. His father was a rich investment guy and his dad said he would finance a restraunt start up for him. He started a burrito shop and his dad nearly flipped but went ahead helping him anyway, eventually selling a stake to mickey Ds. He didnt care for it so bought it back.

Its also nice because they are sourcing all their pork and maybe beef from independent farmers not the factory feed lots. He is very into trying to make a fast food place that supports more than just himself.

I worked with his sister over a summer a couple of years back. She was nice.

That said, my main complaint about Chipotle is the lack of a fun salsa bar. Mediocre mexican food can become quite good if you have lots of salsas, pickled vegetables, onions, jalepenos, cilantro, etc to pile on top of it.
   79. Greg K Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:17 PM (#4393919)
It was also the case in a Northern Virginia sports bar that I was at a year or two ago, at least according to the waitress who wouldn't take my order for a rare burger. This is one of those times when "nanny state" is a fitting description.

There's an episode of the unsuccessful 90s sit-com "It's Like, You Know" that has this exact plot. Man can't order rare hamburger at a restaurant because said restaurant is being sued by a customer who had food poisoning there. Man goes on rant about how this is evidence that America has gone down the toilet.

It's a testament to the show's quality that it is roughly as entertaining as this conversation.
   80. cardsfanboy Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:23 PM (#4393921)
I think cfb is an outlier here.


More than likely yes. I recommended five guys to a lot of friends when they opened one up here, because of what people have said about the quality.(before I ever even tried it) nearly everyone who has had it because of my recommendations has not been impressed.

Good grief. Your assessment of food quality is about as good as your assessment of Bryce Harper last year.

You mean the assessment that I had pretty much nailed until his last week September explosion? The only flaw with my assessment was that I underrated the value of a player with those numbers, not in the accuracy of the assessment.
   81. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:25 PM (#4393922)
The only time I was in a Fuddruckers (in Minny) it was indeed very good for hamburgers, but aren't those sit-down restaurants with waiters/waitresses rather than stand in line to order?


The Fuddruckers here has you stand in line to order and when you get the basic burger, you go to the condiment bar and load up.
   82. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:30 PM (#4393925)
Is Cheeburger Cheeburger run by a bunch of religious nuts, or is this one of those cases where it really is "the government" that's to blame?


I can't speak for Cheeburger, Cheeburger, but the Wendy's nearest my house has their store on land which they lease from Florida Hospital, which is run by the 7th Day Adventists. Part of the lease states no pork products can be served, so you forget about the Baconator.

Therefore, I go to the Wendy's a little further from my house. Piss on their religious freedom stopping me from clogging my arteries if I choose to.
   83. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:31 PM (#4393927)
Lime is also very good and has a good salsa bar.
   84. cardsfanboy Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:34 PM (#4393929)
The Fuddruckers here has you stand in line to order and when you get the basic burger, you go to the condiment bar and load up.


Same here, and it's why I love it. They have diced onions, and diced tomatoes, instead of just sliced tomatoes. I also never order the hamburger and get the steak sandwich.
   85. WillYoung Posted: March 21, 2013 at 09:01 PM (#4393940)
I don't understand this at all, although, to be fair, I've heard that the quality control outside of DC stinks.


The fries at the Five Guys in MN (well, at least the one in Edina) are just as good as those in DC. The burgers, OTOH, are not nearly as good. Now if only Rockland's would upon up a franchise in the Twin Cities. I'm pretty sure I ate at Rockland's at least twice a week during the year I lived in Glover Park.
   86. villageidiom Posted: March 21, 2013 at 09:05 PM (#4393942)
The rice cooker I had before my Panasonic one was a basic Black and Decker model that I bought for probably $25 at Target. I had it for about 15 years, and it made perfect rice every time. Alas, it finally gave out, and they didn't still make a version similar to the one I had, so I shelled out for the upgrade (mostly for the timed cooking feature, which really has been invaluable).
We use the Black and Decker rice cooker (19 years), and plug it into one of those timers people use to make their lamps turn on when they're out of town to make it look like someone is home.

EDIT: Re-reading that, it sounds like I make rice at home when I'm out of town. Not true.
   87. Canker Soriano Posted: March 21, 2013 at 09:20 PM (#4393950)
I admit I don't get the Five Guys things either. The burgers are good, but the fries are only OK. Same thing for In-n-Out, though since I learned you can request the fries to come well done, it's gone up my list. Sadly, I'd rather have a Quarter Pounder with McDonald's fries than any of those other places. About once a month I pour out a cold Frosty on the curb for the death of the Wendy's Big Bacon Classic. Now that was a fast food burger.

Though with burgers I eat out only when I'm either already out and hungry, or just too tired to do it right at home (heat the grill, buttered and grilled bun, make your own ground beef, mince some onion into the meat, etc.). A burger at home can almost always beat anything you're going to get from one of these restaurants.

(Fries at home are another story - I know McDonald's is a big evil corporation, but man they can fry a potato.)
   88. chisoxcollector Posted: March 21, 2013 at 09:25 PM (#4393954)
I've eaten at about 20 different Five Guys locations in about 10 different states, and I haven't really noticed any major differences in the quality of their burgers or fries. The only thing that seems to vary is the quality of the bacon. Count me among those that think a Five Guys burger is in a totally different class than a McD/BK/Wendys burger. And their cajun fries are quite good. I agree with the poster above, only McDonald's fries are noticeably better.

I grew up in Southern California... and yet I've never understood all the love for In-N-Out. Their burgers are just okay, and their fries are AWFUL.
   89. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 09:30 PM (#4393956)
My 2nd mother-in-law was one of those people who couldn't wear a battery-powered watch, because something about her electromagnetic field (or whatever) invariably screwed them up. Maybe I'm that with rice cookers. Between the Rival & the Black & Decker, I doubt I used them 40 times combined before they just stopped. (Several Amazon reviewers reported the same experience.)

The little microwave cooker from Tupperware that I use is pretty handy. Only drawback is that it's so small it's only for 1 cup at a time, but that's a function of my microwave, which is 23 years old & about the size of ... I don't know. Something pretty small.
   90. zachtoma Posted: March 21, 2013 at 09:32 PM (#4393957)
Just like those damn Oscar gift bags. Rich people get all the free stuff!


Because he tweeted it and now we're all talking about Chipotle.

I grew up in Southern California... and yet I've never understood all the love for In-N-Out. Their burgers are just okay, and their fries are AWFUL.


You and me both, man. You can't argue with the prices at In-n-Out, but there's tons of better burgers around - I usually go to Fatburger myself.
   91. chisoxcollector Posted: March 21, 2013 at 09:41 PM (#4393962)
You and me both, man. You can't argue with the prices at In-n-Out, but there's tons of better burgers around - I usually go to Fatburger myself.


Fatburger is definitely a cut above In-N-Out. I have it just behind Five Guys, and just ahead of Shake Shack, as far as fast food burgers go. Five Guys and Fatburger are probably the only fast food burgers that actually taste like beef.
   92. CrosbyBird Posted: March 21, 2013 at 09:48 PM (#4393968)
Question: Is there any remaining fast food chain where you can actually get an honest-to-God blood gushing RARE hamburger any more?

I don't think most fast-food patties can really be cooked rare effectively; they're too thin to be rare on the inside while maintaining a nice crust on the outside.

I think there's a fairly narrow range for beef that runs from halfway between rare/medium-rare (filet mignon territory) and medium (cheap-ass burger). I don't like a cool center, but it's better than anything past medium.

I've never understood all the love for In-N-Out. Their burgers are just okay, and their fries are AWFUL.

I think they make very good burgers, but the fries are lousy.
   93. cardsfanboy Posted: March 21, 2013 at 09:59 PM (#4393979)
Fatburger is definitely a cut above In-N-Out. I have it just behind Five Guys, and just ahead of Shake Shack, as far as fast food burgers go. Five Guys and Fatburger are probably the only fast food burgers that actually taste like beef.


Is shake shack anything like Steak and Shake(worse burgers known to man...claim to be steak burgers, but every single ounce of any substance has been pressed out of them... I think it should be a federal law that outlaws steak presses.) Apparently Shake Shack is modeled from Steak and Shake, so it doesn't sound appealing.

Note: unlike five guys, I do know a lot of people who absolutely love Steak n Shake.
   94. I am going to be Frank Posted: March 21, 2013 at 10:14 PM (#4393988)
If you live near any Asian supermarkets they may sell some rice cookers. Tatung is the brand that I know a lot of Chinese people use (including my parents). Mostly pretty simple but seem pretty sturdy.

Five Guys burgers are too greasy - once finished it just sits in my stomach and I usually don't even order fries. Smashburgers are blech. I was a fan of Fatburger because you could get a fried egg but sadly the one near me closed.

Other than the chains, they only places where I can get a burrito is at a sit down restaurant. Chipotle does make a better burrito but Qdoba does have nachos. The Moe's and Baja Fresh around where I live aren't that good. Pancheros is another chain that has been expanding. It started in the midwest mainly around college campuses but became more corporate. It was pretty good drunk food but now its pretty bland and generic.
   95. Knock on any Iorg Posted: March 21, 2013 at 10:40 PM (#4393994)
It was pretty good drunk food but now its pretty bland and generic.

A sober man might well consider those to be equivalent to each other. Or is "drunk food" another way of saying "high cuisine"?
   96. Canker Soriano Posted: March 21, 2013 at 10:46 PM (#4393997)
I do know a lot of people who absolutely love Steak n Shake.

I love Steak n Shake. I agree the patties are far too flat, but I've eaten more double steakburgers with cheese than any man has a right to. Even better was the patty melt (which, let's face it, is superior to a burger to begin with). Never particularly cared for the fries (what's with the skinny fries people?), but the shakes are quality.

Of course, if you're going to talk flat and greasy burgers that will clog your arteries up good, the conversation begins and ends with Waffle House. A double with cheese, with a side of scattered and covered hash browns, is what I imagine lunch in heaven to be like.
   97. The Yankee Clapper Posted: March 21, 2013 at 10:50 PM (#4394000)
I've patronized 3 Five Guys in Northern Virginia and DC. Pretty good burger, IMHO, and they serve the largest portion of fries that I've ever seen - easily enough for 2 normal appetites. Free peanuts, too.

But you should be talking about 2013 NL MVP Bryce Harper.
   98. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: March 21, 2013 at 11:00 PM (#4394004)
Eh, I tried 5 Guys for the 1st time recently here in SoCal and there wasn't anything about the experience that would lead me to repeat it. The burger was nothing special, the veggies were thoroughly mediocre (limp, wilted lettuce the worst offender) and the "cajun" fries were damn near poisonously salty.
   99. Sleepy supports unauthorized rambling Posted: March 21, 2013 at 11:40 PM (#4394025)
Eh, I tried 5 Guys for the 1st time recently here in SoCal and there wasn't anything about the experience that would lead me to repeat it. The burger was nothing special, the veggies were thoroughly mediocre (limp, wilted lettuce the worst offender) and the "cajun" fries were damn near poisonously salty.


Totally agree. In fact,a buddy gave me a gift card to five guys, almost 2 years ago (when I lived in SoCal) and I never used it- despite being in lunchtime walking distance to a 5 guys- their food really is that bad.

The in'n'out phenomenon is also strange to me. As far as I can tell, the only thing worthwhile about their restaurant is that (while this is important, it's not a huge deal for me) they serve fresh veggies. That's it. The meat isn't great, the fries are awful, the bread is so-so, etc. I'd far rather go to a shake'n'steak than either 5 guys or in'n'out.

And I'd rather go to Chipotle than any of those. But I can't go there more than once a month, or else I have to buy new pants. It'll be interesting to see how this affects bryce harper.
   100. Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: March 21, 2013 at 11:41 PM (#4394026)
But you should be talking about 2013 NL MVP Bryce Harper.


and Little Tavern burgers...
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