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Thursday, March 21, 2013

Bryce Harper Gets Free Chipotle Burritos for Life, World Domination to Follow

Bryce Harper gets free Chipotle burritos for life.

I will let that fact marinate with you for a second as you consider how horrible your own life is now by comparison.

Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: March 21, 2013 at 08:42 AM | 327 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: nationals

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   201. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:16 PM (#4394402)
ick. SSS and all but I have friends who insist on ordering it. Very expensive not that good and the order always ends up wrong. I honestly have no clue why they order it, but they do
.

I ate at a PF Chang's once, in Birmingham, about 2 years ago. Most memorable thing about the experience was that a passing waiter managed to dump a glass of water all over my dining partner. He provided her with a towel but never bothered to follow up to show any kind of solicitousness or anything. I guess he was embarassed, but still.

   202. Lassus Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:18 PM (#4394404)
I have eaten loads of terrible food. More than I should admit.

Food that may or may not be terrible that I have never eaten: Taco Bell, Chipotle, Arby's, Roy Rogers, Hardee's.
   203. zonk Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:20 PM (#4394407)
I have to say... the South Park episode is really the only thing that turned me away from Chipotle... I still rather rather like it - I would 10 times out of 10 rather hit a mexican greasy spoon if given the opportunity, but there are occasions when I'll grab chipotle for lunch out in the burbs.

In-town, it's almost always a place that has "Palace", "Big", or "El" somewhere in the name however.
   204. Ron J2 Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:21 PM (#4394410)
#197 Must have been a long time ago. My one and only experience at Roy Rogers was quite some time ago and it was basically vending machine quality -- just dreadful.
   205. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:22 PM (#4394412)
I drop by Taco Bell for a couple of bean burritos every now & then simply to stock up on packets of their green salsa, which I love.

These days, they're also offering black bean burritos, which feature whole beans rather than refried paste. Pretty good, though expensive (around $1.79) for what they are. Last time, I got one of the new(ish) cantina burritos, to which the same price-point caveat applies (somewhere around $4), though the ingredients were definitely a cut above typical fast-food fare.
   206. The Good Face Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:24 PM (#4394414)
Food that may or may not be terrible that I have never eaten: Taco Bell, Chipotle, Arby's, Roy Rogers, Hardee's.


Taco Bell is not actually food. The others are all better options than starvation.
   207. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:28 PM (#4394417)
I've had good luck with PF Chang, though I prefer to go local (not on principle, for quality/price reasons). Pei Wei is related to them, aren't they? They're okay.
I tried the Taco Bell cantina line once. Still pretty far short of Chipotle.
I've eaten a lot of Taco Bell over the years and, no, they aren't food.
   208. cardsfanboy Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:28 PM (#4394418)
I have eaten loads of terrible food. More than I should admit.

Food that may or may not be terrible that I have never eaten: Taco Bell, Chipotle, Arby's, Roy Rogers, Hardee's.


I've recently got a new job that involves me travelling a lot more so have to eat out all the time(all meals for about six weeks) . I'm travelling with my brother who has been doing this for 12 years and he insists on going only to chains that he knows, because he has had too many inconsistent experiences with non-chains that he doesn't like to take the chance anymore. It's upsetting because I think part of the fun of a travelling job is to try all the bad places, all the different foods etc. Instead we eat at McDonalds, Wendys, Taco Bell(which I hate) Subway(not even Jimmy Johns which is 10 times better imho)and Arby's....that is about it. Once in a while I can convince him to take a chance, but it sucks because it would be nice to have a lot more failed and success's out there.
   209. Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:31 PM (#4394422)
the only thing that turned me away from Chipotle... I still rather rather like it

It's certainly edible, you could do worse. I usually skip it because I would order the burrito and they are just too big. Who wants that much for lunch? The headline sounds more like a punishment than a reward.

Edit: #208 - Well, you guys have probably had a good run but it sounds like it's time to disown your brother. Really, all of the fun of business travel is trying new restaurants on the company dime. Eating at Taco Bell instead...there's no coming back from that.
   210. zonk Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:31 PM (#4394423)
The single biggest contributor to improved health I've enjoyed the last few years has been to never, ever, never, eat at Taco Bell.

I agree on Roy Rogers dip in quality... my recollections of Roy's as kid were fond -- seems like they were at every interstate rest stop on family trips -- but stopped at one a few years back and threw most of it out. Arby's I rather enjoyed in college, but no thanks anymore... Hardee's always seem like K-Mart to Burger King's Target...

One FF place I always thought had truly awful food -- but I loved hitting -- was Jack-in-Box... the food was terrible, but back in the day, it was the only FF I was aware of where you had the whole variety wheel of FF types: Burgers, tacos, pizza puff type things, chicken strips, eggrolls, poppers. I mean - they were all just terrible, but if you couldn't decide, you could always hit Jack-in-the-Box for an awful sampling of everything.
   211. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:34 PM (#4394426)
I gather from their website that Roy Rogers is a Northeastern chain. Don't know if that's always been true, but I'm pretty sure I've never seen one.
   212. Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:46 PM (#4394443)
this trip down fast-food memory lane got me searching stuff, and one place I'd forgotten (and whose menu I was conflating with Roy Rogers) was Hot Shoppes Jr.... they featured Pappy Parker's Smoky Mountain Fried Chicken, the finest fried chicken you ever did eat!

The poor kids who worked at Roy's had to wear these ridiculous uniforms.
   213. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:50 PM (#4394446)
I gather from their website that Roy Rogers is a Northeastern chain. Don't know if that's always been true, but I'm pretty sure I've never seen one.

I'm not sure they even exist anymore. I haven't seen one around here in at least a decade or more. The only true fast food I can stomach is Taco Bell, which may say more about my lack of taste than Taco Bell's menu, or maybe it's just than when I eat out it's almost never likely to be at a fast food joint.

BTW the Roy Rogers chain has a lineage that dates back to 1927, to an A&W Root Beer stand on 14th St. in Washington, between Irving St. and Park Road. By the time this photo was taken, it'd gotten its new name of "Hot Shoppes".
   214. Bernal Diaz has an angel on his shoulder Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:51 PM (#4394447)
Of course here in North Central North Central Indiana we have La Bamba Burritos ( Burritos as big as your head!) but they are not on campus and I very seldom venture across the Wabash to the skeezy side of town except to go downtown.
   215. Bernal Diaz has an angel on his shoulder Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:51 PM (#4394449)
Roy Rogers used to make my favorite fast food fried chicken. Damn that was good chicken.
   216. zonk Posted: March 22, 2013 at 02:55 PM (#4394454)
Of course here in North Central North Central Indiana we have La Bamba Burritos ( Burritos as big as your head!) but they are not on campus and I very seldom venture across the Wabash to the skeezy side of town except to go downtown.


Chicago has a couple La Bamba's -- they're much closer to the taqueria than Chipotle (and that's a feature, not a bug)...
   217. Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: March 22, 2013 at 03:01 PM (#4394461)
I gather from their website that Roy Rogers is a Northeastern chain. Don't know if that's always been true, but I'm pretty sure I've never seen one.

I'm not sure they even exist anymore.


there's one across from Lakeforest Mall in Gaithersburg... according to wikipedia:

As of August 2012, Roy Rogers had 49 stores: 20 Corporate and 29 Franchised. In 2002, the Plamondon Companies purchased the trademark from Imasco, the former parent of Hardee's. Under the new owners the company is headquartered in Frederick, Maryland
   218. Bourbon Samurai Posted: March 22, 2013 at 03:04 PM (#4394467)
Roy Rogers used to make my favorite fast food fried chicken. Damn that was good chicken.



The fried chicken and the roast beef sandwich were ####### delicious. Good fries too.

Alas.
   219. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 03:28 PM (#4394491)
And anyway, we all know that any beer sold in green bottles is by definition better than beer sold in any other type of container.


Except for Rolling Rock. I'd sooner suck the piss out of a dead dog's #### than give them even one dollar, after the way they screwed the people of Latrobe.
   220. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: March 22, 2013 at 03:32 PM (#4394493)
I thought that when Hardee's and Roy Rogers merged, they kept the Rogers chicken.
Hardee's has made huge strides over the years - I'd rate their burgers over BK and, of course, McD at this point.
   221. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 03:32 PM (#4394494)
I'm not sure they even exist anymore.


There are still a couple of Roy Rogers on the PA Turnpike, if you're in the mood for one.
   222. The Good Face Posted: March 22, 2013 at 03:38 PM (#4394498)
And anyway, we all know that any beer sold in green bottles is by definition better than beer sold in any other type of container.


Except for Rolling Rock. I'd sooner suck the piss out of a dead dog's #### than give them even one dollar, after the way they screwed the people of Latrobe.


?

Aside from inflicting bland, watery beer on them, what'd they do?
   223. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 04:00 PM (#4394514)
Aside from inflicting bland, watery beer on them, what'd they do?


This. More info here.

Latrobe WAS Rolling Rock. Picking up and leaving like that, without any warning or discussion, pretty much stabbed the town in the heart.

Annheuser-Busch was happy to leave the line about the beer coming from "the glass-lined tanks of Old Latrobe" on the bottles, though, even now that the beer's made with river water from Newark.
   224. BDC Posted: March 22, 2013 at 04:04 PM (#4394518)
The beer-bottle-color thing is interesting. I actually like beers in clear bottles because I can see what I'm getting. I bought a "Vienna lager" the other day that turned out to be a nondescript darkish beer, not at all what I was expecting. But then, some of the best US craft beer these days (Sixpoint, Oskar Blues, Southern Star) comes in cans anyway.
   225. Canker Soriano Posted: March 22, 2013 at 04:09 PM (#4394521)
Hardee's has made huge strides over the years - I'd rate their burgers over BK and, of course, McD at this point.

I used to really like Hardee's, particularly for breakfast. Their biscuits were head and shoulders above other chains.
   226. zack Posted: March 22, 2013 at 04:18 PM (#4394526)
I'm not sure they even exist anymore. I haven't seen one around here in at least a decade or more.

Never drive or take the bus to NYC? I seem to always end up at the Walt Whitman rest stop on the NJTP. They have roy rogers. I always suffer through Burger King if i'm starving.

I only have it every couple of years, but I loved Arby's as a teenager and I think I still do. I also loved Wendy's, but I spend the night in stomach pain every single time I've eaten there post-25. Same with Pizzeria Uno, except that was every time post-5.
   227. McCoy Posted: March 22, 2013 at 04:33 PM (#4394535)
How is that Rolling Rock screwing a town?

Latrobe had 9,000 people in it in 2000 and Rolling Rock employed 250 people. The new brewery that took over employs 170 people.
   228. The Good Face Posted: March 22, 2013 at 04:40 PM (#4394541)
How is that Rolling Rock screwing a town?

Latrobe had 9,000 people in it in 2000 and Rolling Rock employed 250 people. The new brewery that took over employs 170 people.


Yeah. While it sucks to lose your job, when it comes to corporate deviltry, this is more like poking the poodle than kicking the dog.

I suppose folks could complain that their town lost some important element of its identity, but the bottles still apparently say Old Latrobe or whatever. As far as the rest of the world knows, Rolling Rock is still what it always was; an insipid US macrobrew from Latrobe PA.

That said, I always liked the 7oz pony bottles. More brewers should do that.
   229. WillYoung Posted: March 22, 2013 at 04:48 PM (#4394548)
Confirming yet again that Minneapolis is nothing even resembling a major city.


Obviously you've never visited Burrito Mercado
   230. WillYoung Posted: March 22, 2013 at 04:50 PM (#4394550)
(On the other hand, Hell's Kitchen is one of my favorite breakfast joints anywhere in the USA.)



Did you block off a week to eat each meal? I have never encoutered worse service than in my couple of trips there.
   231. McCoy Posted: March 22, 2013 at 05:18 PM (#4394575)
double post
   232. trackstar Posted: March 22, 2013 at 05:19 PM (#4394576)

Yeah. While it sucks to lose your job, when it comes to corporate deviltry, this is more like poking the poodle than kicking the dog.

I suppose folks could complain that their town lost some important element of its identity, but the bottles still apparently say Old Latrobe or whatever. As far as the rest of the world knows, Rolling Rock is still what it always was; an insipid US macrobrew from Latrobe PA.

That said, I always liked the 7oz pony bottles. More brewers should do that.


I guess this is my cue to delurk.

I was born in Latrobe. I don't live there anymore but I spent my first 18 years (and all of my 28 Christmases) there.

It's not as though it ruined the town when Rolling Rock left. There's a lot more to Latrobe than a brewery. That said, assuming the numbers above are correct, 80 fewer jobs out of 9,000 residents is no insignificant figure, and it's not like they started brewing other stuff there the day Rolling Rock fled. It's been contract production going from one beer after another (they're currently making Red Stripe -- yes, the Jamaican beer is now made in the "glass lined tanks of Old Latrobe") and every day the brewery isn't running is a day people aren't getting paid.

Since neither I nor anyone in my family was employed by the brewery, the biggest effect on my life has been that as I live in other parts of the country I no longer have that same connection to my hometown (unless I pick up a bottle of whatever they happen to be making today, which isn't quite the same). Nor do I have bragging rights when I'm out drinking that the beer in my hand, that is world-famous and can be purchased just about anywhere, is from the same dinky little town in western Pennsylvania that I am.

Sometimes people will find out I'm from Latrobe, maybe because I'm wearing a certain shirt or something, and they say "Hey, Latrobe! Rolling Rock!" And I just have to kind of sigh and explain.

The fact that they've left Latrobe on the bottles might be the most insulting part as far as I'm concerned.

I recognize it was a business decision to move production and as new owners they were totally within their rights to do so. But I don't think the bitterness will ever subside. Rolling Rock used to be all I drank; now my likelihood of ever drinking it or any Anheuser-Busch product are the same as Vlad eloquently described above.
   233. McCoy Posted: March 22, 2013 at 05:21 PM (#4394578)
Plus they moved to freakin Newark. It wasn't like they moved the plant to China or something. They ended up creating jobs for a downtrodden city. what horrible human beings they must be.
   234. The Yankee Clapper Posted: March 22, 2013 at 05:32 PM (#4394585)
There are still a couple of Roy Rogers on the PA Turnpike, if you're in the mood for one.

I think the highway rest stop locations had different ownership and even a different menu. Not the same quality. There are still some Roy Rogers that opted out of the Hardees then McDonalds conversions. Fairfax County in Northern Virginia has a bunch owned by a family that was one of the more successful Roy Rogers franchises. They were pretty good for fast food, but I haven't been there much lately.
   235. SoSH U at work Posted: March 22, 2013 at 05:51 PM (#4394597)
Sometimes people will find out I'm from Latrobe, maybe because I'm wearing a certain shirt or something, and they say "Hey, Latrobe! Rolling Rock!" And I just have to kind of sigh and explain.


If we ever meet, I'll make sure to say, "Hey, Latrobe, home of Arnold Palmer and Latrobe Specialty Metals."

   236. Lassus Posted: March 22, 2013 at 06:33 PM (#4394614)
That said, I always liked the 7oz pony bottles. More brewers should do that.

You drank Old Vienna "OV" Splits before you left wherever it was you lived before Manhattan, didn't you?
   237. Bernal Diaz has an angel on his shoulder Posted: March 22, 2013 at 06:45 PM (#4394619)
Stoney's is better than Rolling Rock anyhow. Not as good as Straub's though.
   238. Jarrod HypnerotomachiaPoliphili(Teddy F. Ballgame) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 06:55 PM (#4394622)
The poor kids who worked at Roy's had to wear these ridiculous uniforms.


Better than the ones at Hot Dog on a Stick.
   239. Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: March 22, 2013 at 07:24 PM (#4394632)
Better than the ones at Hot Dog on a Stick.


that's wrong.
   240. I am going to be Frank Posted: March 22, 2013 at 07:29 PM (#4394635)
Before KFC came up with their extra crispy recipe, Roy Rogers had much better fried chicken. Once KFC came with their extra crispy recipe, Roy Rogers was still better but only marginally. Unfortunately, all the Roy Rogers closed except with a handful that still exist on the NJ Turnpike.
   241. vivaelpujols Posted: March 22, 2013 at 07:40 PM (#4394639)
chipotle is fine, but pretty overrated. It tastes the same as baja fresh or pocquito mas or any of the million chipotle copycats out there (like Mucho Gusto). I don't even like burritos that much, I usually prefer getting Enchiladas at mexican restaurants, which is why poquito mas is the bomb.
   242. vivaelpujols Posted: March 22, 2013 at 07:46 PM (#4394640)
Five Guys doesn't even count as fast food for me because A) it's not fast and B) it's expensive.
   243. spike Posted: March 22, 2013 at 09:08 PM (#4394667)
Functional and indestructible.

Regrettably, Lady spike has tested the limits of this theory with a particularly great Le Creuset dutch oven of mine, and apparently if left on a burner for long enough, it sure looked destroyed. Happily, my experience is that pretty much any enameled cast iron cookware, even stuff from Target, works great. I like to get these Danish ones from the 70's on ebay 'cause they look neat and come in lots of interesting shapes and colors.
   244. spike Posted: March 22, 2013 at 09:12 PM (#4394672)
Someone asked about cutlery earlier, and I started with a bunch of fancy Wusthof and Shun knives, but pretty much just use a Chan Chi Ki (CCK) small Asian cleaver for just about everything now. Hard to find, but not very expensive,stay razor sharp, and quite versatile. For non-cast iron cookware I really love the original Calphalon with the straight, flat handles (not that horrid non-stick junk) from the 90's. Again, a great second hand buy - I'm a pretty serious amateur cook, and that stuff is just awesome.
   245. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 09:59 PM (#4394693)
Regarding the "borrow" thing it is odd and I correct the natives every single time.


This isn't just a Minnesota thing, I have heard this quite a lot in Wisconsin. My favorite WTF ism from Wisconsin though isn't 'bubbler' for drinking fountain, but
"Mom, I'm gonna go over by Johnny's house.'

I remember my Mom (not from WI) saying 'what do you mean over by? are you going there, or are you just going to be in the vicinity?'
   246. WillYoung Posted: March 22, 2013 at 10:05 PM (#4394697)
I was raised in MN and I was taught to cringe every time I heard someone "borrow" something to someone else.

Nothing, makes me cringe more than when my mom or grandma (both from Omaha) randomly add r's to words like wash. It was especially annoying during my first year at George WaRshington.
   247. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 10:09 PM (#4394701)
I could've posted #246 and it would be my own words, but for the part about attending GWU and being raised in MN.
   248. CrosbyBird Posted: March 22, 2013 at 10:29 PM (#4394722)
Moe's is better.

This was most certainly false for me tonight. I just finished my first food from Moe's and it was pretty good, but it wasn't on the same level. I thought all of the ingredients were just a little blander.

I appreciated the option to add cilantro (although it wasn't as strong a cilantro taste as Chipotle's rice), the queso, and the salsa bar. I generally don't eat many chips given the ridiculous size of a loaded burrito, but the free chips were a nice gesture.
   249. boteman Posted: March 22, 2013 at 10:37 PM (#4394728)
There is a Roy Rogers in a strip mall up the hill from downtown Brunswick, Maryland that I patronized a little more than a year ago when I watched CSX finally close WB tower. Double R Bar Burgers baby! It's not like I eat this stuff every day, so even if it is choke-it-down fast food you just go with it for once.

I went to Google Maps and manually scrolled the map until there was the makings of a triangle between I-270 and I-81 with Hagerstown as the apex at the top. I typed in nothing more than "Roy Rogers" and a healthy number of icons popped up on the map, clustered around Frederick, Gophersburg, two in Leesburg, and the one that I mentioned in Brunswick. Those must be the ones now owned by Plamondon Companies.

#212 - Since this thread is now hopelessly meandering in multiple directions, who remembers Eddie Leonard's Sandwich Shops? Whenever his jingle would come on the radio my father would cuss like a Baptist and shut it off or change the station. I don't know what Eddie Leonard ever did to him, but it piqued my curiosity and that jingle is still stuck in my mind after these many decades. I also remember Hot Shoppes and of course Little Tavern "gut busters".

And the original non-stick cookware was indeed the cast iron skillet. Season those babies well, don't turn up the heat too high, and your grandmother (or great-grandmother) won't come back and whack you upside the head with it to teach you a lesson in cookware care.
   250. CrosbyBird Posted: March 22, 2013 at 10:40 PM (#4394729)
The fried chicken and the roast beef sandwich were ####### delicious. Good fries too.

I used to go to a Roy Rogers in Whitestone (about 5-10m from Citifield, although it was Shea at the time) and an arcade in the same parking lot practically every Wednesday night with my dad.

Now Roy Rogers (the restaurant, but I suppose the man as well isn't looking too good these days) and arcades both are a shell of their former selves.
   251. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 10:52 PM (#4394736)
Nothing, makes me cringe more than when my mom or grandma (both from Omaha) randomly add r's to words like wash. It was especially annoying during my first year at George WaRshington.


I suspect there's a lot of that in various regions. My first father-in-law did that, & he grew up just a few miles from where I did in the SW corner of Arkansas.
   252. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 10:55 PM (#4394741)
I appreciated the option to add cilantro (although it wasn't as strong a cilantro taste as Chipotle's rice), the queso, and the salsa bar. I generally don't eat many chips given the ridiculous size of a loaded burrito, but the free chips were a nice gesture.


*sigh* I really wanted to go by the Moe's about 4 miles from my house this evening after work, but it was cold & rainy. Dammit. (High of 44 today, apparently forecast to be twice that tomorrow. Stupid weather.)
   253. Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: March 22, 2013 at 10:58 PM (#4394743)
#212 - Since this thread is now hopelessly meandering in multiple directions, who remembers Eddie Leonard's Sandwich Shops?


Funny thing, that... I grew up in the D.C. area (College Park) and the Eddie Leonard's jingle was ubiquitous, but I never so much as set foot in any of their shops. It wasn't an intentional avoidance, we just never crossed paths. Now, Ledo's pizza was another matter entirely; they were the only thing I missed about D.C. during my Cleveland years (and the only thing I'll miss when I manage to get myself away from here again).
   254. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 22, 2013 at 11:36 PM (#4394772)
Plus they moved to freakin Newark. It wasn't like they moved the plant to China or something. They ended up creating jobs for a downtrodden city. what horrible human beings they must be.


It's not just the damn jobs. It's cultural appropriation.

Latrobe made Rolling Rock into the institution that it is. It started out as nothing, a family business run by locals, and it became a success because the people of Latrobe supported it for all those years. If you pick a random house in Latrobe, and you find a photo album and flip it open, you'll see those little green bottles in the background of pictures at weddings and wakes and 4th of July picnics, going back for three generations.

Latrobe isn't a big town. Everyone there who drank a Rolling Rock knew someone who helped make that beer that they were drinking. It was something that people shared, that brought them together and made them proud, and then Anheuser-Busch snuck in like a thief in the night, scooped up all that shared experience and history, boxed it up, and shipped it hundreds of miles away, to be trotted out by strangers and used to sell slick, trendy crap to other strangers.

They still make beer in Latrobe. Since Rolling Rock left, they've made lots of kinds of beer. Iron City, Sam Adams, Duquesne, Red Stripe... but even if it's made in Latrobe, it'll never really be theirs.
   255. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: March 23, 2013 at 12:01 AM (#4394797)
#212 - Since this thread is now hopelessly meandering in multiple directions, who remembers Eddie Leonard's Sandwich Shops?


Funny thing, that... I grew up in the D.C. area (College Park) and the Eddie Leonard's jingle was ubiquitous, but I never so much as set foot in any of their shops. It wasn't an intentional avoidance, we just never crossed paths. Now, Ledo's pizza was another matter entirely; they were the only thing I missed about D.C. during my Cleveland years (and the only thing I'll miss when I manage to get myself away from here again).

Eddie Leonard's has been closed for probably about 30 or more years by now. They started in the 50's and reached their peak of expansion in the late 60's, but at least in DC itself I don't think they made it much past 1980. The last one I remember was on the corner of 18th & Columbia, where (I think) Starbucks is today. Starbucks is the first tenant on that corner to last for more than a few years ever since the original Dart Drug shut down sometime in the 60's. Great location, but for whatever reason it seemed to be a black cat for any business that opened there.

And Ledo's closed its original Adelphi restaurant on University Blvd. several years ago. AFAIC that was the only one worth going to, but I do admit that that one was pretty good.
   256. Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: March 23, 2013 at 12:09 AM (#4394803)
And Ledo's closed its original Adelphi restaurant on University Blvd. several years ago. AFAIC that was the only one worth going to, but I do admit that that one was pretty good.


they relocated the original restaurant to downtown College Park - Knox Rd to be exact - 'cause the original Adelphi location was crumbling... the franchised locations did not start well (there were serious quality control issues) but they seem to have gotten things under control. I've had pizzas from several Montgomery County franchises in the last few years and all were really good examples of the originals from University Blvd.
   257. Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: March 23, 2013 at 12:12 AM (#4394808)
oh, to link this back to Washington baseball... if I'm not mistaken, Jim Lemon had an interest in the Fireside Inn on Greenbelt Rd. for a number of years, and the Fireside was the original (and only) licensee for Ledo's pizza way back when.
   258. Howie Menckel Posted: March 23, 2013 at 12:51 AM (#4394822)

"Is there a place where people who have English as a first language say "stand on line"?

Google says New York."

Yes, and New Jersey as well.
I don't see any superiority of one over the other. You're both waiting, not literally in or on a line.

   259. just plain joe Posted: March 23, 2013 at 12:51 AM (#4394823)
That said, I always liked the 7oz pony bottles. More brewers should do that.


When I was in college we drank a lot of Schoenling's Little Kings ale in the 7 oz bottles. We knew it was crap but it was a relatively cheap way to get plowed in a hurry. IIRC an eight pack of Little Kings was less than a dollar then (ca 1971-72). Ah, youth.
   260. PreservedFish Posted: March 23, 2013 at 12:55 AM (#4394825)
A friend of mine opened a restaurant in Minneapolis that has received a lot of positive press: The Bachelor Farmer
   261. Bhaakon Posted: March 23, 2013 at 01:50 AM (#4394836)
I don't see any superiority of one over the other. You're both waiting, not literally in or on a line.


Unless there's a painted line upon which said waiters are standing, I don't see it. Besides, "on line" has a totally different meaning now.
   262. Swedish Chef Posted: March 23, 2013 at 02:34 AM (#4394846)
Unless there's a painted line upon which said waiters are standing, I don't see it.

Standing on a notional line isn't any stranger than standing in a notional line.
   263. Every Inge Counts Posted: March 23, 2013 at 02:46 AM (#4394848)
I think Qdoba is better than Chipolte. Had Chipolte once to see what the big deal was, stuck with Qdoba.
   264. bigglou115 Posted: March 23, 2013 at 05:54 AM (#4394854)
You crazy people and your choices. We got our first 5 guys like 2 years ago, same for Chipotle. We don't have In-n-Outs or Whataburgers (well, if you drive 1.5 hours you get to a place called Whataburger but its a different thing). Basically, you've got your super chains or your actual restaurants. Food in Little Rock is starting to expand, but its been slow coming. We just got our first Krispy Kreme and Dunkin' Donuts in the last few years. We even have these things called wine bars now, what the heck is that? I mean, I get the concept, but why? You think I could open a scotch bar?

One thing Little Rock has that nobody else does is Hot Dog Mike. Its not even a food truck, its basically a grill welded to a trailer, but it is awesome.
   265. boteman Posted: March 23, 2013 at 06:32 AM (#4394859)
Ledo's pizza is square because they don't cut corners.

To bring it all the way back to the original topic, let's just be glad a place like Five Guys or Ben's Chili didn't give a lifetime pass to Bryce Harper or he'd probably grow into the dimensions of Ray King within a season or two and become a closer. Nobody wants that, except maybe Cole Hamels.
   266. Greg K Posted: March 23, 2013 at 06:47 AM (#4394861)
I ate at a PF Chang's once, in Birmingham, about 2 years ago. Most memorable thing about the experience was that a passing waiter managed to dump a glass of water all over my dining partner. He provided her with a towel but never bothered to follow up to show any kind of solicitousness or anything. I guess he was embarassed, but still.

My favourite after-bar restaurant when I'm in Scarborough is "Perfect Chinese Restaurant". It's quite a big, banquet hall style place, and it's prime business hours are about 3-4am when they have around fifty plus people packed in there. None of the waiters are particularly good at speaking or understanding English, and seem to go out of their way to be quite rude. Every visit you are guaranteed to get something you didn't order, or somehow encounter unfriendly service. I once asked for some hot sauce and got a salt-shaker. Another time I liked my dish so much that I tried to order another one of the same, but I think the waiter thought I was complaining that the first hadn't arrived yet, so he just hand-waved me to shut up saying "yeah, yeah, yeah" and ran off.

I'm not sure why, but I feel much more at home at a restaurant where the servers treat you like scum. There's probably a similar factor at play in my choice of girlfriends.
   267. Greg K Posted: March 23, 2013 at 06:52 AM (#4394863)
You drank Old Vienna "OV" Splits before you left wherever it was you lived before Manhattan, didn't you?

Old Vienna is a fine beer. It's my generic beer of choice!
   268. Jeff Frances the Mute Posted: March 23, 2013 at 08:01 AM (#4394868)
You think I could open a scotch bar?


No, but you could open a whiskey bar (scotch, Irish, bourbon, etc). Those are growing in popularity.
   269. Misirlou has S.C.M.O.D.S Posted: March 23, 2013 at 09:45 AM (#4394879)
How about a Gin bar? With no sign.
   270. BDC Posted: March 23, 2013 at 10:15 AM (#4394894)
Fast-food chicken is my weakness – I've had to ration my visits to once a year or so, or I'd be wallowing in the ooze of it all. Popeyes is for me the benchmark, but BDC Jr. recently took me to a Chicken Express, which was dirty, disorganized, staffed by untrained depressives, and served fabulous hot luscious chicken. That's it for 2013 for me and fried-chicken joints …
   271. McCoy Posted: March 23, 2013 at 10:18 AM (#4394895)
Latrobe made Rolling Rock into the institution that it is. It started out as nothing, a family business run by locals, and it became a success because the people of Latrobe supported it for all those years. If you pick a random house in Latrobe, and you find a photo album and flip it open, you'll see those little green bottles in the background of pictures at weddings and wakes and 4th of July picnics, going back for three generations.

Latrobe isn't a big town. Everyone there who drank a Rolling Rock knew someone who helped make that beer that they were drinking. It was something that people shared, that brought them together and made them proud, and then Anheuser-Busch snuck in like a thief in the night, scooped up all that shared experience and history, boxed it up, and shipped it hundreds of miles away, to be trotted out by strangers and used to sell slick, trendy crap to other strangers.

They still make beer in Latrobe. Since Rolling Rock left, they've made lots of kinds of beer. Iron City, Sam Adams, Duquesne, Red Stripe... but even if it's made in Latrobe, it'll never really be theirs.


Nice narrative but it doesn't mean squat. Bud bought Rolling Rock for 82 million dollars and they didn't sneak around to do it. If Rolling Rock meant so much to Latrobe then Latrobe should have bought Rolling Rock. They had the chance to do it and didn't do it.

As for locals buying beer or working for the company that is what is called a trade off. Rolling Rock paid people to work at the plant and they offered a good (the beer) at a price and people bought it. End of story. Budweiser doesn't owe them squat and Latrobe is full of a bunch of idiots if they thought they were entitled to a Rolling Rock brewery forever.

Selling slick, trendy crap to other strangers is just plain weird of a stance to take. Bud, now InBev, didn't change the bottle and didn't change the recipe. So if you think RR is slick and trendy crap then it was always slick and trendy crap. Plus nobody outside of Latrobe is allowed to drink it or something?
   272. McCoy Posted: March 23, 2013 at 10:21 AM (#4394897)
The last one I remember was on the corner of 18th & Columbia, where (I think) Starbucks is today. Starbucks is the first tenant on that corner to last for more than a few years ever since the original Dart Drug shut down sometime in the 60's. Great location, but for whatever reason it seemed to be a black cat for any business that opened there.

That's actually kind of a horrible location for most businesses. No parking and it is on the wrong side of the intersection so foot traffic has to cross a heavily congested intersection generally twice to get to it.
   273. McCoy Posted: March 23, 2013 at 10:28 AM (#4394902)
You think I could open a scotch bar?


No, but you could open a whiskey bar (scotch, Irish, bourbon, etc). Those are growing in popularity.


Actually there are a ton of Scotch bars and have been for awhile.

Now then wine bars, depending on the liquor licenses of the county/city, could in fact just sell wine or simply just specialize in wine while offering a full range of other liquors. A lot of places will have different kinds of liquor licenses and one of the cheaper and easier ones to get is the beer & wine license so you will find establishments that don't offer liquor in their establishment. Now then if you wanted to be a Scotch bar or Bourbon bar or vodka bar or margarita bar you would need a full liquor license so it would be rather pointless to spend all that money to get a liquor license and not offer a full range of liquors.

In DC I believe you cannot get a liquor license that just offers beer and wine so the wine bars will offer liquors as well. For instance Veritas in DC is a full-fledged wine bar but it also offers liquor.

As to what a wine bar is it is a place that fills a need which is generally very good wine by the glass. Most restaurants and bars cannot really afford to offer 20 or more different varietals by the glass in 70 or so different styles. So if you have a hankering for Blauburgunder or an Alsatian Pinot Blanc a wine bar is a good bet to offer it or at least offer many kinds of wine that aren't simply Cab, Pinot, Chardonnay and so forth. Plus generally their limited menu is geared towards pairing well with wine and more specifically with the wines they are offering.
   274. boteman Posted: March 23, 2013 at 10:30 AM (#4394905)
As a general rule for us mammals some of the toxins in the body make their way to the skin, which is why your skin is a good indicator of the kind of diet you have. Same is true for chickens, which is why I don't eat the skin, I just peel it right off. So the appeal of greasy, spicy, crispy fried chicken is lost on me when I peel it off like that. By then I'm just down to the chicken meat underneath and I can get that anywhere; "we can make that at home" as Dear Old Mom used to say. Not to mention that the batter encasing said chicken is probably not on the list of one million healthiest foods, either.

So it's good to limit your intake of fried chicken. I'd take a fat burger over fried chicken, but in moderation in any case.
   275. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 23, 2013 at 10:44 AM (#4394913)
One thing Little Rock has that nobody else does is Hot Dog Mike. Its not even a food truck, its basically a grill welded to a trailer, but it is awesome.


Is Your Mama's Good Food still downtown? Loved that place. I have no idea how they managed to make something as pedestrian as creamed corn so wondrous, but they invariably did.

Ditto for Iriana's -- one of my favorite pizza places ever.
   276. McCoy Posted: March 23, 2013 at 11:52 AM (#4394946)
By the way starting next Tuesday the Craft Brewers Conference is on in DC at the convention center and to kick things off there is a beerfest at Nationals Park this weekend. I'm going on Sunday.
   277. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: March 23, 2013 at 12:16 PM (#4394954)
I don't understand this at all, although, to be fair, I've heard that the quality control outside of DC stinks.


I love Subway in Maine. Subway in Massachusetts is ####### terrible. It's like they didn't even make an attempt at homogeny of brand across franchises.
   278. WillYoung Posted: March 23, 2013 at 01:56 PM (#4394978)
PreservedFish, you're friends with one of Governor Dayton's sons? I had reservations there a few months ago, but our friends had to cancel at the last minute. It's still on my list of places I need to visit.
   279. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 23, 2013 at 02:55 PM (#4394995)
Nice narrative but it doesn't mean squat. Bud bought Rolling Rock for 82 million dollars and they didn't sneak around to do it. If Rolling Rock meant so much to Latrobe then Latrobe should have bought Rolling Rock. They had the chance to do it and didn't do it.


They weren't sneaky about wanting to buy the brand, but they gave no indication whatsoever that they were going to swipe the town's legacy and move production out of state. Rolling Rock had been sold before, and it had always stayed right where it was.

As for locals buying beer or working for the company that is what is called a trade off. Rolling Rock paid people to work at the plant and they offered a good (the beer) at a price and people bought it. End of story. Budweiser doesn't owe them squat and Latrobe is full of a bunch of idiots if they thought they were entitled to a Rolling Rock brewery forever.


I guess if you expect a company to be anything other than an amoral engine for extracting wealth from the populace, regardless of any possible consequences, then yeah, that does make Latrobe suckers. It still doesn't make the move right, though.

By your standards, every one of us is a sucker for rooting for a particular baseball team, rather than simply directing our fannish energies toward whatever team is this year's front runner. After all, they're just companies, right? They don't owe you anything.

Selling slick, trendy crap to other strangers is just plain weird of a stance to take. Bud, now InBev, didn't change the bottle and didn't change the recipe. So if you think RR is slick and trendy crap then it was always slick and trendy crap. Plus nobody outside of Latrobe is allowed to drink it or something?


The difference is that when the brewery was located in Latrobe, it could print on the bottles that the beer was "brewed in the glass lined tanks of Old Latrobe" and market itself under the slogan "Born Small Town" and have those things actually be true, instead of just a hollow and cynical marketing ploy. The quirky small-town thing with the green bottles and the painted label and the 33 and all that was the core of the brand, and without it, it's just one cheap macro-brew among many.
   280. Flynn Posted: March 23, 2013 at 03:01 PM (#4394997)
Considering Budweiser ran the brand into the ground, sucking corporate #### seems like a weird stance to take. Moving from Latrobe to Newark (btw, Latrobe isn't swimming in good union jobs so A-B doing some amazing public service by moving jobs to Newark is a bizarre stance to take). But then again McCoy's stance is to be an internet tough guy contrarian. Pretty boring act if you ask me.

   281. bigglou115 Posted: March 23, 2013 at 03:11 PM (#4394999)
Is Your Mama's Good Food still downtown? Loved that place. I have no idea how they managed to make something as pedestrian as creamed corn so wondrous, but they invariably did.

Ditto for Iriana's -- one of my favorite pizza places ever.


Your Moma's is still there and it is still amazing. Same for Iriana's. The thing about Iriana's is that I'd eat there just because its the cleanest restaurant in the area, even if the food was bad (and it is quite the opposite) I'd still eat there because I was sure I wasn't eating something that had touched the floor.
   282. McCoy Posted: March 23, 2013 at 03:23 PM (#4395006)
After all, they're just companies, right? They don't owe you anything.


Correct.

They weren't sneaky about wanting to buy the brand, but they gave no indication whatsoever that they were going to swipe the town's legacy and move production out of state. Rolling Rock had been sold before, and it had always stayed right where it was.

So then they didn't sneak in like a thief in the night?


The difference is that when the brewery was located in Latrobe, it could print on the bottles that the beer was "brewed in the glass lined tanks of Old Latrobe" and market itself under the slogan "Born Small Town" and have those things actually be true, instead of just a hollow and cynical marketing ploy. The quirky small-town thing with the green bottles and the painted label and the 33 and all that was the core of the brand, and without it, it's just one cheap macro-brew among many.

So did its birthplace somehow change?

Rolling Rock was owned by InBev before Bud bought it. The 33, the green bottles, the small town kitsch has all been a marketing ploy for a long long time.

But then again McCoy's stance is to be an internet tough guy contrarian. Pretty boring act if you ask me.

I'm taking a tough guy stance and disagreeing with one person makes me a contrarian. Must be nice to declare things from on up high. Mt. Olympus/Forums sure do breed some smug knowitalls.
   283. HOLLA(R) Posted: March 23, 2013 at 04:09 PM (#4395015)
A friend of mine opened a restaurant in Minneapolis that has received a lot of positive press: The Bachelor Farmer


I ate there with some friends last winter (We ordered many small things and shared them around the table. If you ever eat with a friend who insists on getting his/her own food and will not eat out communally, get better friends), and it was one of the best meals of my life. Though I didn't start getting into food until I left New York City. Boy did I #### that one up.

The cocktails were phenomenal as well. Booze-forward and not at all sweet, thank god.
   284. zonk Posted: March 23, 2013 at 04:10 PM (#4395016)
How about a Gin bar? With no sign.


I'm with you on this...

It's a hipster/fancy-pantsy place -- but the only place I've found like this is the The Violet Hour. They have an extensive menu of gin-based drinks and an extraordinary selections of fine gins, but the problem with it is that it's really more of a place to take a date you want to impress (and on that account, it works and then some) than it is a place to lounge and sip on a good gin.... it's also very pricey - and while I'm fundamentally opposed to $10 drinks, I will say that some of their selections actually come pretty close to being worth the cost.

At the end of the day, I'm perfectly contented with a Hendricks on the rocks - but I can appreciate a more inventive gin-based cocktail, too.

   285. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: March 23, 2013 at 05:03 PM (#4395039)
Count me as one who hopes Gin doesn't become overdone the way Vodka did long ago. Not that I take some pleasure in it being dismissed as pine tree in a glass by the masses, but there's a lot of good gin out there, and some good small local (to me) distilleries making it. I'd hate to see these small brands crowded out.
   286. HOLLA(R) Posted: March 23, 2013 at 05:08 PM (#4395040)
some good small local (to me) distilleries making it


Farmer's Gin is my friend.
   287. The Yankee Clapper Posted: March 23, 2013 at 05:43 PM (#4395053)
This is somewhat relevant: Salad More Dangerous Than Burgers . I'm playing it safe, it seems.
   288. spike Posted: March 23, 2013 at 06:50 PM (#4395078)
The leading food expert cited probably does poll unskewing too.
   289. Bernal Diaz has an angel on his shoulder Posted: March 23, 2013 at 09:14 PM (#4395121)
There is, or maybe was, been a few years, steakhouse in the old train station in Latrobe. Also I was in Latrobe the day Rolling Rock production ended.
   290. Bhaakon Posted: March 23, 2013 at 09:17 PM (#4395124)
I wouldn't be surprised if produce is more dangerous than hamburger, if you follow a very limited definition of "dangerous". The last few big e coli scares I can think of involved contaminated veggies, a lot of vegetables tend to be served uncooked or lightly cooked (ie: unsterilized), and people are generally more lax about hand washing and such when they're not working with meat.
   291. Lassus Posted: March 23, 2013 at 09:28 PM (#4395131)
I'm taking a tough guy stance and disagreeing with one person makes me a contrarian.

I never thought you portrayed yourself as an internet tough guy, but, dude - you disagree with everyone.
   292. McCoy Posted: March 23, 2013 at 10:59 PM (#4395167)
I never thought you portrayed yourself as an internet tough guy, but, dude - you disagree with everyone.

I disagree with things I don't agree with. I don't bother saying "ditto" or "seconded" or "I'm with him" most of time when I agree with somebody. For instance I agree with a lot of the things Walt Davis says but I'm not going to bother to post "ditto". Instead I'll merely enjoy his posts and when he does post something I don't agree with and the subject happens to interest me then I'll post my opinion. I'm not going to blindly agree with people on the internet simply to blindly agree with people on the internet.
   293. PreservedFish Posted: March 23, 2013 at 11:32 PM (#4395178)
Will Young - I'm friends with the chef.
   294. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 24, 2013 at 01:18 PM (#4395271)
Correct.


Then why aren't you rooting for the Reds or the Dodgers this year?

So then they didn't sneak in like a thief in the night?


One night, the people of Latrobe still had Rolling Rock, and the next morning, they didn't.

Rolling Rock was owned by InBev before Bud bought it. The 33, the green bottles, the small town kitsch has all been a marketing ploy for a long long time.


Regardless of who actually cashed the checks at the end of the day, Rolling Rock under InBev was still being made in the same small town, using the same equipment, by the sons and grandsons of the men who'd made it since Prohibition ended. If you can't see the difference, then I genuinely feel sorry for you.

   295. McCoy Posted: March 24, 2013 at 01:47 PM (#4395289)
Then why aren't you rooting for the Reds or the Dodgers this year?

Well, I don't know if they will be any good for starters. But I will be going to Nationals' games because they are easy to get to and should be good.

One night, the people of Latrobe still had Rolling Rock, and the next morning, they didn't.

So you are saying that Budweiser snuck in then.

Regardless of who actually cashed the checks at the end of the day, Rolling Rock under InBev was still being made in the same small town, using the same equipment, by the sons and grandsons of the men who'd made it since Prohibition ended. If you can't see the difference, then I genuinely feel sorry for you.


Difference in what?

Latrobe Brewery was built in 1893 and despite what you think it has been modernized numerous times. Labatt bought the brewery in 1987 and what would later become InBev bought them in 1995. Now City Brewing Co owns the brewery and they continue to make beer there so that the grandsons and great-grandsons of the men who made beer since the Prohibition ended continue to make beer in Latrobe and funny enough one of the beers that City Brewery brews is Rolling Rock. Life goes on.
   296. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 25, 2013 at 11:51 AM (#4395802)
But I will be going to Nationals' games because they are easy to get to and should be good.


And you will be rooting solely for them this year?

So you are saying that Budweiser snuck in then.


They did not conceal their interest in purchasing Rolling Rock, but they did conceal their intention to move the brand away from Latrobe until it was too late for the town to do anything about it.

Difference in what?


The difference between a marketing talking point that is true and one that is not. The purpose of all marketing is ultimately to move product, but there's something fundamentally better (from a moral/ethical POV) about touting a genuine virtue of your product, rather than a phony one.

Now City Brewing Co owns the brewery and they continue to make beer there so that the grandsons and great-grandsons of the men who made beer since the Prohibition ended continue to make beer in Latrobe and funny enough one of the beers that City Brewery brews is Rolling Rock.


City Brewing Company has since purchased the brewery, and they have a contract to produce Rolling Rock, but they don't make Rolling Rock in Latrobe, so I'm not sure what you think that proves. And even if you were right, which you aren't, it wouldn't make Anheuser-Busch's actions any less despicable.
   297. McCoy Posted: March 25, 2013 at 12:18 PM (#4395828)
And you will be rooting solely for them this year?

I don't really get your point here. The Cubs, the Mets, the Cardinals, et al don't owe me a thing. I am a Cubs fan because of geography. the Cubs playing in Chicago isn't my birthright nor am I forced to pledge allegiance to them every season. The Cubs are going to suck this year and suck badly. Consequently I probably won't watch a good deal of their games.

They did not conceal their interest in purchasing Rolling Rock, but they did conceal their intention to move the brand away from Latrobe until it was too late for the town to do anything about it.

You know this because? What exactly was the town going to do and why couldn't they do it once it was announced that Rolling Rock was going to be moved? InBev was looking to sell Rolling Rock in 2009. They found no takers.

The difference between a marketing talking point that is true and one that is not. The purpose of all marketing is ultimately to move product, but there's something fundamentally better (from a moral/ethical POV) about touting a genuine virtue of your product, rather than a phony one.

What wasn't true? The bottles says "To honor the tradition of this great brand, we quote from the original pledge of quality". The really odd thing is you're bashing Bud for actually trying to make the brand more respectable. The brand for decades was marketed as a very cheap bland regional lager to locals in the region and to college kids. Bud tried to market the brand as a craft beer which it wasn't and failed to capture a slice of the craft beer market with the brand. So are you complaining that Bud did't treat the brand like Old Style or Schlitz or something?

City Brewing Company has since purchased the brewery, and they have a contract to produce Rolling Rock, but they don't make Rolling Rock in Latrobe, so I'm not sure what you think that proves. And even if you were right, which you aren't, it wouldn't make Anheuser-Busch's actions any less despicable.

Despicable? They legally bought a company from another company and then legally manufactured it. How despicable.
   298. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: March 25, 2013 at 01:36 PM (#4395882)
I don't really get your point here. The Cubs, the Mets, the Cardinals, et al don't owe me a thing. I am a Cubs fan because of geography. the Cubs playing in Chicago isn't my birthright nor am I forced to pledge allegiance to them every season. The Cubs are going to suck this year and suck badly. Consequently I probably won't watch a good deal of their games.


Then you're not really a fan, and there's no way for me to explain it to you. Sorry.

You know this because?


I followed the story in the news when it was happening, because it was a local product.

What exactly was the town going to do and why couldn't they do it once it was announced that Rolling Rock was going to be moved?


They could have tried to find local money to match Anheuser-Busch's offer, or the workers could have met and negotiated more favorable operating terms to keep the plant in town, or things of that nature.

What wasn't true? The bottles says "To honor the tradition of this great brand, we quote from the original pledge of quality".


They aren't honoring the tradition of the brand. If they were doing that, they wouldn't have moved production to a brewery hundreds of miles away.

The really odd thing is you're bashing Bud for actually trying to make the brand more respectable.


Why should I give a flaming #### about whether or not it's "respectable"? That doesn't do Latrobe any good, does it?

So are you complaining that Bud did't treat the brand like Old Style or Schlitz or something?


I'm complaining that they stole Rolling Rock from Latrobe. I know nothing at all about Old Style, and nothing about Schlitz except that one of my uncles used to drink it back in the '50s and '60s.

Despicable? They legally bought a company from another company and then legally manufactured it. How despicable.


You left out the part where they stole Rolling Rock from Latrobe. Just because something is legal doesn't mean that it's right, in a moral or ethical sense. I would not have thought that was a particularly difficult distinction to grasp.
   299. McCoy Posted: March 25, 2013 at 01:50 PM (#4395892)
Then you're not really a fan, and there's no way for me to explain it to you. Sorry.

No. I'm not your definition of the word "fan". Fortunately the world isn't ruled by you and your whims.


I followed the story in the news when it was happening, because it was a local product.

They could have tried to find local money to match Anheuser-Busch's offer, or the workers could have met and negotiated more favorable operating terms to keep the plant in town, or things of that nature.


And they didn't do any of that and despite what you accuse Budweiser of doing they didn't load up a bunch of Mayflower trucks in the middle of the night and skedaddle. An active citizenry and government could have been making arrangements with Budweiser to ensure Rolling Rock was made in Latrobe or they could have even bought Rolling Rock numerous times throughout the years. They did neither. Nor have they made any attempts to have City Brewing Co make Rolling Rock in Latrobe despite the fact that City Brewing makes Rolling Rock.

They aren't honoring the tradition of the brand. If they were doing that, they wouldn't have moved production to a brewery hundreds of miles away.

I'd say trying to make cheap beer at cheap prices is honoring the tradition of a cheap beer.

Why should I give a flaming #### about whether or not it's "respectable"? That doesn't do Latrobe any good, does it?

And why should I or Budweiser give a flaming #### about what does Latrobe any good?

I'm complaining that they stole Rolling Rock from Latrobe. I know nothing at all about Old Style, and nothing about Schlitz except that one of my uncles used to drink it back in the '50s and '60s.

Except they didn't steal it. They bought it fair and square. Something the people of Latrobe have had ample of chances to do and have not.

You left out the part where they stole Rolling Rock from Latrobe. Just because something is legal doesn't mean that it's right, in a moral or ethical sense. I would not have thought that was a particularly difficult distinction to grasp.

I didn't leave it out because it didn't happen. You can't legally steal something. They did nothing unethical nor immoral.
   300. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: March 25, 2013 at 01:59 PM (#4395901)
You can't legally steal something.


Unless you're a high-rolling banker type, of course.
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