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Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Buck Showalter asks prospect who didn’t recognize Frank Robinson to write paper on him

And stop wearing your shirttails backwards…and tuck in those caps in your pants!

On Monday, Robinson was in Sarasota, Florida to speak with Oriole players at spring training. Among those in attendance was Josh Hart, who was selected by the team in last year’s amateur draft. As Robinson made his way around the facilities, Hart had the opportunity to meet the former All-Star. The minor problem was, the 19-year-old had no idea about the man with whom he had come face-to-face.

Eduardo A. Encina

Buck asked O’s farmhand Josh Hart if he knew who Frank was. He didnt, so Buck told him he wanted a one-page report on him by tmrw.

Given his place in the history of the game, there are sure to be more than a few — especially around Baltimore and Cincinnati — who will wonder how it’s possible to not know who Frank Robinson is. Fortunately, Buck Showalter made sure Josh Hart knows who he is now.

Repoz Posted: February 25, 2014 at 06:23 AM | 171 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: history, orioles

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   1. bjhanke Posted: February 25, 2014 at 06:37 AM (#4661903)
Hey. Dave Winfield, when drafted, didn't know that there was a whole MLB team called the San Diego Padres. On the other hand, a one-page report is certainly my idea of how to deal with that kind of thing. - Brock Hanke
   2. Flynn Posted: February 25, 2014 at 08:20 AM (#4661918)
I guess people will complain about this and how it's irrelevant to playing baseball, but I'm hoping this is Buck's idea of a joke - don't tell the kid anything about Robinson, then ask him about it tomorrow and get an awed teenager talking about the Triple Crown, MVP in both leagues, 587 home runs, first black MLB manager (in each league, again!), playing in five World Series, etc.
   3. Blastin Posted: February 25, 2014 at 09:05 AM (#4661928)
My father used to tell me I could go to any party I wanted in high school, but I had to write a paper (about some other subject) if I went.

I didn't go to a lot of parties.
   4. Tim Wallach was my Hero Posted: February 25, 2014 at 09:15 AM (#4661930)
Sadly, the first thing that comes up to my mind when I think about Frank Robinson is when he fell asleep on the Expos Bench back somewhere in 2002-2004. THEN I think about the incredible career.
   5. attaboy Posted: February 25, 2014 at 09:41 AM (#4661937)
My initial reaction was to hate this but I can't really see the downside...I guess Showalter can lose the players if he is the crotchety old man who tells everyone how great things were in the old days but he didn't say that...directly. Really depends how this was said, tone/volume level, Etc. and more importantly, how did Josh take it. In today's world, you just go to wiki and your job is done so it is an easy task.
   6. TerpNats Posted: February 25, 2014 at 09:47 AM (#4661940)
Appreciate the game's history and the people who have been there before you (that's one of the things I like about Bryce Harper). If you're part of the Baltimore organization and don't understand what Frank Robinson meant to that franchise in particular and the game in general, something is wrong with you.
   7. DL from MN Posted: February 25, 2014 at 09:47 AM (#4661941)
Brock - I'm not sure you could keep it to one page.
   8. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: February 25, 2014 at 09:50 AM (#4661942)
Someone at Fangraphs needs to do a mock-up of what this paper may look like.

14-point Courier, double-spacing...
"Since the dawn of time, Frank Robinson has been an important topic of study."
   9. GregD Posted: February 25, 2014 at 10:00 AM (#4661949)
To understand the meaning of Frank Robinson, we must first ask, "What does frank mean?" And "who is Robinson"? Without definitions there is no possibility for communication. According to dictionary.com, "frank" means "honest or open" and also refers to a tribe of European barbarians...


In seriousness, I'm not surprised. This kid's parents probably aren't be old enough to have seen Robinson play. I wouldn't be surprised if ballplayers couldn't place great players of the 70s and 80s and early 90s at this point; expecting them to know the players of the 60s is a lot. And Frank Robinson, as we've often said here, falls into some weird memory hole where he's often forgotten on the list of all-time greats or even when naming home run leaders and the like.
   10. TerpNats Posted: February 25, 2014 at 10:18 AM (#4661962)
So he wasn't old enough to watch Frank Robinson play...but he certainly is old enough to have watched Frank Robinson manage. (Remember 2005-06 in D.C.?)
   11. BrianBrianson Posted: February 25, 2014 at 10:24 AM (#4661966)
It has recently come to my attention that not enough people understand how great Frank Robinson has been to our lives. Each day we wake up and likely have one or more Frank Robinson lying at the foot of our beds. It is wonderful to be able to wake up and smile each morning because of this.

Social & Cultural Factors

Frank Robinson has a large role in American Culture. Many people can often be seen taking part in activities associated with Frank Robinson. This is partly because people of most ages can be involved and families are brought together by this. Generally a person who displays their dislike for Frank Robinson may be considered an outcast.

Economic Factors

It is not common practice to associate economics with Frank Robinson. Generally, Frank Robinson would be thought to have no effect on our economic situation, but there are in fact some effects. The sales industry associated with Frank Robinson is actually a 2.3 billion dollar a year industry and growing each year. The industry employs nearly 150,000 people in the United States alone. It would be safe to say that Frank Robinson play an important role in American economics and shouldn't be taken for granted.

Environmental Factors

After a three month long research project, I've been able to conclude that Frank Robinson doesn't negatively effect the environment at all. A Frank Robinson did not seem to result in waste products and couldn't be found in forests, jungles, rivers, lakes, oceans, etc... In fact, Frank Robinson produced some positive effects on our sweet little nature.

Political Factors

Oh does Frank Robinson ever influence politics. Last year 5 candidates running for some sort of position used Frank Robinson as the primary topic of their campaign. A person might think Frank Robinson would be a bad topic to lead a campaign with, but in fact with the social and environmental impact is has, this topic was able to gain a great number of followers. These 5 candidates went 4 for 5 on winning their positions.

Conclusion

Frank Robinson seem to be a much more important idea that most give credit for. Next time you see or think of Frank Robinson, think about what you just read and realize what is really going on. It is likely you under valued Frank Robinson before, but will now start to give the credited needed and deserved.

Footnotes

Frank Robinson researched in wikipedia. Frank Robinson @ dictionary.com
   12. Tim Wallach was my Hero Posted: February 25, 2014 at 10:25 AM (#4661967)
So he wasn't old enough to watch Frank Robinson play...but he certainly is old enough to have watched Frank Robinson manage.

Well, as I mentioned above, I think at times, even Frank did not know he was managing.

(Remember 2005-06 in D.C.?)

(Remember 2002-2004 in Montreal?)
   13. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: February 25, 2014 at 10:25 AM (#4661969)
I remember reading a book about Don Mattingly as a kid and being disgusted that Mattingly at one point early in his career thought Babe Ruth was a cartoon character, and not a real player.
   14. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: February 25, 2014 at 10:30 AM (#4661975)
The leading exports of Frank Robinson are home runs, MVPs, copper, and naps on the dugout bench.
   15. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: February 25, 2014 at 10:39 AM (#4661982)
Someone at Fangraphs needs to do a mock-up of what this paper may look like.

Given the research habits of kids these days, I suspect the paper will look a lot like this.
   16. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: February 25, 2014 at 10:43 AM (#4661985)
Frank Robinson is a mammal.
Frank Robinson hits home runs ALL the time.
The purpose of Frank Robinson is to flip out and then fall asleep on the bench.
   17. GregD Posted: February 25, 2014 at 10:47 AM (#4661989)
Lots of good athletes aren't really sports fans, certainly not fans of sports history. I think every sport has stories of the older guys hazing the young ones to learn about their predecessors and so on and so on--so Eric Davis badgered younger Reds because Dave Parker badgered him because Stargell badgered Parker because Clemente badgered Stargell because somebody (Dick Groat?) badgered Clemente etc.)

I'm curious what the cut off point is.

I'd bet most 19-year-old minor leaguers could not identity what position Mike Schmidt played.

I would be curious how many of them could get Ozzie Smith and Cal Ripken. My guess is most but that could be my age.

I doubt many non-catchers could position Johnny Bench or tell the difference between Steve Carlton and Carlton Fisk.

I teach 19-20 year old kids and it is still hard for me to keep up with the pace of amnesia; many of them have no knowledge that the 2000 election dispute happened. Not that they don't have an opinion about it; they truly don't know that there was ever any fuss about. Hanging chad is literally meaningless to them.

I am starting--in NYC!--to get kids who look a little puzzled when someone mentions 9/11. To be fair, it happened when some of them were 5. If they lived outside of the area and didn't have family members affected, it seems like ancient history. I am sure I will soon have students who have to be explained what 9-11 was and then ones who can't keep straight that there were 2 different guys named George Bush who became president. (Don't even get me started on what happens if George P makes it!)

And thus it ever was...I am sure there were kids in the 1830s who thought the original John Adams was still in Congress and arguing Amistad before the Supreme Court.
   18. Tim Wallach was my Hero Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:05 AM (#4662003)
I teach 19-20 year old kids and it is still hard for me to keep up with the pace of amnesia

I've been working with Nunavut Inuit for close to 15 years now and I realized about 5 years ago that many 20ish Inuit had no idea that their territory did not exist before 1999... In such a small society (there's about 30,000 Inuit in Nunavut), it's really surprising. Especially that many of them were like 10 when it was created.

The other day, I was talking with my 33 year-old sister about WWI and she asked me what was the use of knowing anything about that. I said it was just plain fun.

I think kids (and older people too) don't see the fun of knowing stuff: they only want to see what it is useful for.
   19. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:11 AM (#4662008)
Frank Robinson seem to be a much more important idea that most give credit for. Next time you see or think of Frank Robinson, think about what you just read and realize what is really going on. It is likely you under valued Frank Robinson before, but will now start to give the credited needed and deserved.

:-D
   20. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:13 AM (#4662011)
I think kids (and older people too) don't see the fun of knowing stuff: they only want to see what it is useful for.

And yet they'll spend hours a day reading inane Tweets from idiot celebrities, or inane postings on their friends Facebook pages.
   21. Tim Wallach was my Hero Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:16 AM (#4662017)
And yet they'll spend hours a day reading inane Tweets from idiot celebrities, or inane postings on their friends Facebook pages.

True. But do they do it for fun, or just to "matter" in their own social circles? I don't honestly know
[Edit to add: it's also much easier to learn about whichever celebrity's crappy life than it is about the Bataille de la Marne.]
   22. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:18 AM (#4662018)
I'd bet most 19-year-old minor leaguers could not identity what position Mike Schmidt played.


On the Tonight Show last night they played "Catchphrase" with 18 year old Olympian Mikaela Shiffrin. The clue was "9-to-5" and Reese Witherspoon said "its a movie with Dolly Parton and Lily Tomlin" and Shiffrin looked at her like she had two heads. That made me feel old.
   23. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:27 AM (#4662029)
I think kids (and older people too) don't see the fun of knowing stuff: they only want to see what it is useful for.

You might want to quote them George Santayana's observation that "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it", but attribute it to some current teen idol in order to give the message a bit more weight.
   24. Swoboda is freedom Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:34 AM (#4662033)
Frank Robinson, Frank Robinson
You border on the Adriatic
Your land is mostly mountainous.
And your chief export is chrome.
   25. Blastin Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:35 AM (#4662036)
I love learning trivia and history (though I am not so into war history).

I happen to be aware of silly celebrity stuff too, but I know it's silly.
   26. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:36 AM (#4662037)
"9 to 5" came out 34 years ago and comedies in particular don't have much of a shelf life. Look at the top ten movies from any week in the 80s and if there's a title you've absolutely never heard of, it's probably a terrible comedy starring Richard Pryor or Gene Wilder or Danny DeVito or John Candy or Bette Midler or Wendie Jo Sperber.
   27. GregD Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:43 AM (#4662041)
You might want to quote them George Santayana's observation that "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it", but attribute it to some current teen idol in order to give the message a bit more weight.
This one they must hear in high school because even the mediocre students answer with it when I ask why study History.

I have to say I hate that quote as much as it is possible to have any frivolous phrase.

To me you learn the past to 1) understand how your world came to be the way it is--to see it as the product of forces and choices not a natural way of things, and 2) to think more rigorously about how people and institutions function. We don't get to run controlled experiments to see how different things turn out; the past is our only data set. And 3) To realize that people are absolutely terrible at understanding the present, much less at predicting the future, and so to shake free of any vestigial sense of either a narrative of progress or of decline. To realize that the world is fundamentally chaotic and there are no promises that the future will move in any particular direction.

Other people love to learn the past for antiquarianism which is certainly valid and possibly even ennobling but not what interests me.

Since it is literally impossible for the past to repeat itself, and since a truly tragic view of the world leads one to suspect that even if people could learn to avoid past mistakes they would simply then commit new (and possibly worse!) ones, I don't find anything either useful or interesting about the Santayana line. (I am sure Santayana's thought is much more interesting than that.)
   28. Answer Guy Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:48 AM (#4662049)
"Moving Violations" debuted at #2? Seriously?
   29. Guapo Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:50 AM (#4662051)
Vasopressin receptor blockade in the anterior hypothalamus suppresses aggression in Frank Robinson

Abstract

Although the anterior hypothalamus has been implicated in the control of aggression in various rodent species, little is known about the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this control. It has been established that flank marking, which occurs with high frequency during agonistic encounters in hamsters, is dependent upon vasopressin-sensitive neurons in the anterior hypothalamus. The present study was undertaken to determine whether intraspecific aggression in Frank Robinson is similarly influenced by vasopressin in this area of the hypothalamus. Frank Robinson, surgically implanted with guide cannulae aimed at the anterior hypothalamus, were microinjected with three different concentrations of the V1-receptor antagonist d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP or a vehicle control of 0.9% NaCl. Sixty minutes after each microinjection a small male hamster was introduced into the home cage of Frank Robinson. Frank Robinson showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in the number of biting attacks on the intruders over the 10 minute test period. The V1-receptor antagonist also caused a significant increase in Frank Robinson's latencies to attack the intruder. However, Frank Robinson's total contact time with the intruder was unaffected by drug treatment suggesting that the reduction of aggression was not due to a generalized effect upon social behavior. The specificity of the drug treatment was further supported by the observation that it did not affect Frank Robinson's sexual motivation or ability to mount a receptive female. These data suggest that vasopressin-sensitive neurons in the anterior hypothalamus are involved in the control of intraspecific aggression in Frank Robinson.


Signed, Josh Hart
   30. Tim Wallach was my Hero Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:50 AM (#4662052)
I think kids (and older people too) don't see the fun of knowing stuff: they only want to see what it is useful for.

You might want to quote them George Santayana's observation that "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it", but attribute it to some current teen idol in order to give the message a bit more weight.

Maybe. But I'm also tired of our tendency to find justification for everything. I mean, most of the times, historical knowledge isn't useful (even if we want to believe so). It's super fun, though. I think we should value the pleasure of knowing and learning. It's what I'm trying to do with my two young kids, anyway (and it seems to be working since my daughter knows more about astronomy than I ever did before I actually had to browse the internet and buy books in order to be able to answer her questions).
   31. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:55 AM (#4662058)
I think kids (and older people too) don't see the fun of knowing stuff: they only want to see what it is useful for.

You might want to quote them George Santayana's observation that "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it", but attribute it to some current teen idol in order to give the message a bit more weight.

Maybe. But I'm also tired of our tendency to find justification for everything.


I completely agree with that sentiment, especially when it comes to my enormous Bookmarked collection of "Useless Information".
   32. Russ Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:55 AM (#4662059)
Maybe. But I'm also tired of our tendency to find justification for everything. I mean, most of the times, historical knowledge isn't useful (even if we want to believe so). It's super fun, though. I think we should value the pleasure of knowing and learning. It's what I'm trying to do with my two young kids, anyway (and it seems to be working since my daughter knows more about astronomy than I ever did before I actually had to browse the internet and buy books in order to be able to answer her questions).


Part of the problem is that knowledge is basically free now, there is actually very little value in "knowing stuff". Now the key skill is being able to critically evaluate "stuff" and to be able to gather the freely available information into coherent thoughts, arguments, and belief structures.

Facts don't have inherent value, but evidence does (in support of arguments and decision-making), so when teaching about history, it would be imperative to draw out how these "facts" could be used to understand or develop an argument or to support a decision.

   33. Russ Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:56 AM (#4662062)
especially when it comes to my enormous Bookmarked collection of "Useless Information"


Working in a department filled with with mathematicians, I think it is fair (and less pejorative) to note that is not really "useless information", but rather "information that has yet to be used". :-)
   34. Hang down your head, Tom Foley Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:07 PM (#4662074)
Frank Robinson (1932 – 4 July 2004) was an eccentric street entertainer in Nottingham, England. He was by far Nottingham's best known busker[1] and was regularly seen around Nottingham City Centre for over fifteen years. His favourite busking place was outside of the C&A store in the Lister Gate area of the city.
   35. Answer Guy Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:09 PM (#4662078)
Part of the problem is that knowledge is basically free now, there is actually very little value in "knowing stuff". Now the key skill is being able to critically evaluate "stuff" and to be able to gather the freely available information into coherent thoughts, arguments, and belief structures.


Information is cheap. Meaning is expensive.
   36. AROM Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:10 PM (#4662080)
(Don't even get me started on what happens if George P makes it!)


I'll give up on this country and change my screen name to CESRMOF (Cheese Eating Surrender Rally Monkey of France).
   37. Mark S. is bored Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:12 PM (#4662083)
I remember reading a book about Don Mattingly as a kid and being disgusted that Mattingly at one point early in his career thought Babe Ruth was a cartoon character, and not a real player.
He thought that Babe Ruth was the guy on the Gas House Gorillas from the Baseball Bugs cartoon.
   38. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:30 PM (#4662094)
Who is Frank Robinson? Webster's defines him as "a signature or mark affixed by special privilege to a letter, package, or the like to ensure its transmission free of charge, as by mail."
   39. Bourbon Samurai in Asia Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:40 PM (#4662098)
This article is worth a click through just to see the picture of Frank judging Davey Johnson at kangaroo court
   40. DL from MN Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:40 PM (#4662101)
I agree with the sentiment here. It is more important to teach the "why and how" of history than the "when and where".
   41. Bourbon Samurai in Asia Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:40 PM (#4662103)
Oh, it's not in that one! Here's the yahoo one
   42. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:52 PM (#4662110)
Part of the problem is that knowledge is basically free now, there is actually very little value in "knowing stuff". Now the key skill is being able to critically evaluate "stuff" and to be able to gather the freely available information into coherent thoughts, arguments, and belief structures.

Facts don't have inherent value, but evidence does (in support of arguments and decision-making), so when teaching about history, it would be imperative to draw out how these "facts" could be used to understand or develop an argument or to support a decision.


That's a critical distinction. In my own former profession of book selling, good book buying took a rather vast amount of knowledge in many subject areas, in addition to knowing which books were truly "rare" and which ones only seemed that way. 20 or 30 years ago, it was relatively easy to make a good living by combining that knowledge with a directory of used book shops, because most dealers had to price to their local market, leaving many books way underpriced for shops with a wider customer base. For a long time it was like having a license to print money.

Contrast that to today, when a monkey with a smartphone can learn the current market price(s) of nearly any book ever published in a matter of a few seconds, regardless of whether or not he has even the faintest idea of who the author is or what the book is about. It's not surprising that most of the better book dealers who've successfully made the transition to the 21st century world of bookselling have scrapped most of their low and midpriced books and begun to concentrate almost exclusively on books worth from $100 on up, where knowledge is still at a premium.
   43. Tom Nawrocki Posted: February 25, 2014 at 12:58 PM (#4662114)
I remember when Nolan Ryan set the all-time strikeout record, he had no idea who Walter Johnson was. I was an obsessive little fan at that point and couldn't understand that at all.
   44. boteman is not here 'til October Posted: February 25, 2014 at 01:05 PM (#4662119)
I bet if this kid spent a few minutes with Professor Terguson teaching him about Frank Robinson he'd remember!
   45. The District Attorney Posted: February 25, 2014 at 01:07 PM (#4662122)
I assume #11 is from eHow.com.
   46. Best Regards, President of Comfort, Esq. Posted: February 25, 2014 at 01:10 PM (#4662127)
I remember reading a book about Don Mattingly as a kid and being disgusted that Mattingly at one point early in his career thought Babe Ruth was a cartoon character, and not a real player.


Ty Cobb felt the same way about Babe Ruth.
   47. Matthew E Posted: February 25, 2014 at 01:16 PM (#4662132)
I think it's great when players know about baseball history, but come on: it's not their job. Their job is to play baseball well and, secondarily, to represent the ballclub well in public. They don't have to know much about history for that, and, further, 'knowing stuff about history' and 'playing baseball well' are two skills that don't have a lot of overlap. I think this one-page report thing is largely gratuitious humiliation and, worse, that that's what (some) people like about it. These damn kids today with their Twitters and Tweeters! Frank Robinson never would have allowed any Twitter hashtags in the clubhouse, I'll tell you that!
   48. Random Transaction Generator Posted: February 25, 2014 at 01:29 PM (#4662138)
When I was getting into the history of baseball, I often confused Frank Robinson with Brooks Robinson, so if this kid had made that mistake, I wouldn't have been that surprised.
   49. Yoenis Cespedes, Baseball Savant Posted: February 25, 2014 at 01:55 PM (#4662158)
Baseball needs more players like Frank Robinson.

/baseballmogul2002
   50. boteman is not here 'til October Posted: February 25, 2014 at 01:56 PM (#4662161)
When I was getting into the history of baseball, I often confused Frank Robinson with Brooks Robinson

This often happens when one brother overshadows the other.
   51. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: February 25, 2014 at 02:00 PM (#4662164)
"Moving Violations" debuted at #2? Seriously?

"Critical Condition" was #1 for two weeks!
   52. T.J. Posted: February 25, 2014 at 02:25 PM (#4662196)
What you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.
   53. zack Posted: February 25, 2014 at 02:39 PM (#4662214)
Who the hell is Wendie Jo Sperber?!

... ... ...the sister from the Back to the Future was a movie star?

In conclusion, Frank Robinson was a man of contrasts. Also, one time Matt Lecroy was such a bad catcher that it made him cry.
   54. Answer Guy Posted: February 25, 2014 at 02:40 PM (#4662218)
I remember seeing "Moving Violations" on HBO or one of the cable movie channels. It's supposed to do for those traffic school people with traffic tickets what the "Police Academy" movies do for police academies. (And I've never been clear how someone came up with satirizing those; I guess it was like "Stripes" for law enforcement as opposed to the military.) I figured that movie was one step above direct-to-video.

The only movie that secured more box office dough that week was "Police Academy 2."

I loved those movies as a kid and it pains to me admit that my mother was right about how terrible they are, as Comedy Central is fond of showing the first three films in the series on Saturday mornings.
   55. vortex of dissipation Posted: February 25, 2014 at 02:42 PM (#4662222)
Who the hell is Wendie Jo Sperber?!


Who the hell was Wendie Jo Sperber?!
   56. bjhanke Posted: February 25, 2014 at 02:52 PM (#4662231)
DL - Oh, you figured out that I was wordy, huh. You've known that for years. It comes with the territory of having an English teacher, who loved to debate but hated losing to her sons, for a mother. If I left ANY tiny piece of context unsaid, mom would pounce on it, put up the worst possible spin and claim that I had said that. You end up surrounding anything you say with any and all context you have about it. At least some of the readers here like the stories I end up telling. But, yes, I am guilty. And I think It's funny when I get wordy, so no offense was taken at all.

RoyalsRetro - That was fun. Webster's, of course, thinks that the term "frank" refers to congressional franking privileges. Wikipedia might produce better results. But you knew that - thanks for the laugh. - Brock

   57. Answer Guy Posted: February 25, 2014 at 02:59 PM (#4662239)
I remember the old, weird Internet would have memes like "Real Ultimate Power." Thanks for bringing me back, #16.
   58. Hang down your head, Tom Foley Posted: February 25, 2014 at 03:11 PM (#4662253)
This often happens when one brother overshadows the other.
I had the same problem with Vance and Rudy Law and their dad Charley on the 1983 White Sox.
   59. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: February 25, 2014 at 03:20 PM (#4662263)
Who the hell is Wendie Jo Sperber?!

... ... ...the sister from the Back to the Future was a movie star?


She was also the proctologist lady in "Bachelor Party". And the titular protagonist of "Dinky Hocker Shoots Smack!"
   60. zack Posted: February 25, 2014 at 03:45 PM (#4662280)
If I left ANY tiny piece of context unsaid, mom would pounce on it, put up the worst possible spin and claim that I had said that. You end up surrounding anything you say with any and all context you have about it.


So what you're saying is, your mom was an internet message board?
   61. RMc's desperate, often sordid world Posted: February 25, 2014 at 04:05 PM (#4662297)
Frank Robinson is SVP, Corporate Real Estate and Workplace for McKesson, a Fortune 16 corporation.

Frank Robinson is a former American football player who played at the linebacker position for the Tulane Green Wave from 1977 to 1980.

Frank Robinson is the founder and chief executive officer of Island Events, LLC.

Frank Robinson is an associate in the Business Law and Franchise Law Groups.

Frank Robinson is a fresh voice for the free market and makes it okay to come out of the closet!
   62. Walt Davis Posted: February 25, 2014 at 04:14 PM (#4662309)
Frank Robinson was a minor throw-in to the Milt Pappas trade. This allowed Frank to join his more famous brother Brooks on the Orioles. In his first year with the Orioles, Frank led the league with 7 sacrifice flies. Although he would never again reach that total, Frank Robinson continued to be a useful player until he landed in Cleveland where his father, Wilbert Robinson, was the manager.
   63. Rickey! On a blog from 1998. With the candlestick. Posted: February 25, 2014 at 04:25 PM (#4662320)
So he wasn't old enough to watch Frank Robinson play...but he certainly is old enough to have watched Frank Robinson manage. (Remember 2005-06 in D.C.?)


Josh Hart was born Oct 2, 1994. Which means he was 11 years old in 2005. Now, maybe I'm underselling the modern baseball kid, but how many 11 year olds go to the games to watch the manager?

EDIT: If Josh Hart was going to a game to watch the manager, it was Bobby Cox who would have been running his hometown Braves. (He's from Lilburn, GA.) He's not going to be paying a lot of attention to the Expos/Nats dugout.
   64. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: February 25, 2014 at 04:26 PM (#4662322)
Frank Robinson was a minor throw-in to the Milt Pappas trade. This allowed Frank to join his more famous brother Brooks on the Orioles. In his first year with the Orioles, Frank led the league with 7 sacrifice flies. Although he would never again reach that total, Frank Robinson continued to be a useful player until he landed in Cleveland where his father, Wilbert Robinson, was the manager.


You totally ignored the part where he broke the racial barrier by becoming the first African-American in baseball, when the Dodgers signed him in 1947.
   65. Sunday silence Posted: February 25, 2014 at 04:31 PM (#4662326)
Andy ran a really good book shop. I picked up Campaigns of Napoleon from him for $60 which was not a steal and not a bad deal either. I sold it a few years later on ebay for $65 which made me feel great.

You could find better prices in many other stores in the area, but his about the only one that had a serious collection in that locale. Interesting to hear his insight on this.
   66. esseff Posted: February 25, 2014 at 04:33 PM (#4662327)
Sadly, the first thing that comes up to my mind when I think about Frank Robinson is when he fell asleep on the Expos Bench back somewhere in 2002-2004.



But there's also that great moment, thankfully preserved on You Tube, when the Expos botch the infield fly in front of home plate, then tag home plate thinking they've recorded a force. After the umpire calls the runner safe at home, the players start to argue. Robinson strides purposefully from the dugout, and just for a moment it seems like he's going to go after the ump, too. But instead he angrily waves his players back to their positions and doesn't say a word to the umpire, because he, unlike his players (and pbp man Duane Kuiper), knows that the umpire got the call exactly right.
   67. BDC Posted: February 25, 2014 at 04:34 PM (#4662329)
All this information and nothing about his evil twin Coy Robinson.
   68. vortex of dissipation Posted: February 25, 2014 at 04:46 PM (#4662340)
But there's also that great moment, thankfully preserved on You Tube, when the Expos botch the infield fly in front of home plate, then tag home plate thinking they've recorded a force. After the umpire calls the runner safe at home, the players start to argue. Robinson strides purposefully from the dugout, and just for a moment it seems like he's going to go after the ump, too. But instead he angrily waves his players back to their positions and doesn't say a word to the umpire, because he, unlike his players, knows that the umpire got the call exactly right.


The runner who so deftly touches home plate is Neifi Perez. Whatever his deficiencies as a player, apparently he knew the rules...
   69. esseff Posted: February 25, 2014 at 04:50 PM (#4662343)
The runner who so deftly touches home plate is Neifi Perez. Whatever his deficiencies as a player, apparently he knew the rules...


Or, more likely, got lucky at the end. If he knew the rules, he would have stayed at third base.
   70. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:03 PM (#4662353)

Or, more likely, got lucky at the end. If he knew the rules, he would have stayed at third base.


There was no one covering third. The shortstop was at second. Fernando Tatis was pursuing the pop-up. As long as Neifi stayed between third and the various Expos standing dumbfounded around the ball, allowing him the opportunity to retreat, he was safe.

It's possible he drifted off the bag when the play started, but when the ball dropped it's pretty clear he knew exactly what he was doing. He immediately gestured to the ump as soon as he touched home.
   71. Walt Davis Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:03 PM (#4662354)
You totally ignored the part where he broke the racial barrier by becoming the first African-American in baseball, when the Dodgers signed him in 1947.

That was Jackie Mason who later voiced Chef on South Park.
   72. Hang down your head, Tom Foley Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:03 PM (#4662355)
Most famous for his role as TV's Benson, rubber-faced funnyman Frank Robinson has never been in my kitchen.
   73. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:04 PM (#4662357)
You totally ignored the part where he broke the racial barrier by becoming the first African-American in baseball, when the Dodgers signed him in 1947.



Signed of course, by legendary GM Rickey Henderson.
   74. BDC Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:08 PM (#4662360)
I thought Jackie Mason starred in Sidney Lumet's film of Lolita.
   75. Rickey! On a blog from 1998. With the candlestick. Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:09 PM (#4662362)
A defense first middle infielder is going to know the infield fly rule as well as anyone in baseball. An offense first infielder like Fernando Tatis, not so much. (For the record, the bases were loaded, and the runner from second had already gone to third, while Rich Aurilia took advantage of the confusion at home to move from first to second. So at that point, Perez had no retreat option. 3B was occupied. But he clearly knew the rules and was waiting patiently for the defenders to clear the plate so he could sneak in and touch safely while they congratulated themselves on getting the "force."
   76. God Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:11 PM (#4662364)
Frank Robinson is the delicious new hot dog the Orioles have introduced at Camden Yards this season to complement Boog's BBQ.
   77. Jarrod HypnerotomachiaPoliphili(Teddy F. Ballgame) Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:41 PM (#4662388)
Sadly, the first thing that comes up to my mind when I think about Frank Robinson is when he fell asleep on the Expos Bench back somewhere in 2002-2004. THEN I think about the incredible career.


I think first about
that great moment, thankfully preserved on You Tube, when the Expos botch the infield fly in front of home plate
. Just disappointed that I wasn't the first to mention it.
   78. God Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:50 PM (#4662397)
I'm all for dumping on Neifi Perez whenever possible, but it's obvious from the video that he knew the rule and was trying to sneak in because it was clear the Expos didn't know the rule. Neifi even gestured to the umpire slyly like you do when you're about to pull a hidden ball trick.
   79. Der-K thinks the Essex Green were a good band. Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:50 PM (#4662398)
When I think of F-Rob, I think about:
* the essay on him in the first BJHBA.
* shaking his hand before a Nats game. It pained him to be gladhanding anyone and I felt bad to be in his workzone.

On Neifi: when you're not that great, it's doubly important to learn that stuff. (Meant as a compliment, thought it obviously doesn't read that way - he did what he needed to survive in the bigs.)
   80. Ivan Grushenko of Hong Kong Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:54 PM (#4662400)
A Frank Robinson did not seem to result in waste products

I find this hard to believe.
I'll give up on this country and change my screen name to CESRMOF (Cheese Eating Surrender Rally Monkey of France).

Oh come on! Hong Kong has to be a lot more fun than France.
   81. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: February 25, 2014 at 05:58 PM (#4662407)
If Neifi knew the rule, he would have held near third until the ball was caught, instead of being 75% of the way down the line. You guys are giving him way too much credit.
   82. jingoist Posted: February 25, 2014 at 06:13 PM (#4662423)
#74
"I thought Jackie Mason starred in Sidney Lumet's film of Lolita"

DOH!!!!

Everybody knows Jackie Mason invented the Mason jar; Perry Mason was the guy luring Sue Lyons with a lollypop
   83. Rickey! On a blog from 1998. With the candlestick. Posted: February 25, 2014 at 06:22 PM (#4662428)
If Neifi knew the rule, he would have held near third until the ball was caught, instead of being 75% of the way down the line. You guys are giving him way too much credit.


The ump is rather slow to call the inf fly, actually. Before he makes the call, with one out and the bases loaded, you have to cheat down the line. After the call, you're hung out if the runner behind you has advanced. I have no great love for Neifi Perez, but he made a smart baseball play there while the Expos made fools of themselves.
   84. Hang down your head, Tom Foley Posted: February 25, 2014 at 06:44 PM (#4662439)
Everybody knows Jackie Mason invented the Mason jar; Perry Mason was the guy luring Sue Lyons with a lollypop
And that's why Sue Lyons pulled down her pants after sliding into first at Tiger Stadium.
   85. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: February 25, 2014 at 06:55 PM (#4662449)
If Neifi knew the rule, he would have held near third until the ball was caught, instead of being 75% of the way down the line. You guys are giving him way too much credit.


There was no one covering third, or anywhere near it. He followed Tatis in, but stayed closer to third than any Expos infielder, so if the ball was caught, he could beat a retreat. There was no risk to him.
   86. esseff Posted: February 25, 2014 at 06:58 PM (#4662452)
I give Perez credit for recognizing that Joyce hadn't called him out on the force and that the play was thus still alive.

Beyond that, I don't give him for being so far down the line that he could have easily been tagged for a double play, ruining a big scoring opportunity. All it would have taken was for one of the five Expos to realize the rule, for someone to yell to them from the dugout or for them to make a tag just in case/because of the confusion.
   87. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: February 25, 2014 at 07:10 PM (#4662461)
All it would have taken was for one of the five Expos to realize the rule, for someone to yell to them from the dugout or for them to make a tag just in case/because of the confusion.


And had any of that happened, Neifi could have hightailed it back to the uncovered third base. He's presumably faster than any of the players who would have been involved in the pursuit (Tatis, the pitcher, catcher and possibly the first baseman).

If you really think Neifi was confused, rather than aware of what he was doing, why didn't he sprint for home when the ball fell to the grass?

   88. boteman is not here 'til October Posted: February 25, 2014 at 07:14 PM (#4662466)
All it would have taken was for one of the five Expos to realize the rule, for someone to yell to them from the dugout or for them to make a tag just in case/because of the confusion.

In fact, having just watched that YouTube video it looks like Wil Cordero near the end was pointing and shouting to his fellow fielders to tag out Perez, but it was too late.
   89. zenbitz Posted: February 25, 2014 at 07:22 PM (#4662473)

THREAD DELIVERS.

In a tribute to the outstanding comedy delivered here, I give you
Frank Robinson - according to the backs of baseball cards you can find in the first couple pages on Google Images:

Frank Robinson
Height: 6'1" Weight: 195* Bats: Right Throws: Right. Born August 31, 1935. Home: Los Angeles, Calif.
Frank broke into the Majors last season and took the Rookie of the Year honors. He was the top man in Runs Scored and tied the record for Homers for first year men. Frank found night games to his liking in '56 and compliled a .314 average while belting 20 circuit smashes in 64 "after dark" contests. Frank led the Sally League in Runs in '54.
Frank was NL Rookie of the Year in 1956 when he hit 38 homers to tie an all-time major league record for first-year men. He has more homers than any other right-hander in Red's history (202).
In 1960 he won the NL slugging crown with a .595 mark. Last year he lead the club with 34 HR's, 124 RBIs, and 21 SB's. Selected to the All-Star Game in 1961.
Frank was the N.L. Most Valuable Player in 1961.
Frank led the A.L. in batting, homers, and runs batted in in 1966. That year he hit two homers in the World Series off Don Drysdale. The slugger was named to his 8th All-Star Squad in '67.
Frank is the first man to have won Most Valuable Player Awards in the National and American Leagues. The hard hitting outfielder won the Rookie of the Year honors when he joined Cincinnati in 1956.






** WTH when I was working out I was the same size as FRANK ROBINSON?
   90. Walt Davis Posted: February 25, 2014 at 07:51 PM (#4662490)
Frank found night games to his liking in '56 and compliled a .314 average while belting 20 circuit smashes in 64 "after dark" contests.

Today we'd say "post-racist."
   91. donlock Posted: February 25, 2014 at 08:59 PM (#4662520)
“That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons that history has to teach.”
? Aldous Huxley
   92. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 25, 2014 at 09:35 PM (#4662531)
Everybody knows Jackie Mason invented the Mason jar


No, no, no - that was the Freemasons, although not until after they killed Jesus and His wife Mary. There are clues in most of the world's top art museums.
   93. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: February 25, 2014 at 09:45 PM (#4662536)
** WTH when I was working out I was the same size as FRANK ROBINSON?

Me, right now: Alberto Callaspo.
   94. Walt Davis Posted: February 25, 2014 at 09:56 PM (#4662541)
Who is Frank Robinson? Frank Robinson could be Ichiro if Ichiro wanted him to be.

But couldn't we all be Ichiro if Ichiro wanted us to be?

Therefore Ichiro is both the universal oneness that binds us together and the source of all that makes us unique individuals.

Ergo, Frank Robinson is Ichiro.
   95. jingoist Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:45 PM (#4662585)
Ergo

As to that concept of universal oneness; I'm all for it once Trout signs that humongous contract and shares his money with those of us who are part of his oneness.

Come to think of it aren't we all owed big $$$ from Arod and Jeter and the other big earners who are part of this wonderful oneness?
   96. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: February 25, 2014 at 11:57 PM (#4662588)
universal oneness


Robby is Everywhere
By Otis Nixon

When I look out into your eyes out there,
When I look out into your faces,
You know what I see?
I see a little bit of Robby
In each and every one of you out there.

Lemme tell ya...
Weeeeeeeeeellllllll...

Robby was RoY
Robby was MVP
Robby won a triple crown
Robby’s in the Hall of Fame

Man o man
What I want you to see
Is that the big F's
Inside of you and me

Robby is everywhere, man!
He's in everything.
He's in everybody...

Robby’s a 14-time All-Star.
He hit 586 dingers
Robby destroyed second basemen
Robby is still in your mom!

He's in everybody.
He's in the young, the old,
the fat, the skinny,
the white, the black
the brown and the blue
people got Robby in 'em too

Robby is in everybody out there.
Everybody's got Robby in them!
Everybody except one person that is...
Yeah, one person!
The evil opposite of Robby.
The Anti-Robby

Anti-Robby got no Robby in 'em,
lemme tell ya.

Centaur A-Rod has no Robby in him.

And Robby is in Juan Rivera
but he's trying to get out, man!
He's trying to get out!
Listen up Juanie Baby!

Robby was RoY
Robby was MVP
Robby won a triple crown
Robby’s in the Hall of Fame

Man o man
What I want you to see
Is that the big F's
Inside of you and me

Man, there's a lot of unexplained phenomenon
out there in the world.
Lot of things people say
What the heck's going on?

Let me tell ya!

Who built Marlins Park?
ROBBY!
Who built Tal’s Hill?
ROBBY!

Yeah, man you see guys
coming in from the pen
driving bullpen cars
and you think they're talking to Alou,
they're talking to Todd Self.
Man, no they're talking to ROBBY!
ROBBY! ROBBY!

You know what’s going on in that Fenway Triangle?
Out in the Fenway Triangle
Robby needs triples.
Robby needs triples.
Robby Robby Robby
Robby Robby Robby
Robby needs triples.

Aahh! Manager Robby!
Special Advisor Robby!
Senior Vice President for Major League Operations Robby it is.

Yeah man, you know people from Cincinnati,
people from Cincy they once came up to the O’s.
They say we like Milt Pappas.
They say how about a Baldschun,
and toss in a Simpson.

They gave up Robby.
ROBBY!
They got rid of Robby.
But Robby is a perfect being.
So Baltimore moved in peace and harmony to World Championess.

Soon all will become Robby.
Even Mike Scioscia will become Robby.
Why do you think they call it evolution anyway?
It's really Robbylution!
Robbylution!

Robby was RoY
Robby was MVP
Robby won a triple crown
Robby’s in the Hall of Fame

Man o man
What I want you to see
Is that the big F's
Inside of you and me

That's right ladies and gentlemen,
The time has come!
Time has come to talk
To that little bit of Robby inside of you.

Talk to them!
Shut them up!
Say "Robby, entertain me!"
"Please me, Robby!"
"Make me be laugh again
at the You Tube infield fly clip"

But there’s more!
There’s another side of Robby
and he's feeling for ya
He says he wants you to let it out!
Everybody's got to let it out like the man!

Like the man
Get those tearducts going now
Get your lip too.
Not no fool Mo Rivera lip either
Everybody!
Yeah, we're cryin’ now!

Robby is with us.
He's with us and he's speaking to us.
He says "LeCroy!"
"LeCroy!"
"Everybody!"
"Everybody got to cry!"

Robby was RoY
Robby was MVP
Robby won a triple crown
Robby’s in the Hall of Fame

Man o man
What I want you to see
Is that the big F's
Inside of you and me

Robby was RoY
Robby was MVP
Robby won a triple crown
Robby’s in the Hall of Fame

Man o man
What I want you to see
Is that the big F's
Inside of you and me

Robby!
   97. Dan Posted: February 26, 2014 at 02:02 AM (#4662633)
The ironic part of this whole thing is that there probably aren't more than 1 or 2 players on this kid's entire team who actually know who Frank Robinson is. This kid is curious enough to actually ask and gets punished by Showalter.
   98. Rob_Wood Posted: February 26, 2014 at 06:37 AM (#4662643)
Youngsters today not knowing who Frank Robinson is/was is roughly equivalent to me not knowing who guys like Tris Speaker and Rogers Hornsby were when I was their age. I had the advantage since I read periodicals such as Baseball Digest and The Sporting News as a wee lad. Another advantage I had was playing endless hours of All Star Baseball with the old-timer cards. I learned names such as Honus Wagner, Zack Wheat, Eddie Collins, Jimmy Foxx, etc. via that game. As I got older I learned more about these all-time greats, poring over them in the 1969 Baseball Encyclopedia. Of course, today's youngsters have much more access to information about old-timey players, but I do not blame them for their ignorance.
   99. bjhanke Posted: February 26, 2014 at 07:05 AM (#4662646)
Zach -"So what you're saying is, your mom was an internet message board?"

Yep, although she didn't go ad hominem THAT often.

Rob - You played ASB, too? I got hooked in 1956, when I was 8, by a guy who became my best friend. I still have all my discs (I'm only missing the 1980B set) because the friend died in a car crash coming home from his honeymoon, and I'd never dealt with death before, so holding on to that game became my coping mechanism. Do you know that the fandom for that game has not gone away, and that there's actually a Yahoo Group for it (fra paolo is in that group, among others)? Or that a REALLY old-time fan named John Rose still publishes an annual magazine about it? Still more fun than the law allows. - Brock
   100. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: February 26, 2014 at 08:00 AM (#4662651)
Youngsters today not knowing who Frank Robinson is/was is roughly equivalent to me not knowing who guys like Tris Speaker and Rogers Hornsby were when I was their age. I had the advantage since I read periodicals such as Baseball Digest and The Sporting News as a wee lad.

Good point, and then there's also this: Not only did magazines like The Sporting News and SPORT regularly feature interviews and stories about old time players and events, it's also that there were, relatively speaking, so few past years (and players) to write about. If you started following baseball in 1952, as I did, the "past" that these publications covered went back about 50 years**, each with 16 teams, and many of the stars of those years were still alive and kicking.

OTOH for someone born in 1994, a similar timespan of the "past" would require going back about 110+ years, with anywhere from 16 to 30 teams a year, with nearly all of the players from 60 years ago on back now dead, and with relatively little video evidence of their existence. It's kind of like the difference between having to clean a one bedroom apartment and having to clean a four bedroom house, and how many 20 year olds*** do we know who even like to clean their own rooms?

**Cobb, Speaker, Wagner, and Cy Young were all still alive in 1952, among many other players from the deadball era and the great majority of players from the 1920's and later.

***or 69 year old men, for that matter
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