Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Saturday, January 26, 2008

Canberra teenager bound for the New York Yankees

Not many people know that Canberra was founded by Crocodile Steinbrenner on Apr. 28, 1985.

The latest Canberra teenager bound for the big US baseball leagues is expected to sign a seven-year deal with the New York Yankees today. Kyle Perkins, 16, joins the world’s most renowned baseball club after being spotted by a Yankees scout during last year’s under-18 national championship in Western Australia.

The 16-year-old Daramalan College student was told a fortnight ago to expect an offer from the baseballing powerhouse. And today it arrives. Perkins, who is in Year 11, will join the club roster as a catcher in 2010 after he has finished school. Until then he is expected to follow a rigorous training regime and a strict diet and put in a lot of hard work.

...“This is a life-changing event,” Perkins said yesterday ahead of his Australian Provincials debut last night in the Claxton Shield match against Queensland. “I look at this as though it is the opportunity to start another journey.”

Repoz Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:19 AM | 35 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: international, minor leagues, scouting, yankees

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. phredbird Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:35 AM (#2676373)
i'd give anything to be called a 'baseballing powerhouse'.
   2. Phil Coorey is a T-Shirt Salesman Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:35 AM (#2676375)
I'd be looking to get out of Canberra as well....
   3. Cowboy Popup Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:41 AM (#2676380)
The Yanks sure do love signing young catchers.
   4. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:41 AM (#2676382)
Seven-year deal?!?
   5. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:42 AM (#2676383)
i'd give anything to be called a 'baseballing powerhouse'.

Now you missed your chance.
   6. phredbird Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:46 AM (#2676385)
well, i can ask my girlfriend if she could refer to me that way.

''honey, if somebody calls for me on the phone, and i'm not here, please say 'the baseballing powerhouse isn't here. can i take a message?' ''
   7. phredbird Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:47 AM (#2676386)
btw, i thought we couldn't change our usernames. how do you do that?
   8.   Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:49 AM (#2676388)
In the top right click "Your account." And from there you can change your username. I've posted under dozens of names.

To clarify: Technically you can't change your username (what you use to log in with,) but you can change your screen name, which is what is displayed.
   9. Honkie Kong Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:49 AM (#2676389)
Phil, any idea what happened to Greg Chappell's son?
He was pretty highly recruited, wasn't he?
   10. phredbird Posted: January 26, 2008 at 02:54 AM (#2676391)
sorry crispix. i'll give it back if you want to keep it.
   11. philly Posted: January 26, 2008 at 03:33 AM (#2676413)
Seven-year deal?!?


Standard minor league contracts are for one year with six additional reserve clause years. Foreign papers tend to report that arrangement as a "seven year deal". US papers don't much care and simply refer to all non-40 man roster players as generic minor leaguers.
   12. Der Komminsk-sar Posted: January 26, 2008 at 03:37 AM (#2676417)
EDIT: what philly said.

So, Repoz - why post this signing? The Yanks aren't very active in Australia, but loads of guys gets signed from there... Here's one site (an agency's) that covers some Aussie news.
   13. Greg K Posted: January 26, 2008 at 08:50 AM (#2676509)
Year 11 sounds so much grander than "Grade 11". Sort of like you are being bred and molded for some kind of military venture against Zanzibar or something.

I hear, "The 11th Grade" a lot in movies and TV. Is that an official term in America? Or is that just a thing people say? I don't think I've ever heard anyone in Canada refer to it as it as "The 4th Grade"
   14. jyjjy Posted: January 26, 2008 at 12:01 PM (#2676520)
In the US "4th grade" is standard and you hardly ever hear "grade 4"
   15. McCoy Posted: January 26, 2008 at 05:14 PM (#2676554)
9, 10, 11, and 12 you hardly ever hear. It is freshmen, sophomore, junior, and senior for that. Everything else is 1st grade, 2nd grade, so on up to 8.
   16. Bernal Diaz has an angel on his shoulder Posted: January 26, 2008 at 05:33 PM (#2676555)
Does Canberra have a hickish rep in Australia? I spent a decent amount of time in each of Melbourne, Sydney, Canberra and Adelaide and liked Canberra second best.
   17. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 26, 2008 at 07:34 PM (#2676585)
9, 10, 11, and 12 you hardly ever hear. It is freshmen, sophomore, junior, and senior for that. Everything else is 1st grade, 2nd grade, so on up to 8.
While using the terms freshman, etc. are more frequent, I hear freshman and 9th grader, etc. used interchangeably. I don't know if there are regional differences on this one. I've lived in Philly most of my life but spent 5 years in KC as an adult and 10 years in Cincy as a kid and never detected any particular difference in usage.
   18. McCoy Posted: January 26, 2008 at 07:41 PM (#2676591)
I guess it probably depends on the school system. I think some school systems have junior highs or schools that go up to 9th grade, or is that elementary schools that go up into Jr. High? I don't know it has been awhile.
   19. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: January 26, 2008 at 09:06 PM (#2676634)
Does Canberra have a hickish rep in Australia?

I think it's notorious for lacking completely in culture or community. It's a planned community on a massive scale, and it was planned (if I remember what I read) such that people live far apart, it's hard to get from one part of town to another, and there's no effective commercial center to attract visitors. I've never been there, but the Aussies I know do tend to sneer at it. I think they regard it as a giant suburb out in the middle of nowhere.
   20. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: January 26, 2008 at 09:27 PM (#2676639)
I think it's notorious for lacking completely in culture or community. It's a planned community on a massive scale, and it was planned (if I remember what I read) such that people live far apart, it's hard to get from one part of town to another, and there's no effective commercial center to attract visitors. I've never been there, but the Aussies I know do tend to sneer at it. I think they regard it as a giant suburb out in the middle of nowhere.


Not unlike other national capitals that were spun from whole cloth like Washington and Brasilia.
   21. Swedish Chef Posted: January 26, 2008 at 11:27 PM (#2676677)
Older planned capitals:
Alexanderia 332BC
Istanbul 330AD
St Petersburg 1703AD

Great cities all, just give Canberra a couple of centuries.
   22. 1k5v3L Posted: January 26, 2008 at 11:41 PM (#2676684)
Istanbul 330AD


A fan of They Might Be Giants, I see...
   23. JH (in DC) Posted: January 27, 2008 at 12:00 AM (#2676689)
Older planned capitals:
Alexanderia 332BC
Istanbul 330AD
St Petersburg 1703AD

Great cities all, just give Canberra a couple of centuries.


This is very true. Canberra is less than 100 years old as a major city. In 1900, Washington, D.C. was a total backwater, until the pMcMillan Plan, and even for a while after that.

So, yes, Canberra not a great culture center now, but its memorials are solid (and on beautiful panoramic lines), and it has potential.
   24. Bernal Diaz has an angel on his shoulder Posted: January 27, 2008 at 12:09 AM (#2676692)
I had really good Japanese food down the road from the emabassy in Canberra. Long story.
   25. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: January 27, 2008 at 12:24 AM (#2676699)
Oh? Do tell.
   26. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: January 27, 2008 at 12:31 AM (#2676700)
I enjoyed DC quite a bit when I lived there as well, and it was a complete backwater, outshone by Richmond to the south and Balitmore to the north, quite literally for more than a century. Having never been to Canberra, I can't really speak to it on certain levels, but it does have a couple of disadvantages that DC does not. DC, though happenstance or otherwise I don't know enough to say, ended up as part of a nearly-continuous strip of settled land stretching from northern Virginia up into New England. As the national capitol, it turned into one of many natural centers of culture. I suppose this is possible with Canberra, but Canberra isn't really between anywhere and anywhere else -- it does have Sydney to the north and Melbourne to the south, but it's not part of a contiguous coastline, along a natural travel route, or anything else. It was chosen at least partially for its remoteness, so it would not appear to favor either of the country's two dominant cities. It also was built as a "garden city", which makes it physically nice to look at but purposefully cut off from itself -- it was purposefully built spread out, like a suburb, and subsequent delevopments in the area of vehicular tranportation have meant that there is no real incentive to build up rather than out. It could be that in another sixty years or so Canberra will be a very cool place in the way that Sydney and Melbourne are, but I doubt it.
   27. Bernal Diaz has an angel on his shoulder Posted: January 27, 2008 at 12:36 AM (#2676703)
Oh? Do tell.


I don;t think you have the proper clearance. It is not that interesting anyhow.
   28. Phil Coorey is a T-Shirt Salesman Posted: January 28, 2008 at 01:35 AM (#2677238)
I think it's notorious for lacking completely in culture or community. It's a planned community on a massive scale, and it was planned (if I remember what I read) such that people live far apart, it's hard to get from one part of town to another, and there's no effective commercial center to attract visitors. I've never been there, but the Aussies I know do tend to sneer at it. I think they regard it as a giant suburb out in the middle of nowhere.

Perfect description of the ########
   29. Steve Parris, Je t'aime Posted: January 29, 2008 at 02:49 AM (#2678116)
Does Canberra have a hickish rep in Australia?

I think it's notorious for lacking completely in culture or community. Does Canberra have a hickish rep in Australia?


The Bill Bryson book about Australia read like a love letter to the country, but the only uncomplimentary things he had to say were about Canberra - sterile, without culture, etc.
   30. jwb Posted: January 29, 2008 at 05:00 AM (#2678204)
St Petersburg 1703AD
I have never understood why we English speakers refer to that city as "St." Petersburg. It is not named after the Christian keeper of the Pearly Gates, but after Tsar Peter the Great, who founded it. In Russian, it is "Petrograd," which translates more or less to Petersburg. St. Petersburg would be something like "Gorod Piotra Blazhenovo."

"Petrograd" would be a cool name for a premium gasoline. "Your performance car will make the grade with Petrograd!" Porsche, dweeby looking guy, and hot chick zoom off on highway 101 or something.
   31. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: January 29, 2008 at 05:04 AM (#2678207)
No, no. It was only Petrograd from 1914 to 1924. Before that it was Saint Petersburg (yes, named like it was a German or Dutch city). Then in the Soviet Union it was Leningrad. Now it's back to being Saint Petersburg (Sankt-Peterburg).
   32. Swedish Chef Posted: January 29, 2008 at 05:08 AM (#2678208)
In Russian, it is "Petrograd," which translates more or less to Petersburg. St. Petersburg would be something like "Gorod Piotra Blazhenovo."


No, Petrograd is something that the Russians renamed it in 1914, because they thought ?????-?????????? sounded german. Which of course was Peter the Great's intention, westernizer as he was.

Nowadays it is ?????-??????????.
   33. Hugh Jorgan Posted: January 29, 2008 at 05:33 AM (#2678221)
Great cities all, just give Canberra a couple of centuries.

Phil has it right, Canberra is the country's pie-hole. Full of bogans and public service employees. It's the one major city here that is NOT located on a picturesque harbour or beachfront. Why would you live on island and live in the middle of it?

Its brutally hot in the summer and effing cold in the winter(by aussie standards), and besides as we say, "its the arsehole of australia as 10 million flies can't be wrong."
   34. Golfing Great Mitch Cumstein Posted: January 29, 2008 at 06:10 AM (#2678238)
It was cool to see "fortnight" in a present day baseball article.


In 1900, Washington, D.C. was a total backwater, until the pMcMillan Plan, and even for a while after that.

From what I have gathered from Washington Before the War and various historical markers around the city, DC was a small town compared to other East Coast cities, but it wasn't antiseptic and had developed some neighborhood charm. The New Deal and WWII changed the city into the metropolis it is today.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
greenback calls it soccer
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogTrevor Hoffman's Hall of Fame induction seems inevitable
(63 - 3:37pm, Sep 02)
Last: Sweatpants

NewsblogGleeman: Twins ask fans which brand of luxury car they are
(2 - 3:36pm, Sep 02)
Last: Robert in Manhattan Beach

NewsblogRule change means more players to choose from for postseason roster
(7 - 3:34pm, Sep 02)
Last: Gary Truth Serum

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-2-2014
(34 - 3:33pm, Sep 02)
Last: The Robby Hammock District (Dan Lee)

NewsblogThe indisputable selfishness of Derek Jeter
(6 - 3:31pm, Sep 02)
Last: AROM

NewsblogFG (Zimmerman): Alex Gordon, UZR, and Bad Left Field Defense
(47 - 3:25pm, Sep 02)
Last: Ron J2

NewsblogBPP: Why do people still think Jack Morris pitched to the score?
(24 - 3:21pm, Sep 02)
Last: JL

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread August, 2014
(1002 - 3:20pm, Sep 02)
Last: Commissioner Bud Black Beltre Hillman

NewsblogOT: Politics, September, 2014: ESPN honors Daily Worker sports editor Lester Rodney
(213 - 3:19pm, Sep 02)
Last: CrosbyBird

NewsblogBrewers prospect plays every position, all in one game
(10 - 3:17pm, Sep 02)
Last: zonk

NewsblogOT August 2014:  Wrassle Mania I
(103 - 3:16pm, Sep 02)
Last: Good cripple hitter

NewsblogPhoto of the day: Bill Murray, indy league ticket-taker
(119 - 3:15pm, Sep 02)
Last: GGC don't think it can get longer than a novella

NewsblogExtreme Moneyball: The Houston Astros Go All In on Data Analysis
(8 - 2:58pm, Sep 02)
Last: Ron J2

NewsblogAthletics Acquire Adam Dunn
(44 - 2:55pm, Sep 02)
Last: Ron J2

NewsblogOT: Monthly NBA Thread - September 2014
(11 - 2:54pm, Sep 02)
Last: tshipman

Page rendered in 0.1886 seconds
52 querie(s) executed