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Monday, October 31, 2011

Cardinals manager La Russa retires

As carsdfanboy just said…“Best manager in my lifetime and probably the past fifty years.”

The Cardinals announced this morning that manager Tony La Russa has retired after 16 seasons with the Cardinals.

“Tony leaves behind a legacy of success that will always be rememered as one of the most successful eras in Cardinals history,” chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. said at the announcement. “I knew this day would come. I just hoped that it wouldn’t.”

Repoz Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:14 PM | 168 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: cardinals

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   1. AndrewJ Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:18 PM (#3983219)
Did not see this coming.
   2. Dale Sams Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:21 PM (#3983223)
Neither did I...but talk about going out on top.
   3. A Random 8-Year-Old Eskimo Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:22 PM (#3983225)
I didn't see this coming either.

A fantastic career that culminated in a most improbable World Series victory.
   4. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:25 PM (#3983228)
Wow. Despite his prickliness, he did a great job for the A's back in the day. Definitely one of the greats. So kudos on a great career Tony and thanks for signing an autograph for my grandmother. Now lighten up, will ya?
   5. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:25 PM (#3983230)
Without checking, I think he's the first manager to retire after winning the World SEries. In fact, I think he's the first one to go out in the World Series.

From last year: 10 best managerial finales.

Only seven managers ever worked in five decades. Two retired last year (Torre and Cox) and two are retiring this year (LaRussa and McKeon). Plus we've also seen Lou Piniella and Cito Gaston go in the same time period.
   6. McCoy Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:25 PM (#3983231)
So when does he announce that he is taking the Astros' job? Before or after he gets the Clydesdale?
   7. AndrewJ Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:27 PM (#3983235)
So John McGraw's second-place on the all-time managerial wins list is still safe.
   8. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:27 PM (#3983236)
Without checking, I think he's the first manager to retire after winning the World SEries.

he is*--the only other examples in all of sports I can think of are Buck Shaw (1960 Iggles), John Wooden (1975 UCLA), Al McGuire (1977 Marquette), Howard Schnellengerger (1983 Miami)


*unless you count the weird Johnny Keane situation in 1964
   9. McCoy Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:27 PM (#3983238)
Things are looking up for the Cubs each passing day. Theo and Co. come to Chicago, Jocketty leaves the Cardinals but unfortunately goes to the Reds. But Dusty also goes to the Reds so it is still a win for the Cubs. The Astros are leaving the NL Central, Prince and Albert are free agents, and Tony is retiring from the Cards. What's next? The Hall announcing that Santo will be inducted?
   10. Dale Sams Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:29 PM (#3983241)
"LaRussa hangs up his shingle"...news at 10.
   11. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:29 PM (#3983242)
he is*--the only other examples in all of sports I can think of are Buck Shaw (1960 Iggles), John Wooden (1975 UCLA), Al McGuire (1977 Marquette), Howard Schnellengerger (1983 Miami)

Bill Walsh. At least from the NFL.
   12. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:30 PM (#3983243)
The Astros are leaving the NL Central

What, you WANT them to leave?
   13. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:30 PM (#3983244)
Schnellenberger did not retire after '83, he wanted to coach a newly relocated USFL team in Miami, but ultimately that whole thing blew up, the team went to Orlando, didn't want Howard, and he went to coach at Louisville in '85. Talk about stepping down.
   14. AndrewJ Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:30 PM (#3983245)
So who's in line to succeed him?
   15. The District Attorney Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:30 PM (#3983246)
So can they go get Rasmus back now?...

Ranking of video games piggybacking off a name:

7. World Series Baseball Starring Deion Sanders
6. Ken Griffey, Jr.'s Winning Run
5. Frank Thomas Big Hurt Baseball
4. Cal Ripken Real Baseball
3. Tony La Russa Baseball
2. Earl Weaver Baseball
1. RBI Baseball
   16. A Random 8-Year-Old Eskimo Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:32 PM (#3983249)
La Russa's career should be properly remembered, but this news also raises a host of interesting questions, such as who succeeds him, what happens to Dave Duncan and how does this impact the likelihood of Pujols returning?
   17. SoSH U at work Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:33 PM (#3983252)
So who's in line to succeed him?


Oquendo, right?

As was the case with all right-thinking people, I never liked him, but damn he was a hell of a skipper.

So can they go get Rasmus back now?...


If you think the Cards dumped him when his value was lowest, don't look at his numbers in Toronto.
   18. fra paolo Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:33 PM (#3983253)
So who is now the #1 active manager? Dave Johnson? Mike Scioscia? Dusty Baker?
   19. Benji Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:34 PM (#3983254)
Wow. I knew he was around awhile, but his age snuck up on me. He leaves on top with a masterful performance and I guess he'll be in my neck of the woods in 5 years. Will Duncan go too?
   20. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:34 PM (#3983257)
So John McGraw's second-place on the all-time managerial wins list is still safe.

Whoah - I forgot about that. Only 35 short, too.

However, Tony LaRussa won 62 games in the postseason and McGraw had 26. So if you include those . .. . LaRussa leads by ONE.

Whither Dave Duncan? He had health problems this year so I'll assume he's retiring, too.
   21. AndrewJ Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:35 PM (#3983260)
An amazing month or so of baseball ends with this poignant note.

Knowing when to leave might be the toughest decision in sports. Tony did it right.
   22. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:36 PM (#3983261)
So who is now the #1 active manager? Dave Johnson? Mike Scioscia? Dusty Baker?

In terms of wins - Jim Leyland, Dusty Baker, and Bruce Bochy.

In terms of games over .500: Davey Johnson, Mike Scioscia, Charlie Manuel.
   23. hokieneer Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:39 PM (#3983264)
Knowing when to leave might be the toughest decision in sports. He did it right.

I still don't understand this. I love(d) playing the game of baseball so much, I couldn't imagine not playing it just for sake of public image. I would be one of those players that retire when they stop offering me contracts, and I would enjoy every damn sub replacement year I could produce.
   24. SoSH U at work Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:40 PM (#3983266)
In terms of wins - Jim Leyland, Dusty Baker, and Bruce Bochy.


Damn, Dusty's record in Cincinnati is the exact same as it was in Chicago, 322-326.
   25. How Flounder got here, he hasn't a clue. Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:40 PM (#3983267)
Oquendo, right?


I would think so. At least he is the favorite of the internal canidates.

Also, it didn't last, but Dick Vermeil retired after the Rams SB win.
   26. Lassus Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:40 PM (#3983268)
McCarver also announces retirement, tune in for next year's World Series with Joe Buck and Tony LaRussa!


Anyhow, does this at all affect Pujols' decision?

And as I agreed with in the other thread, THAT's the way to retire, Tony.
   27. Matt Welch Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:41 PM (#3983269)
Now THAT'S how you do it.
   28. Andere Richtingen Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:41 PM (#3983270)
Copying and pasting my Lounge comment:

I’ve seen a lot of Tony LaRussa in my life, and grew to detest him, but fact is he was the second most interesting and entertaining manager around in my lifetime, so he will be missed. I also think he evolved from being an over-rated manager to a great one, primarily in his time in St. Louis. In his prior gigs, he seemed to be like most managers, prone to expiring after a few years and losing his touch in an organization. I’m sure that the Cardinals organization being what it is helped, but I think after those last few horrible years in Oakland he re-invented himself and truly mastered the role. He made plenty of mistakes but you can’t argue with the results. The Cardinals had so many success stories in his tenure, not just the championships, but the individuals who had so many great seasons.
   29. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:42 PM (#3983271)
Is Jose Oquendo the heir apparent or will they go outside the organization?
   30. toratoratora Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:43 PM (#3983273)
Wow.
Color me completely surprised. I thought Tony looked kind of old and a bit worn down at the Series press conferences (Especially the bullpen phone one) but this is just out of nowhere.
Fare thee well, Tony. I never cared much for you, and I never liked your teams, but you were a helluva manager (Call it Danny Ainge syndrome-love him when he's on your team but loathe him otherwise), the best of your era.And a pretty good era for managers it was.

Way to go out on top.

(Wonder what impact this will have on the Pujol's negotiations?)
   31. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:43 PM (#3983274)
he is*--the only other examples in all of sports I can think of are Buck Shaw (1960 Iggles), John Wooden (1975 UCLA), Al McGuire (1977 Marquette), Howard Schnellengerger (1983 Miami)


Larry Brown's last game as a college coach was upsetting Oklahoma in the '88 Finals. Not quite the same thing though.
   32. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:44 PM (#3983276)
   33. Bourbon Samurai in Asia Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:45 PM (#3983277)
Wow. Way to go out on top. I've always been a Larussa apologist, so I enjoyed him overcoming some of the sniping that came his way this year. Glad his legacy isn't the bullpen phone incident.
   34. Joey B.: posting for the kids of northeast Ohio Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:45 PM (#3983278)
I can't help but wonder if this is at least partly because he knows that Pujols isn't coming back.

In any event, what a career Mr. LaRussa, so congrats. You were always smarter than all the know-it-alls who like to delude themselves into thinking that they're smarter than you, and you got the last laugh in the end. Now for God's sake, don't drink and drive.
   35. Nasty Nate Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:47 PM (#3983282)
Its obviously because he accomplished his goal: he got a Budweiser clydesdale named after him...
   36. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:47 PM (#3983283)
So who is the last player who retired with such a milestone (2nd in wins) so obviously in reach? Mussina was a makeable but not guaranteed 30 wins from 300. Kaline at 399 HR?
   37. The Long Arm of Rudy Law Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:49 PM (#3983285)
Schnellenberger did not retire after '83, he wanted to coach a newly relocated USFL team in Miami, but ultimately that whole thing blew up, the team went to Orlando, didn't want Howard, and he went to coach at Louisville in '85. Talk about stepping down.


Schnellenberger is still coaching, but he's retiring after this year. It would be a huge story if Florida Atlantic sent him off with the national championship, since they're 0-6 and they're Florida Atlantic.
   38. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:50 PM (#3983287)
12 times his team finished in first place. 7 times his teams had a losing record*.

*8 if you include the 1986 White Sox, the only team to fire him - which GM Hawk Harrelson did in the first half of the season.
   39. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:50 PM (#3983288)
Always thought it was interesting that TLR was considered a big stat guy (and lauded for it), then kinda disavowed that label when "stat guy" became a dirty word associated with you nerdy sabermetricians. I was actually a TLR fan back in the day, despite his managing the hated Athletics, because I read "Men at Work" and found his analytical, stats-oriented, buck conventional wisdom-style refreshing. Then I found him to be a whiny insufferable jerk. But through it all he was always a great manager. Next stop, Cooperstown.
   40. Steve Sparks Flying Everywhere Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:51 PM (#3983289)
I think La Russa was on a one year deal this year because he was considering retiring after last year. Makes a lot of sense to go out on top.

I'm guessing there aren't any other MLB managers who are law school graduates now.
   41. The Yankee Clapper Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:51 PM (#3983290)
Even if LaRussa has zero interest, there will be some speculation about his availability for any prime managerial job that opens in the next few years.

Albert & Tony to the Cubs? They'd probably have to shoot that Clydesdale
   42. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:52 PM (#3983291)
QUESTION:
Could we get TOrre, Cox, and LaRussa going in the same year to Cooperstown?

IIRC, anyone over 65 has to be retired for a year and a half. The issue is when does the non-players election from the VC occur. Depending on how it works out, you might get all three in the same induction ceremony.
   43. SoSH U at work Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:54 PM (#3983292)
*8 if you include the 1986 White Sox, the only team to fire him - which GM Hawk Harrelson did in the first half of the season.


I think it's amazing that since the middle of 1979, he only spent three weeks not managing a club.
   44. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:54 PM (#3983293)
close to 50 years in MLB--as an 18 year old in 1963, he played in the game in which Early Wynn finally got his 300th
   45. SoSH U at work Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:57 PM (#3983297)
IIRC, anyone over 65 has to be retired for a year and a half. The issue is when does the non-players election from the VC occur. Depending on how it works out, you might get all three in the same induction ceremony.


Shouldn't it be at least three years out? Gillick beat out, among others, Billy Martin in the most recent Expansion Era election, and I'd think all three of those guys would be on the same ballot with Billy.
   46. Tricky Dick Posted: October 31, 2011 at 02:57 PM (#3983298)
What will Dave Duncan do? Stay with the Cardinals, or go elsewhere? I was under the impression that Duncan only stayed with the Cardinals' organization because of LaRussa.
   47. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:02 PM (#3983300)
Oldest currently employed managers:

1-30-43: Davey Johnson
1-4-44: Charlie Manuel
12-15-44: Jim Leyland
5-27-49: Terry Collins
6-15-49: Dusty Baker
4-29-52: Ron Washington
2-8-54: Joe Maddon
8-19-54: Ned Yost
4-16-55: Bruce Bochy
12-31-55: Jim Tracy
5-23-56: Buck Showalter
8-19-56: Ron Roenicke
1-19-57: Brad Mills
3-12-57: Mike Quade
5-28-57: Kirk Gibson
6-30-57: Bud Black
7-30-57: Clint Hurdle
10-24-57: Ron Gardenhire
11-27-58: Mike Scioscia
4-20-61: Don Mattingly
10-28-61: Bob Melvin
8-4-62: John Farrell
1-20-64: Ozzie Guillen
1-28-64: Fredi Gonzalez
10-14-64: Joe Girardi
7-14-67: Robin Ventura
1-27-68: Eric Wedge
1-11-69: Manny Acta

Johnson & Manuel are older than LaRussa.
   48. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:03 PM (#3983302)
However, Tony LaRussa won 62 games in the postseason and McGraw had 26. So if you include those . .. . LaRussa leads by ONE.

I count 70 postseason wins (70-57 in games, 16-11 in series)
   49. LionoftheSenate (Brewers v A's World Series) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:03 PM (#3983304)
he is*--the only other examples in all of sports I can think of are Buck Shaw (1960 Iggles), John Wooden (1975 UCLA), Al McGuire (1977 Marquette), Howard Schnellengerger (1983 Miami)


Bill Walsh was added. Schnellenberger was subtracted. Should add Tom Osborne to list.
   50. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:04 PM (#3983306)
Any chance he called the Cards to say he is "returning" and they thought he said "retiring"?
   51. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:04 PM (#3983307)
I think it's amazing that since the middle of 1979, he only spent three weeks not managing a club.

Yep. 33 years and missed only 3 weeks. It's about as long as John McGraw, who was there all the time from 1901-31. No break for McGraw, but LaRussa had a longer stretch of consecutive years managed. Connie Mack was the only one who lasted more consecutive years than LaRussa.
   52. Mark Armour Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:04 PM (#3983308)
Danny Murtaugh retired after winning the 1971 World Series. He came back later, but so might LaRussa.
   53. The District Attorney Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:05 PM (#3983310)
Any chance he called the Cards to say he is "returning" and they thought he said "retiring"?
If he did it over the bullpen phone, quite possibly.
   54. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:06 PM (#3983312)
Shouldn't it be at least three years out? Gillick beat out, among others, Billy Martin in the most recent Expansion Era election, and I'd think all three of those guys would be on the same ballot with Billy.

That's right. I forgot Gillick just wen tin this year.

I count 70 postseason wins (70-57 in games, 16-11 in series)

I'll recheck.

EDITED: rechecked - you're right. 70 postseason wins. Thanks for the correction.
   55. Gamingboy Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:10 PM (#3983321)
Woah. This was... not expected. At all. Helluva way to go out, though.

He'll be a Hall of Famer, for sure.
   56. Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:11 PM (#3983322)
LaRussa's retirement makes me feel a little older (I'm about to turn 38). My first year of paying attention to baseball was 1981 (tough year to start loving baseball), when I was 7 years old.

Last player active in 1981 who played major-league baseball: I believe it was Rickey Henderson, in 2003 (Julio Franco started in 1982, and played until 2007);

Last manager who managed in 1981 to remain active: Torre and Cox were active until 2010; McKeon and LaRussa through 2011. Do we think any of these four guy will manage a team again? Frank Robinson? LaRussa is the youngest - he just turned 67 years old.

Remaining stadia from 1981: Wrigley, Dodger Stadium, Fenway, Kaufmann. Oakland and Anaheim are in the same buildings, but both have been significantly changed. Wrigley and Fenway are obviously unique. As time goes by, the planning, location, and construction of Dodger Stadium (at a time when most other ballparks getting built were cookie-cutter concrete ashtrays) remains an amazing accomplishment. And the transformation of Kaufmann from Three Rivers Stadium to gorgeous ballpark is something, too.

I have to say, there's not much left from the days when LaRussa started. Third most wins. Second most games managed. Three rings - only five men have more rings. Made lasting changes to the game of baseball (if you said, "He manages like LaRussa," somebody would know what you meant). An all-timer.
   57. Dave Spiwak Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:13 PM (#3983324)
He's obviously stepping aside so the Cards can offer Pujols a player-manager contract.
   58. The Long Arm of Rudy Law Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:13 PM (#3983325)
I remember reading that La Russa was looking forward to spending some summer time with his family for the first time when the White Sox fired him in 1986.

Tony La Russa's Ultimate Baseball had a Commodore 64 version.
   59. Andere Richtingen Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:18 PM (#3983333)
Neither did I...but talk about going out on top.

No kidding. Even Red Schoendienst doesn't have a Clydesdale.
   60. zonk Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:20 PM (#3983335)
I'll set aside my TLR cattiness and agree that he's one of the best of all-time, but if we're talking last 50 years -- I'd still take Earl Weaver as my manager any day of the week, regardless of the numbers.
   61. Gamingboy Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:20 PM (#3983336)
Maybe Mark McGwire will be manager. (ducks)
   62. Don Malcolm Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:21 PM (#3983337)
Primey for #50.

Waiting for Brock's take on this.
   63. Karl from NY Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:23 PM (#3983340)
Great news for Lisa. Now she can root for a nice quality NL Central team without having to like TLR.
   64. Mike Webber Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:23 PM (#3983341)
1-27-68: Eric Wedge
1-11-69: Manny Acta


How can there be just one manager younger than me, while there are at least three GMs? That just seems weird.
   65. toratoratora Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:25 PM (#3983343)
close to 50 years in MLB--as an 18 year old in 1963, he played in the game in which Early Wynn finally got his 300th


Which brings to mind that TLR is a ringer for one of the great trivia questions I've ever heard:

Name the 3 men who started a game at SS as an 18 year old in the post `61 expansion era.
The hint is that all 3 are, or will be, in the HoF.
The other two are easy to guess, but TLR is the crusher.
   66. AROM Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:28 PM (#3983346)
Has there been a manager born in the 1970's yet? We've certainly had quite a few GMs from the decade.
   67. SoSH U at work Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:30 PM (#3983348)
A.J. Hinch.
   68. Perry Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:31 PM (#3983350)
I'm guessing Duncan retires too. They've been together forever, and Dunc's wife is seriously ill, he left the club for several weeks this year due to her illness.

Oquendo's been the heir apparent for many years, but... you never know. They might look for more of a sabr-guy. Francona?

I don't think it affects Pujols. He's looking for 8-10 years, and TLR was clearly year-to-year in any case. I don't think Albert would base an 8- to 10-year decision on who's going to be managing for only 1 or 2. It might have worked in the other direction -- Tony might know Albert's leaving, and that might have helped make up his mind.
   69. Karl from NY Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:38 PM (#3983353)
Name the 3 men who started a game at SS as an 18 year old in the post `61 expansion era.
The hint is that all 3 are, or will be, in the HoF.
The other two are easy to guess, but TLR is the crusher.

I guessed Ernie Banks and Ripken which were both wrong. Banks is way older than that and Ripken didn't debut until 20. Duh, one must be A-rod.
   70. phredbird Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:40 PM (#3983358)
very surprised. i thought he'd want one more year, but i guess he wants to avoid the headaches that are sure to come no matter what happens with the pujols signing. if they get him, expectations will be unreasonably high, if they don't get him, the universe will collapse in on itself.
   71. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:41 PM (#3983359)
I guessed Ernie Banks and Ripken, but Banks is way older than that. Duh, must be A-rod.


Ripken didn't start that young did he? I assumed A-Rod and Yount were the two players.
   72. SoSH U at work Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:43 PM (#3983364)
I guessed Ernie Banks and Ripken which were both wrong. Banks is way older than that and Ripken didn't debut until 20. Duh, one must be A-rod.


Yount would be the other.
   73. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:45 PM (#3983365)
Danny Murtaugh retired after winning the 1971 World Series. He came back later, but so might LaRussa.

If you add temporary retirements to the list of eligibles, I doubt if any manager's ever had a greater sendoff than Earl Weaver in 1982. His team lost the division title to the Brewers in the final game of the season in a 10-2 blowout, and the entire crowd remained for a full 15 minutes after the final out to give him a standing ovation.

--------------------------------

How can there be just one manager younger than me, while there are at least three GMs? That just seems weird.

I'm not sure which makes me feel more like the glue factory's around the corner, the fact that there are only two managers older than me, or that there are already two younger ex-Presidents.
   74. The Long Arm of Rudy Law Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:50 PM (#3983369)
Has there been a manager born in the 1970's yet? We've certainly had quite a few GMs from the decade.


A.J. Hinch.


Brandon Hyde managed a game too.
   75. esseff Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:50 PM (#3983371)
*unless you count the weird Johnny Keane situation in 1964


Bill Walsh was added. Schnellenberger was subtracted. Should add Tom Osborne to list.


Keane didn't retire. He jumped from a championship team to another team, by choice and instantaneously (i.e., no retirement interval like, say, Vermeil).

Walsh was head coach at Stanford after leaving as coach of the 49ers.

Those guys are part of a sub-group of men who chose to step down from their teams after a championship but did not retire (EDIT: for good) from managing/coaching.
   76. esseff Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:54 PM (#3983375)
If you add temporary retirements to the list of eligibles, I doubt if any manager's ever had a greater sendoff than Earl Weaver in 1982. His team lost the division title to the Brewers in the final game of the season in a 10-2 blowout, and the entire crowd remained for a full 15 minutes after the final out to give him a standing ovation.


Sounds like last year's NLDS, when the Giants, having just won a postseason series, interrupted their pig pile to join the salute to Cox.
   77. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:57 PM (#3983379)
I definitely did see this coming -- LaRussa has seemed a bit weary in recent seasons, and this gives him a chance to go out on top. I wish I had posted my prediction after Game 7.
   78. SouthSideRyan Posted: October 31, 2011 at 03:59 PM (#3983384)
Any chance he called the Cards to say he is "returning" and they thought he said "retiring"?


Hmmmmm slurred speech joke or bullpen phone joke?
   79. Mike Emeigh Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:01 PM (#3983385)
Did not see this coming.


I suspected it might, so I am not entirely surprised by this. LaRussa seemed to be getting tired of the sturm und drang with the media by the end of the year, and there were just a lot of other little signs that indicated to me that he might be about ready to call it a career. I'm not even sure TLR would have come back had the Cardinals lost.

-- MWE
   80. toratoratora Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:03 PM (#3983386)
I guessed Ernie Banks and Ripken which were both wrong. Banks is way older than that and Ripken didn't debut until 20. Duh, one must be A-rod.



Yount would be the other.


Yep.
   81. Heinie Mantush (Krusty) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:04 PM (#3983388)
I think St. Louis' desire to keep Pujols just go stronger. I think Pujols' desire to stay in St. Louis just got weaker.
   82. shock Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:08 PM (#3983392)


I suspected it might, so I am not entirely surprised by this. LaRussa seemed to be getting tired of the sturm und drang with the media by the end of the year, and there were just a lot of other little signs that indicated to me that he might be about ready to call it a career. I'm not even sure TLR would have come back had the Cardinals lost.


Making predictions after the fact is so easy!
   83. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:13 PM (#3983400)
Making predictions after the fact is so easy!

I knew someone would say that.
   84. Tom Nawrocki Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:14 PM (#3983401)

Making predictions after the fact is so easy!


I predicted this yesterday.
   85. Ron J Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:14 PM (#3983402)
#81 Maybe he'd be interested in a full time player manager gig (as opposed to only when he's batting)

I posted it as a lame joke, but on reflection I could sort of see this.
   86. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:23 PM (#3983411)
Hmmmmm slurred speech joke or bullpen phone joke?


Yes.
   87. Perry Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:24 PM (#3983412)
TLR: I'm retiring.
Cards fans: Now??? Today??? Can't you just let us enjoy the moment?
TLR: The moment's over.
   88. The elusive Robert Denby Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:25 PM (#3983414)
World Series Baseball Starring Deion Sanders

It's like having a punter as the face of your football video game franchise.
   89. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:31 PM (#3983418)
I predicted this yesterday.

You and Mike Imrem both.
   90. AndrewJ Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:32 PM (#3983420)
"You quit when you quit," Bill Bradley once said. "What law says you have to leave when you're on top? How do you even know?" I suspect Tony knew.
   91. Heinie Mantush (Krusty) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:33 PM (#3983422)

I posted it as a lame joke, but on reflection I could sort of see this.


I could, too. However, Pujols would need a grizzled bench coach to help him through the first couple of years. Purely hypothetically, do you think Pujols would leave some money on the table if the DeWitt's really handed him the team and said "Player/manager, and major input in personnel decisions"? I think that would be the sort of respect that would appeal to Pujols.
   92. shock Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:34 PM (#3983423)

I knew someone would say that.


Brilliant.

On an unrelated topic, today I learned that SoSH U and SoSHially Unacceptable are not necessarily the same person.
   93. PreservedFish Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:35 PM (#3983425)
World Series Baseball Starring Deion Sanders

It's like having a punter as the face of your football video game franchise.


Deion Sanders hit .533 in the World Series.
   94. bunyon Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:36 PM (#3983429)
#81 Maybe he'd be interested in a full time player manager gig (as opposed to only when he's batting)

I posted it as a lame joke, but on reflection I could sort of see this.


If that is what it takes for St. Louis to keep him, they should do it.
   95. base ball chick Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:40 PM (#3983432)
Karl from NY Posted: October 31, 2011 at 11:23 AM (#3983340)

Great news for Lisa. Now she can root for a nice quality NL Central team without having to like TLR.


- correctamundo
i've got a few more weeks to find out if houston is gonna have a baseball team after the end of the 2012 season - and if not, then i guess it's gonna be saint looey. even though i kind of want to root for braves and pirates too...
   96. AndrewJ Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:40 PM (#3983433)
Pujols as manager? We haven't had a player-manager since Pete Rose 25 years ago. I like it.
   97. Spahn Insane Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:45 PM (#3983438)
Hm. This almost makes the Cards' world series win worth it. Almost.

In any event, he's got my respect, if not anything resembling my affection. Annoying as he is, he was damned good at what he did.
   98. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:48 PM (#3983440)

Pujols as manager? We haven't had a player-manager since Pete Rose 25 years ago. I like it.


LaRussa was making $2.8 million/year. Add that to a reasonable if less-than-max Pujols contract, and Albert might sign it.
   99. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:48 PM (#3983441)

Pujols as manager? We haven't had a player-manager since Pete Rose 25 years ago. I like it.


He plays small-ball too much, calling hit-and-runs at inopportune times.
   100. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: October 31, 2011 at 04:54 PM (#3983443)
Congrats Tony
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