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Monday, October 01, 2018

Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (October 2018)

Over the past eight months EW has stalked [Jamie Lee] Curtis and the rest of the Halloween crew — though hopefully in a much less threatening manner than Michael Myers tracks Laurie Strode. The result is a story which includes interviews with Curtis, [David Gordon] Green, [Danny] McBride, [John] Carpenter, and Nick Castle, who once again makes an appearance as Myers in the new film, 40 years after playing the slasher icon in the original movie.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: October 01, 2018 at 09:32 AM | 254 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   1. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 01, 2018 at 11:48 AM (#5756252)
532. PreservedFish Posted: October 01, 2018 at 09:39 AM (#5756121)
Right, so how do we watch movies nowadays? I guess you just pay the $3-4 to watch on Amazon? We actually use our library. A couple years ago we were in a months-long queue with all the local grandmas to see Spotlight after it won the Oscar.

I make it to the theater 2-3 times a month still. Beyond that, everything I see is through my library or streaming services (I subscribe to FilmStruck, MUBI, Netflix and Amazon Prime.)
   2. McCoy Posted: October 01, 2018 at 12:00 PM (#5756267)
Looks like I'll be spending a weekend in DC this December to meet up with old friends. Haven't really been back in two years. What's new? I would like to see all the new additions to the Union market area since I left. Any other areas besides the Wharf (which I imagine will be too cold to really hang out at) get completed in DC? Any new restaurants to check out?
   3. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 01, 2018 at 12:11 PM (#5756277)
Oh, and my wife has Hulu, which is great because I learned yesterday that Aaron Katz’s newest movie (Gemini) is on there; I had been holding out hope that I might get to see it in the theater but, alas....
   4. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 01, 2018 at 12:48 PM (#5756324)
Right, so how do we watch movies nowadays? I guess you just pay the $3-4 to watch on Amazon? We actually use our library. A couple years ago we were in a months-long queue with all the local grandmas to see Spotlight after it won the Oscar.


Mostly by getting DVDs from the library. I've only seen a few movies in the theater over the last five or so years, maybe one a year, and they've all been anime. I don't subscribe to Netflix, Amazon, or Hulu, etc., but I do subscribe to Crunchyroll and HIDIVE, but more for TV series than movies.
   5. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 01, 2018 at 01:47 PM (#5756433)
“Arts & Faith” present their list of the Top 100 Films

Looks like....6 by Bergman, 6 by Tarkovsky, 5 by the Dardennes, 5 by Bresson....They certainly have their favorites!

(The saddest omission to me is Lee Chang-dong’s Secret Sunshine, which IMO is the most thoughtful meditation on faith and repentance and forgiveness ever captured on film.)
   6. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 01, 2018 at 05:19 PM (#5756907)
DAVO PRESENTS: THE MOVIES OF 2018

EXCELLENT
(none)

VERY GOOD
1. Happy End
2. Sorry To Bother You
3. Madeline's Madeline

GOOD
4. Hereditary
5. Fahrenheit 11/9
6. Smallfoot
7. Support the Girls
8. Paddington 2
9. Tik Tik Tik
10. A Futile and Stupid Gesture
11. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
12. Christopher Robin
13. The Death of Stalin


ABOVE REPLACEMENT (IE BETTER THAN WATCHING A BLANK SCREEN)
14. King Lear
15. Annihilation
16. Mission: Impossible --Fallout


REPLACEMENT LEVEL
17. Peter Rabbit
17. Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation
17. Incredibles 2
17. Disobedience

BELOW REPLACEMENT (IE WORSE THAN WATCHING A BLANK SCREEN)
21. A Simple Favor
22. Mom and Dad
23. Skyscraper
24. Won't You Be My Neighbor
25. Solo: A Star Wars Story

AGGRESSIVELY TERRIBLE
26. The 15:17 to Paris
27. Unfriended: Dark Web
   7. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 01, 2018 at 06:34 PM (#5756964)
BELOW REPLACEMENT (IE WORSE THAN WATCHING A BLANK SCREEN)
22. Mom and Dad


I found it pretty fun. Granted, I'm predisposed to favor anything that falls just about anywhere on the horror spectrum (except for so-called torture porn, I guess -- no thanks), but still.

Otherwise, I think I've seen only Death of Stalin & Annihilation on your list. I'd probably move the latter up to "Good" & Stalin up to "Very Good." I'm not much for comedies most of the time, but I enjoyed that one.

Courtesy of Netflix, Hereditary is sitting on my shelf waiting for me to finish Dead Night.
   8. PreservedFish Posted: October 01, 2018 at 06:45 PM (#5756969)
Gef, you might have missed my question for you in the end of the Sept thread. I watched a Korean zombie flick last night, Train to Busan. It was entertaining but I was frustrated by one inconsistency: the science of zombiefication changed depending on the character's emotional heft. Extras would change from human to full zombie in about 10 seconds, but when major characters got bit, the process took several minutes, enough time for them to consider the horror of the moment, make plans for their inevitable demise, etc. You're the zombie expert - would this bother you?
   9. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 01, 2018 at 06:46 PM (#5756970)
Finally getting a chance (very busy at work today) to respond to this post from this morning) ...


527. PreservedFish Posted: October 01, 2018 at 08:33 AM (#5756086)
There's one thing I wanted to ask gef about, given his marvelous experience with the genre. One thing that bothered me about the movie is that the rules of infection were inconsistent, depending on the emotional heft of the moment. Unimportant characters changed into zombies within about 10 seconds of being bit, but important characters instead took several minute to progress from bite to zombiefication, long enough to realize what was happening, to think deeply on their predicament, to make arrangements for the inevitable, etc. Would that bother you?


Can't say it bothers me. One of the excuses commonly given for varying times of conversion (for lack of a better word) is that often that's how regular ol' diseases work with people. You might get the flu 4 days after exposure to someone carrying it; I might do so in 10 hours. (Note: I have no idea of whether these are reasonable intervals or not.) Etc. etc. etc.

And let's face it, in real life truly interesting people get considerably more time to do interesting things than boring people do to do boring things.

Uh ... don't they?
   10. AndrewJ Posted: October 01, 2018 at 07:22 PM (#5756993)
EW has stalked [Jamie Lee] Curtis and the rest of the Halloween crew

Jamie and husband Christopher Guest were good friends with Richie Ashburn.
   11. Voodoo Posted: October 01, 2018 at 08:45 PM (#5757042)
And let's face it, in real life truly interesting people get considerably more time to do interesting things than boring people do to do boring things.


This boring-ass post took no time at all, right?
   12. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 01, 2018 at 08:59 PM (#5757051)
But still more than yours.
   13. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 02, 2018 at 12:12 AM (#5757107)
Ansel Elgort to Star in Steven Spielberg's 'West Side Story'

Baby Driver star Ansel Elgort has nabbed the male lead in Steven Spielberg’s upcoming take on West Side Story.

The actor will play Tony, a role first portrayed by Larry Kert in the original 1957 Broadway musical. Richard Beymer played the part in the classic 1961 movie.

Oscar-nominated screenwriter and Pulitzer Prize winner Tony Kushner has written the adaptation of the musical originally penned by Arthur Laurents and Stephen Sondheim with music by Leonard Bernstein.


Here's a clip of Mr Elgort singing on a tonight show. And we already know he can dance, so..... yay?
   14. Lassus Posted: October 02, 2018 at 08:22 AM (#5757145)
And we already know he can dance, so..... yay?

From Baby Driver? No, that's not Robbins dancing. (He may be able to dance West Side, but that film's not an indication of what's required.) Tom Holland is a real triple threat, and classically trained, so I would - based on the little we know - trust him a lot more. (I don't mean to harsh on Elgort - he'll probably be good.)
   15. BDC Posted: October 02, 2018 at 09:26 AM (#5757159)
Oscar-nominated screenwriter and Pulitzer Prize winner Tony Kushner has written the adaptation of the musical originally penned by Arthur Laurents and Stephen Sondheim with music by Leonard Bernstein


The scene where the ghost of Ethel Rosenberg says Kaddish over Bernardo's body may surprise viewers.
   16. BDC Posted: October 02, 2018 at 09:30 AM (#5757162)
And speaking of American classics, I started reading The Sun Also Rises yesterday. I have mixed feelings about it. I loved the book when I first read it, in high school, and I've read it a few times since, always annoyed by some things and admiring others. It's a strange book to have become a classic.

I realized that I first read The Sun Also Rises 46 years ago, in 1972. Hemingway had published it 46 years earlier, in 1926. This is happening to me more and more: some ancient event is as far from some point in my life when I first heard of it, as I am from that point now.
   17. BDC Posted: October 02, 2018 at 09:44 AM (#5757172)
And … RIP Charles Aznavour, age 94.
   18. PreservedFish Posted: October 02, 2018 at 09:51 AM (#5757178)
I devoured most of Hemingway when I was a young man. To be honest, half of the appeal was the lifestyle porn, the idea of traipsing around the Basque Country with my own wineskin, of being young and hungry and ambitious in Paris, of learning Italian in bed with my Italian mistress, and so on. I haven't read any of the big novels in well over a decade, and am really not sure how I'd feel if I revisited them. I think I'd be better equipped to enjoy his prose, but probably less likely to buy his brave and polished self-image hook line and sinker.

Last night I watched The Trip to Spain. I love these movies. They don't talk about Hemingway but it plays constantly on the romanticism of being a young man abroad - Steve Coogan is reading Laurie Lee's As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning (or at least he carries it around and lets people see that he's reading it), and planning to write a book about his own peregrinations in Spain when he was 18 years old, a book he'll never actually start writing of course, about experiences that probably weren't terribly interesting, the joke being that Coogan thinking that he could or should produce a book a sign of his unearned pretension. At one point they meet a handsome young Brit that is himself traveling around Spain, funding his endless journey by busking with his guitar in the streets, living the life that Coogan never actually had and now, being middle-aged, never could have. Coogan gets so jealous that he leaves in a huff. I saw a lot of myself in Coogan's character. I tend to think that I'm "the type of person" that would buy a one-way ticket to Europe and cruise around having unforgettable experiences, but in reality I'm the type of person that has a boring family life in America and is extremely lucky to plan a cross-Atlantic trip with my expensive kids once every few years.
   19. PreservedFish Posted: October 02, 2018 at 10:28 AM (#5757215)
There's a Woody Allen movie where Allen moves to Paris, the Left Bank, rents a studio and plays guitar and tries to capture a romantic youthful life. I don't recall which film, he only plays a minor character. I think it was one of his 90s ones, before he started mostly using younger actors. He's 50+ years old and he looks frankly ridiculous but I couldn't tell if that was the joke or if it was a totally earnest part of him that still wanted to be romantic and youthful in Paris.
   20. BDC Posted: October 02, 2018 at 11:02 AM (#5757241)
I haven't read any of the big novels in well over a decade, and am really not sure how I'd feel if I revisited them. I think I'd be better equipped to enjoy his prose, but probably less likely to buy his brave and polished self-image hook line and sinker


I re-read A Farewell to Arms a few years ago and still found it very powerful. I also read Death in the Afternoon recently, largely for "work," and found it mostly infuriating (though here and there, there's an amazing paragraph or two about death, machismo, cruelty, fate, etc.)

But even when I was young and much into Hemingway, I did not like For Whom the Bell Tolls at all, and I have little interest in re-reading The Old Man and the Sea.

I think Hemingway had a wry take on his own American-abroadness. The Sun Also Rises is full of name-dropping of Paris places in a way that can be evocative or annoying (or just boring if you have no interest in the Paris street map). But once in a while he makes this kind of observation:

We ate dinner at Madame Lecomte’s restaurant … It was crowded with Americans and we had to stand up and wait for a place. Some one had put it on the American Women’s Club list as a quaint restaurant on the Paris quais as yet untouched by Americans, so we had to wait forty-five minutes for a table.


All but name-checking Rick Steves, thirty years before the poor guy was born :(

   21. PreservedFish Posted: October 02, 2018 at 11:17 AM (#5757260)
Mary McCarthy's Venice Observed has a section where she recounts the 300+ year tradition of tourists complaining that Venice had already been ruined by other tourists.

When it comes to eating in Paris, AJ Liebling's Between Meals is probably the best thing I've read. The Orwell book Down and Out in Paris and London also has some choice sections for those interested in the food service industry, with reportage both exotic and timeless.
   22. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: October 02, 2018 at 11:24 AM (#5757266)
The Orwell book Down and Out in Paris and London also has some choice sections for those interested in the food service industry, with reportage both exotic and timeless.


Ah, the life of the plongeur, that sounded so fun!

(It's a great book and I love me some Orwell)
   23. Lassus Posted: October 02, 2018 at 11:35 AM (#5757277)
Mary McCarthy's Venice Observed has a section where she recounts the 300+ year tradition of tourists complaining that Venice had already been ruined by other tourists.

I have this book, and Mary McCarthy is awesome.
   24. PreservedFish Posted: October 02, 2018 at 11:54 AM (#5757292)
I've never read another word of hers, and only vaguely know her as a kind of midcentury public intellectual. I just picked the book up in a secondhand shop. She's ####### smart, so smart and so self-conscious of everything that it can be overwhelming. I get the feeling she couldn't ever just write a little regular traveler's sentence about the sun rising over the water or the pigeons of St Mark's square or a widow sweeping a doorstep without getting deep into what Ruskin or Byron have already said about it, or without reflecting on the tourist's gaze or whatnot.
   25. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 02, 2018 at 12:34 PM (#5757348)
In genre TV news, it sounds like Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series is going to be made into a TV series on Amazon (for reals this time, they swear).
   26. Lassus Posted: October 02, 2018 at 12:37 PM (#5757351)
re: 24 - She was an alum icon from my school, which rather fits in to your description.
   27. Hysterical & Useless Posted: October 02, 2018 at 01:14 PM (#5757390)
Mary McCarthy vs Lillian Hellman, one of the great literary feuds of the 20th century. And McCarthy's assessment of Hellman, one of the great putdowns ever:

Every word she writes is a lie, including "and" and "the."
   28. Morty Causa Posted: October 02, 2018 at 01:37 PM (#5757421)
Mary McCarthy is also the sister of noted B-movie leading actor and A-movie supporting actor, Kevin McCarthy, who was especially prominent in the '50s and '60s. You may remember him from the original The Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

I think most everyone who knew Mary agreed she was a grade-A #####. But, then, so was Hellman, who also may have been a phony. Gore Vidal comments somewhere in re her long-term relationship with Dashiell Hammett, "Did anyone ever actually see them together?" I have a vague memory of seeing Mary McCarthy on late night TV, Cavett probably. Don't remember anything she said. She was married for a while to another prominent public intellectual and literary critic, the gargantuan Edmund Wilson.
   29. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 02, 2018 at 02:36 PM (#5757502)
Mary McCarthy is also the sister of noted B-movie leading actor and A-movie supporting actor, Kevin McCarthy, who was especially prominent in the '50s and '60s. You may remember him from the original The Invasion of the Body Snatchers.


Huh. Had no idea.
   30. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 03, 2018 at 01:41 PM (#5759434)
So I am a big comic book guy (from back in the day, not as much now) and I like comic book movies in general (and really all genre movies honestly), but the Venom trailers left me completely cold and uninterested. I figured it was because I was not that into the anti-hero stuff or maybe my vague dislike of the character, but based on the early reviews I read it seems to be just a bad movie.
   31. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 03, 2018 at 02:47 PM (#5759508)
Venom came along about 5 years after I stopped following comics, but when I learned some 2 decades after the fact about the character & concept & how popular it was I was appalled, & I remain so today. Then again, I'm pretty much a strict constructionist when it comes to Marvel's & DC's core characters, to the point that even at age 11 I found the 6-armed Spidey stunt circa ASM #100 cringingly stupid. (The "Kryptonite No More" arc for Superman was around the same time, I guess, & I had no use for it, either.)

I'm slooooowllllyyyyy adjusting to a reality wherein the X-Men aren't just Cyclops, Marvel Girl, Ice-Man & the Beast.
   32. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 03, 2018 at 02:53 PM (#5759518)
Also, Bucky has been dead since 1945.

I'm Unfrozen Caveman Comics Fan, & I approve this message.
   33. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 03, 2018 at 04:14 PM (#5759604)
I'm slooooowllllyyyyy adjusting to a reality wherein the X-Men aren't just Cyclops, Marvel Girl, Ice-Man & the Beast.


Angel cries in a corner for not being included.
   34. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 03, 2018 at 04:41 PM (#5759633)
As well he should. The Scarlet Witch scrambled my brain. Or something.
   35. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 03, 2018 at 06:49 PM (#5759741)
I present:

THE MOST ANTICIPATED MOVIES OF 2019, ACCORDING TO THE PEOPLE I FOLLOW ON LETTERBOXD:

1. The Beach Bum (dir Harmony Korine, starring Matthew McConaughey, Zac Efron, Snoop Dogg, and Jimmy Buffett)
2. The Irishman (dir Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci)
3. Ad Astra (dir James Gray, starring Brad Pitt and Tommy Lee Jones)
4. Ferrari (dir Michael Mann, starring Hugh Jackman and Noomi Rapace
5. Blessed Virgin (dir Paul Verhoeven, starring Virginie Efria and Lambert Wilson)
6. Monster Hunter (dir Paul WS Anderson, starring Milla Jovovich)
7. Captain Marvel (dir Anna Boden, starring Brie Larson and Jude Law)
8. Where'd You Go, Bernadette (dir Richard Linklater, starring Cate Blanchett and Kristen Wiig)
9. Godzilla: King of the Monsters (dir Michael Dougherty, starring Kyle Chandler and Vera Farmiga and Godzilla)
10. Dune (dir Denis Villeneuve, starring Timothee Chalamet)

11. Blossoms (dir Wong Kar-wai, starring Kris Wu)
12. Untitled Avengers Movie (dir Russos, starring the Supes)
13. The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part (dir Mike Mitchell, starring legos)
14. Lights Out (dir Brian De Palma, starring ???)
15. Toy Story 4 (dir Josh Cooley, starring toys)
16. Freakshift (dir Ben Wheatley, starring Alicia Vikander and Armie Hammer)
17. Star Wars 9 (dir JJ Abrams, starring Chewbacca)
18. The New Mutants (dir Josh Boone, starring Anya Taylor-Joy and Maisie Williams)
19. Glass (dir M Night Shyamalan, starring Bruce Willis, James McAvoy, Samuel L Jackson)
20. Us (dir Jordan Peele, starring Lupita Nyong'o and Elisabeth Moss)
   36. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 03, 2018 at 06:51 PM (#5759743)
I am ALL ####### IN on 6 and 19.
   37. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 03, 2018 at 07:06 PM (#5759755)
A very good new track from Tangerine, "Local Mall". A bit less rock than previous releases, but still strong songwriting.
   38. Hot Wheeling American, MS-13 Enthusiast Posted: October 03, 2018 at 07:07 PM (#5759756)
Have been home with a flu diagnosis since Sunday. Will hopefully be back in the office tomorrow, which brings to a close the flu film festival:

Minding the Gap (Hulu) - documentary about skateboarding friends from Rockford, Illinois. But about much more. Strong recommendation.

Too Funny to Fail: The Life and Death of The Dana Carvey Show (Hulu) - the absence of Louis CK and Charlie Kaufman was glaring, but I don't know if they would have added much substantively, just some more color. A good sit for nostalgia purposes, but not essential viewing.

The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling (HBO) - touching tribute of a friend by Apatow

My Fair Lady (TCM) - (i) Audrey Hepburn is gorgous; and (ii) I've had the tune to 'Wouldn't it be Loverly' in my head for days :(

Mulholland Drive (Blu-Ray, Criterion Collection) - first time watching it. Half way through - 'when's my mind gonna get ######??'. Two thirds in - 'whaaaaaa'. After - read as much as I can, keep thinking about it. Impressed it lived up to the hype. Will it live up to...a second viewing??

It Happened One Night (TCM) - gimme more of Clark Gable's charachters putting down female leads, please.

Blade (Netflix) - holds up! Lean, even at two hours. Even most of the effects held up for me.

The Spirit of the Beehive (TCM) - absolutely nothing to say!
   39. Hot Wheeling American, MS-13 Enthusiast Posted: October 03, 2018 at 07:09 PM (#5759758)
I watched the trailer for Holmes and Watson, starring Ferrell and Reilly, and didn't laugh once :(
   40. Howie Menckel Posted: October 03, 2018 at 08:16 PM (#5759821)
Peggy Sue, who inspired Buddy Holly's song about 60 years ago, died this week.

her contribution to cinema is that indirectly she inspired a movie called "Peggy Sue Got Married," which featured Nicolas Cage in the worst acting performance in movie history.
   41. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 03, 2018 at 08:34 PM (#5759841)
39- I didn’t either. But I’m 100% buying what they’re selling (“Step Brothers” is spectacular) so I’m in.
   42. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 05, 2018 at 10:23 AM (#5760981)
her contribution to cinema is that indirectly she inspired a movie called "Peggy Sue Got Married," which featured Nicolas Cage in the worst acting performance in movie history


I wanted to like "Peggy Sue Got Married," I really did. But man that was not a good movie. Nicolas Cage is an actor who is occasionally good (maybe even very good), but in total I really fail to see why he ha the status he does. He is a character actor who mysteriously is treated like a leading man.
   43. BDC Posted: October 05, 2018 at 11:13 AM (#5761031)
One of the problems in parodying Sherlock Holmes is that parodies of Holmes began to appear practically before the ink was dry on the original publications. As a result, relatively "serious" versions like William Gillette's play, the Basil Rathbone movies, and the Cumberbatch/Freeman TV series have always had built-in elements of parody and self-parody. Heck, the original stories had some self-parody in them, though at times they also go for serious drama.

So it's a very tired concept. The Mel Brooks troupe made Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother, but Brooks himself didn't get involved, perhaps because it was too much of a stationary target even for him. You have to either go really clever and engage the serious fan element, or you have to go really, really stupid. Little doubt about which way this new one will go. The question is maybe whether it will be stupid enough. I sense from the trailer a certain amount of just showing up in costume and assuming that a takeoff of Sherlock Holmes will automatically be funny, but that's not a good assumption.
   44. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 05, 2018 at 12:24 PM (#5761118)
Formatting a long list of names right now, & I must say that "Maximus" is not a first name I would've expected with what is obviously a hyphenated Vietnamese surname.
   45. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 05, 2018 at 12:29 PM (#5761123)
Courtesy of Netflix, Hereditary is sitting on my shelf waiting for me to finish Dead Night.


Halfway through Hereditary right now (as I think I've mentioned before, over the last couple of years or so I've developed the horrible habit of pretty much limiting my movie-watching to 30ish-minute intervals grabbed before I start getting ready for work), & so far so good. I've found yet again that if I hadn't checked the IMDb credits, I'd have had no idea that Toni Collette is one of the leads. The woman is an absolute chameleon, at least in my (no doubt weakening) eyes.

Dead Night was shockingly better than I expected, especially for a movie that AFAIK got even limited attention only because it cast Barbara Crampton (Re-Animator, From Beyond) in a major role. Lots of reviewers on IMDb hated it & dismissed it as a trainwreck ... What can I say? Maybe I like trainwrecks. (See also: my fondness a few years back for Twixt & Gallowwalkers.)
   46. Morty Causa Posted: October 05, 2018 at 01:07 PM (#5761150)
My new favorite whatever take on Sherlock

Lennon's feeling for words has an uncanny exact touch. Absurd, surreal, but it sounds right. He really should have engaged in more writing beside the songwriting.
   47. Greg K Posted: October 05, 2018 at 07:00 PM (#5761427)
One of the Flashman stories has a bit of Sherlock in it. Holmes and Watson come across a drunk (or maybe just pretend drunk?) Flashman, and Holmes spins an elaborate backstory for him based on a few observations that allows them to "solve" a case. When in reality Holmes is entirely wrong about everything and Flashman has nothing at all to do with the mystery.
   48. PreservedFish Posted: October 05, 2018 at 09:30 PM (#5761521)
I find it recornered in my nosebook that it was a dokey and winnie cave towart the end of Marge in the ear of our Loaf 1892 in Much Bladder, a city off the North Wold. Shamrock Womlbs had receeded a telephart whilst we sat at our lunch eating.


Did Jack Keefe collaborate with Lennon?
   49. Morty Causa Posted: October 05, 2018 at 10:17 PM (#5761542)
I'm not much of a fan--of Keefe, that is. Although I can picture the Beatles in A Hard Day's Night cavorting in a baseball field (say, Fenway) instead of a soccer field to "Can't Buy Me Love".

EDIT: Maybe Keefe's hero could play for a team called the Walruses.
   50. BDC Posted: October 06, 2018 at 09:44 AM (#5761614)
in reality Holmes is entirely wrong about everything


For Holmes/Watson fans, I strongly recommend Pierre Bayard's book Sherlock Homes Was Wrong. Bayard tried something similar with Agatha Christie's Murder of Roger Ackroyd, too – his solutions are ingenious.
   51. BDC Posted: October 06, 2018 at 11:23 AM (#5761622)
And in other culture news, you might want to inspect the frame of the next picture you bid on at Sotheby's:

{Banksy's} Girl With Balloon was the final item in an auction at Sotheby’s in London on Friday night and its sale price equalled the artist’s previous auction record of £1.04m.

Shortly after the hammer came down on the item, however, the canvas began to pass through a shredder installed in the frame.


The unnamed buyer, presumably after an initial reaction of WTFF, might have reacted with great delight. Art-market expert Joey Syer noted

“This is now part of art history in its shredded state and we’d estimate Banksy has added at a minimum 50% to its value, possibly as high as being worth £2m plus.”


And he's right. After all, what would the Venus de Milo be worth if she had arms? Many a contemporary artist works by taking pieces and smashing, shredding, twisting, washing, reassembling them. Probably the most famous example is Marcel Duchamp's Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, which is supposed to have been dropped and broken, greatly adding to its appeal, but which some art historians suspect was carefully half-smashed by Duchamp for effect (and to get a good story out of it).
   52. PreservedFish Posted: October 06, 2018 at 07:54 PM (#5761753)
Bayard is pretty clever, huh? I enjoyed How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read. Naturally, I only skimmed it, enough to get the gist.
   53. Morty Causa Posted: October 06, 2018 at 08:57 PM (#5761775)
Yeah, but did that picture play a recording of "See you in hell, Candy Boys" as it ate itself?

Or have a hand reach out and give the buyer a Melvin.
   54. Rennie's Tenet Posted: October 07, 2018 at 07:37 AM (#5761873)
The new Doctor rolls out today. BBC America is showing it eight times from this afternoon through tomorrow morning, breaking only once to show the old "Blink" episode. I fell away years ago when Clara took over the show, caught up a little with some Capaldi-Bill episodes in BBC America's recent marathon, will give the new one a shot.
   55. McCoy Posted: October 07, 2018 at 08:52 AM (#5761883)
Never seen it
   56. Lassus Posted: October 07, 2018 at 08:56 AM (#5761884)
I am hugely excited for the Who premiere today, although I am concerned about one thing. From the previews, they seem to have given her a TEAM of companions, as if one was too few for her to carry the show. I hope I'm wrong in that.
   57. Omineca Greg Posted: October 07, 2018 at 12:12 PM (#5761919)
Film: The Longest Yard. 1974. My kids were up to the Omineca right around the time Burt died, so we all thought it would be fitting to check out one of his movies. My son had a pretty good idea of who Reynolds was, but interestingly my daughter mainly knew him from an old country song...

Well you know I'm not much good at writing letters
So I gave up and decided that I'd call
Now there's really not much new to tell you
Things back here they never change at all
It snowed today, it's cold here for November
But I hear the weather's warm out there

Oh, and if you see Burt Reynolds
Would you shake his hand for me
And tell ol' Burt, I've seen all his movies
Well, I hope you make the big time
I hope your dreams come true
But if Hollywood don't need you
Honey I still do

Last night I drove the truck to Amarillo
Some friends and I we had a laugh or two
But lately we don't cut up like we used to
'Cause all that I can think about is you
Well, I know this is what you've always wanted
But I know now that all I want is you

So if you see Burt Reynolds
Would you shake his hand for me
And tell ol' Burt, I've seen all his movies
Well, I hope you make the big time
I hope your dreams come true
But if Hollywood don't need you
Honey I still do
If Hollywood don't need you
Honey, I still do

McDill

We decided on The Longest Yard. I'd seen it before, but couldn't remember anything about it, it was brand new for the rest of the family. We all liked it, the story of a narcissistic ####### who [REDACTED FOR SPOILERS]. For a 70s movie, it moves along at a good clip. The climactic football game is well done, it's staring right into the teeth of so many cinematic and storytelling cliches, but it still manages to be exciting and fresh, top marks to Robert Aldrich on that score.

I thought it was interesting how times have changed. Slapping a #####, drinking and driving, the things (among others) that got Burt in the pokey...our attitudes have changed so much towards those crimes, it was hard to get a read on if he was supposed to be a charming rogue...or a shameless reprobate. I also wondered about the audience's acceptance of the prisoners (in real life, criminals are sometimes not the easiest people to like) as the lovable underdogs, but I guess we all deal with power disparities in our everyday lives that it's easy to empathise with anybody who finds themselves in a prison type situation. Who doesn't want to stick it to the man?

Folk: Morning Way, Trader Horne. 1970. I notice that I'm the only one who brings up British Folk music here, so I don't know if anybody's interested or not. But I'll pretend that at least a few people are...

Trader Horne was a short lived duo made up of Judy Dyble (Fairport Convention's woman singer before Sandy Denny) and Jackie McAuley (the second most famous dude from Belfast R&B band, Them.). This was a legendary album back in the day when people collected such things, reputed to be excellent, but also very rare. Of course now with streaming services, anybody can check it out.

Very English. Flutes and celeste and guitars, mostly acoustic. Strings. Harpsichord. Songs about childhood, and the value of keeping a childlike perspective in adulthood. Judy is a fantastic singer, poor Jackie is completely overwhelmed, fortunately for him their vocals are recorded with a hard stereo pan. I dunno, I was a little disappointed by this album, the sound is immediately ingratiating, but I can't say the songs really stick with me very much. The first time through it was by far the most enjoyable of my sessions with it. I thought it was going to turn out awesome, but as I listened to it more, it wore out its welcome. Well, here...

Growing Man

Book: A Terrible Country, Keith Gessen. This novel just came out in July, so if you were wondering if I were up to date at all or if I lived exclusively in the 70s...now you know. The story of an over-educated, underemployed young man (temporarily?) leaving behind his life in America to take care of his ailing 89 year old grandmother in Moscow. I won't unpack the story any more than that, there's a lot happening here. I thought this was almost great. So many timely themes bouncing off each other and a page turning type story.

The thing that held it back for me was the style of the narration. The prose is functional, that's it, the most emotional parts were robbed of some of their power by the clinical dullness of the writing. Now, the thing is, the narrator is kind of a wiener, or I think he is, maybe you're supposed to think he's an incredible man of action. And that's the rub. I can't tell if Gessen is a wiener, and so he writes a wiener protagonist thinking that this cat is the ####, or if Gessen is all too aware of the wienerness of his character, and uses his narration to emphasise it. I'm still making up my mind about that. But the ideas in the book are staying with me; class in both Russia and the USA, American academic politics, ethics, family responsibility and sense of place in the world, there's a lot of good stuff in this one.

Pop: Palo Santo, Years & Years. This record just dropped in July. Years & Years is a London pop band, kind of clubby I guess, lead by Olly Alexander. Olly is quite the magnetic rock-star type person and attracts all kinds of media attention. He's also a gay man, and he has lots of interesting things to say about life as such, more in interviews and other star-making machinery contexts than in the music itself. I like this, mostly songs about getting your freak on but then sometimes falling in love and subsequently getting your heart broken. I think it's interesting that while listening to it, it's not the gayness that seems foreign to me, it's neat to see that most emotions crossover from his sexual perspective to mine...and just a few that get muddled a bit. If there's a difference in our worldviews, it has more to do with the age discrepancy. I'm 49 and I've been married for 29 years, sex is an ingredient in my relationship, sure, of course, but I'm not about to have a breakdown over what's happening, or not happening, with my life in the sack, not at this late date, not with half a lifetime with the same woman. So if Olly's lyrics sometimes come across as overwrought to me, it's not the queerness, it's the drama of youth that sometimes seems like a bridge too far. Here, this is my favourite song...

I wrote it down when I first met you
The way that you stared at me
You're so damn smart, you think you're special
But maybe I wouldn't agree
Don't lose perspective
We all get damaged, and some of us don't ever heal
But you must be happy without me


Jazz: Your Queen Is A Reptile: Sons of Kemet. March 2018. I'm sending out this one specifically for PreservedFish, who loves his jazz with references to Egypt, and hopefully Saturn too. Kemet is Ancient Egyptian for "Egypt" so I think this might be in his wheelhouse. Led by saxophonist Shabaka Hutchings, another Londoner, this is black diaspora jazz with quite the line up: two drummers, tuba, and Hutchings. The rhythms are powerful, I love the breath the tuba gives the bottom, Hutchings has to play his ass off just to keep from getting steam-rolled. Each track is dedicated to an important woman of colour, to contrast with the elitist, inherently hierarchical monarchy of the UK. The opening song is "My Queen Is Ada Eastman", Eastman being Hutchings grandma back in Barbados.

Some of the tracks have lyrics, rapping, toasting, reciting, to help give the theme Hutchings is going for. The feeling isn't overly angry or revolutionary, even if it is confrontational; the music is joyous and resilient, the lyrics celebrate survival and self-reliant success in the face of an indifferent world (a white world...led by a reptile...so maybe a little angry). I'm going to gush about any jazz I write about here, I listen to a lot of it, so for movies and books sometimes I'm doing things that I think are interesting, even if they don't knock me off my feet, but with jazz I'm listening to so much of it, that I have more than enough to only chat up what I think is the most compelling music. Anyway...

My Queen Is Harriet Tubman

   58. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 07, 2018 at 01:10 PM (#5761932)
I am hugely excited for the Who premiere today, although I am concerned about one thing. From the previews, they seem to have given her a TEAM of companions, as if one was too few for her to carry the show. I hope I'm wrong in that.


Yes, she has three. This harks back to the early days of the series, when William Hartnell's Doctor travelled with three companions. Peter Davison's Fifth Doctor also did. So it's not a totally new idea. Looking forward to the premiere.

I fell away years ago when Clara took over the show


I loved Clara. Of course, a large part of that was that not only was Jenna Coleman from Blackpool, my home town, the character of Clara in show was also, and she mentioned Blackpool on several occasions. Having my home town woven into the fabric of my favorite show was incredibly cool for me. And Jenna went to school with the son of my cousin's best friend, so there's a personal connection there. Well, almost.
   59. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 07, 2018 at 01:27 PM (#5761943)
Folk: Morning Way, Trader Horne. 1970. I notice that I'm the only one who brings up British Folk music here, so I don't know if anybody's interested or not. But I'll pretend that at least a few people are...


Yes, I love British folk and folk-rock. Please feel free to make any comments you'd feel inclined to. I'll definitely read them.
   60. Lassus Posted: October 07, 2018 at 01:27 PM (#5761944)
I loved Clara.

I know I'm supposed to love Amy and Rory, but I did not. Clara was fine, no better or worse than others. I have yet to find a companion I liked more than Martha Jones.
   61. BDC Posted: October 07, 2018 at 03:07 PM (#5761967)
RIP Montserrat Caballé, age 85. Before my opera-going time, but a major star of the late 20th century. Here she is in 1984 in Barcelona in Massenet's Hérodiade, a bit of a primitive recording, but it conveys a sense of the power of her voice and her stage presence.
   62. Swoboda is freedom Posted: October 07, 2018 at 03:17 PM (#5761971)
she inspired a movie called "Peggy Sue Got Married," which featured Nicolas Cage in the worst acting performance in movie history


Nicolas Cage is awful in that movie, what a weird choice of voice he did. However, I am not sure it is even the worst acting the Cage has done. He was worse in Left Behind, Wicker Man, Ghost Rider I and II, Vampire's Kiss and probably a few others.
   63. Baldrick Posted: October 07, 2018 at 03:24 PM (#5761974)
I stopped watching Doctor Who a few years ago (after the first Capaldi season). Not out of any strong commitment; it just didn't feel important anymore. And that's partly because I started looking back and realized that the last actual good season was...season 3, probably. Not that there's been no good content since then, of course, but on the whole it's been kind of a drag ever since Martha Jones left. And it was just a draining experience to keep coming back hoping that this time, I'd just get a fun story without a million pointless complications or Deep Portentous Musings About What It All Means.

But I decided I would try to catch up, because I am excited for the new Doctor. So I've been watching Series 9, and it's definitely better than some of the dreadful ones that came before. But also still suffers from a lot of the rot that has defined the whole Moffat era.

Basically: it's okay to just tell fun stories with a kooky guy in a box getting into scrapes and then saving everyone! Not everything has to be a puzzle!
   64. phredbird Posted: October 07, 2018 at 04:21 PM (#5761995)

every cr@p movie nicholas cage has ever done is made up for by 'adaptation'.
   65. Swoboda is freedom Posted: October 07, 2018 at 04:56 PM (#5762008)
every cr@p movie nicholas cage has ever done is made up for by 'adaptation'.

I loved Adaptation and Raising Arizona. Moonstruck, Valley Girl, Red Rock West, Fast Times at Ridgemont High are all good, but he has a lot of crap to make up for. I rewatched Leaving Las Vegas a few years back and what a horrible movie. There is not one scene where Cage isn't "acting". Same thing with "Matchstick Men". None of it rings true.
   66. Tin Angel Posted: October 07, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5762013)
Leave No Trace is very, very good. Looking forward to Mandy.
   67. McCoy Posted: October 07, 2018 at 05:10 PM (#5762017)
So who is the son or daughter of a famous person in Hotel Artemis? Tons of celebrities in small roles in a movie that probably had some potential but slightly misfired.
   68. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: October 07, 2018 at 05:23 PM (#5762023)
   69. phredbird Posted: October 07, 2018 at 05:39 PM (#5762031)

i used 'adaptation' in a class i taught on visual literacy, hoping that the students would see that the charlie kaufman character and his 'twin' represented the two faces of postmodernity -- critique and complicity; and how their proximity are one of the causes of our current societal malaise. i mean, i could have assigned jameson or baudrillard and a couple of others -- and i did -- but i knew most of them weren't going to do the readings. hell, they were a chore for me.

but they had trouble with all the different layers of the movie. none of them could shake themselves of the notion that donald was real within the 'narrative' of the movie ... let alone getting to the notion that the entire movie was a meta exercise -- that this was kaufmann bemoaning the fact that, while the movie business is captive to the idea that a closed narrative can't be tampered with, that it's mendacious and craven and is rife with everything that corrupts critical thinking, he can't bring himself to abandon it, he's just the kind of weak little masturbating adolescent the movies are made for ... at the end of the movie, 'charlie kaufmann' is wondering who's going to play him ...

it's a wonder to me that the thing ever even got made, really.
   70. Tin Angel Posted: October 07, 2018 at 06:11 PM (#5762036)
it's a wonder to me that the thing ever even got made, really.


It probably wouldn't today.

hoping that the students would see that the charlie kaufman character and his 'twin' represented the two faces of postmodernity -- critique and complicity; and how their proximity are one of the causes of our current societal malaise.


I guess I'm curious as to how you are so sure of your conclusions about the film. That's one of maybe half a dozen interpretations someone could have.
   71. McCoy Posted: October 07, 2018 at 06:56 PM (#5762049)
He's got tenure. That's why he is so sure.
   72. McCoy Posted: October 07, 2018 at 07:02 PM (#5762052)
Just grilled up a Costco T-Bone and did some McDonald's style old school French fries with the beef tallow along with a half bottle of Shafer 1.5 Cab. Couldn't really tell the difference between peanut oil fries and beef tallow fries. Tasted the same to us.

I wish they could make a home deep fryer that could actually hold its temp when you drop two potatoes worth of fries in the fryer. I was at Costco today and I saw a giant turkey fryer and it made me think maybe I should just buy one of those bigboys to use as a regular fryer. But then I'd have to buy a 35 gallon container oil and I don't want to really do that.

I wish more companies would sell their wine in half bottle sizes. The profit margin is probably higher and it would probably lead to more wine sales. I know Coppola has tried to do wine in a can and it seems that there are a lot of attempts to whites, roses, and bubbles in a can but I think 12 oz is too much wine for cold wine in a can and those should probably be in Red Bull size cans.
   73. phredbird Posted: October 07, 2018 at 07:13 PM (#5762055)

sure, it's an interpretation, but i was hoping the students would see it after a semester of being exposed to a number of theories and observations about the image in the present day.

the twinning device spoke volumes to me ... it wasn't just that there were two 'characters' engaged in a dialectic. they were clones of each other, which to me describes the critique/compicity paradox. in this age of information and late capitalism we can't escape our complicity even as we use critique to try to reconcile our presence in the world. we are both at the same time. well, some of us anyway.

charlie's agonizing over his 'art' -- his intellectual problem -- was continually undermined by donald's ability to negotiate the problem of moviemaking by becoming absolutely complicit in 'the business'.

the scene towards the end of the movie, when charlie and donald are trapped in the swamp -- geez, can it be a more obvious metaphor -- and in danger of their lives, encapsulates the conflict at the heart of the movie. the two of them have this moving conversation, alone with each other, and they each trade essential information that ultimately liberates charlie ... charlie sees that he can be screwed over, ignored, mistreated in all the ways that moviemaking can do to you, but your love is your love, it is its own pure thing. he has an epiphany that even though a movie isn't anything real or meaningful in and of itself, making a movie is the only act that gives meaning to him ...

and so, at the very end of the movie, donald is 'gone', and the real charlie embodies synthesis. he has no scars from the 'chase scene' that resulted in donald's death, because of course it never 'happened'. but it was a true climax, just the kind of thing he couldn't manufacture from trying to adapt a long form journalistic piece of material like 'the orchid thief' -- the macguffin (sp?) of the movie ...
   74. phredbird Posted: October 07, 2018 at 07:21 PM (#5762058)
He's got tenure. That's why he is so sure.


if only.

i was handed a one-year appointment and told i could do whatever i wanted with the course, so i assigned baudrillard, berger, and bazin along with a bunch of other things i couldn't resist. this to a class that included freshmen and a number of ESL students.

we watched all four episodes of 'ways of seeing', 'museum hours', 'chinatown', 'festen' (the dogma 95 movie) ... i made them read 'understanding comics' ...

we watched 'nightcrawler' as an illustration of baudrillard's thesis about the collapse of meaning in the electronic media.

it was probably the most unpopular course ever taught in that department ever. a friend of mine took a look at the syllabus a while back and said it was graduate level. i went a little nuts teaching it, or trying to. i'll probably never get in front of a class again, which i'm sure is a relief to all concerned.
   75. Lassus Posted: October 07, 2018 at 08:34 PM (#5762075)
i made them read 'understanding comics'

McCloud's lack of fictional output is maddening.

Also, nice to see you back around, phredbird, feel like you're back from a long BTF hiatus.
   76. Tin Angel Posted: October 07, 2018 at 08:42 PM (#5762078)
Anyone read Willy Vlautin? Don't Skip Out On Me is fantastic.
   77. phredbird Posted: October 07, 2018 at 08:57 PM (#5762087)

Also, nice to see you back around, phredbird, feel like you're back from a long BTF hiatus.


eh, i've been around, off and on. i like to hang around the omnichatters and read CFB's comments during cards games. so THAT's over for a while. :-(

the last 4 years have been kind of a drag for a lot of reasons besides the stl collapse.

   78. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 08, 2018 at 09:21 AM (#5762239)
McCloud's lack of fictional output is maddening


Was unable to get more than 4 or 5 issues into Zot! Maybe if I'd read it as it was coming out, rather than as a 50ish curmudgeon ...
   79. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 08, 2018 at 09:27 AM (#5762243)
Tech question, y'all --

To try to free up more memory on my not-exactly-state-of-the-art Android, I ditched Google Chrome over the weekend & uploaded Firefox instead. Didn't notice any particularly dramatic differences, except that BTF started coming up really wide & small*; enlarging the type just meant lots of side-to-side scrolling, which to say the least isn't ideal. So I subbed Opera for Firefox; same thing.

Is there something I can do with my settings or whatever to overcome this? And/or is there another browser out there that replicates the perfectly cromulent view of this site I get with Chrome?


*Yeah, yeah. That's what she said.
   80. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 08, 2018 at 09:31 AM (#5762247)
(I should note that I'm especially desirous of being able to follow proceedings here because I'm due for at least an overnight stay [knock wood] Wednesday after hernia surgery. The procedure was originally scheduled for last month, but I delayed it because Hurricane Florence intensified the hell out of our workload at the office.)
   81. Morty Causa Posted: October 08, 2018 at 09:42 AM (#5762252)
Good luck with the surgery, gef.
   82. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 08, 2018 at 10:01 AM (#5762264)
Good luck with the surgery, gef.


Merci beaucoup. This is what I went in for back in 6/15, when the surgeon found dead bowel instead of -- or I suppose actually in addition to -- a plain ol' hernia & had to take care of the former rather than the latter, lest I (apparently) die. Hoping for no surprises this time around, needless to say.
   83. Morty Causa Posted: October 08, 2018 at 10:09 AM (#5762267)
That does sound kind of serious. (Biology has no mercy.) Again, bon chance.
   84. Lassus Posted: October 08, 2018 at 10:10 AM (#5762268)
Was unable to get more than 4 or 5 issues into Zot! Maybe if I'd read it as it was coming out, rather than as a 50ish curmudgeon ...

One of my favorite comics of all time. In fairness, I did read it at 16.
   85. McCoy Posted: October 08, 2018 at 01:34 PM (#5762433)
Better Call Saul season finale tonight. Boo. Good season but surprisingly it seems like nothing really got done this year. I guess Mike alienating himself from his daughter in law and then reconciling along with pushing "normal" friends away is something but for the most part that was always a side of Mike that was barely clinging on at the best of times. I don't really know if Jimmy has progressed much this season beyond his outburst in the last episode. Kim is still Kim things and the whole drug side is in stasis. You can definitely see Jimmy and Mike breaking bad but they are doing it at a much much slower pace than Walter White ever did.
   86. BDC Posted: October 08, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5762449)
By chance we just finished watching the third season of Saul and from your write-up, McCoy, it seems like we could just skip the fourth … I find at times that it's not just the slow movement of the story that's frustrating; it's the stylistic choice to show some establishing action (people making coffee, brushing their teeth, etc.) in super-loving detail. This can be interesting once in a while, but as a repeated idiom it gets kind of boring, no matter how stylishly done.
   87. McCoy Posted: October 08, 2018 at 02:08 PM (#5762462)
Well, I would caution against that. Jimmy is an interesting character and Vince tells an interesting story. I like seeing Mike be the perfect henchman, Jimmy the perfect con artist, and Kim trying to straddle both worlds and be happy. Years from now I don't think I could tell you what happened in season 4 (obviously the season finale is coming up so that could change) whereas earlier seasons had distinct events and character developments.

But yeah, the regular deep focus on something mundane can be oft putting and it always make me think I'm missing some sort symbolism that Vince and his directors are trying to convey.
   88. Bote Man Posted: October 08, 2018 at 02:11 PM (#5762467)
Is there something I can do with my settings or whatever to overcome this? And/or is there another browser out there that replicates the perfectly cromulent view of this site I get with Chrome?

The CSS (Cascading Style Sheet) here dictates the presentation of the page and I find myself compromising between large text and not scrolling sideways on my ZTE Android phone. If Chrome is doing magic, I don't know what that is.

You might investigate if Firefox for Android can use a local stylesheet. If so, you can set rules with ! (bang) signifying "important" which will take precedence over the site's rules. If you specify such an important rule with a large font size you might end up with what you want. It'll take some doing, but it could be worth it.

I do prefer Firefox for general browsing because you can add the uMatrix and uBlock plug-ins that cut down on a LOT of bandwidth and CPU hogs, notably ad sites (that can serve up malware) and tracking sites, but there's a knack to knowing what to add and what to leave blocked.

The real answer is for Jim to update the site to something more amenable to viewing on smaller screens, but that is probably such a major undertaking that it won't happen. I like things to be nice and light, which for the most part this site is.
   89. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: October 08, 2018 at 02:18 PM (#5762477)
Those are two good takes on Better Call Saul. BDC, there's a ton of that crap in season #4. It works, but then they do it again and again and again. RE: Mike, he's a great character, but I really don't care or need to see Mike's personal life.
   90. Bote Man Posted: October 08, 2018 at 04:44 PM (#5762623)
GEF: Better still, in Firefox go to Settings -> Accessibility ->
Use system font size = enable
Always zoom = enable

Suddenly this site is much more readable in Firefox Android.
   91. cardsfanboy Posted: October 08, 2018 at 06:21 PM (#5762687)
I watched the trailer for Holmes and Watson, starring Ferrell and Reilly, and didn't laugh once :(


I like those two, I like Sherlock Holmes(except the original stories, I hated Doyle's writing style) and enjoy a good comedy version of a well known concept... and that trailer did nothing for me.
   92. PreservedFish Posted: October 08, 2018 at 06:30 PM (#5762692)
I find at times that it's not just the slow movement of the story that's frustrating; it's the stylistic choice to show some establishing action (people making coffee, brushing their teeth, etc.) in super-loving detail. This can be interesting once in a while, but as a repeated idiom it gets kind of boring, no matter how stylishly done.

This is why you're not a Knausgaard guy.
   93. cardsfanboy Posted: October 08, 2018 at 06:36 PM (#5762697)
I am hugely excited for the Who premiere today, although I am concerned about one thing. From the previews, they seem to have given her a TEAM of companions, as if one was too few for her to carry the show. I hope I'm wrong in that.


Peter Davidson had that, and the first year of Tom Baker he had a couple of companions also, heck even the first doctor had three companions from the beginning. My issue with these three companions is that they are related or have had similar life experiences(all being from the same time) with Adric/Nyssa/Tegan (Peter Davidson) you had a genius boy from a futuristic society, a genius girl from a futuristic feudal society and a perfectly average person from earth. They had different life experiences under different worlds so they had their own way to contribute. (of course the writers often hated this and would sideline one or two of the characters every few episodes so that they could write a tighter script---so there is that)

I liked Jodies Whittaker's doctor very much, the story was meh but had a bit of a story to it, and the companions were okay, but not developed enough, so we'll see where they go from there. They added a girl/boy pairing that looks like it's to deflect any potential Rose/Martha type of affection that would have happened with just a companion of the opposite sex. And the older white male is probably there to act as a symbolism/deflection of sexism if they decide that in a time period someone will only listen to the white male instead of the hyper competent female.


Plenty of good episodes of the Doctor new series did feature more than a couple of companions. (Rose/Mickey/K-9/Sarah Jane; Rose/Mickey/Jackie and sometimes even her dad; Billie/Missy/Nardole; River/Amy/Rory; and about another half dozen examples that I can think of) so it's not unheard of them to have a large group of companions, just they don't usually stick around long, and with the way that they have evolved the companion relationship with Amy and Rory/Clara and Billie, where the companion isn't permanently part of the Tardis, but a guest on an adventure while having their own lives, it's easy to see how they can tailor the episode to the number of companions that they feel they need.
   94. PreservedFish Posted: October 08, 2018 at 06:45 PM (#5762702)
i was handed a one-year appointment and told i could do whatever i wanted with the course, so i assigned baudrillard, berger, and bazin along with a bunch of other things i couldn't resist. this to a class that included freshmen and a number of ESL students.
...
it was probably the most unpopular course ever taught in that department ever. a friend of mine took a look at the syllabus a while back and said it was graduate level. i went a little nuts teaching it, or trying to. i'll probably never get in front of a class again, which i'm sure is a relief to all concerned.


I am fascinated by your erudite and terrible choices. More detail please on your wacky career.
   95. cardsfanboy Posted: October 08, 2018 at 06:48 PM (#5762703)

I know I'm supposed to love Amy and Rory, but I did not. Clara was fine, no better or worse than others. I have yet to find a companion I liked more than Martha Jones.


Everyone has their favorite, and I think Martha is traditionally underrated as far as companions go, but I have enjoyed every new series companion in their own way. Each time I think I can narrow down my favorite, I remember why I liked another. I am somewhat ticked off at how Bill was ultimately treated, she was wasted at the end when she was a fantastic companion that deserved more than one season.


I stopped watching Doctor Who a few years ago (after the first Capaldi season). Not out of any strong commitment; it just didn't feel important anymore. And that's partly because I started looking back and realized that the last actual good season was...season 3, probably. Not that there's been no good content since then, of course, but on the whole it's been kind of a drag ever since Martha Jones left. And it was just a draining experience to keep coming back hoping that this time, I'd just get a fun story without a million pointless complications or Deep Portentous Musings About What It All Means.

But I decided I would try to catch up, because I am excited for the new Doctor. So I've been watching Series 9, and it's definitely better than some of the dreadful ones that came before. But also still suffers from a lot of the rot that has defined the whole Moffat era.

Basically: it's okay to just tell fun stories with a kooky guy in a box getting into scrapes and then saving everyone! Not everything has to be a puzzle!


It can be, but there is always fun in puzzles also. Capaldi was a great doctor, but was handed some really crappy scripts. I have every episode of the new series and will sometime re-watch them, but will skip an episode here or there and the number of Capaldi episodes I skip is at a much higher percentage than the first three. My issue is the similarity of the monsters(How many monsters exist because of the power to stop observing them? Angels was cool, silence was okay, but we get it, stop making up new monsters that only are deadly when you aren't looking)
(My favorite episode of all time in the new series is The Doctor's Wife, and I have watched that at least 8 times if not more... it has everything that I want from a Doctor Who story)

Ultimately there weren't nearly as many great Capaldi episodes as either he or Clara/Bill/Missy/Nardole deserved.
   96. K-BAR, J-BAR (trhn) Posted: October 08, 2018 at 06:58 PM (#5762705)
This might interest someone here as it's tangentially Pavement related: Last night at a Bonnie "Prince" Billie show I met David Berman (Silver Jews). He was very gracious. He said he's finishing up a new album called Purple Mountain.
   97. cardsfanboy Posted: October 08, 2018 at 07:06 PM (#5762715)
   30. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 03, 2018 at 01:41 PM (#5759434)
So I am a big comic book guy (from back in the day, not as much now) and I like comic book movies in general (and really all genre movies honestly), but the Venom trailers left me completely cold and uninterested. I figured it was because I was not that into the anti-hero stuff or maybe my vague dislike of the character, but based on the early reviews I read it seems to be just a bad movie.


It doesn't really do much for me, but by removing his origin being tied into Spider-man, maybe they can make their own character with a bit better motivation, instead of having created a popular capable villain that they had to hammer into a role of anti-hero to capitalize on his popularity.
The sentient suit that has a different motivation and has to be curbed by the decent human in it, has been done to death in comics, but it's still a relatively fresh concept for the movie world.


   31. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 03, 2018 at 02:47 PM (#5759508)
Venom came along about 5 years after I stopped following comics, but when I learned some 2 decades after the fact about the character & concept & how popular it was I was appalled, & I remain so today. Then again, I'm pretty much a strict constructionist when it comes to Marvel's & DC's core characters, to the point that even at age 11 I found the 6-armed Spidey stunt circa ASM #100 cringingly stupid. (The "Kryptonite No More" arc for Superman was around the same time, I guess, & I had no use for it, either.)


He was popular and exploited by Marvel, but considering the rise of Punisher, Wolverine and Ghost Rider at the time, it isn't surprising about his popularity, especially once the powers that be made him into an anti-hero.


32. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 03, 2018 at 02:53 PM (#5759518)
Also, Bucky has been dead since 1945.

I'm Unfrozen Caveman Comics Fan, & I approve this message.


Bucky's resurrection was great storytelling so I'm fine with his return. I wish Nomad didn't have to be killed for it to happen(Nomad, another one of those 90's hero with a gray sense of justice)--note:I'm a Captain America super fan, so love all characters related to captain america... heck my user name on CBR was Capt USA...about the only place I don't have Cardsfanboy as my user name.


   98. Lassus Posted: October 08, 2018 at 11:24 PM (#5762913)
Capaldi was a great doctor, but was handed some really crappy scripts.

God, yes. It was a shame.
   99. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: October 09, 2018 at 04:54 AM (#5762937)
This might interest someone here as it's tangentially Pavement related: Last night at a Bonnie "Prince" Billie show I met David Berman (Silver Jews). He was very gracious. He said he's finishing up a new album called Purple Mountain.

How was the show? He's playing Brooklyn tomorrow/Thursday. I want to go to one, but I am lazy.
   100. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 09, 2018 at 10:09 AM (#5763024)
I'm a Captain America super fan, so love all characters related to captain america... heck my user name on CBR was Capt USA...about the only place I don't have Cardsfanboy as my user name.


About a dozen Christmases ago on the old Comic Book Resources Classic Comics Forum we regulars were charged with coming up with our dozen favorite characters ever, & Cap was #2 for me, behind only Sgt. Fury. The frisson I experienced watching the Sleepers saga portrayed on the old Marvel Super-Heroes cartoon show back in 2nd grade has never really left me, I guess, though I didn't start buying the comic for another couple of years, with #111 (Steranko's 2nd ish).

So far the only two modern (i.e. from after the first Spider-Man movie) Marvel movies I've watched have been the two Cap films.
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