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Monday, October 01, 2018

Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (October 2018)

Over the past eight months EW has stalked [Jamie Lee] Curtis and the rest of the Halloween crew — though hopefully in a much less threatening manner than Michael Myers tracks Laurie Strode. The result is a story which includes interviews with Curtis, [David Gordon] Green, [Danny] McBride, [John] Carpenter, and Nick Castle, who once again makes an appearance as Myers in the new film, 40 years after playing the slasher icon in the original movie.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: October 01, 2018 at 09:32 AM | 254 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   101. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 09, 2018 at 10:26 AM (#5763035)
So far the only two modern (i.e. from after the first Spider-Man movie) Marvel movies I've watched have been the two Cap films.


The first Avengers movie has some good Cap moments (I am not a fond of the other Avengers movies). Spider-Man Homecoming has some really funny Cap PSAs.

Captain America is my favorite super hero. As anti-heroes became more and more popular I gravitated more and more to Cap. It helps the movies that Chris Evans is tremendous as Cap.

Note: There are three Cap movies. First Avenger, Winter Soldier, and Civil War. I hope you meant the first two, because both are great. Civil War is ... less great.
   102. PreservedFish Posted: October 09, 2018 at 10:38 AM (#5763052)
Jazz: Your Queen Is A Reptile: Sons of Kemet. March 2018. I'm sending out this one specifically for PreservedFish, who loves his jazz with references to Egypt, and hopefully Saturn too. Kemet is Ancient Egyptian for "Egypt" so I think this might be in his wheelhouse. Led by saxophonist Shabaka Hutchings, another Londoner, this is black diaspora jazz with quite the line up: two drummers, tuba, and Hutchings. The rhythms are powerful, I love the breath the tuba gives the bottom, Hutchings has to play his ass off just to keep from getting steam-rolled.


Thanks for this OG, I'm listening to it right now and really enjoying it. It seems to belong more to the funk/jam lineage more so than the jazz, but it's definitely up my alley. Really love the double drummers.

Here's a similar rec right back at ya: Salah Ragab and the Cairo Jazz Band - "Neveen". You may know it already, but it was new to me.
   103. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 09, 2018 at 10:43 AM (#5763057)
I’m pretty sure the final 3 shots (and 2 cuts) of Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born is my favorite movie of 2018.
   104. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: October 09, 2018 at 11:01 AM (#5763080)
I find at times that it's not just the slow movement of the story that's frustrating; it's the stylistic choice to show some establishing action (people making coffee, brushing their teeth, etc.) in super-loving detail.


I see your point, but I think it is incredible to watch. The scene of Mike dismantling his car, or him using the metal detector in the desert, or the Jimmy/Kim opening montage from a few episodes ago are beautifully cinematic and unlike anything else on TV.

Honestly, more Kim and Nacho, and less of the Hector/Gus dynamic, please. We get it, these dudes hate each other. And for a guy that was a complete chameleon in BB, Gus sure is a hands-on kingpin.

The final scene from last night seemed a little on-the-nose for the "how did Jimmy become Saul" crowd.
   105. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 09, 2018 at 11:36 AM (#5763114)
I’m pretty sure the final 3 shots (and 2 cuts) of Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born is my favorite movie of 2018.
Saw it last night, and was not particularly impressed. The second half was indeed better, and I suppose the cuts at the end are good, but (I don't think this is a spoiler?) why the hell did the song at the end sound exactly like Whitney Houston's version of "I Will Always Love You"?? No way his character would have written a song like that, or a song that was even open to being interpreted that way.

There was just way too much in the movie that was completely implausible from a musical standpoint, especially in the first half. One more non-spoiler example to illustrate my point - in the beginning, when Jake goes into the drag bar and immediately gets recognized. Jake's music is basically warmed-over '70s southern rock. Kings of Leon would be probably be closest modern comp, but he sounds more like a tribute to Sillwater, the band from Almost Famous.* Anyway, there's no way that someone who plays that kind of music would ever be recognized and fawned over in a drag bar. The various music scenes are way too compartmentalized, and rock music is way too "niche," for that to happen these days. I get that the first half of the movie had to be compressed so that the second half could happen, but it was just too many things happening way too quickly and coincidentally, with virtually no foundation laid, for it to be even "movie-plausible."

*Except for one song that had a nice kind of Jason Isbell vibe.
   106. jmurph Posted: October 09, 2018 at 11:37 AM (#5763116)
*Except for one song that had a nice kind of Jason Isbell vibe.

Presumably the one written by Jason Isbell?
   107. BDC Posted: October 09, 2018 at 11:42 AM (#5763120)
I read that Lady Gaga sings "La Vie en Rose." I don't suppose she sings "The Man That Got Away?"
   108. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 09, 2018 at 11:42 AM (#5763121)
Presumably the one written by Jason Isbell?
HA! Yeah, that one. I had no idea he actually wrote it. I'm a huge fan of his.
   109. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 09, 2018 at 11:46 AM (#5763124)
I read that Lady Gaga sings "La Vie en Rose."
She does...and then some.

I don't suppose she sings "The Man That Got Away?"
She does not.
   110. PreservedFish Posted: October 09, 2018 at 11:49 AM (#5763128)
Don't worry guys, you can spoil "A Star is Born."
   111. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 09, 2018 at 12:09 PM (#5763143)
Spoiler: Lady Gaga looks really different in costume as a human being.
   112. McCoy Posted: October 09, 2018 at 12:25 PM (#5763159)
Venture Bros was kind of one big "meh" for me. It has taken over 5 years to get out 18 22 minute episodes with season 6 widely being considered forgettable and not good. With this season I know a lot of critics have given good grades for the episodes and perhaps they are good shows but they just aren't the Venture Bros shows I like, I guess. I mean Brock finally getting to be Brock after years and years of doing pretty much nothing was great but even that feels like it was fan service over something they could have gone full hog on.
   113. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 09, 2018 at 01:12 PM (#5763196)
To be clear, most of the latest A Star Is Born is not very good. But there are enough slivers of brilliance throughout that it more than makes up for its inherent structural deficiencies. Lemme list em:

* The slow-motion shot the first time Jackson and Ally see each other, mid-“La Vie En Rose.”

* Actually everything about Cooper’s reaction to it, where he has a full smile in his face throughout and his feeling of “I’ve never heard anything so beautiful and I’ve never been so happy as I am at this exact moment” is so strong it leaps through the screen and I started smiling for him.

* The way he touches her nose, the way he straightforwardly asks about her fake eyelashes, and watches her remove them.

* When they arrive at the hotel making out for the first time, but then she asks to use the bathroom before they have sex, but she really just wants to wipe the sweat off her pits and crotch.

* Oh and their first love scene generally, when he wakes her up in the middle of the night and they slowly start taking off each other’s clothes.

* His tinnitus is a plot point, but it adds to the verite quality by doing something movies never do)—when someone says something to Cooper, he’ll sometimes respond by saying “What? I missed that.” (Or he’ll answer a different question from the one that was asked!)

* Oh also the moment when he mispronounces a word and gets corrected on it.

* And when they smear cake frosting on their faces. Or when she puts the fake eyebrows on him in the tub.

* Sam Elliot’s last meeting with Coopef is so nice, and one of the ways where it really helps to have an actor double as director. There are no fireworks, no big speeches, just a terse goodbye and then in the master stroke Cooper holds the camera on Elliot’s face for a solid minute, and he keeps stone-face stiff upper lip throughout but ever so slightly you can see the sadness beneath his eyes, threatening to overtake the facade of strength. It’s one of those where you can totally believe a minute later Elliot pulled the car over and burst into ugly crying.

* But of course....damn, that final Shot + Cut + Shot + Cut + Shot is an all-timer. Not a dry eye in the house. It’s basic, classical Hollywood editing and it’s ####### perfect.
   114. K-BAR, J-BAR (trhn) Posted: October 09, 2018 at 01:48 PM (#5763241)
How was the show? He's playing Brooklyn tomorrow/Thursday. I want to go to one, but I am lazy.


Jazzy. Great drummer. Nicely orchestrated with tuba, trombone, saxophone, upright bass, violin, cello. He sang well and sounded very good with his accompanist on those duet/high harmony songs. The arrangements nodded in the direction of the underlying melodies, but never really embraced them. So it was mainly pleasing from the standpoint of appreciating novel arrangements and good musicianship.

The venue was a tiny theater in the Art Institute, so it was intimate but also almost oppressively formal. As a Will Oldham fan who'd always intended to see him, I was glad to have gone and will see him again.
   115. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 09, 2018 at 02:57 PM (#5763303)
Note: There are three Cap movies. First Avenger, Winter Soldier, and Civil War. I hope you meant the first two, because both are great. Civil War is ... less great.


I don't think I realized Civil War was considered a Cap movie. The actual Civil War event that Marvel created back in ... was it a decade ago? more? ... wound up being pretty much of a dealbreaker for me as a consumer of their comics at that time.
   116. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 09, 2018 at 03:02 PM (#5763306)
Captain America is my favorite super hero. As anti-heroes became more and more popular I gravitated more and more to Cap.


As someone who in some ways is very likely to the left of Davo, it's probably odd that I regard Cap so very highly (ditto for Nick Fury, I suppose), but ... fandom is complicated. Heck, my out-&-out BernieBro friend in the Nashville area is a huge fan of the tycoon superhero Iron Man.
   117. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 09, 2018 at 03:07 PM (#5763312)
My favorite author was a Nazi, these things happen.
   118. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 09, 2018 at 03:09 PM (#5763315)
My favorite author was a Nazi, these things happen.


I hope you're not referring to Mein Kampf.
   119. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 09, 2018 at 03:11 PM (#5763320)
Ha ha, no. Knut Hamsun.

And on the “low” side....I love those Taken movies so damn much, even though I KNOW they’re 100% pure uncut fascism injecting into my veins.
   120. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 09, 2018 at 03:12 PM (#5763321)
I should note that I'm especially desirous of being able to follow proceedings here because I'm due for at least an overnight stay [knock wood] Wednesday after hernia surgery.


Dear Former Co-Worker at the Little Rock Newspaper:

I am very sorry that you took a nap Sunday & then never woke up, dying at 69. I also wish you had timed it differently, as I was already feeling rather apprehensive about having surgery tomorrow morning*.

Dear Former Somewhat Casual Friend from Childhood & Adolescence:

I am very sorry to have learned today via Facebook that you have died, apparently from diabetes-related complications. Again, though, I wish you had timed things differently.



*Was told today to report to the hospital at 6 a.m. That bloody early, I'm not even sure I'll need anesthesia.
   121. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 09, 2018 at 03:16 PM (#5763325)
My favorite author was a Nazi, these things happen.


My favorite author, Phil Dick, was, um, borderline insane in some ways. And while he was a leftist overall, he nevertheless reported fellow sf author Thomas M. Disch to the FBI as a Russian spy, or some such crap. What that was all about, I'm at a loss to even speculate.
   122. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 09, 2018 at 03:38 PM (#5763340)
Also, I’m not saying Lady Gaga has a niche fan-base, but 3 of the previews before A Star Is Born were biopics about gay men.
   123. PreservedFish Posted: October 09, 2018 at 04:37 PM (#5763421)
3 of the previews before A Star Is Born were biopics about gay men.


Really? That's excellent.
   124. phredbird Posted: October 09, 2018 at 05:18 PM (#5763450)

Ha ha, no. Knut Hamsun.


did you see the movie about him with max von sydow?

   125. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 09, 2018 at 05:24 PM (#5763456)
3 of the previews before A Star Is Born were biopics about gay men.

Really? That's excellent.
Freddie Mercury, Elton John, and...who was the third one? I forget. I'm wary of biopics in general, and music biopics especially, with their tendency to reduce the subjects' lives into a series of Overtly Symbolic Turning Points ("Ray" coming to mind as a major offender), but I'll probably see both the Queen and Elton John movies. The latter especially looks like it could be a more whimsical treatment that works well (I hope).
   126. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 09, 2018 at 05:51 PM (#5763471)
I was kind of cheating—the third one was BOY ERASED, an adaptation of a bestselling memoir about a teenage boy who’s sent to a gay conversion therapy program. But it got the “based on a true story” voiceover in the trailer so I’m counting it!

(Also, looks like the second year in a row where Lucas Hedges is in a Best Picture nominee playing a gay teen who’s scared to come out of the closet to his super religious parents, after Lady Bird.)
   127. cardsfanboy Posted: October 09, 2018 at 06:13 PM (#5763479)
As someone who in some ways is very likely to the left of Davo, it's probably odd that I regard Cap so very highly (ditto for Nick Fury, I suppose), but ... fandom is complicated. Heck, my out-&-out BernieBro friend in the Nashville area is a huge fan of the tycoon superhero Iron Man.


I'm very far left and I'm a huge Captain America fan. When people ask me why I joined the Marines, I say I wanted to serve my country just like Cap. Cap gets very political at times, but he almost always supports the dream of America and not the reality of the country. He would be the last person to support most right wing policies(Ultimate Cap on the other hand, was a bit more jingoistic and probably supports some of those policies) Ultimately though the thing about the iconic super heroes, is that they represent the best versions of their motif's. Tony Stark might be a rich corporate sob, but he tries to do right by his employees, and as a corporation. Captain America may be an American icon, but he is about the ideals of the country, not the laws of this country. Batman is a vigilante with very tight rules on what he allows him self to do to the people he 'arrests', etc.
   128. cardsfanboy Posted: October 09, 2018 at 06:16 PM (#5763483)

I don't think I realized Civil War was considered a Cap movie. The actual Civil War event that Marvel created back in ... was it a decade ago? more? ... wound up being pretty much of a dealbreaker for me as a consumer of their comics at that time.


People who like Civil War (the movie) argue that the Captain America trilogy is the best superhero trilogy ever, above the Dark Knight(it's only real competition---although Superman 1/2 was probably as good as any of those movies, but the third one ruined that one)
   129. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 09, 2018 at 06:16 PM (#5763485)
I was kind of cheating—the third one was BOY ERASED, an adaptation of a bestselling memoir about a teenage boy who’s sent to a gay conversion therapy program. But it got the “based on a true story” voiceover in the trailer so I’m counting it!
Huh, they didn't show that one for us.

Tangentially related, but is it a new thing that the previews are head-splittingly loud? Even the ones that aren't for action movies.
   130. Greg K Posted: October 09, 2018 at 08:09 PM (#5763538)
Since we're on the topic of super hero comics, a trip into the 18th century may be appropriate...

13 Year old boy doodles chicken wearing pants rather than doing his math homework.
   131. McCoy Posted: October 09, 2018 at 09:14 PM (#5763590)
Good last episode of better call Saul
   132. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 09, 2018 at 09:39 PM (#5763606)

Ha ha, no. Knut Hamsun.
124. phredbird Posted: October 09, 2018 at 05:18 PM (#5763450)

did you see the movie about him with max von sydow?

Nope...in fact, didn’t even know it existed. Decent? Keep in mind that the next good biopic I see about a writer will be the first...
   133. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 10, 2018 at 08:39 AM (#5763843)
Keep in mind that the next good biopic I see about a writer will be the first...


I thought The Shining was pretty good ;)
   134. BDC Posted: October 10, 2018 at 09:28 AM (#5763874)
the next good biopic I see about a writer will be the first


Can You Ever Forgive Me? looks pretty good (and apparently opens next week) – I guess you'd have to put "writer" in scare quotes for that one, but it seems to be a fairly literary picture.
   135. BDC Posted: October 10, 2018 at 09:38 AM (#5763880)
But yes, I don't think movies about writers make for great drama. Writing is exciting, and baseball is like writing, as Marianne Moore used to say, but neither one necessarily makes a good movie.

Best films about famous writers: Mickey Rourke as (basically) Charles Bukowski in Barfly; Judy Davis as George Sand in Impromptu, Joseph Fiennes as Shakespeare in Love, Romain Duris as Molière. Though I know people who hated Barfly and/or Shakespeare in Love. In fact I can sense the incoming hate about to descend on this very comment :-D

EDIT: Molière: if you hated Shakespeare in Love, you'll hate Molière. But I think it's the best of the Shakespeare-in-Love genre. There was also a Goethe in Love (not the exact title, I don't think; watchable) and of course Anne Hathaway as Jane Austen in Love or whatever that was called, which did nothing for me.
   136. jmurph Posted: October 10, 2018 at 09:51 AM (#5763883)
Though I know people who hated Barfly and/or Shakespeare in Love. In fact I can sense the incoming hate about to descend on this very comment :-D

I know the whole thing about Saving Private Ryan and Thin Red Line (and Affliction and Gods and Monsters- that was a pretty good year!), I get it, but Shakespeare in Love is pretty much a perfect big ensemble romantic dramedy. It's great and holds up quite well.
   137. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2018 at 10:16 AM (#5763894)
When I watched Bright Star, the John Keats biopic, it just reminded me how much Great Literature was created by idle wealthy young men. Made me kind of angry. Why should we care what this privileged emo loser thinks about Nightingales or Grecian Urns?
   138. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 10, 2018 at 10:19 AM (#5763899)
Though I know people who hated Barfly and/or Shakespeare in Love.


I actively and purposefully avoided Barfly but (despite it being very uncool) I loved Shakespeare in Love. Of course I also love rom-coms and even a good Soap Opera.
   139. BDC Posted: October 10, 2018 at 10:56 AM (#5763951)
And I forgot Paul Muni as Émile Zola. That's an impossibly corny movie, but you gotta see it once in your life. J'accuse!
   140. Yonder Alonso in misguided trousers (cardinal) Posted: October 10, 2018 at 11:38 AM (#5763988)
When I watched Bright Star, the John Keats biopic, it just reminded me how much Great Literature was created by idle wealthy young men. Made me kind of angry. Why should we care what this privileged emo loser thinks about Nightingales or Grecian Urns?


To be fair to Keats, he didn't have a chance to become an idle wealthy old man, what with dying at 25.
   141. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 10, 2018 at 12:03 PM (#5764003)
Writing is exciting
Can I have some of what you're drinking? My life would be so, so much better if I could find a way to enjoy writing.* I hate it. It's drudgery. Unfortunately, the perception appears to be that I'm good at it, and every job I've ever had (journalist/freelance copywriter/sociology grad student/lawyer) has involved a ton of it.

*Something lengthier than a BBTF post, anyway.
   142. BDC Posted: October 10, 2018 at 12:37 PM (#5764024)
I still like writing. I don't like deadlines, and I don't like revising to meet the demands of editors or peer reviewers. Unfortunately professional writing consists mostly of those things. Self-published book reviews on the Internet have been perfect for me, but have only "earned" me a few dozen free books over the last 15 years :)
   143. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 10, 2018 at 01:38 PM (#5764079)
I still like writing.


My paying job involves "writing" SQl code, data models, source to target documentation and the like (along with the occasional other documentation). My sedentary hobbies involve tons of writing though.
   144. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 10, 2018 at 01:39 PM (#5764084)
Writing is exciting


I love to write. I was an English major in college primarily because of that, and many of the jobs I've had involved writing, editing, and proofreading. The actual writing itself isn't always fun - like any job, it's work, but there's a real thrill when you come up with something that you think is good. And it may be a bit vain, but it's really satisfying when you get something published and see your name in print...
   145. Hysterical & Useless Posted: October 10, 2018 at 01:43 PM (#5764090)
how much Great Literature was created by idle wealthy young men


he didn't have a chance to become an idle wealthy old man, what with dying at 25.


Ummm...Keats was apprenticed to an apothecary. He was neither wealthy nor idle. During his lifetime, his writing was widely disparaged because of his class background, ie, because he wasn't born to wealth and idleness.

My life would be so, so much better if I could find a way to enjoy writing


I hate writing. I love having written.
(Dorothy Parker)

And of course:

No man but a blockhead ever wrote for anything but money.
(Samuel Johnson, LLD)
   146. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2018 at 02:13 PM (#5764123)
Ummm...Keats was apprenticed to an apothecary. He was neither wealthy nor idle. During his lifetime, his writing was widely disparaged because of his class background, ie, because he wasn't born to wealth and idleness.


Couldn't have been more wrong! I seem to remember in the film he's continually moping around in Downton Abbey style settings.
   147. Rennie's Tenet Posted: October 10, 2018 at 02:44 PM (#5764148)
The movie's not really about him, but the Charles Dickens character in The Muppet Christmas Carol is spot-on.
   148. jmurph Posted: October 10, 2018 at 02:47 PM (#5764151)
The movie's not really about him, but the Charles Dickens character in The Muppet Christmas Carol is spot-on.

This should henceforth be referred to as "the Charles Dickens biopic The Muppet Christmas Carol."
   149. Hysterical & Useless Posted: October 10, 2018 at 02:58 PM (#5764161)
I seem to remember in the film he's continually moping around in Downton Abbey style settings


Have to admit that although I saw the film I have little to no memory of it, though the hoity-toity type settings sound familiar. And of course since JK spent the last several years of his life dying of TB, he probably did get in an inordinate amount of moping.
   150. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: October 10, 2018 at 03:14 PM (#5764180)
Keep in mind that the next good biopic I see about a writer will be the first...


I'm not sure it exactly qualifies as a "biopic", but Topsy-Turvey about Gilbert and Sullivan is pretty damn great.
   151. PepTech, the Legendary Posted: October 10, 2018 at 03:26 PM (#5764192)
Keep in mind that the next good biopic I see about a writer will be the first...

I thought The Shining was pretty good ;)
Misery was better...
   152. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: October 10, 2018 at 03:26 PM (#5764193)
Second on Topsy-Turvy.
--
My paying job involves "writing" SQL code, data models, source to target documentation and the like (along with the occasional other documentation). My sedentary hobbies involve tons of writing though.


I do quite a bit of SQL coding in my work as well.

I have a real love/hate relationship with writing. As a rule, the more that I do, the less happy that I am (especially writing that isn't sports or pop culture focused) - so I'm on a longstanding hiatus.
   153. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2018 at 03:43 PM (#5764217)
I have been mulling a career switch to writing of some sort. I love cooking - I love being on my feet and using my hands - but I despise the realities of the restaurant industry, the hours, the pressure, etc. I like writing (I don't love it), but I would love the freedom it could entail. Flexibility is very important to me. At the moment I have a food-related job in which I do a lot of writing, some technical and some more writerly. I don't like being hunched over a computer all day, but the flexibility is exceptional.
   154. Greg K Posted: October 10, 2018 at 04:04 PM (#5764241)
I've probably written more over the past year than I have at any other time in my life*. Unfortunately, the majority of that writing has not been for school or work. So it's been super rewarding, just not the kind of rewarding that helps pay the rent.

But I've absolutely loved doing it. I actually wake up every morning and write for a couple hours first thing before grabbing some breakfast and a shower. [And often fall asleep thinking about what I get to write tomorrow] I can enjoy writing for publication, but it's always got unwelcome stress attached the closer I get to hearing from reviewers/editors. If I could figure out how to make a living out of writing stuff that no one else will evaluate or judge, I'd have it made!

*rough estimate of 750,000 words of podcast scripts, plus I guess technically some work writing.



   155. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2018 at 04:14 PM (#5764246)
750,000 words. Wow!
   156. Baldrick Posted: October 10, 2018 at 05:05 PM (#5764293)
But I've absolutely loved doing it. I actually wake up every morning and write for a couple hours first thing before grabbing some breakfast and a shower. [And often fall asleep thinking about what I get to write tomorrow] I can enjoy writing for publication, but it's always got unwelcome stress attached the closer I get to hearing from reviewers/editors. If I could figure out how to make a living out of writing stuff that no one else will evaluate or judge, I'd have it made!

I've had a music blog for well over a decade now, and kept it pretty regular for about the first eight years. And lately I've been doing a lot of soccer writing. Total compensation for all that work: a few free CDs and press passes for some soccer games. But I've loved it and find the words flow easily and I'm usually excited to get on to the next thing.

During that time I also did grad school, wrote a dissertation, churned out a bunch of papers, revisions, re-revisions, etc. And while some of that is occasionally rewarding, I enjoy it a whole lot less than the 'real' writing. And yes, the dread that comes from dealing with reviews and the endless (long delayed) rejections is terrible.

In other news, I'm very much digging Early Stuart England. Still incredibly frustrated by the English insistence on referring to everyone by their title instead of just using names like normal people. But otherwise, it's all great.
   157. Greg K Posted: October 10, 2018 at 05:19 PM (#5764303)
In other news, I'm very much digging Early Stuart England. Still incredibly frustrated by the English insistence on referring to everyone by their title instead of just using names like normal people. But otherwise, it's all great.

The extensive (and ever-altering) cast list is one of the things I'm always concerned about. But I never know who half the characters in Dostoevsky's novels are, and my mom always told me "as long as you're no worse than Dostoevsky, you're done ok".

Glad to hear you're enjoying it! I was worried two episodes in a row about trade might lose some listeners, but nothing like a murder scandal this week to bring keep the audience engaged.
   158. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2018 at 05:32 PM (#5764313)
Do you mind sharing some of the details on how it's going? How many subscribers and such? It's kind of exciting for you, I imagine.
   159. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 10, 2018 at 05:33 PM (#5764317)
I wonder if it's actually all writing that I don't like, or whether I could do and enjoy it as a hobby if I didn't have to do it so much for work.
   160. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2018 at 05:45 PM (#5764330)
I'm thinking about starting a blog just for fun, reviewing travel literature. I read a lot of the stuff. It's a niche that doesn't exist on the web somehow - Google results still mostly turn up defunct blogs - but I have no illusions that it could ever make me a dime. It would be a hobby, good practice, and intellectual exercise. My goal would be to get someone to send me a free book to review. That book would probably suck, but it would still be neat.
   161. BDC Posted: October 10, 2018 at 06:16 PM (#5764357)
If you put up some well-written regular content, Fish, publishers will be happy to send you books for review. Well, most publishers. A few are still either stingy with review copies or distrustful of web writing. But for the majority, the advantages of getting some immediate free public reaction to a book are substantial.
   162. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2018 at 06:19 PM (#5764359)
What if the only people that read it are a few members of the BTF pop-culture thread and my mom?
   163. Greg K Posted: October 10, 2018 at 06:39 PM (#5764366)
Do you mind sharing some of the details on how it's going? How many subscribers and such? It's kind of exciting for you, I imagine.

It is exciting! Though I get the sense that listener numbers aren't at levels I should be super excited about.

It seems that I have roughly 60-70 regular listeners. On the plus side, 70% of people who listen to the first episode have become regular listeners. I have no idea if that's a good number, but I feel good about it. I had thought the intro would stop a lot of people from committing themselves to a two year slog.

The main obstacle to growth is promotion. I throw a few bucks at targeted facebook ads (hooray for data targeting!) But I imagine there's more I could do.
   164. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 10, 2018 at 06:45 PM (#5764368)
I've been bingeing my way through the "Andrew Talks to Chefs" podcast, in which Andrew Friedman (from what I gather, a longtime marketer for chefs and cookbook collaborator)...well...talks to chefs. He gets a lot of high-profile guests and the interviews are generally interesting, although he has a tic where he compulsively agrees with his guests. There are times when he will interject a "yes," "yeah," or "uh-huh" after literally every clause the guest speaks.

He also, befitting his marketing background, is absolutely shameless about begging listeners to rate or review the show on iTunes over and over and over again, as well as plugging his book (Chefs, Drugs and Rock & Roll - it was an enjoyable read) and book tour events. The promotion gets grating after a few episodes in a row. It's like the NPR pledge drive got a podcast.
   165. BDC Posted: October 10, 2018 at 06:46 PM (#5764369)
What if the only people that read it are a few members of the BTF pop-culture thread and my mom?


That's the other side of web reviewing, though. It not only goes public in a hurry, but it persists (as long as you pay your hosting fee :) If a book gets a print review, most copies of that review get recycled within a few weeks of publication. Put it on the web and people can Google it for years to come (which is why so many print sources maintain web archives). A good percentage of the book reviews I do get read by the authors, and their moms read them, etc., and people sometimes discover them years later. One author actually wrote me last year to say that her mom said hi and thanks.

Once you have posted several reviews of books you have bought or borrowed, identify some likely publishers and write to their publicity departments, either with specific suggestions from their catalog or with the idea that they can send you new stuff at their discretion. Not all will respond, but you may strike up some regular connections.
   166. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2018 at 07:49 PM (#5764397)
Thanks for the deets, professor. Sounds like something that will be an enjoyable hobby for 3 months, an intolerable burden for another couple, and then sadly abandoned. Much like my short career as a community radio DJ.
   167. Greg K Posted: October 10, 2018 at 07:51 PM (#5764398)
Hey, I've persisted in far more pointless endevaours for far longer!
   168. PreservedFish Posted: October 10, 2018 at 07:55 PM (#5764399)
That's encouraging.
   169. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 10, 2018 at 09:10 PM (#5764427)
Hey, I've persisted in far more pointless endevaours for far longer!
Come on, being Canadian isn't all that bad. Don't beat yourself up.
   170. phredbird Posted: October 11, 2018 at 02:03 AM (#5764476)

I am fascinated by your erudite and terrible choices. More detail please on your wacky career.


oh dear. i don't think so. but i will tell you that i enjoyed assembling some of the material we covered in class.

i forgot to mention that walter benjamin's 'the work of art in the age of mechanical reproduction' was also on the syllabus.

'fascism aestheticizes politics, while communism politicizes art' was, to me, one of the foundational theses of the course. it didn't really matter to me that the argument is one that may not have relevance since the fall of communism except that benjamin's rhetorical skill was something that the students needed to be exposed to, along with a number of other sections of the book.

from that, 'ways of seeing' was useful to watch, since berger illustrated a number of benjamin's ideas quite well. that series, to me, still has currency today.

one of the ways i tried to help the students understand some of the concepts was to take direct quotes from 'ways of seeing' and direct quotes spoken by don draper on 'mad men' and asking the students which was which.

they actually enjoyed that.

   171. McCoy Posted: October 11, 2018 at 05:07 AM (#5764485)
Re 153. Make the switch to hotels. Put a suit on and run the whole thing.
   172. PreservedFish Posted: October 11, 2018 at 07:29 AM (#5764489)
Thanks McCoy. I've considered that - in fact, years ago, I got very very close to applying for a master's program at one of the fancy schmancy Swiss hotel schools, which tend to send people into management in places like Hong Kong - but today I'm entrenched in a small town with no real hotel to speak of within an hour's drive. The area I'm in is a wonderful place to start a small business or restaurant, particularly a seasonal one, but the seasonality is all backwards for me, as I have no intention of working my butt off every summer while my kids are off school and then only ever seeing them in the damn winter. I should probably become a teacher - there are vocational schools, culinary programs, a potential option if I can't otherwise find some sort of creative work from home situation.
   173. Zonk just has affection for alumni Posted: October 11, 2018 at 09:17 AM (#5764497)
Watched 22 July on Netflix last night...

It's... haunting. Antiseptic - in an appropriate way, and really just a jarring experience. The closest it really gets to being any kind of morality scold is really the very last few minutes (it's long, about 2.5 hours), and even then - it's more an appropriate and measured capstone than it is slapping an appropriate ending on.

Speaking solely to it at cinematic art - I'll save anything beyond that for the OTP - what impressed me most about it is - believe it or not - the lack of hate... in any direction... it's almost a dazed walk-through of the survivors, their families, the defense attorney, even the mass murderer himself to a certain extent. Even the end, where there is the heart-tugging final testimony - it still manages to avoid cartoon villainy in favor of a more pitiful disgust (or disgusted pity).

IOW - I think that purely as cinematic art, it's extraordinarily well done. It's not a polemic or a screed.
   174. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 11, 2018 at 04:34 PM (#5764795)
Sampling is kinda ###### up isn’t it?

I saw a YouTube video about the early-00s nu metal band Crazy Town. They kinda toiled around making tons of music no one much liked, until the day they decided to just use a Red Hot Chili Peppers guitar lick over one of their raps and bam, they became a 1-hit-wonder with “Butterfly.”

It’s weirder still because they had toured as one of the Chili Peppers’ opening acts a few years before “Butterfly.” So like...they presumably heard the RHCP guitar lick on “Pretty Little Ditty” on the tour, thought “Man I wish we could make music that good,” but then a bit later realized “Hey wait, we don’t have to make anything on our own, we can just take that exact guitar lick and call it ‘sampling’ and be done with it.” And that’s what they did!
   175. PreservedFish Posted: October 11, 2018 at 08:58 PM (#5764927)
It's true, you don't know much about music.

Sampling can be craven and avaricious, or it can be reverential.

Crazy Town sampled a ~15-second snippet from an obscure song, a "deep cut" with an uncharacteristic sound that was never played on the radio, and which many RHCP's fans probably couldn't have identified. In my book, that's doing more good than harm. It rescued a little bit of beauty from the dustbin of music history*. You presume that they were lazy and greedy. I presume that they were friends with RHCP, that they asked permission, that they shared writing credits, that RHCP has been handsomely rewarded from the "Butterfly" sales, and that they enjoyed the new attention it brought to one of their classic albums.

The idea that every song most be wholly novel and unique is alien to the dominant American traditions, whether folk music, blues, jazz, or standards. It's true and obvious that some people sample with ill intent, merely to steal a better melody than they could have come up with themselves, but many other samples both pay tribute to the original work and add to the cross-generational musical dialogue.

*And then proceeded to taint it with disgusting white guy rap-rock, but let's put that aside for now.
   176. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: October 12, 2018 at 12:03 PM (#5765110)
They kinda toiled around making tons of music no one much liked, until the day they decided to just use a Red Hot Chili Peppers guitar lick over one of their raps and bam, they became a 1-hit-wonder with “Butterfly.”


Heh, I remember that song from the "Orange County" soundtrack. "Higher Ground" I think was the sample.

Was it here where we discussed good soundtracks from bad movies? "Orange County" could be a nominee. I'd probably go with "The Jerky Boys", a film which I actually have never seen, but am nevertheless comfortable stating that it is terrible.
   177. Swoboda is freedom Posted: October 12, 2018 at 12:53 PM (#5765152)
Nope...in fact, didn’t even know it existed. Decent? Keep in mind that the next good biopic I see about a writer will be the first...


My Left Foot was pretty good. I liked Capote too. I liked Infamous too with Toby Jones as Capote. Almost Famous is about Cameron Crowe as a music writer.


Not bio pics but like Adaptation and Barton Fink (not the Coens best but pretty memorable). Stranger than Fiction?
   178. Greg K Posted: October 12, 2018 at 01:20 PM (#5765165)
Was it here where we discussed good soundtracks from bad movies? "Orange County" could be a nominee. I'd probably go with "The Jerky Boys", a film which I actually have never seen, but am nevertheless comfortable stating that it is terrible.

I've neither listened to the soundtrack nor seen the movie, but an ex-girlfriend once bought the soundtrack to "Wicker Park" after seeing the movie and hating it.
   179. phredbird Posted: October 12, 2018 at 04:38 PM (#5765305)

Siesta was kind of a dopy movie with ellen barkin and gabriel byrne, but it had a killer soundtrack by miles davis.

johnny suede was kind of interesting and i enjoyed brad pitt playing a retro rocker, and the soundtrack had a bunch of great music by link wray.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziG6f-vN2iA
   180. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 13, 2018 at 12:01 PM (#5765590)
Back home as of early yesterday afternoon from hernia surgery; this is the first time I've really felt like parking myself at the computer. Everything went as well as can be expected, I'm sure, except for the part about throwing up two nights running. Blech (literally, I suppose). Not the best idea ever after abdominal surgery.

I see the surgeon next Thursday, but I guess until then I'll be pretty much living on soups from Panera Bread & the Chinese & Thai/Laotion eateries near my abode.
   181. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 13, 2018 at 12:06 PM (#5765592)
My life would be so, so much better if I could find a way to enjoy writing.* I hate it. It's drudgery. Unfortunately, the perception appears to be that I'm good at it, and every job I've ever had (journalist/freelance copywriter/sociology grad student/lawyer) has involved a ton of it.


Having done both, I've found that I'm far, far happier screwing with other people's words -- i.e. editing -- than I am generating my own, though apparently I'm at least competent at the latter. I still do a fair amount of it for work, my job title (online managing editor) aside, and over the years I've come to not mind doing it as much as I used to. (I haven't actually been a writer per se since freelancing back around late '04.)

Can't remember who said it, but there's a quote that goes something like "I hate writing. I love having written." That's a pretty good summary.
   182. Howie Menckel Posted: October 13, 2018 at 12:13 PM (#5765596)
Back home as of early yesterday afternoon from hernia surgery

had this 3 years ago. had my doc visit a week later, all good.
the receptionist asked what day I should list as when I am ready to return to work.
"How about NOW?" I asked.

she said she had never heard that before.

to get back on topic, I write for a living.
but I also say, don't do it "unless you must."
   183. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 13, 2018 at 12:40 PM (#5765604)
had this 3 years ago. had my doc visit a week later, all good.
the receptionist asked what day I should list as when I am ready to return to work.
"How about NOW?" I asked.

she said she had never heard that before.


I suspect I'll be tempted to take that approach, especially since my absence means my ridiculously understaffed office (the social media specialist left 2 weeks ago) means we're down 33 percent. (It's really more like 66 percent, since my supervisor could no more post something on our news site -- my main job duty -- than she could split the atom.)

With any luck, though, I'll keep reminding myself that I'm looking at losing a week's vacation at the end of the year because I skipped a scheduled week off in anticipation of Hurricane Florence.
   184. Omineca Greg Posted: October 14, 2018 at 10:03 AM (#5766197)
I'm listening to [Sons of Kemet] it right now and really enjoying it


Hutchings is in another band, the one that brings the "Space Is The Place" to the party. The music doesn't owe that much to Sun Ra, but instead they see him as a spiritual godfather, his ability to create personal myth is how he inspires them, the ability to define yourself in the face of millions (OK, in Sun Ra's it might only be thousands) of commentators in the peanut gallery who are there to put you into a bag. The band is called "The Comet Is Coming"...

Neon Baby

Here's a similar rec right back at ya: Salah Ragab and the Cairo Jazz Band - "Neveen". You may know it already, but it was new to me.

No, I'd never heard of that before. Thank you, I like it.

From right when the Pop Culture Extravaganza was first posted, it's been inevitable that one day "Jazz From North Africa" would eventually take over the thread. Pavement, Games of Thrones, superhero movies...sure, you can talk about those things for awhile, but I knew that one day the elephant in the room (no really, they had elephants in North Africa...until Whitey killed them all) could no longer be ignored.

See the pyramids along the Nile
Watch the sun rise on a tropic isle
Just remember, darling, all the while
You belong to me.

See the marketplace in old Algiers
Send me photographs and souvenirs
But remember when a dream appears
You belong to me.

I'll be so alone without you
Maybe you'll be lonesome too---and blue

Fly the ocean in a silver plane
Watch the jungle when it's wet with rain
Just remember till you're home again
You belong to me

Price/King/Stewart


OK, that's not really jazz, and it's not from North Africa, it's about North Africa, but no one sets a mood like Jo Stafford, so we'll go with it.

Where were we?

Oh, yeah, Algiers.

At Padovani Beach the dance hall is open every day. And in that huge rectangular box with its entire side open to the sea, the poor young people of the neighborhood dance until evening. Often I used to await there a a moment of exceptional beauty. During the day the hall is protected by sloping wooden awnings. When the sun goes down they are raised. Then the hall is filled with an odd green light born of the double shell of the sky and the sea. When one is seated far from the windows, one sees only the sky and, silhouetted against it, the faces of the dancers passing in succession. Sometimes a waltz is being played, and against the green background the black profiles whirl obstinately like those cut-out silhouettes that are attached to a phonograph's turntable. Night comes rapidly after this, and with it the lights. But I am unable to relate the thrill and secrecy that subtle instant holds for me. I recall at least a magnificent tall girl who had danced all afternoon. She was wearing a jasmine garland on her right blue dress, wet with perspiration from the small of her back to her legs. She was laughing as she danced and throwing back her head. As she passed the tables, she left behind her a mingled scent of flowers and flesh. When evening came, I could no longer see her body pressed tight to her partner, but against her body alternating spots of white jasmine and black hair, and when she would throw back her swelling breast I would hear her laugh and see her partner's profile suddenly plunge forward. I owe to such evenings the idea I have of innocence. In any case, I learn not to separate these creatures bursting with violent energy from the sky where their desires whirl.

Camus


Ah, absurdists make boners so complicated. And no matter how compelling the offer may seem, DON'T take Albert up on his invitation for a stroll on the beach. Camus Beach Days are Bad Beach Days, take my word on this.

And just when you think this post couldn't get any stranger...

Anyway, Padovani Beach is now known as El Kettani Beach, and of course, is in Algiers. Probably the most famous jazzman from Algiers is Martial Solal. Let's listen to his most well known crossover work, shall we?

New York Herald Tribune

I know exactly what you're thinking, I haven't offered up even one bit of North African Jazz yet! We've had 50s pop exoticism, existential soft porn, and now footage of Jean Seberg wandering the streets of Paris, wearing an agreeably tight t-shirt, with jazzy, but not jazz, accompaniment.

First off, I don't like your attitude, mister. I'm trying to set the scene, if you don't like it, cram it, buddy! Go back to reading your "I watched a TV show, it was good" type posts that make up the bulk of the material here. Keep on killing the elephants and the dodos and the West African Black Rhinos (the last one really galls me, if you cant get a boner, you can either read some Camus or take a boner pill, your choice will probably depend on if you have a library card or a really good benefits plan...but don't kill rhinos to take their horns)...OK, I'm done with my anti-poaching virtue signalling now, back to your regularly scheduled libertarian "If the Rhinos didn't make it, tough ####, the free market has spoken" programming.

Secondly, what's wrong with Jean Seberg in a tight t-shirt? I'll leave it up to the Godard scholars here to give the finer details, but I can lay the groundwork...

Why is this scene, and accompanying music called "New York Herald Tribune"? It's in Paris after all. Now don't act like you don't know, it was the second thing you probably noticed (after the pixie cut). "New York Herald Tribune" is written on Jean's tits. Sorry to put it like that, but that's how it is. But what to make of that?

A biting indictment of male gaze? Keep killing those rhinos, boys.

A nod and the wink of the leering viewer wallowing in a young woman's sexuality? Drinking in her gamine beauty like a camel drinking at the oasis? It's all about the humps, isn't boys?

A metaphor for Michel's fascination with all things American; the music, the culture, the gangster chic, the women?

Anyway, you can make up your own mind.

Martial Solal is so much more than movie music though. Dude is 91 and still kicking. Let's see...how 'bout...well, of course...

A Night In Tunisia
   185. PreservedFish Posted: October 14, 2018 at 11:15 AM (#5766203)
Some time ago ElRoy observed that despite the frequency with which things are observed to be "burgeoning," few ever seem to "burgeon" or to have "burgeoned." Last night I was re-reading Right Ho, Jeeves and came across an example in the flesh, as Bertie describes the effect of Jeeves' famous miraculous hangover cure:

As I drained the glass now, new life seemed to burgeon within me.

Of course this is Wodehouse, and almost every sentence has some wit or novelty to it, so he very well could be playing on the scarcity of the word.
   186. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 14, 2018 at 12:33 PM (#5766214)
Finished reading a true crime paperback a couple of days ago & was intrigued to see not one, not two, not three but four references -- all in dialogue -- to what the suspect experienced after he "waked" up. I found that a bit jarring, as I would use "woke," but Google advises me that the first usage isn't actually incorrect.

I wonder if it's a regional thing. The crime occurred in Shreveport (which is why I picked the volume up at Montgomery's only used book place last week), which is very much my own neck of the woods, but the suspect was from Morty's stomping grounds, pretty much.
   187. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 14, 2018 at 12:42 PM (#5766216)
I mentioned quite a while back that I wanted to read some of Wodehouse's Jeeves books, but I never followed up on my comments. I got an omnibus edition from the library that included Right Ho, Jeeves, and Joy in the Morning, along with a collection of short stories.

I read Right Ho, Jeeves first, and enjoyed it very much. But when I read Joy in the Morning, I thought it was one of the funniest things I've ever read. The wit seemed sharper, and while Right Ho, Jeeves seemed like a collection of set pieces, Joy in the Morning was a snowball rolling down a mountain, gathering momentum all the time. I'm glad I read both of them, but I preferred the latter. Thanks to those who recommended Wodehouse; I'll certainly read more.
   188. Morty Causa Posted: October 14, 2018 at 03:46 PM (#5766245)
Astute assessment there. Joy in the Morning has a perfectly balanced plot, all on a very high plane. Quite an achievement, especially considering he wrote it while in a German internment camp. Many fans, which include scholars and critics, regard Right Ho, Jeeves the masterpiece of the series, but Joy in the Morning has its advocates, you make a good case for it edging out others. Right Ho, Jeeves has its renown setpiece, Gussie handing out the prizes at the Market Snodsbury boys' grammar school fete, but it is also well-plotted, but the setpieces, of which the Gussie one is just one-- there's Bertie accidentally proposing to the Bassett and Anatole fulminating in his unique idiolect at Gussie up on Anatole's bedroom skylight. They are so good they tend to overwhelm its well-balanced place. Still, JitM goes from 0 to 80 in record time and just cruises at that speed until the end when it does a Road Runner burst of speed as it makes its exit. Wodehouse was never in more full command of all his considerable comic resources.

But, I consider the first four Jeeves-Wooster novels in the running for best novel (they are all A+).

For the Blandings Castle series, my favorites are Leave it to Jeeves, Summer Lightning, and Heavy Weather (the last two making up a tandem).

Miscellaneous favorites include The Luck of the Bodkins (I'm a sucker for shipboard farces), Summer Moonshine, Sam the Sudden, and Quick Service, to name just a few.
   189. PreservedFish Posted: October 14, 2018 at 04:03 PM (#5766248)
I believe I'll put Joy in the Morning on my list. I just chewed through The Inimitable Jeeves, which is even more episodic than Right Ho, Jeeves, and also fairly repetitive, many of the stories featuring Bingo Little, who has the same conundrum every time, and liberally re-using structures and subplots such as 'Jeeves and Bertie fight about the fruity cummerbund.' Which isn't to say that it's not an absolute gem, which it is.
   190. BDC Posted: October 14, 2018 at 04:19 PM (#5766251)
PG Wodehouse also wrote the lyrics to Jerome Kern's song "Bill," which would eventually be integral to Show Boat, and is still one of the loveliest of all show tunes.
   191. Morty Causa Posted: October 14, 2018 at 04:33 PM (#5766258)
189:

Some consider The Inimitable Jeeves the first novel, highly episodic though it is. It's probably my favorite book of short stories. But, then, Wodehouse wrote a lot of short stories (magazines during the teens, '20s, and '30s paid really well for short stories), including many Jeeves ones (he wrote many more Jeeves short stories than Blandings Castle ones) before a novel proper came to the fore (Thank You, Jeeves, 1934). One thing about Wodehouse is that he didn't feel just because a series was popular he had to churn 'em out. The first Blandings Castle novel is in 1915. The second 1923, the third 1929, the fourth 1933. Since he started late on the Jeeves novels, they are closer together (he wrote essentially the same number of novels in each series), but, still, Blandings and standalones are interspersed throughout the Jeeves series.
   192. Morty Causa Posted: October 14, 2018 at 04:36 PM (#5766262)
I believe I'll put Joy in the Morning on my list.

I don't think you'll regret it. As Vortex notes, it's pretty damn great. Plot, characters, atmosphere--a lot of it takes place at night, giving it A Midsummer Night's Dream tint.
   193. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 14, 2018 at 05:29 PM (#5766279)
Hey, do any of you guys have very fond memories of watching Toy Story for the first time?

If so, I beg you not to watch it on dvd.

Cuz I’m doing it right now. And I mean. It’s like watching a PlayStation2 cutscene.
   194. PreservedFish Posted: October 14, 2018 at 05:39 PM (#5766283)
I never connected much with any of the Toy Story movies, even though they're all by consensus totally brilliant.
   195. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: October 15, 2018 at 03:03 AM (#5766553)
Toy Story with its once-astonishing but now 25-year-old graphics and its uncanny valley mean kid still kicks emotional and comedic ass over the far more technically proficient animated features of today. Ordinarily I'd shudder at the prospect of a "Toy Story 4," which is in production, but the marvelous "Toy Story 3" is at worst the second-greatest "threequel" ever made. That's a question of Woody vs. Blondie, and Buzz vs. Tuco.
   196. Lassus Posted: October 15, 2018 at 08:11 AM (#5766561)
My perfect hypothetical podcast of McCoy and Ray talking movies has been thrown into disarray by the addition of Davo to the pop-culture review scene. Three is a lot for a good podcast, but I'm willing to take the risk.
   197. PreservedFish Posted: October 15, 2018 at 08:20 AM (#5766563)
It would be amazing to hear them discourse on one of Davo's preferred genres.
   198. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 15, 2018 at 08:35 AM (#5766569)
Hey, do any of you guys have very fond memories of watching Toy Story for the first time?


My boys are adults now (both voting age), but we watched and owned and rewatched pretty much every Pixar movie for many years. Toy Story is very solid, but 2 is the better movie IMO. Great moments in both, with TS 3 still good but a fair step behind.
   199. McCoy Posted: October 15, 2018 at 08:43 AM (#5766570)
Wall-E was on last night again. Pixar for awhile there had a great run of great first acts.
   200. PreservedFish Posted: October 15, 2018 at 09:19 AM (#5766580)
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NewsblogOT - 2018 NFL thread
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