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Monday, October 01, 2018

Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (October 2018)

Over the past eight months EW has stalked [Jamie Lee] Curtis and the rest of the Halloween crew — though hopefully in a much less threatening manner than Michael Myers tracks Laurie Strode. The result is a story which includes interviews with Curtis, [David Gordon] Green, [Danny] McBride, [John] Carpenter, and Nick Castle, who once again makes an appearance as Myers in the new film, 40 years after playing the slasher icon in the original movie.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: October 01, 2018 at 09:32 AM | 732 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   501. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 19, 2018 at 02:47 PM (#5771310)
Flip
   502. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 19, 2018 at 02:51 PM (#5771316)
What is the appeal of, I dunno, hearing some fat woman sing uber-melodramatically in Italian?

Different strokes.
But that's not really equivalent, is it? Terror and mutilation are things that are repulsive to us from an evolutionary standpoint. Yes, of course fear has it biological function, but it's not designed for enjoyment purposes.
   503. Morty Causa Posted: October 19, 2018 at 02:52 PM (#5771317)
The British Film Institute list of Top 100 British movies


Any list of great British films that doesn't have Colonel Blimp at or near the top will be ignored by me.
   504. PreservedFish Posted: October 19, 2018 at 02:53 PM (#5771318)

“The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown."

-- H.P. Lovecraft


I wrote a paper on this topic, Lovecraft's treatment of the unknown, in high school. I reread some of his best known stories recently and I was amused at how intentionally vague he can be, in combination with how ridiculously florid the language is. It's a strange combination, someone will see something scary and it results in a paragraph of the purplest prose imaginable with somehow essentially no details.
   505. Tin Angel Posted: October 19, 2018 at 02:54 PM (#5771319)
Yes, of course fear has it biological function, but it's not designed for enjoyment purposes.


But our brain does release "enjoyable" chemicals when one is relieved of fear.
   506. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: October 19, 2018 at 02:54 PM (#5771320)
I went out to the movies in SF, the theatre happened to be showing the midnight premiere of one of the Saw torture flicks. The people that lined up for that one were a really terrifying collection of humanity.


I can imagine - like I said, not a big fan of those... I think I saw the first Saw - and as noted, saw the Hostel, but not at all my cup of tea.

I make an exception for zombie films - but it's not really the gore that draws me to them (I'd say it's 80% the post-apocalyptic themes/20% the humor).

For the few true "slasher" - which I guess I'd put in a separate category from the pure gore films... Hills Have Eyes is just a really, really creepy -- lonely desert, etc - atmosphere. Texas Chainsaw - the original, I just like for the minimalism and the WTF is happening shock.

Raimi's stuff - the Evil Dead series? There's the cabin in the woods creepiness, the obvious brilliance of Bruce Campbell, and the sly sense of the absurd.

But yeah, the hardcore stuff like the Saw films do not do anything for me. Only seen the original, like I said, but I thought the odd premise was more interesting than the gore or mutilation. I see no reason for there to have been any sequels (well, 'artistically'... I mean, I'm sure the 'reason' was money).
   507. PreservedFish Posted: October 19, 2018 at 02:56 PM (#5771321)
Torture porn is one thing but there are very few action movies - maybe few movies at all - that don't engage your sense of fear at least to a small degree.
   508. Tin Angel Posted: October 19, 2018 at 02:57 PM (#5771323)
I make an exception for zombie films - but it's not really the gore that draws me to them (I'd say it's 80% the post-apocalyptic themes/20% the humor).


I'm kind of obsessed with the original Zombie (1979).
   509. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:01 PM (#5771329)
Yes, of course fear has it biological function, but it's not designed for enjoyment purposes.


Neither is sadness, I presume, & yet just a few posts back people were listing movies that made them cry.
   510. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:04 PM (#5771330)
I'm kind of obsessed with the original Zombie (1979).


I need to rewatch that, having done so only once, back in early '04, when my zombie movie obsession was just beginning*. In retrospect, it was something like the 23rd such film I'd ever watched (this over a period of about 30 1/2 years). I've added another 300 to the list since then.

*The actual starting point was the aforementioned 2004 Dawn of the Dead, the only movie I've ever paid three times to watch on the big screen. The foundation, though, was laid the previous year with 28 Days Later.
   511. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:05 PM (#5771331)
Neither is sadness, I presume, & yet just a few posts back people were listing movies that made them cry.
Yeah, I guess, but it still strikes me as different. Fear and mutilation are, biologically speaking, actively aversive to us. Our evolutionary reaction is to recoil from them. Sadness doesn't trigger that involuntary response.
   512. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:08 PM (#5771333)
Yeah, I guess, but it still strikes me as different. Fear and mutilation are, biologically speaking, actively aversive to us. Our evolutionary reaction is to recoil from them. Sadness doesn't trigger that involuntary response.


IDK, setting aside the romanticism of ancestral worship type films -- plenty of good historical films involve elements that we, as a society, would currently recoil from.

I mean, Schindler's List doesn't exactly have a REALLY happy ending.... Neither does the prior-page mentioned Life is Beautiful.
   513. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:10 PM (#5771336)
Fear and mutilation are, biologically speaking, actively aversive to us. Our evolutionary reaction is to recoil from them.


Sickness & death are also actively aversive to us, surely. I for one am fascinated with books on contagion, disease & the like, & that extends to movies. Finding something enjoyable &/or interesting doesn't mean that one wishes to, I dunno, actually experience it or wish to see others cope with its manifestation.

See also, I suppose, war movies, books, etc.
   514. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:11 PM (#5771337)
GROWN UPS....man, I dunno. I had just gone to my ten-year high school reunion. My wife had just found out she was pregnant.

I don’t know. I have justifications for the rest. Sometimes I just cry, I guess.
   515. PreservedFish Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:11 PM (#5771338)
I mean there's a reason we don't just watch videos of fluffy baby bunnies all day. Most of us, that is.
   516. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:13 PM (#5771343)
I mean there's a reason we don't just watch videos of fluffy baby bunnies all day. Most of us, that is.


Sure, because Fatal Attraction has left a lasting mark on many of us... Donnie Darko, too.
   517. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:20 PM (#5771348)
I mean there's a reason we don't just watch videos of fluffy baby bunnies all day. Most of us, that is.


Elroy strikes me as more of a brony.
   518. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:21 PM (#5771349)
I mean there's a reason we don't just watch videos of fluffy baby bunnies all day. Most of us, that is.

Sure, because Fatal Attraction has left a lasting mark on many of us... Donnie Darko, too.


Night of the Lepus, hop on down!
   519. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:22 PM (#5771352)
Night of the Lepus, hop on down!


Dammit.

I was trying to think of that!
   520. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:25 PM (#5771353)
Elroy strikes me as more of a brony.
I have a special custom-made ARod one. Every day I comb his pretty, pretty tail.
   521. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:26 PM (#5771354)
Elroy strikes me as more of a brony.


Not to change topics/media, but convinced a friend who had never watched Bob's Burgers to watch an episode with me.

I chose The Equestranauts.

It worked.
   522. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:29 PM (#5771357)
   523. PreservedFish Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:30 PM (#5771358)
I'll let one of the professors get into details, but of course Aristotle recognized fear as one of the critical emotions we feel to prompt catharsis, which is sort of letting one's pent up emotions flow freely, which feels good and clears the head. Like rubbing one out.
   524. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: October 19, 2018 at 03:40 PM (#5771365)

I also considered a number of films that, looking at the reviews - generally do get decent reviews and more "decent films I like more than most people". That would include stuff like Kelly's Heroes, Tremors, and a few others.


Tremors is a legitimately very good film.

I've always liked it since I saw it in the theatre, it's easily in my Top 100 favorite films; but I hadn't really thought about it recently until I watched the Red Letter Media re:view of it.

It's just a really, really well made, smart movie about ... graboids!
   525. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: October 19, 2018 at 04:17 PM (#5771380)
Was trying to think of a top 10 movies list, but it's probably easier to a do a top 10 "bad" movies I love...

1. Battlefield Earth - the only one I have on this list because I just truly love how cheesy, awful, and ridiculous it is. I still watch it when it shows up on cable. It's like frying cheese whiz in bacon fat. It's not actually that good and it's awful for you, but with the right... enhancement? Ummmm.... yummmm.


Battlefield Earth was the first movie I ever purchased on DVD. I'd seen it before and thought it was hilarious and couldn't resist when I saw it sitting lonely in a "Buy Me Please!" remainder box when I was in line at the Burbank Fry's. Well worth the $3.99, that movie makes me as happy as a baby psychlo on a straght diet of kerbango!

Some more choices I'd add:

The Apple ... not more needs to be added to Nathan Rabin's wonderful write-up for his AV Club series My Year of Flops, but I ... just love this movie. In another world, it would be a cult-midnight screening sensation, like Rocky Horror or The Room. It tells the story of a naive folk signing duo from Canada, who win a prestigious music competition and are then slowly corrupted by the Devil himself, in the form of a top music executive.

Its pleasures are too numberable to fully recount, suffice to say, do you know all of the different drugs people used to take back in the 70's? I can safely say the people involved in making The Apple took ALL of them, in large quantities. There's a musical number that's an ode to methamphetamines (yes, that's a young Catherine Mary Stewart and ... don't blink a young Finola Hughes) and the movie ends with a literal (well, within the movie literal) deus ex machina and in between there's a delight of batshit lunacy.

Deep Blue Sea ...great white sharks become super intelligent, hunt people. MY HAT IS LIKE A SHARK'S FIN!

The Arrival ... IDMB gives the following synopsis of the plot: "Zane, an astronomer, discovers intelligent alien life. But the aliens are keeping a deadly secret, and will do anything to stop Zane from learning it."

I'll simply add ... Zane, an astronomer ... is played by Charlie Sheen.

You're welcome.
   526. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: October 19, 2018 at 04:18 PM (#5771382)
ah, deep blue sea. An amazingly bad movie to love.
   527. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 19, 2018 at 04:25 PM (#5771390)
The Arrival ... IDMB gives the following synopsis of the plot: "Zane, an astronomer, discovers intelligent alien life. But the aliens are keeping a deadly secret, and will do anything to stop Zane from learning it."

I'll simply add ... Zane, an astronomer ... is played by Charlie Sheen.

You're welcome.


IIRC, this one came out around the same time as Jodie Foster's much-lauded Contact. I caught Arrival at the dollar theater maybe 4 miles from my house & found it quite enjoyable. I finally saw Contact maybe a year ago. It certainly didn't suck.

Another convenient encapsulation of my tastes, I suppose.
   528. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 19, 2018 at 04:26 PM (#5771391)
526: Oh, I love that one so much, too. It’s basically perfect—for certain definitions of perfect...
   529. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 19, 2018 at 04:46 PM (#5771394)
Am about to go watch the final 25 minutes or so of How to Talk to Girls at Parties.


The movie wound up being very, very enjoyable -- off the top of my head, probably my favorite of the year. I'd forgotten that it's basically an expansion of a Neil Gaiman short story (that I haven't read) based somewhat autobiographically on his own first-generation punk youth (he's a year & 6 weeks my junior).

Other than a deliberately Lovecraftian short story or two, I don't believe I've ever read any of Gaiman's fiction, & for that matter offhand I'm not sure I've read any of his comics other than an OK-ish (given my complete lack of interest in Kirby's '70s DC oeuvre, it could hardly have been anything more than that, however skillfully done) adaptation of Kirby's New Gods stuff around a dozen years ago.

Other than the opening New Rose, most of the music was original (& really quite decent). A notable exception was a couple of tracks by the semi-legendary if obscure Homosexuals (think: Desperate Bicycles if they'd been infinitely more prolific), whose singer has a bit role in the film. And whoever did the "Thanks to" listing knew his or her #### -- mentions not only of the obvious Pistols & Damned but also the Buzzcocks, Eater, Lurkers, Stranglers & Vibrators, among others.
   530. Greg K Posted: October 19, 2018 at 04:49 PM (#5771396)
The Arrival ... IDMB gives the following synopsis of the plot: "Zane, an astronomer, discovers intelligent alien life. But the aliens are keeping a deadly secret, and will do anything to stop Zane from learning it."

I read this as the tag line for the Amy Adams movie.

Which would be weird because
A] I'm pretty sure her name isn't "Zane" in that movie
B] she's a linguist, not an astronomer
C] The aliens are trying to give her information, not hide it

But, aside from that, I thought...yeah, that about sums it up.
   531. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: October 19, 2018 at 04:54 PM (#5771397)
Oh, here's some bonus bad/good Charlie Sheen: The Chase


Here’s movie critic James Berardinelli on The Chase: "As an example of modern cinematic art, The Chase is an utter failure. As a character study, it can’t get past the comic book stage. As a tightly plotted thriller, it’s missing about half the story line. But, as a piece of unfettered, unpretentious entertainment, it hits the bullseye." That’s a perfect distillation of the Good Bad Movie genre. To further Berardinelli’s point, and to give you some highlights if you haven’t seen The Chase, here are a few things that happen:

Charlie Sheen, a children’s party clown, is on the lam after a string of robberies perpetrated by a clown are pegged on him. (They got the wrong clown!)
Charlie Sheen, in order to evade police, takes Kristy Swanson hostage and initiates the titular chase.
Two vigilantes — played by Anthony Kiedis and Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, of course — try to apprehend Sheen, only for their car to crash in a fiery explosion.
Swanson empathizes with Sheen, and the two have sex DURING THE CHASE.
At the end of the film, Swanson, now in love with Sheen, steals a helicopter, and the two abscond to Mexico and live happily ever after.



h/t The Ringer: The 50 Best Good Bad Movies
   532. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: October 19, 2018 at 05:05 PM (#5771399)
Dammit, I forgot Anaconda ... HOW COULD I FORGET ANACONDA?!?!??

J-LO, Ice Cube, Eric Stoltz (with the best mid-movie move ever), Jon Voight hammier than a North Carolina swine farm.

Just remember snakes don't eat people ...
   533. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 19, 2018 at 05:07 PM (#5771400)
The movie podcast I’m listening to just relayed an anecdote about Deep Blue Sea. (There’s a SPOILER but I mean if you haven’t seen it by this point, that’s your fault):


Ok so after they had finished principal photography, they called star Saffron Burrows up and said “Hey, sorry, but we need to shoot another scene with you, a scene where you get eaten by the shark.”

And Miss Burrows goes “Okay, sure, I guess. Yeah. But, ummm.....Why?”

And the studio heads said “Well...in every test screening we’ve done so far the audiences have been shouting ‘DIE! DIE! DIE!’ at your character.”
   534. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: October 19, 2018 at 05:37 PM (#5771410)
I think it's incorrect to claim the two things I bolded are always distinct things.


Had I said they were you might have a point, since I didn't make that claim I am not sure what your point is.
   535. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 20, 2018 at 12:07 AM (#5771606)
Total long-shot, but, you BBTFers are large and contain multitudes:

I was watching a movie and in one scene our heroine is watching something on TV. I searched everywhere and couldn't find any source showing WHAT movie she was watching. So I took a few screenshots of it on my laptop:

Does anyone recognize what movie this is (or even what actors these are)?

Much obliged!
   536. McCoy Posted: October 20, 2018 at 07:32 AM (#5771649)
It would help if you told us what movie you were watching.
   537. PreservedFish Posted: October 20, 2018 at 08:07 AM (#5771656)
I watched La La Land last night. Two years behind the curve. Of course it was charming but a fairly light confection. The music, singing and dancing were not of very high quality (I think that was partially intentional), the agonizing the characters do over whether or not to follow your dreams or sell out was pretty tired subject matter. The huge Oscar buzz must have been 99% attributable to the fact that it's a unabashed love letter to Hollywood and Los Angeles. I think that, as television has increasingly (and perhaps definitively) become the medium of serious drama, and film has had to consolidate its few advantages by concentrating more than ever on action and spectacle, Hollywood needs to lean on nostalgia as an attraction for its non-superhero movies.
   538. BDC Posted: October 20, 2018 at 08:32 AM (#5771658)
I don't believe I've ever read any of Gaiman's fiction


Neil Gaiman must be the five-tool-player of contemporary culture. Well, four, I guess: screenwriting, comics, adult fiction, children's fiction; and then he also writes constantly about himself and the contemporary scene. I really only know his children's books. Coraline is a classic – a book that seems like it should have been around forever, but is barely 15 years old. La Dernière is re-reading The Graveyard Book right now; she teaches it every year. Gaiman is unusual in knowing children's-book conventions and traditions really well but still being able to write fresh stories in the old modes.
   539. Howie Menckel Posted: October 20, 2018 at 01:08 PM (#5771711)
I just made your day

that's a short video of an 11-year football player with one hand, who gets the jersey of his dreams - Seattle's Shaquem Griffin
   540. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 20, 2018 at 01:11 PM (#5771712)
535-536: Aaron Katz’s Gemini
   541. cardsfanboy Posted: October 20, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5771758)
I make an exception for zombie films - but it's not really the gore that draws me to them (I'd say it's 80% the post-apocalyptic themes/20% the humor).


A well done zombie film is about the political message or whatever message they are trying to send... it's not about the gore, violence or scare but about a message.
   542. cardsfanboy Posted: October 20, 2018 at 05:22 PM (#5771761)
double post
   543. PreservedFish Posted: October 20, 2018 at 10:50 PM (#5771879)
A well done zombie film is about the political message or whatever message they are trying to send... it's not about the gore, violence or scare but about a message.


It's obviously also about the gore and violence.
   544. Lassus Posted: October 20, 2018 at 10:57 PM (#5771881)
Upon extensive review, it's difficult for me to see how and where Gaiman has actually surpassed his work on Sandman. (Granted, it's a very, very high bar.)
   545. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 22, 2018 at 04:10 PM (#5772614)
Kyoto band Homecomings have quietly worked their way into becoming one of my favorite current artists. The use of the word quietly is deliberate – theirs is a subtle appeal that doesn’t immediately hit you over the head. A Western parallel might be Camera Obscura, a band with excellent songwriting skills and a good, but non-flashy, singer. Ayaka Tatamino often sings in English, but for this song she uses Japanese. Guitarist Yuki Fukutomi has a knack for coming up with memorable themes that often don’t appear until late in the song – here it doesn’t appear until after the three-minute mark. He did the same thing on “Songbirds”, a great track from earlier this year that was used as the ending song for the anime Liz and the Blue Bird. I shelled out the bucks to buy the Japanese CD-single for that song, figuring it would remain a non-LP track. Homecomings’ new album, Whale Living, is released this week, and includes both that song, and the new song this video is for, “Blue Hour”. Oh, well…
   546. BDC Posted: October 22, 2018 at 04:35 PM (#5772631)
Carmen at the Dallas Opera right now is a very good version, with no notable weaknesses: except maybe a set that, for a couple of acts, required characters to enter on a mezzanine stage left, cross and exit stage right, and then come down a narrow staircase crossing back left again. This was confusing enough when it was one person, but the entire chorus coming and going that way looked like rush hour at Penn Station.

I remember awhile ago somebody was asking the difference between opera and musical, and the (quite useful) distinction that opera is sung through, without spoken dialogue. Carmen, though, has lots of spoken dialogue, almost as much as some modern musicals. It belongs to opéra comique, one of the many older French genres (like ballet-pantomime and comédie-vaudeville) that combined speeches and songs in various proportions. I guess the definition of opera is kinda fluid. You knows it when you hears it.

Carmen is your basic story of male rage turned on a woman who asserts her sexual independence. It's still pretty relevant.
   547. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 22, 2018 at 04:48 PM (#5772643)
Podcasts are popular culture, right? What do we listen to? I’ll start:

* Blank Check (movies—they focus on directors (“who had massive success early on and were given a blank check to make their own crazy passion project”) , and devote a 2-hour episode to each film in a director’s career. I’ve listened to a lot of movie podcasts, and this is the best—perfect balance of comedy and insight.) They just wrapped up Ang Lee and have moved on to Nancy Meyers.

* The Cinephiliacs: Movies, but with much more of an academic bent. Can be boring and a lot of guests talk about really obscure titles.

* How Did This Get Made: Comedy show about BAD movies.

* Chapo Trap House: Socialism and yuks

*Unbelievable: Religious debate of basically every variety.

* 30 Minutes in the New Testament: Exactly what it sounds like! Hosted by two Lutheran pastors.

* Effectively Wild: The FanGraphs/BPro baseball podcast.

* Vegan Warrior Princess Attack! - 2 radical vegan feminists/communists. I mostly stick to their pop culture episodes.

* The Dollop: Comedy/history. The host tells the story of an historical event, to his buddy, an improv comedian who has no idea what the topic will be about. The host is a pretty radical Leftist, and his stories reflect that....but often they’re just very very silly anecdotes.

* The Bruenigs: Politics, hosted by two married political columnists. The wife is Elizabeth Bruenig of the Washington Post, who’s probably the highest profile TradCath Socialist around.

* An Earful of Convoy/ An Earful of Cocktail: hosted by a BBTFer, he splits these movies into 5-minute chunks and then devotes a 2-hour episode to each section. Meaning, you know, they spend 50 hours analyzing the movie Convoy. 100% my style of humor!
   548. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 22, 2018 at 04:50 PM (#5772647)
Carmen at the Dallas Opera right now is a very good version,
I thought everything south of the Mason-Dixon line was an Opry. Is that not the case?
   549. BDC Posted: October 22, 2018 at 06:01 PM (#5772700)
I thought everything south of the Mason-Dixon line was an Opry. Is that not the case?


After one of the intermissions yesterday, a big guy was squeezing past a little old lady in the first row of the mezzanine. He looked back at her as she passed, and she said to him, "Ah'd jist as soon not pitch over this rile and land on my hade."
   550. PreservedFish Posted: October 22, 2018 at 06:23 PM (#5772710)
* An Earful of Convoy/ An Earful of Cocktail: hosted by a BBTFer, he splits these movies into 5-minute chunks and then devotes a 2-hour episode to each section. Meaning, you know, they spend 50 hours analyzing the movie Convoy. 100% my style of humor!


Intrigued. Who is it? And how long can he stay on topic?
   551. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 22, 2018 at 06:50 PM (#5772719)
Guillermo del Toro's next project will be a stop-motion Pinocchio musical for Netflix.
   552. BDC Posted: October 22, 2018 at 07:32 PM (#5772728)
I have been listening to some podcasts in French lately, not that I understand much of them; but I have faith in the immersion method. One that I stumbled across has people reading from newspapers … of a hundred years ago. I found one podcast that was a very stirring analysis of the abdication of the Kaiser in 1918, I thought kind of florid, but hey, it was French … only to find it was actually from 1918, but being read very dramatically by a presenter in 2018.
   553. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: October 22, 2018 at 07:53 PM (#5772731)
Movie/TV pedantry alert:

So I just started watching Nightfall on Netflix. A fictionalized account of the knights templar following the fall of the Crusader States. The series begins with the fall of Acre in 1291*, with some of the main characters escaping to France. After the credits, we move to Paris, 15 years later*. So it's presumably 1306. Yada, yada, yada...near the beginning of episode 2, the pope visits the Paris Temple to install a new master, the old one having been murdered by highwaymen in episode 1. He is called Boniface. I decided to look him up, as I am wont to do when viewing historical fiction. Turns out Boniface VIII (which the credits list as the character) died in 1303. In 1306, the Pope is Clement V, who, on Oct 13, 1307, is said to have ordered the arrest and execution of the Templars. I have no doubt that that will play a part in the series.

My question is, why say "Paris, 15 years later", rather than 10 years later, or 12 years later. The 15 years had no other significance other than to present a passage of time. Yes, it's true, few viewers will know of or discover this discrepancy. But why not just try to be accurate in the first place? Maybe the necessity to cheat on the time frame will become apparent later in the series, in that it was crucial that is was 15 and not 10 or 12 years later to move the plot along or for dramatic effect.** But it bugs the hell out of me that writers and directors at times take no care in accuracy, when being accurate costs nothing.


*As specifically stated in written overlay.

** like for example, in Braveheart, where Wallace remains alive during his drawing and quartering long enough to outlive Edward I, when in reality, Edward outlived Wallace by 2 years. It was dramatic license, and understandable.
   554. PreservedFish Posted: October 22, 2018 at 08:13 PM (#5772739)
Movie/TV pedantry alert:

So I just started watching Nightfall on Netflix.


You've made a pedantry blunder of Brobdingnagian proportions, because the show is spelled Knightfall. Apparently. I just googled it. The other thing I discovered is that the official Netflix blurb begins with the words "Fifteen years after the Crusades..." so I think it's safe to assume that they chose that number because "twelve" would be too distractingly specific.
   555. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: October 22, 2018 at 08:14 PM (#5772740)
And, it is made clear shortly after I resumed viewing episode 2. A sub plot emerges, the plan to marry the French King's daughter Isabella to Edward, prince of Wales (to whom she was married in 1308). The real life Isabella was born in 1295, so if this were 1303 with Boniface VIII still alive, Isabella would be only 8 years old. While it was common for royal marriages to be arranged at age 8 and even younger, I suspect the marriage is imminent in the show, and thus the show runners had to decide between fudging the dates of the death of Boniface VIII (1303), and the birth/marraige date of Isabella . They chose the former.
   556. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: October 22, 2018 at 08:15 PM (#5772741)
because the show is spelled Knightfall.


I blame stupid autocorrect.
   557. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: October 23, 2018 at 09:44 AM (#5772906)
Podcasts are popular culture, right? What do we listen to?


Good choices on "How Did This Get Made" and "Effectively Wild". A couple of those sound interesting, thank you for sharing.

Besides sports*, some of my other favorites are:

"My Favorite Murder" - true crime,

"WTF" - Marc Maron long-form interviews with actors and comedians,

"About Last Night" - typical comedy podcast, but with two of my favorite comedians,

"Reply All" - a tech show that is more about peoples' interactions with tech,

"Serial" - I never listened to the first season, but I am really enjoying the current season, set in a Cleveland courthouse,


*sports podcasts: "Lowe Post" (NBA), "Hang Up and Listen", "The Ryen Russillo Show", "Poscast" (Joe Posnanski).

   558. PreservedFish Posted: October 23, 2018 at 10:03 AM (#5772921)
I'm listening to Yoko Ono's new album. It's pretty brutal.
   559. Lassus Posted: October 23, 2018 at 10:03 AM (#5772922)
You have to be a particular type, but "Watch What Crappens" can be fun if you're unnecessarily exposed to a lot of BRAVO.
   560. Howie Menckel Posted: October 23, 2018 at 10:12 AM (#5772932)
Podcasts are popular culture, right? What do we listen to?

I do a weekly podcasts, yet I don't listen to any.

I'll beat someone to it: "That is so very Howie."
   561. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 23, 2018 at 10:49 AM (#5772953)
I read Dawn Powell’s The Locusts Have No King last night.

She had an interesting life:

On November 20, 1920, she married Joseph Gousha, an aspiring poet and advertising copy-writer. In 1921, the couple had their only child, Joseph R. Gousha Jr. ("Jojo"). Her husband abandoned poetry for the steady work of advertising, and the family moved to Greenwich Village, which remained her home base for the rest of her life.(...)

Dawn Powell wrote hundreds of short stories, ten plays, a dozen novels, and an extended diary starting in 1931. Her writings, however, never generated enough money to live off. Throughout her life, she supported herself with various jobs, including being a freelance writer, an extra in silent films, a Hollywood screenwriter, a book reviewer, and a radio personality.

Locusts is set right in the thick of these worlds—it’s first and foremost a satire of the New York City publishing industry, but ad-men and Hollywood bigshots and Broadway stars and journalists all pop up as supporting characters, and it’s fully immersive; you could tell it was written by someone who really knew this world.

It was pretty far out of my comfort zone—and I doubt I will read her other novels—but it was still a fun, interesting read.
   562. Zonk qualifies as an invasive species Posted: October 23, 2018 at 11:56 AM (#5772991)
I thought everything south of the Mason-Dixon line was an Opry. Is that not the case?


FWIW, I went to the Grand Ole Opry a few years back and despite the genre not being my particular cup of tea, I highly recommend it. Don't recall all the acts that night - but Jesse McReynolds, who's probably pushing 90, was a real treat. Montgomery Gentry, Charley Pride, Sara Evans, Gene Watson... the novelty act Riders in the Sky.... It was a fun evening and something I'd certainly do again.

Recommended even if it's not one's cup of tea.
   563. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: October 23, 2018 at 12:10 PM (#5773014)
Hmm, non-sports podcasts I listen to regularly:

Freakonomics (depending on the topic)
Palaeocast
Tetzoo
Herepetological Highlights
Squamates
Stuff You Should Know (topic dependent)
Monster Talk
Science Weekly (topic dependent)
Science for the People (topic dependent)
Big Picture Science (topic dependent)
Hardcore History
Revisionist History

I don't really enjoy pop culture podcasts for some reason. I guess if I can input MY opinion I'm not really interested in hearing other people gab away. It might be why I listen to so much science and history since they're talking about stuff I don't know anything about so I'm content to just listen.
   564. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: October 23, 2018 at 12:21 PM (#5773029)
Is Knightfall any good? I watched the first few minutes of it and it seemed like it was going to be a toxic combination of gory and preachy. Should I give it another shot?
   565. Lassus Posted: October 23, 2018 at 12:45 PM (#5773076)
I don't know, but we plan on starting it this evening. I'll offer a review if anyone cares.
   566. PreservedFish Posted: October 23, 2018 at 12:53 PM (#5773085)
Anything I've ever come across that touches on the Knights Templar is mostly concerned with esoteric magical secrets and such and such. Is this show?
   567. Lassus Posted: October 23, 2018 at 01:12 PM (#5773121)
I get the impression the answer to that question is "no", but Misirlou will have to answer, unless you want to find out later.

The reviews are fantastically all over the place. I mean, that's probably not exactly accurate, no one thinks it's brilliant; but some people think it's definitely good, and others think it sucks.
   568. PreservedFish Posted: October 23, 2018 at 01:22 PM (#5773131)
Someone mentioned a new show about 9th century Vikings that was, improbably, a comedy. I might try that one.
   569. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 23, 2018 at 01:24 PM (#5773134)
BDC -- here's the passage (from this book) I mentioned to you elsewhere a couple of weeks ago. I'm wondering if any of it resonates with (or engenders any other response from) you, given your delving into European crime fiction:

Many who had been radicalized in the late 1960s or 70s turned to writing works that were inspired by American crime fiction. Dominique Manotti, herslef a historian and Communist activist before she became a writer of detective stories, remarked that May 1968 was the "founding event" for authors such as herself. Didier Daeninckx (born 1949) published Meurtres pour Memoire in 1983 -- a work based on the life and crimes of Maurice Papon, prefect of the Paris police between 1958 and 1967 -- and Le Geant Inacheve (1984) which revolves around a man who looks back on his radical activism in the 1960s before "the face of Pol Pot could be discerned behind the smile of Mao." Cesare Battisti (born 1954) began to write polars while in exile in France after having been convicted of terrorist murder in Italy. Most famously, Stieg Larsson, the Swedish creator of the Millennium series, had been a very young 68er, campaigning against the Vietnam War when he was 14 and joining a Trotskyist movement six years later.

The 68er authors sought to subvert conventional notions of "classic literature" and to redefine notions of crime -- in ways that concentrated attention on the powerful or on the state itself. However, their novels also revealed a change in attitudes to crime and violence on the part of some 68ers. Left-wing movements were themselves held up to scrutiny or mockery -- notably by Thierry Jonquet, a Trotskyist who published some of his novels under the pseudonym of Ramon Mercader, the name of Trotsky's assassin. The heroes of novels were less likely to be idealistic revolutionaries or heroic criminals. Increasingly, they were Chandleresque figures -- disabused policemen or ex policemen. The hero of Jean-Patrick Manchette's Morgue Pleine (1973) was a private detective haunted by the fact that he had, as a gendarme, killed a demonstrator.
   570. Baldrick Posted: October 23, 2018 at 02:21 PM (#5773191)
A little self-promotion, but in the interest of kicking off some talk about new music, here's some things I've written about recent records:
- The new Alkaline Trio is probably their best album in 15+ years.
- Vanessa Peters has one of the best albums about what it means to live in this particular political moment
- The new Nicki Minaj album is WAY too long, but there's a fantastic 45 minute record in the midst of it
- Brandi Carlile, with one of the best songs about what it's like to be a parent that I've ever heard
   571. Hysterical & Useless Posted: October 23, 2018 at 04:07 PM (#5773328)
We've been watching Atypical on Netflix. Right in my wife's wheelhouse (she was a teacher & administrator in special ed for...35 years was it? So anything to do with autism is going to grab her. But it's not bad, some quite funny. Of course, a lot of it is about the rest of the family, not just them coping with autism (he's 18 and actually a pretty mild case) but other stuff any family might have to deal with (eg teenagers, changing schools, infidelity).

Comedies are always underrepresented on Best lists. Personally, I think being intentionally funny is incredibly difficult and anyone who can do it well is a ####### genius.
   572. Hot Wheeling American, MS-13 Enthusiast Posted: October 23, 2018 at 04:27 PM (#5773354)
Podcasts in the regular rotation:

Hollywood Handbook - picked it up in August and devoured all available episodes
Heavyweight
This American Life (though episodes have been piling up as the focus has been on current events)
WTF
The /Filmcast
How Did This Get Made - I won't listen to all, but I also once made the mistake of watching a movie just to then listen to an episode. It was...this and...not worth it. Only podcast I've seen live (Superman IV)
PTI (really the only sports talk I've listened to in the last ten years)
Your Kickstarter Sucks
Reply All

The Rewatchables (haven't listened to Bill Simmons in years, but if he has a wheelhouse anymore, it's probably talking about 90s movies with his staff)

Extra Hot Great (used to listen to this regularly, now just when I see a topic I want to hear. Think I first got off the train of regular listening when one of the hosts rejected my polite request to not burp while recording.)

The Tobolowsky Files (though no episodes for the last year and a half)

Have had S-Town sitting in my podcast app for over a year. Will I ever get to it? Hmm.

Serial (didn't even know this was back until it was a few episodes in. Have only caught the first so far, but will get to the rest)

StartUp (ehh, when I get around to it)
   573. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: October 23, 2018 at 05:43 PM (#5773418)
I get the impression the answer to that question is "no", but Misirlou will have to answer, unless you want to find out later.

The reviews are fantastically all over the place. I mean, that's probably not exactly accurate, no one thinks it's brilliant; but some people think it's definitely good, and others think it sucks.


It's OK. It's not must see, but it's not bad. If you like medieval dramas, which I do. I loved "The Pillars of the earth", and the sequel "World Without End." Netflix is debuting a series about Robert the Bruce next month.

No mysticism yet, aside from a bunch of Holy Grail stuff.
   574. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: October 23, 2018 at 05:44 PM (#5773420)
Someone mentioned a new show about 9th century Vikings that was, improbably, a comedy. I might try that one.


Norsemen. It's awesome. More like a dramady. It's not all comedy, but there are some LOL bits.
   575. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: October 23, 2018 at 05:47 PM (#5773421)
Regular Podcasts:

Planet Money
FiveThirtyEight Politics
The Greatest generation
Friendly Fire
Hardcore History

Occasional, when driving with my wife:

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me
This American Life
Freakonomics
   576. BDC Posted: October 23, 2018 at 07:37 PM (#5773472)
The 68er authors sought to subvert conventional notions of "classic literature" and to redefine notions of crime -- in ways that concentrated attention on the powerful or on the state itself. However, their novels also revealed a change in attitudes to crime and violence on the part of some 68ers. …. The heroes of novels were less likely to be idealistic revolutionaries or heroic criminals. Increasingly, they were Chandleresque figures -- disabused policemen or ex policemen. The hero of Jean-Patrick Manchette's Morgue Pleine (1973) was a private detective haunted by the fact that he had, as a gendarme, killed a demonstrator


Yes, gef, I think this is a major development in European crime fiction post-1968. I have this sense in the back of my head that I read a French crime novel recently where the detective was a 1968 radical. I want to say it was Jean Echenoz's novel Chopin's Move, which is more of a spy story than a policier but which, IIRC, features an old radical now in the dubious employ of the government. But I may be misremembering. If I get a better fix on it I will let you know.

Manchette is a very important figure in this history. He died way too young but did some remarkable things: I recently read Fatale and Three to Kill, very sharp and pretty nihilistic.

Gunnar Staalesen (b. 1947), in Norway, does Chandleresque private-eye novels. His detective Varg Veum is a disillusioned ex-social-worker.

Andrea Camilleri's Montalbano, in Sicily, is a police commissioner but has a leftish past. (Camilleri is over 90 now and thus would have been over 40 in '68, but Montalbano is somewhat younger, and as sometimes happens with series heroes, doesn't appreciably age over 20-25 years.)

Daeninckx is a key writer from that era, too. So was Sébastien Japrisot, who started writing crime novels a bit before '68 but then made several of them into films in the late '60s and early '70s: very much the noirish twisty story instead of the straightforward hero from either side of the tracks.
   577. Lassus Posted: October 23, 2018 at 11:40 PM (#5773803)
I feel super-old, because podcasts bore me, and I don't listen to any of them.

Reductress: I Started a Podcast Just So My Nerd Boyfriend Would Listen to Me
Being in a relationship is truly a dream, but one thing that feels like a nightmare is that my boyfriend is obsessed with podcasts, which involves listening to people talk that are not me. Every ####### minute of the day he’s got his buds in his ears listening to two men discuss humans becoming cyborgs, or three men eating their way through Tuscaloosa, or four men reviewing bad movies. It’s like if I’m not sponsored by Blue Apron, he won’t listen to my inane thoughts about barbecue sauce! That’s why I decided to take control of my relationship and start a podcast just so my nerd ass boyfriend will listen to me.

And it wasn’t easy; something people don’t mention about podcasts is that starting a podcast is hard! “How do you even record one?” I shouted at no one in the shower. I scoured the Internet for help and turns out there are more podcasts than there are children in the world
   578. Lassus Posted: October 23, 2018 at 11:47 PM (#5773812)
In other pop culture news, someone appears to be going for a land-speed cancellation record:

Bradley Whitford–Produced Church Choir Comedy in the Works at NBC
The series, which would potentially star Whitford, centers on “a rural church choir that gets the gift it never thought it needed when a salty, Ivy League professor becomes its director.”
   579. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 23, 2018 at 11:56 PM (#5773821)
I feel super-old, because podcasts bore me, and I don't listen to any of them.


I feel even older, because I'm not exactly sure how one would find and listen to them... :-)
   580. Lassus Posted: October 24, 2018 at 12:04 AM (#5773828)
wrong thread
   581. Howie Menckel Posted: October 24, 2018 at 12:12 AM (#5773836)
something people don’t mention about podcasts is that starting a podcast is hard! “How do you even record one?”

I had to buy a special headset and join Skype to get my weekly podcast started 2 months ago. I told my younger co-host that if his dog wakes up tomorrow and starts quoting Shakespeare, he should be less surprised than this development.

yesterday, with some assistance, I figured out how to scan my business receipts to my employer (I upload them; I'm more of a download sort of guy, but this is the world as we know it in 2018). I will say that even if one is adept at such stuff, it's less convenient now to put in for expenses than it was 20 years ago - such is progress, I suppose.
   582. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 24, 2018 at 03:28 AM (#5773844)
I've really dropped off the podcast listening habit, but there were a few overlaps with above-named titles:

Hardcore History
Harmontown
Welcome to Nightvale
Shut Up and Sit Down
The Bugle
The Tobolowsky Files
Sundays Supplement
The Dead Authors Podcast

   583. Greg K Posted: October 24, 2018 at 08:11 AM (#5773864)
And it wasn’t easy; something people don’t mention about podcasts is that starting a podcast is hard! “How do you even record one?” I shouted at no one in the shower. I scoured the Internet for help and turns out there are more podcasts than there are children in the world

Odd. I found starting a podcast was incredibly easy.

Or does she mean getting people to listen to it is hard?
   584. Greg K Posted: October 24, 2018 at 08:13 AM (#5773867)
Is the Bugle still going? I sort of tailed off around when John Oliver started his HBO show and I sort of just assumed he'd bow out.

I may have to look it up again.
   585. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: October 24, 2018 at 08:23 AM (#5773869)
Norsemen. It's awesome. More like a dramady. It's not all comedy, but there are some LOL bits.


Seconded on the awesome. It is somewhat a parody of Vikings. I found it hilarious.
   586. McCoy Posted: October 24, 2018 at 08:56 AM (#5773886)
Almost bizarrely podcasts just aren't convenient for me. The only time I'm going to listen to a podcast is while I'm driving to and from work and I'm certainly not going to plan out my commutes ahead time and set up a playlist of podcasts for my drives.
   587. Greg K Posted: October 24, 2018 at 09:03 AM (#5773890)
I've had some good luck with commutes. For a couple years my walk to work (40 minutes or so) was an ideal time for many podcast episodes. Now I've got about a half hour walk to my girlfriend's place, so I'll have to scope out some slightly shorter podcasts.

Walking is really the only time I find I can listen to a podcast. I find it difficult to just sit and listen to one.
   588. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 24, 2018 at 09:06 AM (#5773892)
Is the Bugle still going? I sort of tailed off around when John Oliver started his HBO show and I sort of just assumed he'd bow out.

I may have to look it up again.


I get sporadic notifications from their Twitter account, but I think Oliver is pretty much out now. At the moment, I'm not sure that I really need MORE current affairs snark in my life.

It does occasionally remind me to pull out my mp3s of 'The Department', the BBC audio comedy with Oliver, Zaltzman, and Chris Addison from 10-15 years ago. Some wonderful lines in that.
   589. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: October 24, 2018 at 09:17 AM (#5773899)
Almost bizarrely podcasts just aren't convenient for me. The only time I'm going to listen to a podcast is while I'm driving to and from work and I'm certainly not going to plan out my commutes ahead time and set up a playlist of podcasts for my drives.

Is this hard? I just listen to a podcast and if it ends before my commute is up I tell my phone to play an album or a Spotify radio station.

Walking is really the only time I find I can listen to a podcast. I find it difficult to just sit and listen to one.

I can't just kick back and listen to one either, but with the commute, the dog walking, the yard work and that I have a job where I can listen to music/podcasts all day long I burn through a lot of podcasts and audio books.
   590. PreservedFish Posted: October 24, 2018 at 09:21 AM (#5773903)
Me too. Podcasts have changed folding laundry or doing dishes from an annoyance into a joy.
   591. McCoy Posted: October 24, 2018 at 09:25 AM (#5773907)
Is this hard? I just listen to a podcast and if it ends before my commute is up I tell my phone to play an album or a Spotify radio station.

I have little to no desire organizing my podcasts ahead of time. I get in my car, plug my phone into the charger, and Pandora comes on. It shuffles the songs up adequately enough. I have no desire scrolling through podcasts or even worse scrolling through podcasts while I'm on the highway because the one I selected turned out to be boring.
   592. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 24, 2018 at 09:43 AM (#5773917)
Me too. Podcasts have changed folding laundry or doing dishes from an annoyance into a joy.


Listening to Dan Carlin describe the horrors of the Eastern Front during WW1 really makes puts my bathroom-cleaning chores in perspective.
   593. Swoboda is freedom Posted: October 24, 2018 at 10:27 AM (#5773954)
I overlap with a lot on the podcasts I listen to

Hardcore History
Revolutions
538
Wait Wait Don't Tell me
Freakonomics
Fresh Air (very selective, only if there is a good author on)
Hidden Brain
How did this get made?
Revisionist History
Poscast

I mostly listen as I am doing something else. Cooking, chores, taking a walk.
   594. PreservedFish Posted: October 24, 2018 at 10:33 AM (#5773959)
My favorite podcast unmentioned so far is "In Our Time," the BBC radio broadcast. Three academics present a topic of history or philosophy or the arts or such. It's pretty dry, and I forget everything immediately afterwords, and I'm not sure why I like it so much, but I do. Something soothing about those professorial British accents.

One that I listened to recently that people might enjoy is "Song Exploder." A musician discusses his or her song in great detail, with aid of the master tracks, isolating each little bit and explaining the decisions behind every element. Like, they'll isolate a bassline and talk about exactly why the bass sounds the way it does. I found the Liz Phair song "Divorce Song" to be particularly enjoyable and enlightening - amazing how much thought and good taste goes into what is known as a classic of raw, indie and low-fi rock.
   595. Swoboda is freedom Posted: October 24, 2018 at 10:45 AM (#5773977)
One that I listened to recently that people might enjoy is "Song Exploder." A musician discusses his or her song in great detail, with aid of the master tracks, isolating each little bit and explaining the decisions behind every element.


The used to have a show called Classic Albums where a musician would go through the tracks and discuss it. Paul Simon etc. It was fascinating. Even with bands I do not really like such as Fleetwood Mac, were great. The amount of work on some of these is amazing. I remember watching one on Steely Dan for Aja. The choices they made, the session artists they chose. Really loved it.
   596. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: October 24, 2018 at 01:53 PM (#5774191)
The Bugle is still going - Zaltz and a coterie of co-hosts, generally from outside the US or UK. Alice Fraser, in particular, is quite good.
   597. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: October 24, 2018 at 02:08 PM (#5774201)
My list has skewed too comedy heavy of late, I need to reset everything. It currently includes:
The Lowe Post, Hang Up and Listen, Woj Pod, Baseball America, Three Swings, The Hooray Show, The Dana Gould Hour, The Reductress Minute, WTF, Andy Daly Podcast Pilot Podcast, CBB, The Dollop, Doughboys, Harmontown, improv4humans, Gilbert Gottfried's ACP, JJGo!, Judge John Hodgman, Spontaneanation, Smartest Man in the World, Punch Up The Jam, Good One, Dead Authors, Put Your Hands Together, Why Won't You Date Me, No Such Thing As A Fish, Stuff You Should Know, The Tobolowsky Files, 538, 99% Invisible, The Memory Palace, pretty everything Matt Gourley related (Superego/James Bonding/In Voorhees We Trust/I Was There Too/Pistol Shrimps), MDWAP, the list goes on.
As a rule, these are background noise while I'm working.

Song Exploder is very good.

   598. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: October 24, 2018 at 02:31 PM (#5774217)
Horror: This isn't universal but: I'm close to someone who is somewhere between "layman expert" and "should be teaching this as part of their academic post" wrt horror, which is a genre I've never cared for or identified with - and we got to talking about trauma. In a world where some feel at risk (this includes anxiety) for whatever reason (including gender violence - note the preponderance of horror/true crime fans that are women), these productions can offer a packaged version of evil/violence/dread that is contained, fictional, possibly understandable, does not impact you directly, that may have a solution or happy ending.
This made sense to me.
   599. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 24, 2018 at 02:44 PM (#5774243)
I caught both The Sisters Brothers and The Old Man & the Gun last night, which are both quite good (particularly the former, the first English -language movie from the great French director Jacques Audiard, a western set in 1850s Oregon starting John C Reilly, Joaquin Phoenix, Jake Gyllenhall and Riz Ahmed.) Not much to say beyond “great story, very well told” but, hey—that’s not easy!

(The latter is just an unabashed love letter to “Robert Redford, Movie Star,” and is consequently charming as all hell.
   600. Davo and his Moose Tacos Posted: October 24, 2018 at 03:39 PM (#5774315)
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