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Tuesday, October 01, 2019

Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (October 2019)

Universal released a behind-the-scenes video on the making of Sam Mendes’ upcoming WWI drama 1917, which provides the first look at the way it was uniquely lensed to appear as one continuous take to create a real-time experience.

...

Filming largely on location in England, Mendes and cinematographer Roger Deakins created long takes with camera movement, choreographed to appear as one continuous take for an immersive, real-time experience. Respected director of photography Deakins — who won an Oscar for Blade Runner 2049 and was nominated an additional 13 times — previously worked with Mendes on Skyfall, Revolutionary Road and Jarhead.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: October 01, 2019 at 03:56 AM | 589 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   501. the Centaur Nipple Paradox (CoB). Posted: October 19, 2019 at 07:15 PM (#5891988)
flop
   502. Lassus Posted: October 19, 2019 at 11:23 PM (#5892133)
Billy, did you listen to the 9th? It also makes a great video.
   503. notdavo Posted: October 22, 2019 at 12:09 AM (#5892700)
Ishmael in 407
Davo!

What do you make of Scorsese’s The Last Temptation of Christ? Or of Kazantzakis' The Last Temptation of Christ?

Artistically, theologically, whatever else.

Gonna get this out before the banhammer finishes me off for good, lol.

As a film I think it’s very low-tier Scorsese, suffused to even its very final shot (!) with cinematic concerns. The casting of very famous celebrities, that absurd Peter Gabriel score (I make no judgment of its quality on a musical level, noting only the cheesiness of letting a mega-famous pop star write the music for your Jesus movie).

Theologically it’s much more interesting to me, since it’s closer to my view of the Christ, yet, even still, for a man so concerned with getting us to appreciate His humanity, Marty’s film is bogged down with so much of the wholly extraneous supernatural stuff, the “miracles” and such. But its dramatization of the titular temptation is just about perfect, a brilliant depiction of the difficulties of living for the spirit (as opposed to the flesh).

I think his Silence is the actual masterpiece (I went long on it here).

I think the best purely Jesus film is Pasolini’s The Gospel According to Matthew (which of course avoids all the Hollywood-ification of Scorsese’s version, casting amateur non-actors and using pre-existing songs from several different eras and cultures). But the best film I’ve ever seen about the miracle of Faith, period, is Lee Chang-dong’s Secret Sunshine.
   504. PreservedFish Posted: October 22, 2019 at 08:42 AM (#5892711)
I was also very impressed by Silence.
   505. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: October 22, 2019 at 08:57 AM (#5892716)
Mark Harris:
"Nothing that any director has said about a Marvel movie is nearly as mean as Gwyneth Paltrow's refusal to remember which ones she's in."
   506. chisoxcollector Posted: October 22, 2019 at 09:11 AM (#5892717)
I finished the Eastwood films for my Blindspotting project over the weekend. As a whole, I enjoyed them more than I expected.

Excellent
The Outlaw Josey Wales

Very Good
Dirty Harry
High Plains Drifter (this movie was weird!)
In the Line of Fire

Good
Escape From Alcatraz

Next up is Jack Nicholson. I debated choosing a different actor, as I’ve seen a good bit of Nicholson’s work. But I can’t really think of anybody suitable to replace him. And he does have a lot to choose from! I’ve already seen all of the following:

The Shining
The Departed
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest
Chinatown
Batman
Easy Rider
A Few Good Men
As Good As It Gets
Five Easy Pieces
Broadcast News
Reds
The Witches of Eastwick
The King of Marvin Gardens

Right now I’m leaning towards:

Terms of Endearment (this one is locked in)
The Last Detail
The Passenger
Prizzi’s Honor
Carnal Knowledge

I also considered The Missouri Breaks, Heartburn, and Ironweed.
   507. jmurph Posted: October 22, 2019 at 09:18 AM (#5892719)
Gonna get this out before the banhammer finishes me off for good, lol.

Please tell me you have not actually been banned, I can't imagine what would merit that.
   508. Lassus Posted: October 22, 2019 at 09:53 AM (#5892729)
EDIT: I take that back, I seem mistaken.
   509. Lassus Posted: October 22, 2019 at 09:57 AM (#5892731)
I also considered The Missouri Breaks, Heartburn, and Ironweed.

I'm biased, but I think Ironweed is a masterpiece. Your current choices seem great, but I think moving out one of the older ones of Last Detail, Passenger, or Carnal Knowledge for the newer Ironweed might provide greater scope. I mean, for that volume, it is hard to choose just five.

My argument would be I am a massive William Kennedy fan, and this adaptation was amazing, one of the few of a novel I've ever actually liked, and I REALLY liked the novel. Prizzi's Honor is great, but pretty light fare. Again, everything you have is worthy - I'm just biased towards that film. (Hilarious that I consider 1987 "newer".)
   510. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 22, 2019 at 10:10 AM (#5892735)
I did enjoy The Last Detail when I watched it a year or two ago.
   511. Lassus Posted: October 22, 2019 at 10:55 AM (#5892766)
Anyone else catch the new Watchmen? It's getting great reviews, and maybe I'm being a grump, but it really seems to be trying awful hard.
   512. PreservedFish Posted: October 22, 2019 at 10:59 AM (#5892771)
What does "trying awful hard" mean?
   513. Lassus Posted: October 22, 2019 at 11:05 AM (#5892775)
A fair question.

That you can see the effort to get you engaged, rather than it just playing out naturally? I grok that it's probably sort of an unfair "I know it when I see it" argument. Some of the opening (not the 1919 Tulsa stuff, following) was a bit hackneyed. The lead pulling a bad guy into a room for an off-camera beating for information is pretty tired. Cute nods and asides to a different reality. I'll definitely keep watching, although I fear a MYSTERY that goes to MORE MYSTERY for next season, but that's kinda standard by now.

After ONE EPISODE I think that it probably could have had the story told without the WATCHMEN framing, really. That's an impression that I wonder if it will continue for me.
   514. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 22, 2019 at 12:46 PM (#5892868)
What does "trying awful hard" mean?
It insists upon itself.
   515. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 22, 2019 at 12:47 PM (#5892870)
Billy, did you listen to the 9th? It also makes a great video.
Not yet - I went to bed shortly after downloading and haven't had a chance to sit down with it yet. Thanks for the reminder though.
   516. Lassus Posted: October 22, 2019 at 12:59 PM (#5892877)
The video is also pretty gripping, although I don't know about sound quality or why it's 93 minutes.
   517. I Helped Patrick McGoohan Escape Posted: October 22, 2019 at 02:30 PM (#5892928)
Let's see...controversial opinions on music.

Most of these that I have an opinion on I at least half agree with!

I like both Peter Gabriel solo and Phil Collins led Genesis better than Gabriel/Genesis.

All have similar high points, but I'd go Gabriel > Gabriel / Genesis > Collins / Genesis

Now that I've listened to this, I don't like the original very much.

No Moe Tucker and Sterling Morrison, no Velvet Underground.

I have absolutely no interest in any lyrics Roger Waters has ever written.

If Stewart Copeland and Andy Summers had managed to kill Sting (and it wasn't for a lack of trying), the Police would have been a much better band.

That there are millions of people who only know Sandy Denny from "Battle of Evermore" is one of the great tragedies of the 20th century.

Co-sign!

"Moonchild" is one of the best songs on In The Court of the Crimson King

The first half is better than I Talk to the Wind and Epitaph, but it gets way too noodly

I get more out of Tom Waits pre-Rain Dogs than post-Rain Dogs.

In general I agree, but Bone Machine is a high point of his for me. Closing Time and Small Change are my overall faves, though

Unrelated Tom Waits story - I worked at a coffee shop in college when his daughter was going to the same school and they came in. The Stones were on the in-store music system and he started doing a real hacky Keith Richards impression. His daughter was beyond embarrassed.

I like both Brian Eno solo and Bryan Ferry led Roxy Music better than Eno/Ferry/Roxy.

Like above, in general I agree, but For Your Pleasure is probably my fave Roxy album. There was no way the two of them could co-exist and each put out way more high quality material separately than together.
   518. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 22, 2019 at 02:34 PM (#5892929)
Anyone else catch the new Watchmen? It's getting great reviews, and maybe I'm being a grump, but it really seems to be trying awful hard.


Mixed feelings. On the one hand, it's very handsomely made with a great cast, and if there wasn't quite a volume of TV of a similar filmic quality already being made, it would be pretty special in surface appearance. There's some use of real-world historical events - primarily the Tulsa race riots - mixed in with some slightly witty spins on an alternate history, like Robert Redford being president instead of Ronald Reagan.

But there's always the nudging at your elbow - remember this thing? Rorschach's mask, the squid, the superhero autobiography sitting on someone's desk, the Nite Owl's ride, the framing of the shot with the newspaper front page of Veidt being presumed dead. Every few minutes the show seems to throw something to remind you of artifacts and events from the comic book, rather than exploring the world it's creating. Which is an interesting one! I would dole out the source material references more sparingly. Maybe that's similar to your reaction? I don't know.

The point was made elsewhere that the source material isn't really about race, in part because British writers, particularly white ones, aren't as interested in that topic as they are in exploring issues of class and privilege. I don't know if that means the show is doing something new and interesting, or missing part of the point of what made the original stand out more in the comics landscape. Then again, a lot of good comics writers are British, so maybe that's a dead end.

   519. Mike A Posted: October 22, 2019 at 03:08 PM (#5892943)

If Stewart Copeland and Andy Summers had managed to kill Sting (and it wasn't for a lack of trying), the Police would have been a much better band.

OK, I spent way too long trying to figure this one out. I know Sting wasn't as good a player as the other two, but I am having a very, very hard time imagining The Police a better band without Sting (also The Pogues being better without Shane, but that's a whole 'nother ball of wax).

And Stewart Copeland is actually my favorite drummer, I even modeled my (bad) drumming after him, holding the left stick underhanded. But The Police needed Sting's writing, charisma, etc, etc. Without Sting, maybe they're a more technically proficient band, but they're...boring.

Oh, on another note, Duke is Genesis's best album.
   520. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 22, 2019 at 03:17 PM (#5892949)
And Stewart Copeland is actually my favorite drummer, I even modeled my (bad) drumming after him, holding the left stick underhanded. But The Police needed Sting's writing, charisma, etc, etc. Without Sting, maybe they're a more technically proficient band, but they're...boring.
Plus, if they killed him, they would have been in jail for most of their prime years.
   521. Cowboy Popup Posted: October 22, 2019 at 03:21 PM (#5892950)
As someone who has never read nor seen Watchmen, I really liked the premiere.

I thought the opening scene in Tulsa was powerful and upsetting. I think the light touch stuff was what really sucked me in. The cops wearing masks, the squid rain, some of the novel tech (and the missing existing tech) all helped build out a strange but relatable world. The weird interrogation scene was fun and I am interested to know what the random aristocrat and his two robot (or whatever) servants are up to.

I will definitely be watching this show, possibly in real time to show support since apparently the rating sucked.

The point was made elsewhere that the source material isn't really about race, in part because British writers, particularly white ones, aren't as interested in that topic as they are in exploring issues of class and privilege. I don't know if that means the show is doing something new and interesting, or missing part of the point of what made the original stand out more in the comics landscape. Then again, a lot of good comics writers are British, so maybe that's a dead end.

Am I right that this show is more like a sequel to the source material rather than based upon the source material? If so, does it matter if the original tackled race? And anyways, race and class are inextricably intertwined in this country. It would be hard to tackle one without the other. Well, not hard since so much of American pop culture avoids the race issue as much as possible, but examining one without the other would make the story less relevant and meaningful.
   522. Ishmael Posted: October 22, 2019 at 04:49 PM (#5892994)
As a film I think it’s very low-tier Scorsese, suffused to even its very final shot (!) with cinematic concerns. The casting of very famous celebrities, that absurd Peter Gabriel score (I make no judgment of its quality on a musical level, noting only the cheesiness of letting a mega-famous pop star write the music for your Jesus movie).

I agree with this, I think. I find Keitel particularly distracting for some reason. Dafoe should be too, but I love his intensity, almost possession.

Bowie is stunt casting of course, but man, it's Bowie.

Theologically it’s much more interesting to me, since it’s closer to my view of the Christ, yet, even still, for a man so concerned with getting us to appreciate His humanity, Marty’s film is bogged down with so much of the wholly extraneous supernatural stuff, the “miracles” and such. But its dramatization of the titular temptation is just about perfect, a brilliant depiction of the difficulties of living for the spirit (as opposed to the flesh).

I think the miracles are necessary. Kazantzakis was trying to take seriously the dual nature of Christ. To take seriously the psychology of a person wrestling with divine purpose as well as with evil and temptation. You kind of need a reason for him to take the divinity part seriously for it to be anything other than a portrait of a madman. Now, most people prefer the docetic Jesus, but you need both sides if you want to explore the cracks in the hypostatic union, I reckon.

I think his Silence is the actual masterpiece (I went long on it here).

Silence is excellent, certainly my favourite Scorsese. But I wrote loads about it here when it came out, so I won't go on about it too much. I like that your review wrestles with the ambiguity of it all, the impossibility of Rodrigues' situation, the failure of divine providence. I think it resists an easy reading. I know that Endō was very disillusioned with the prospects of Christianity in Japan - I think the novel and the film confront that historical reality. In that sense it's almost a companion piece to the triumphant conversion and martyrdom narratives that inspire the missionaries - what happens when those miracles never come?

I'll have to check out Secret Sunshine.

Be well Davo. Write more about stuff you like - it's always interesting, even when I don't agree with you.
   523. chisoxcollector Posted: October 22, 2019 at 04:55 PM (#5893000)
I find Keitel particularly distracting for some reason

I actually think Harvey Keitel is a pretty terrible actor. I’m shocked he’s been as successful as he has.
   524. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: October 22, 2019 at 05:11 PM (#5893005)
Next up is Jack Nicholson.


Consider "The Pledge", it came out around 2000 or 2001. He plays a retiring cop who hangs onto the proverbial "one last case". It was a flop, but I thought it was pretty good.
   525. Lassus Posted: October 22, 2019 at 05:53 PM (#5893020)
The point was made elsewhere that the source material isn't really about race, in part because British writers, particularly white ones, aren't as interested in that topic as they are in exploring issues of class and privilege. I don't know if that means the show is doing something new and interesting, or missing part of the point of what made the original stand out more in the comics landscape.

Agree, had the same thought.


As someone who has never read... Watchmen

I know it's because I'm a teenage comic book nerd of the 80s, but this is unfathomable to me.
   526. PreservedFish Posted: October 22, 2019 at 07:04 PM (#5893049)
I had never heard of Watchmen until around the time that the movie came out, I think. There was some time there, around the releases of 300 and Sin City - and more to my tastes, Ghost World and American Splendor and Persepolis - that movies helped push graphic novels to prominence in my own little world. I went back and read some Frank Miller and Alan Moore, the things you'd find on lists of "best graphic novels ever." Also some Chris Ware and Craig Thompson. I was something of a literature dork (amateur compared to others in this community) that was never into comic books. Before all that, the only graphic novel I'd ever read was probably Maus.

I did read Watchmen, and I really enjoyed it, and was impressed with the vision and artistry. I know that's not the most insightful, trenchant review, but it's what I got right now. Good read.
   527. Baldrick Posted: October 22, 2019 at 07:29 PM (#5893055)
I'm not opposed on principle but I just can't do graphic novels. I've tried and my mind just doesn't process them. I read the text and then I remember there are pictures. And then I quickly scan them, shrug, and go onto the next page. And then the same thing happens. I have a friend who has been trying to sell me on Gaiman's Sandman novels for years and years and I'm sure they're great, but...

Anyone else have this reaction, and is it worth continuing to try to get over it? Or is this just a medium that's not for me?
   528. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 22, 2019 at 08:30 PM (#5893091)
I'm not opposed on principle but I just can't do graphic novels. I've tried and my mind just doesn't process them. I read the text and then I remember there are pictures. And then I quickly scan them, shrug, and go onto the next page. And then the same thing happens. I have a friend who has been trying to sell me on Gaiman's Sandman novels for years and years and I'm sure they're great, but...

Anyone else have this reaction, and is it worth continuing to try to get over it? Or is this just a medium that's not for me?


I think it's just how each person processes things, and what they're used to. Most TV and movies I watch are in Japanese, a language I don't speak, so naturally I use subtitles. A few days ago I watched an English-language movie on DVD. I was perfectly capable of following the dialogue, but half-way through the film I put the English subtitles on, because I just felt more natural processing the dialogue that way if I chose to...

I'm used to reading manga, which goes from right to left on the page. If I read an English-language graphic novel, it takes a little while to get used to going left to right, but after a few pages it feels normal. (And no, I have no such problem reading a non-graphic English language text.)
   529. Cowboy Popup Posted: October 22, 2019 at 08:44 PM (#5893104)
Hey Vortex, if I remember correctly you were one of the posters who encouraged me to stick with Evangelion. Excellent call! The series came alive for me after a short break. It was a thoroughly rich and rewarding viewing experience. I even enjoyed the ending. I will almost certainly rewatch it at some point.

Haven't watched the movie yet but I understand it has a more literal ending. I'll get to it eventually.
   530. Lassus Posted: October 22, 2019 at 09:14 PM (#5893134)
   531. PreservedFish Posted: October 22, 2019 at 09:42 PM (#5893165)
My thing with graphic novels is that I have to tell myself to slow down and to enjoy the illustrations. There's a big part of me that just wants to get the narrative and so to flip pages and yell "done!" and slam the book down. You can read a monumentally large graphic novel in just a few hours. I haven't really gotten over this and because the $/entertainment ratio seems a bit off, I don't seek them out often, even though I like the idea of them.

For those of you with kids, I read Hugo with my 6 yr old (yes, the book that the Scorcese film is based on) and loved it. It isn't quite a graphic novel, it's a novel that is lavishly illustrated and flips between several pages of prose and then several pages of illustration and so on. I thought it was extremely well done.
   532. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 23, 2019 at 03:25 AM (#5893259)

Am I right that this show is more like a sequel to the source material rather than based upon the source material? If so, does it matter if the original tackled race? And anyways, race and class are inextricably intertwined in this country. It would be hard to tackle one without the other. Well, not hard since so much of American pop culture avoids the race issue as much as possible, but examining one without the other would make the story less relevant and meaningful.


It's definitely a sequel, although it will probably retcon or ignore bits and pieces of the original, as is perfectly justifiable. I'm hopefully not trying to make an argument that the sequel has to embody and reflect the same themes as the original, nor that - after one episode! - it's run out of time to do so, just that it was interesting to see the thematic shift. The fact that the 'Black Wall Street' attack was the opening scene of the show makes me think that the intertwining of class and race will not be ignored, at least.

I think a lot of the throw-in flavour like the items I mentioned earlier play a little better for non-readers of the book, but at least I'm highly interested in what they do next, and in who they've assembled to do it.

I'm not opposed on principle but I just can't do graphic novels. I've tried and my mind just doesn't process them. I read the text and then I remember there are pictures. And then I quickly scan them, shrug, and go onto the next page. And then the same thing happens. I have a friend who has been trying to sell me on Gaiman's Sandman novels for years and years and I'm sure they're great, but...

Anyone else have this reaction, and is it worth continuing to try to get over it? Or is this just a medium that's not for me?


I've never heard of that reaction, but it's definitely possible that this just isn't for you. I'm extremely pro-try-new-things, but ballet and opera have both very limited ability to hold my attention. I imagine on this thread we could reel off dozens of graphic novels that might form some kind of breakthrough - however, with so much great art out there in other forms, is that what you would want to spend your time on? Perhaps not.

Contrastingly, I've been startled how quickly I've taken to the form as an adult, after my teenage years were almost entirely spent with novels. I don't know whether it's less downtime to take in a narrative, being more focused on visual choices (playing around with photography as a hobby), or what - but the library's grown up from 'Sandman and almost nothing else' to quite a variety. Image Comics taking off really spoilt me for choice.
   533. Omineca Greg Posted: October 23, 2019 at 10:13 AM (#5893312)
But The Police needed Sting's writing, charisma, etc, etc.

Ah! You see, this is where you and I disagree. There's no need to over-analyse it; I don't like Sting. I call him "The King of Vain". If I want to hear Jungian philosophy with my pop music, I would never turn to a jive-ass ############ like Sting, not when George Clinton is around...

Yo, this is Mood Control (yo-ho!)
Saying you might as well pay attention (this is mood control)
If you can't afford free speech
(mood, mood, mood, someone's funking with the mood!)

Mood Control is designed to render funkable
Ideas brought to you by the makers of Mr. Prolong
Better known as Urge Overkill
The pimping of the Pleasure Principle

Oh, but we'll be pecking lightly
Like a woodpecker with a headache
'Cause it's cheaper to funk
Than it is to pay attention
You dig?
Huck-a-buck
A-Lo and behold, someone's funking with the Mood Control

When you're taking every kind of pill
(deprogram, program, and re-program)
Nothing seems to ever cure your ill
(peck me lightly like a woodpecker with a headache)...

Clinton/Collins


The Collins would be Bootsy, not Phil.

The first half [of Moonchild] is better than I Talk to the Wind and Epitaph, but it gets way too noodly.


Yeah, this is the majority view. If you ever look at user generated reviews for In The Court of the Crimson King, they all read like this...

"ItCotCK is one of the best albums ever! The only thing that stops it from knocking off [and this is where they insert some Pink Floyd, Genesis or Rush album] is the free improv part of 'Moonchild'."

And in a way they're right; the second section of Moonchild is almost anti-music. Fripp and the lads futz about for almost ten minutes, it's boring to distraction. But that's precisely the point. Every song on In the Court represents a different failing of humanity, "Moonchild" is the love song. 陰陽 tra la blah blah. But ultimately love is just an illusion (because this is prog, every subsection of a song has a distinct name, instead of "Verse" and "Chrous" and "Bridge", prog has "The Crown of Charlemagne" and "The Wanton Milk-Maid" and "The Forbidden Grimoire"). In Moonchild, the first section is called "The Dream" and is all very pretty, but the second section is "The Illusion" which lasts five times as long, and is nothing but hopeless flailing around.

Think about it....
   534. PreservedFish Posted: October 23, 2019 at 10:26 AM (#5893324)
I don't know whether it's less downtime to take in a narrative, being more focused on visual choices (playing around with photography as a hobby), or what - but the library's grown up from 'Sandman and almost nothing else' to quite a variety. Image Comics taking off really spoilt me for choice.



Top recs. Hit me.
   535. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: October 23, 2019 at 10:40 AM (#5893335)
The Adventures of Tintin (I'm only half-kidding).
   536. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: October 23, 2019 at 10:47 AM (#5893343)
As it happens, it's from Image -- probably my favorite title since I returned to comics circa 2004 from a 25-year hiatus (brought on by the unconscionable cover price rise to 40 cents in late '78) is I Kill Giants. Not even remotely a superhero comic (though I have no problem with those in general; it's the movies I'm not crazy about), & made into a very faithful & very good movie just a couple of years ago, though probably it suffered by being superficially similar to A Monster Calls, which came out around the same time.
   537. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: October 23, 2019 at 10:55 AM (#5893347)
BTW, for those who recommended The Rocketeer, I'm enjoying the heck out of it. (For various unfortunate reasons, I tend to watch movies in chunks, i.e. before I get ready for work in the a.m.) And yes, Jennifer Connelly is downright luminous.

Sort of surprised that Billy Campbell never became any sort of star; I knew him almost solely from the TV show Once & Again. I guess the film's rather tepid box office performance (going by Wikipedia) didn't do his career a lot of favors.
   538. PreservedFish Posted: October 23, 2019 at 11:01 AM (#5893352)
Oh, I've read most of the Tintins, my daughter is obsessed with them.
   539. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 23, 2019 at 11:39 AM (#5893373)
Hey Vortex, if I remember correctly you were one of the posters who encouraged me to stick with Evangelion. Excellent call! The series came alive for me after a short break. It was a thoroughly rich and rewarding viewing experience. I even enjoyed the ending. I will almost certainly rewatch it at some point.

Haven't watched the movie yet but I understand it has a more literal ending. I'll get to it eventually.


Really glad that you enjoyed it. The End of Evangelion is definitely worth seeing, although whether it "clears up" or further confuses the ending for people is still a matter of heated debate.
   540. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 23, 2019 at 11:49 AM (#5893379)
Oh, I've read most of the Tintins, my daughter is obsessed with them.


Herge was really good at illustrating aircraft - some of the aircraft in the Tintin books are fictional, but most of them are recognizable images of real aircraft, although often with fictional insignia. One aftermarket manufacturer of decals for model aircraft has brought out a series of decals for aircraft in the series, and I started to build a Spitfire from Land of Black Gold a while back, though I ran into some problems with the kit and haven't finished it.
   541. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: October 23, 2019 at 11:49 AM (#5893380)
My wife gave me the Tintin box set for Christmas, which I enjoyed immensely. The artwork is great, and I love the period elements of it (train travel, telegrams, etc.) One thing that I caught while re-reading was that Snowy is a true deus ex machina. He must have saved Tintin's hide half a dozen times.
   542. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 23, 2019 at 12:23 PM (#5893404)
Top recs. Hit me.


'Saga' is deeply entertaining, in a twist-every-issue way. A pretty obvious place to start! We are all Lying Cat. 'Die' is my new obsession - I don't even play D&D, but I know enough of the context that it's darkly beautiful and too clever for me every time I think it's sliding into cliché. Stephanie Hans' art is sublime. 'Pax Romana' is only 4 issues, but it's got sociopolitical bluster scattered all over the page. Yes, what if the Catholic Church sent mercenaries back to the Roman Empire to try to alter history? I would definitely like to know, please.

'Injection' is my favourite of the recent Warren Ellis efforts, involving five futurists who, depressed by how boring the future looks, inject an AI into the internet to change that, and are somewhat horrified by how it goes. "I am offended by your ham, sir." And 'East of West' is Hickman in apocalyptic Western mode, with the US split into quite literal nations jockeying for power in the face of the return of the Four Horsemen. Well, three. Death's kind of gone rogue.

I lost track of 'Shutter' after the first dozen issues, but I need to get back to it. 'Paper Girls' is 'Stranger Things' but better, with time-travel instead of (or in addition to?) interdimensional shenanigans. And you can't go wrong with 'Sex Criminals', which isn't quite what it sounds like, but also isn't that far away. If your orgasms could stop time, wouldn't you use it to rob banks? Of course you would. It's kind of sad that superhero movies are dominating Hollywood at a time when so many superb comics are coming out that are very little to do with the genre.

I'm leaving out so much really good stuff, too. Oh, and Tintin is fantastic - unbelievable senses of place and time - and 'I Kill Giants' totally absorbing.
   543. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 23, 2019 at 12:31 PM (#5893407)
"I am offended by your ham, sir."
Origin story of the Ham Fighters?
   544. Lassus Posted: October 23, 2019 at 12:47 PM (#5893415)
'Injection' is my favourite of the recent Warren Ellis efforts, involving five futurists who, depressed by how boring the future looks, inject an AI into the internet to change that, and are somewhat horrified by how it goes.

I started this, but the density and stylistic puzzle kind of immediately wore me out, akin to Gibson's future-language in "The Peripheral". Does Injection get better/more understandable, or am I just stupid/boring?
   545. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: October 23, 2019 at 01:11 PM (#5893436)
I've read, I believe, only the first Paper Girls TPB, but I enjoyed it (though even if it were perfectly pedestrian I'd like it fine because Cliff Chiang is one of my favorite artists). I own the next 3 volumes as well & need to get to those.

I've mostly read prose the last few years & just haven't been in a comics mood (one notable exception being most of DC's Bombshells run, though even there I need to finish the final 3 collections, I think).

Next thing I dive into for the first time will almost certainly be Dark Horse's Black Hammer.
   546. Manny Coon Posted: October 23, 2019 at 01:42 PM (#5893464)
Monstress is really good.
   547. Greg Pope Posted: October 23, 2019 at 02:17 PM (#5893492)
BTW, for those who recommended The Rocketeer, I'm enjoying the heck out of it.

Glad to help.

Sort of surprised that Billy Campbell never became any sort of star

I'm surprised, too. He's a fine actor and has (had?) leading man looks.
   548. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 23, 2019 at 02:36 PM (#5893504)
Origin story of the Ham Fighters?


Hedlund has people to fight ham, or at least long pig, for him.

I started this, but the density and stylistic puzzle kind of immediately wore me out, akin to Gibson's future-language in "The Peripheral". Does Injection get better/more understandable, or am I just stupid/boring?


I didn't have the same reaction, but I did like the first TPB a lot less than the second, which is one of my favourite arcs that Ellis has ever done (and I've read a LOT of Ellis).

I've read, I believe, only the first Paper Girls TPB, but I enjoyed it (though even if it were perfectly pedestrian I'd like it fine because Cliff Chiang is one of my favorite artists). I own the next 3 volumes as well & need to get to those.


I haven't read the fourth yet, but just finished the third. I'm not sure I'm tracking all of the plot, but the time travel shenanigans are fun enough to keep me hooked.

Monstress is really good.


Another one I left out/forgot! Also, 'The Wicked + The Divine', and I hear great things about '##### Planet' and 'Chew' . . .
   549. Tin Angel Posted: October 23, 2019 at 03:19 PM (#5893523)
New Swans album streaming here.
   550. Lassus Posted: October 23, 2019 at 04:18 PM (#5893547)
Also, 'The Wicked + The Divine'

I randomly ended up (and I'll be damned but I truly have no idea how) with the first two TPBs for this, and am looking forward to continuing. Also, the creators of that are heading up some new sci-fi series soon.
   551. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: October 23, 2019 at 04:49 PM (#5893555)
Wire have a new album due early next year, have released a video of the first song & are scheduled to play Atlanta. Life is goo- ... well, not as bad as it could be.
   552. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 23, 2019 at 05:51 PM (#5893570)
A new song from SHISHAMO, "What You Care For", a cautionary tale of what happens when you ignore your girlfriend. This video may trigger horror in guitarists who don't like seeing their instruments destroyed. What makes that a touch ironic is that the song features a rather nice guitar solo from Asako Miyazaki.

Today is also the release date for the new Akai Ko-en EP - a five song collection with their new singer, Riko Ishino, and on a new label, Epic. I'm still getting used to Riko, because I loved their former singer, but since the other band members are all the same, and guitarist Maisa Tsuno writes the material, what I've heard so far still sounds like Akai Ko-en. They've been one of my favorite bands for some time, and I hope they'll remain so. I've just downloaded the EP, and will listen to it in full later. Here's "Rinrin Ranran".
   553. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 23, 2019 at 06:04 PM (#5893571)
Apropos of nothing, I just saw a TV ad for a toilet that is billed as being "able to flush 24 golf balls." I would think consumers who need that particular functionality have bigger problems to attend to.
   554. PreservedFish Posted: October 23, 2019 at 06:22 PM (#5893578)
Seems potentially relevant for a thread where people are celebrating the new releases of bands that are 43 and 37 years old.
   555. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: October 24, 2019 at 10:26 AM (#5893906)
Finished The Rocketeer this a.m., & it definitely held up through the end. My estimation of the film climbed even higher when I discovered just now, via Wikipedia, that "Tiny Ron" -- the actor who portrayed the Rondo Hatton-esque goon -- is actually Ron Taylor, who played for my beloved ABA's Washington Caps, New York Nets, Virginia Squires & Pittsburgh Condors. (I'll have to check at home to see if the cardstock sheet I have at home with Condors autographs includes his signature, as it does the legendary John Brisker's.)
   556. Greg Pope Posted: October 24, 2019 at 10:11 PM (#5894227)
Finished The Rocketeer this a.m., & it definitely held up through the end.

Directing this movie apparently played a large role in helping Joe Johnston land the job for Captain America: the First Avenger.
   557. PreservedFish Posted: October 26, 2019 at 11:24 PM (#5895085)
Werner Herzog is in the new Star Wars movie. Extraordinary.
   558. the Centaur Nipple Paradox (CoB). Posted: October 27, 2019 at 03:07 AM (#5895105)
Well, this sucks:|

Sadly, Neff’s experience is indicative of a recent trend across North America, where it’s sometimes hard to tell exactly what Disney’s new policy regarding back-catalogue films is, beyond generally making it more difficult to show classic 20th Century Fox movies in theaters. The Transit Drive-In in Lockport, New York, which has hosted packed screenings of older Fox films like Alien, Aliens, Say Anything, The Princess Bride, and Moulin Rouge, says those films and others can no longer be screened there. The Little Theater in Rochester booked Fox’s Fight Club for August and was told by a Disney spokesperson mere days before the scheduled screening that a Digital Cinema Package (DCP) of the movie would no longer be shipped; then a Disney representative called the theater to apologize for the misunderstanding, and assured management that the film was still on its way; the reversal happened a day after a Los Angeles Times reporter called Disney asking them to clarify their repertory policies.

A recent Canadian Broadcasting Company story confirmed that even major first-run chains like Cineplex will now lose access to Fox repertory titles.


Link
   559. the Centaur Nipple Paradox (CoB). Posted: October 27, 2019 at 03:30 AM (#5895106)
Werner Herzog is in the new Star Wars movie. Extraordinary.


I read that at a glance as "Werner Herzog IS the new Star Wars movie. Extraordinary."

And I'd agree, sight unseen!

"Werner Herzog IS the new Star Wars movie" might just be the only thing that could get me excited about a new Star Wars movie.

This is why the universe is broken, if it weren't, I'd be as rich as Croesus and I'd pay Werner Herzog a dump truck full of money to make a "Star Wars film".

Midichloridians? I've got your midiFloridians right here!

We have to become humble in front of this overwhelming misery and overwhelming fornication... overwhelming growth and overwhelming lack of order. Even the - the stars up here in the - in the sky look like a mess. There is no harmony in the universe. We have to get acquainted to this idea that there is no real harmony as we have conceived it. But when I say this, I say this all full of admiration for the jungle. It is not that I hate it, I love it. I love it very much. But I love it against my better judgment.

Here's $150 million dollars, tell me about why you don't like sand ...
   560. PreservedFish Posted: October 27, 2019 at 09:16 AM (#5895111)
Nothing is real. Nothing is certain. It is hard to determine whether these creatures are dividing into their own doppelgangers and do they really meet or is it just their own imagining mirror reflection? Are we today the Banthae who look back into the abyss of time when we see the paintings of the Tatooine caves?
   561. yo la tengo Posted: October 27, 2019 at 01:10 PM (#5895138)
In the name of hyping bands much less than 37 years old, I strongly recommend the band Big Thief. They have released two terrific albums this year. Check out the song 'Not' as your into.
   562. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: October 27, 2019 at 01:32 PM (#5895142)
One nice thing about my near-26-year-old case of tinnitus is that I'm apparently impervious to its worsening, if the lack of after-effects from last night's Stiff Little Fingers & Avengers show is any indication.
   563. Dog on the sidewalk has an ugly bracelet Posted: October 27, 2019 at 01:58 PM (#5895145)
In the name of hyping bands much less than 37 years old, I strongly recommend the band Big Thief. They have released two terrific albums this year. Check out the song 'Not' as your into.

I saw them at Webster Hall a couple weeks ago! They put on a good show. "Not" is a fine song, but my recommendation would be "Masterpiece."

On a related note, Mark Duplass was there with his wife. I was blocking the entryway, so he tapped me on the shoulder at one point to ask me to move. Jealous, Davo?
   564. The Run Fairy Posted: October 27, 2019 at 02:10 PM (#5895149)
We have to become humble in front of this overwhelming misery and overwhelming fornication... overwhelming growth and overwhelming lack of order. Even the - the stars up here in the - in the sky look like a mess. There is no harmony in the universe. We have to get acquainted to this idea that there is no real harmony as we have conceived it. But when I say this, I say this all full of admiration for the jungle. It is not that I hate it, I love it. I love it very much. But I love it against my better judgment.


Also from that scene:

I would see fornication and asphyxiation and choking and fighting for survival and... growing and... just rotting away. Of course, there's a lot of misery. But it is the same misery that is all around us. The trees here are in misery, and the birds are in misery. I don't think they - they sing. They just screech in pain.


It's funny, last week I watched I Walked With A Zombie and was struck by how Tom Conway's character has a very similar line:




[the characters are on a boat, on their way to an apparent island paradise. Betsy is looking out at the water at night]

Paul Holland: It's not beautiful.

Betsy Connell: You read my thoughts Mr. Holland.

Paul Holland: It's easy enough to read the thoughts of a newcomer. Everything seems beautiful because you don't understand. Those flying fish, they're not leaping for joy, they're jumping in terror. Bigger fish want to eat them. That luminous water, it takes its gleam from millions of tiny dead bodies. The glitter of putrescence. There's no beauty here, only death and decay.

Betsy Connell: You can't really believe that.

Paul Holland: Everything good dies here. Even the stars.


Maybe Val Lewton was the proto-Werner Herzog.
   565. Swoboda is freedom Posted: October 27, 2019 at 03:56 PM (#5895169)
Terms of Endearment (this one is locked in)
The Last Detail
The Passenger
Prizzi’s Honor
Carnal Knowledge

I also considered The Missouri Breaks, Heartburn, and Ironweed.


Skip Heartburn. Not that great. I really like Ironweed (both movie and book and Streep is really good).

Last Detail is terrific, so is Prizzi. I didn't like Carnal Knowledge that much. Missouri Breaks is a good comedy, might be a good change of pace. Or try The Fortune (with Beatty and Stockard Channing)
   566. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: October 27, 2019 at 04:25 PM (#5895171)
I haven't the slightest idea of why it took me 35 years to finally watch Videodrome, especially since I've watched just about everything else of Cronenberg's through Naked Lunch (I did catch Crash, Spider & Cosmpolis after that, & I've moved eXistenZ toward the top of my Netflix queue), but Debbie Harry's new memoir reminded me anew of that lapse in my life. Prime Cronenberg, which is to say wonderful.
   567. vortex of dissipation Posted: October 27, 2019 at 04:30 PM (#5895172)
In the name of hyping bands much less than 37 years old, I strongly recommend the band Big Thief. They have released two terrific albums this year. Check out the song 'Not' as your into.

I saw them at Webster Hall a couple weeks ago! They put on a good show. "Not" is a fine song, but my recommendation would be "Masterpiece."


Thanks for the recommendation. I quite liked both songs.
   568. yo la tengo Posted: October 27, 2019 at 05:50 PM (#5895192)
The wife and I watched My Name is Dolemite yesterday on Netflix. Eddie Murphy still has quite a bit of star charisma to my eye. The movie was slight, but it was fun and we finished right before first pitch of the World Series game. I never saw the original Dolemite films, are they as wildly trivial as they seem in this movie?
   569. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: October 27, 2019 at 06:03 PM (#5895196)
Agree on DimN, which I liked.
I don’t know if “wildly trivial” is the phrase I’d use but they’re certainly ridiculous - amateurish, gleeful, messy. The end of DimN features a bunch of real clips, which should give you some idea.
   570. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: October 27, 2019 at 06:04 PM (#5895197)
Big Thief is great.
   571. yo la tengo Posted: October 27, 2019 at 06:04 PM (#5895198)
Got the movie name reversed, thanks for the correction.
   572. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: October 27, 2019 at 06:19 PM (#5895199)
No correction intended - hadn’t noticed!
   573. yo la tengo Posted: October 27, 2019 at 07:06 PM (#5895205)
The wife and I have tickets to one of the nights of Yo La Tengo's Hanukkah residency this year. I have wild dreams that Big Thief might be an opener. They are on a layoff at that point before their European tour and Brooklyn is their home. A boy can dream, right? The shtick with the Hanukkah shows is that there is an unannounced stand up opener each night and an unannounced band opening each night. Also, each night's door goes to a different charitable fund. Saw one of these shows in Hoboken, pretty sure it was 2008. The New Pornographers were the band and Todd Barry (IIRC) was the stand up
   574. Mr Dashwood Posted: October 27, 2019 at 10:27 PM (#5895275)
Davo, who is a mutual on Twitter, has asked me to report to this thread that he has been banned from the site for conduct unbecoming in one of the fora, so any questions asked of him recently will go unanswered.

(He actually asked me to reply to a specific query, but I have had two many G&Ts; and can't be bothered to hunt it down.)

Incidentally, I am a LAST TEMPTATION fan, in both book and cinematic formats. It is, I think, the film I've paid to see at the cinema the most often, and was the first film of my blu-ray collection. (I also like the score.)

EDIT: Also, I am writing about a top 100 films during 1963-72 over at Letterboxd, if you want to try and find them. The last one I did was IT'S THE GREAT PUMPKIN, CHARLIE BROWN.
Link
   575. Dog on the sidewalk has an ugly bracelet Posted: October 27, 2019 at 10:45 PM (#5895296)
What did he say to get banned!?

I hope he's allowed back. I much appreciate his brand of generally affable crazy.
   576. Mr Dashwood Posted: October 27, 2019 at 11:10 PM (#5895308)
What did he say to get banned!?

He threw around some expletive-laden denunciations which may or may not have been justified.

The Lounge has got Bernal, perros and now Davo banned.

And they have a Narc patrol that polices the site checking to make sure that none of them try to sneak back.

Some nice guys over there, eh?
   577. PreservedFish Posted: October 27, 2019 at 11:19 PM (#5895317)
But I thought the Lounge were the chummiest chums on the intrawebs.
   578. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 27, 2019 at 11:23 PM (#5895321)
Is the Lounge that strange place where people block-quote 27 previous posts before adding an incomprehensible one-sentence inside joke?
   579. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: October 28, 2019 at 12:10 AM (#5895329)
Another vote for Big Thief. They were really good opening for Alvvays in Bloomington last year.
   580. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: October 28, 2019 at 01:47 AM (#5895333)
He threw around some expletive-laden denunciations which may or may not have been justified.


Christians gonna Christian.
   581. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 28, 2019 at 06:46 AM (#5895337)
We caught up with John Wick 3 at the weekend. Pretty much what you might expect, stylishly conceived and made, but with a bare minimum of effort going into the script. Someone deeper into John Wick lore than me might have gotten more out of it. The action sequences remain awfully impressive, although I must admit that the gun fights wear thin quicker than the hand-to-hand combat sequences.
   582. Cowboy Popup Posted: October 28, 2019 at 09:10 AM (#5895345)
He threw around some expletive-laden denunciations which may or may not have been justified

At least he went out doing what he loved. Real shame to lose his voice here.
   583. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: October 28, 2019 at 09:17 AM (#5895346)
Finally saw the Wick series in a marathon a few months back, after hearing lots of comparisons to The Raid (which is GREAT). I enjoyed all three but I'm not sure how I feel about just how stupid the internal logic of that world is - like, some of it is funny-ridiculous, some of it is painful-ridiculous, and some of it is boring.
   584. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: October 28, 2019 at 01:00 PM (#5895444)
   585. Howie Menckel Posted: October 28, 2019 at 02:01 PM (#5895469)
if that was supposed to be Albright, it's the wrong link
   586. Lassus Posted: October 28, 2019 at 04:13 PM (#5895523)
Your link is bad, and you should feel bad.
   587. The Run Fairy Posted: October 31, 2019 at 04:34 PM (#5897545)
If anybody is looking for something baseball-related to watch on Halloween night, you might want to watch The Beaning. I saw it on Criterion Channel but it's also available off youtube. Criterion's summary:

Devils in the outfield! Steeped in occult dread, this experimental documentary uncovers a sinister conspiracy theory surrounding the death of Cleveland baseball player Ray Chapman, who was killed by a ball thrown by Yankees pitcher Carl Mays in 1920.


I wouldn't call it great, but it's probably the only baseball documentary that quotes F.W. Murnau's Faust. Plus it's less than ten minutes long so it's easy to watch.
   588. I Helped Patrick McGoohan Escape Posted: November 01, 2019 at 01:08 AM (#5897641)
Every song on In the Court represents a different failing of humanity, "Moonchild" is the love song.


I thought this was Fripp's song about the humanity's failing at love
   589. Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: November 01, 2019 at 01:21 AM (#5897643)
November is here.
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