Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Chili Davis ‘not going to blame myself,’ wishes next Cubs hitting coach better

About the time the Cubs announced the hiring of the sixth hitting coach in eight seasons of Theo Epstein’s front office regime, Chili Davis got in his truck and headed out of Chicago on Monday – still sorting out how he took the fall for a group of hitters unable or unwilling to hear his message.

“The driving gives me a little time think about things,” said Davis, who was fired last week after just one season into a multiyear contract. “I guess I need to make some adjustments in the way I deliver my message to the millennial players now. I need to make those adjustments for the next job I get, if there is one.

“But without losing my identity,” he added. “Because I know what I know. And I know what I bring is not wrong. I’m not going to blame myself for this. I’m not going to blame anyone. It didn’t work.

It’s a poor craftsman who blames his tools…..

QLE Posted: October 17, 2018 at 06:04 AM | 62 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: blame, chili davis, cubs, hitting

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. asinwreck Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:11 AM (#5768733)
It’s a poor craftsman who blames his tools…..

Are you referring to Davis or Epstein?
   2. Batman Posted: October 17, 2018 at 10:53 AM (#5768827)
"When the only tool you have is a millennial, everything looks like a communication problem."

-Chili Davis
   3. Russ Posted: October 17, 2018 at 10:55 AM (#5768831)
"When the only tool you have is a millennial, everything looks like a communication problem."

-Chili Davis


Amazing.
   4. Zonk is One Individual Posted: October 17, 2018 at 11:10 AM (#5768848)
I would like to congratulate Chili on his new, finely manicured lawn that those damn kids better not walk on. It's a beaut!
   5. Walks Clog Up the Bases Posted: October 17, 2018 at 12:30 PM (#5768931)
I'm a millennial and have subsequently become fascinated by the utter contempt large swaths of older generations have for us. I know it's sort of a rite of passage to become fortified in your beliefs that your generation got it all right while becoming increasingly disenfranchised with the next generation behind you. Still, it's amusing how some people take it to such great lengths that they descend into caricature.
   6. McCoy Posted: October 17, 2018 at 12:41 PM (#5768940)
I've always loved millennials. They eschew traditional career routes which is good for me as it decreases competition and gives me job security. They like to focus on careers that were generally considered hobbies or menial back in the day so I can get a really good haircut nowadays or a great meatball sandwich or a really sharpened pencil. I say kudos to youth and their life choices.
   7. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: October 17, 2018 at 12:58 PM (#5768964)
I'm a millennial and have subsequently become fascinated by the utter contempt large swaths of older generations have for us.

All your trophies, ribbons, awards, and certificates leave us old codgers expecting more because back in our day it meant you actually won something.
   8. PreservedFish Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:00 PM (#5768966)
All your trophies, ribbons, awards, and certificates leave us old codgers expecting more because back in our day it meant you actually won something.

You were the ones giving them out. Millenial 11-year olds did not order and pay for the awards and trophies and certificates.
   9. Zonk is One Individual Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:02 PM (#5768971)
I'm a millennial and have subsequently become fascinated by the utter contempt large swaths of older generations have for us. I know it's sort of a rite of passage to become fortified in your beliefs that your generation got it all right while becoming increasingly disenfranchised with the next generation behind you. Still, it's amusing how some people take it to such great lengths that they descend into caricature.


I'm a Gen Xer that has actually hired millennials and yeah... It puzzles me, too.

I see no difference between those 10-20 years younger than me than I recall myself being at that age. I marvel at some of the memes and social media silliness about such folks interviewing while tapping on their phones and whatnot because I've never seen it.

Indeed - the last person I hired for a position (granted, this was about 5 years ago) sent me one of those written 'thank you's with the boilerplate about please don't hesitate to contact me should you wish to follow-up on anything yada yada.

Once he accepted the offer, I almost immediately started teasing him about his quaintness... so maybe I'm actually contributing to the problem.
   10. , Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:11 PM (#5768985)
You were the ones giving them out. Millenial 11-year olds did not order and pay for the awards and trophies and certificates.

Exactly. Parents get the children they create.

But, really, I agree with zonk. I see no difference in millenials (and the folks coming behind them) and myself and my friends at the same age, correcting for difference in tech. Likewise, as I've aged, I now see little difference in my generation and my parents, or they and my grandparents.

Folks are folks.
   11. McCoy Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:11 PM (#5768987)
Well, I've been doing the hiring for about the last 15 years and I've seen some doozies. There hasn't been any "too busy to interview because I'm on my phone" but I recall one woman telling me she wanted the job because she needed to make enough money to feed and stable her horse. I mean thanks for the honesty and all but that is probably not the best answer if you want to get hired.

But yeah, youth has always acted a bit odd and at times stupid when it comes to employment and millennials are not unique in that regard. 20 years ago my executive chef almost killed a local cooking school intern because the intern wanted to "conversate" with the chef about his duties and how the chef needed to understand the needs and feels of this guy. Or how another 19 year old cook at the time wanted to have off Fridays and Saturdays (the main reason 90% are employed) because he "wanted to have a life".
   12. SoSH U at work Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:12 PM (#5768988)
You were the ones giving them out. Millenial 11-year olds did not order and pay for the awards and trophies and certificates.


Nor do any of them have a mistaken understanding of their worth. Trophies are dust collectors. All of them (except the Stanley Cup).

My favorite old guy railing at participation trophies was when Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker and complete ass James Harrison boasted about how he confiscated his prepubescent kids' participation trophies. This was a few years after declining a visit to the White House with this statement: "If you want to see the Pittsburgh Steelers, invite us when we don't win the Super Bowl. So as far as I'm concerned he would have invited Arizona if they had won."

   13. Walks Clog Up the Bases Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:15 PM (#5768996)
All your trophies, ribbons, awards, and certificates leave us old codgers expecting more because back in our day it meant you actually won something.


I'm an older millennial, so maybe I just missed it, but my childhood activities to ribbons/trophies/awards ratio was pretty poor. In fact, that was the root of one of my younger brother's more clever "boom, roasted!" moments toward me:

My room in the house had a few individual nails in the walls here and there, so I would occasionally hang up the stupid type of #### that's important to a young boy (i.e. my framed Ken Griffey Jr. fan club 8 x 10 glossy).

One year, our little league team got individual framed (participation) certificates and I hung mine near the corner of an otherwise empty wall. Not being one for change, that thing stayed up on my wall for years, becoming visual white noise to me as I entered my high school years. One day, I walked into my room, and my brother had printed out a banner that read "WALL OF ACHIEVEMENTS" with the "S" intentionally crudely scribbled out to really drive home the idea that my life's achievements to that point was (according to the wall, anyway) a lone little league participation certificate from more than half a decade prior.

   14. Batman Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:15 PM (#5768997)
Some day, millennials will talk about how, back in their day, they had to get jobs and work all day just to feed and stable their horses.
   15. PreservedFish Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:19 PM (#5768999)
I think millenials are terrific.
   16. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:43 PM (#5769034)
We recently let go a millennial where I work. She was hired to be a SQL developer and I don't know who interviewed her, but it quickly became obvious that all she knew about SQL was how to spell it. When given a task she didn't understand, her attempts to work through it were mostly asking other people to do it for her while at the same time asking them to invent hypothetical business questions so she could work on her coding skills. All the while, she was in the office exactly 8.0 hours a day (in a salaried position), although working much less in actuality when you consider the hours each day she was on her phone texting or watching videos or whatever or just plain away from her desk. She didn't report up through my group, but I had direct line of sight to her desk in our soul-sucking "open office," so I saw it all. When told directly by her team lead that her work wasn't getting done on time, was of poor quality, and that she was spending entirely too much time on her phone every day, nothing changed.

Most of our new college hires and interns I've worked with have been fine, but her memorable example goes a long way toward understanding how the stereotype developed.
   17. PreservedFish Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:49 PM (#5769040)
It was so great how there were never bad employees before they invented smart phones.
   18. McCoy Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:55 PM (#5769045)
I think the most current trend, and it isn't exclusive to millennials, is that people think there is power in victimhood.
   19. caspian88 Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:59 PM (#5769047)
#16 almost perfectly describes my office, except that all the problem employees are 50+ and we have exactly 6 employees under 40 (only one of whom is actually a problem).

Also, gotta remember that "kids these days" (high school and college-age people) are not Millennials. Millennials are now all at least in their mid-20's and some are nearly 40.

My personal dividing line (for Americans) is that you're a Millennial if you can remember 9/11 but not Challenger.
   20. Brian C Posted: October 17, 2018 at 02:04 PM (#5769060)
All the while, she was in the office exactly 8.0 hours a day (in a salaried position),

Not related to millenials, but this brings up one of the strangest developments in my professional life, which just occurred over this past summer. I'm salaried, but I guess that due to some workplace regulation or another, I also use a timeclock and get overtime pay if I work more than 40 hours a week. So I have been point-blank instructed that I am to work 7.98 hours every day.
   21. Hysterical & Useless Posted: October 17, 2018 at 02:20 PM (#5769078)
Folks are folks


And they all suck.


Probably the biggest reason old farts hate kids is because they're sure THEY COULD DO THE JOB (of being young) BETTER!!!!

But they're never going to get the chance.
   22. Jose is an Absurd Force of Nature Posted: October 17, 2018 at 02:26 PM (#5769085)
I'm a millennial and have subsequently become fascinated by the utter contempt large swaths of older generations have for us. I know it's sort of a rite of passage to become fortified in your beliefs that your generation got it all right while becoming increasingly disenfranchised with the next generation behind you. Still, it's amusing how some people take it to such great lengths that they descend into caricature.


This happens with every generation and it is idiotic every time. Watching my friends kids grow up I'm stunned at their level of empathy, engagement and understanding of the world. There is a decency to kids today that didn't exist when I was young. They can still be little shits when they want but there doesn't seem to be the cliqueiness I remember from my youth.
   23. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: October 17, 2018 at 02:30 PM (#5769089)
FTR, the employee in my story is 25.

I'm just feeling especially codgerly lately since last week I received a Senior Citizen discount from a fast food joint despite not asking for it and not being asked my age.

I am 50 years old. Some gray hair, but mostly still thick and dark.
   24. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: October 17, 2018 at 02:56 PM (#5769108)
Young people are, as a rule, more interesting than people my age or older. YMMV.

This happens with every generation and it is idiotic every time.
Agree though it seems a bit more vehement this time.
Then again, I'm a Gen-Xer - we started all ironic and then found the New Sincerity, so we're like - yeah, we could be better.
   25. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: October 17, 2018 at 03:04 PM (#5769118)
Each generation is pretty much the same as the preceding one. Circumstances do change.

   26. Zonk is One Individual Posted: October 17, 2018 at 03:10 PM (#5769124)
Then again, I'm a Gen-Xer - we started all ironic and then found the New Sincerity, so we're like - yeah, we could be better.


The 'nomads' in that great endless cycle theory of generations as a kind of spoked wheel, IIRC.

Anyway, yeah... I have no doubt the stereotype exists because there ARE real examples.

I just remember when I started my "career" in the late 90s - and some of the other entry-level folks my same age were utterly worthless, too.

In a way, I think I almost prefer the millennial approach of being worthless by tapping on a smart phone all day long... BITD? Such folks were, instead, constantly in my cube wanting to spend hours talking about the last X-Files or Buffy episode.

I mean, I'm not anti-water cooler or let's only have social conversations on assigned breaks... but FFS, if I need to get something done today, kindly take the hint that I'm actually trying to work while you continue to yammer on.
   27. PreservedFish Posted: October 17, 2018 at 03:14 PM (#5769130)
Watching my friends kids grow up I'm stunned at their level of empathy, engagement and understanding of the world. There is a decency to kids today that didn't exist when I was young. They can still be little shits when they want but there doesn't seem to be the cliqueiness I remember from my youth.


This is why I wonder if the "participation trophy" thing* might actually be good. Oldsters like to congratulate themselves for succeeding in a dog eat dog world** but is it really wrong to hope to disrupt the dog eat dog cycle? Can't dogs just get along?

* To be clear, I don't think that participation trophies do anything significant to tamp down man's natural competitive instincts, just using it as shorthand for larger trends
**Although of course their own elders were mocking how unchallenging their upbringings were.
   28. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 17, 2018 at 03:45 PM (#5769171)
is it really wrong to hope to disrupt the dog eat dog cycle? Can't dogs just get along?
It seems they get along quite well as long as they approve of the smell of each others' anuses, but I'm not sure we really want to import that model for humans.
   29. Batman Posted: October 17, 2018 at 04:01 PM (#5769197)
It seems they get along quite well as long as they approve of the smell of each others' anuses
That's how Manny Machado will choose his next team.
   30. Zonk is One Individual Posted: October 17, 2018 at 04:06 PM (#5769206)
It seems they get along quite well as long as they approve of the smell of each others' anuses

That's how Manny Machado will choose his next team.


So THAT'S why he seems to be going out of his way to show his ass side this postseason!
   31. T.J. Posted: October 17, 2018 at 04:27 PM (#5769230)
Yeah, this kind of thing happens every new generation. There were SO MANY articles back in the '80s and early '90s about how worthless, cynical, and lazy we Gen-Xers were, neglected and ignored by our Boomer and Silent parents, turned into latchkey kids. Pop culture was rife with it. Movies: SINGLES, SLACKER, etc. Music: Nirvana, Pearl Jam, etc.

https://www.amazon.com/Managing-Generation-Bring-Talent-Revised/dp/0393320758

https://qz.com/work/1070139/millennials-are-no-harder-to-manage-than-generation-x-according-to-the-commentary-of-the-1990s/

http://time.com/247/millennials-the-me-me-me-generation/

https://www.amazon.com/Generation-X-Tales-Accelerated-Culture/dp/031205436X/
   32. Walks Clog Up the Bases Posted: October 17, 2018 at 04:31 PM (#5769236)
This is why I wonder if the "participation trophy" thing* might actually be good. Oldsters like to congratulate themselves for succeeding in a dog eat dog world** but is it really wrong to hope to disrupt the dog eat dog cycle? Can't dogs just get along?


Anecdotal evidence and all that, but sometimes I think that the common millennial affliction of loads of student debt and a soft job market relative to the cost of those degree has helped forge a level of empathy I see quite often in my fellow millennials. We get the rap of being entitled good-for-nothings who don't wanna work, but still feel owed all the trappings of the American dream. My experiences haven't been like that.

Most of the ones I know are just trying to get by, pay down their student debt, own a reliable car, and, if they don't have health insurance, not break an ankle or something. Even then, I see a common decency in them that I don't always see from the older folks who have been brow-beating us a hobby. Good example of this is with tipping at a bar or restaurant. Most of my friends are excellent tippers, which I think stems from a shared empathy for the server/bartender who is usually also just trying to get by. Compare that with some of the tips I've seen older, more established folks leave at our favored watering holes and it's laughable.
   33. Zonk is One Individual Posted: October 17, 2018 at 04:45 PM (#5769251)
This is why I wonder if the "participation trophy" thing* might actually be good. Oldsters like to congratulate themselves for succeeding in a dog eat dog world** but is it really wrong to hope to disrupt the dog eat dog cycle? Can't dogs just get along?


Have you SEEN FB lately?

Awarding yourself a participation trophy for drinking from a hose, riding in the back of a pickup truck without seat belts, doing chores or not having a cellphone is all it pretty much is for a lot of folks.

I mean, I'm sorry 3D printer technology is still fairly pricey but yeesh...
   34. McCoy Posted: October 17, 2018 at 04:46 PM (#5769253)
Older people as a general rule leave less of a tip than younger people and it is that way for a variety of reasons. One is as you mentioned a empathy thing. Another is that they simply have less money to spend. Another is that they simply don't respect the job. Another is that they simply don't respect the person. Another is that they have unrealistic expectations.
   35. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 17, 2018 at 04:57 PM (#5769265)
I would assume another reason that older people tip relatively poorly is that the generally accepted standard percentage for tips has risen over the years, and they either don't know or refuse to accept that it's more than when they were young.
   36. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: October 17, 2018 at 05:12 PM (#5769276)
Dang right, ElRoy. Who decided 18% is now the standard?
   37. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 17, 2018 at 05:19 PM (#5769282)

"Millenials" has basically become the catch-all way that people describe everyone who is younger than them.

But yeah, I did on-campus interviewing for my firm for a number of years and I was often floored by how much *better* qualified the kids today are than I was, at least on paper. Now, part of that is due to campus career offices coaching the kids a lot better and the internet provides a lot more resources for kids to use in their job search process. But in general they come to the interviews much better prepared and with better resumes than I did.

FWIW, I'm a late Gen X-er (born in '79) and while I remember everyone getting a trophy when we were really young, that stopped after a couple of seasons due to budget cuts in our town rec department. After that, only winners got trophies.
   38. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: October 17, 2018 at 05:23 PM (#5769288)
Who decided 18% is now the standard?
People about 20 years ago. These days it's 20%, minimum.
   39. Zonk is One Individual Posted: October 17, 2018 at 05:24 PM (#5769292)
Dang right, ElRoy. Who decided 18% is now the standard?


Heh - well, actually - the fact that it seems most server wage rates are the same as they were ~20 years ago... I've got a cousin (well, daughter of a cousin - though, that still makes us cousins, right?) who actually waits tables at the same chain restaurant I did for a year or two 20 years ago - and her hourly rate is actually the same I made 20 years ago at the same place.... $2.13 an hour.

   40. Brian C Posted: October 17, 2018 at 05:41 PM (#5769319)
I'll die on a 20% hill (although I do round up to the next dollar).

More to the point on tipping: when I go to a fast food place where they "let" you add a tip on a credit card transaction - let's say, for example, Jersey Mike's, which comes immediately to mind - am I supposed to add a tip? I thought the whole point of a tip was that I was being waited on, i.e., value-added service.

I really resent tipping for counter service unless I'm going crazy with special orders or something. Plus, who am I tipping in that case? Is everyone splitting tips? Is it just going to the register person? Is management just pocketing it?
   41. GregD Posted: October 17, 2018 at 06:02 PM (#5769346)
I've got a cousin (well, daughter of a cousin - though, that still makes us cousins, right?)
Yes. Once removed but there's only certain parts of society that make that distinction or know what it is
   42. Batman Posted: October 17, 2018 at 06:03 PM (#5769349)
Back in my day, if the service was good enough, you tipped by not giving the waitress polio.
   43. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: October 17, 2018 at 08:53 PM (#5769489)
and her hourly rate is actually the same I made 20 years ago at the same place.... $2.13 an hour.


No jokes..but is that even legal?

I'm the first of the gen x'rs and I like millennials. I'm more then happy to make way for a bright eyed younger generation and see how they are going to change the world. Sometimes for the worse, but mostly for the better I think.

   44. Hank Gillette Posted: October 17, 2018 at 08:55 PM (#5769490)
I would assume another reason that older people tip relatively poorly is that the generally accepted standard percentage for tips has risen over the years, and they either don't know or refuse to accept that it's more than when they were young.


Why should that be? The price of a nice meal has gone by a factor of 5-10 since I was in high school 50 years ago. Therefore, a 15% has also gone up 5-10 times. It’s already more than when I was young.
   45. Hank Gillette Posted: October 17, 2018 at 08:58 PM (#5769491)
This happens with every generation and it is idiotic every time. Watching my friends kids grow up I'm stunned at their level of empathy, engagement and understanding of the world. There is a decency to kids today that didn't exist when I was young.


I’m a boomer and there were idealistic kids back then, too, who wanted to change the world. They found out, as the kids today probably will, that the world does not change that easily, not as long as our leaders are motivated by greed and not the general welfare.
   46. McCoy Posted: October 17, 2018 at 08:59 PM (#5769493)
That's been my argument as well. You go to some diner for breakfast where the total per person check is something like $8 go ahead and tip 25% or more but there is a no reason to give some high end steakhouse that is coming in at 100+ dollars per person 20% or more unless that is what you want to give. There is no reason to give 20% on a $400 bottle of wine. You're not getting $80 of service from the staff and only getting $10 of service if you opt for the $50 bottle.
   47. McCoy Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:01 PM (#5769498)
I’m a boomer and there were idealistic kids back then, too, who wanted to change the world. They found out, as the kids today probably will, that the world does not change that easily, not as long as our leaders are motivated by greed and not the general welfare.

I don't think it is a matter of idealism but of ignorance, selfishness, naivete. All young people basically think the world is going to bend to their bidding and almost everybody grows up and realizes the world cares little about what they want.
   48. Hank Gillette Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:04 PM (#5769506)
Who decided 18% is now the standard?

People about 20 years ago. These days it's 20%, minimum.


Who makes that rule? The union of waiters?

As I said before, I am not going to let the beneficiary of the tip dictate a higher percentage, when I’ve already increased the amount I tip, based on a constant percentage.

i think the problem is that the people who are advocating that don’t understand math.
   49. McCoy Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:08 PM (#5769528)
I think they understand math very well. 20% of $100 is a helluva lot better than 15% of $50.
   50. Howie Menckel Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:19 PM (#5769556)
I have 10 millennial nephews and nieces (5 of each).

generally they strike me as awesome. not as ambitious, overall, but they are really good people.

their desire to live a happier life - even at the expense of getting ahead more quickly - doesn't strike me as unreasonable at all.

I was in a cell phone store 2 years ago, and the 2 young ladies working there were making fun of a previous customer. I noted that while tradition was that "the customer is always right" and never act snarky in front of another customer, they had no intention of following those rules, did they?

they both laughed and said yes, I get it.

c'est le vie, say the old folks.
   51. bachslunch Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:31 PM (#5769568)
The standard tip in restaurants for waitstaff is 20% and has been for some time now. That’s what I leave, regardless of check size, though I sometimes round up. It’s also considered standard to tip that amount to bartenders, food delivery (that is, folks like pizza delivery) people, and room service food servers.

In the Jersey Mike’s example mentioned above, I do not tip. I also do not put money in counter tip jars. These folks usually get a decent hourly wage.
   52. Ziggy's screen name Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:31 PM (#5769569)
Once while I was in Australia I left a $30 tip on a $150 meal, which I thought was perfectly reasonable. And didn't realize (I hadn't been there long) that Australia is one of those "round up to the next dollar and give them some change if you've got it" sort of tipping countries. Man did I get good service next time I went in there.
   53. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:48 PM (#5769586)
Probably late to the party.. but I am not anti-participation award. I worked in youth sports for long enough to generally acknowledge that most kids aren't going to play beyond high school (to be really honest, middle school) and if they want some sort of memento to commemorate a season that might recall fond memories at some point later in life, so be it.

I've coached youth soccer for a few years (I generally have no idea what I'm doing, but we have fun) and my general rule of thumb for participation is awards is a nice, small medal that can easily be stored. The reaction that I get from parents when I tell them that is astonishing. You would think that I told them I wanted to give the kids a platter of poo because they "aren't getting a trophy". Sure, it's fun when little Johnny gets his first trophy at 4 and it's something they are super proud of. What they forget is that when Johnny turns 10 and he's played youth sports for 6 years (let's say that he plays 2 seasons a year) that he's going to have 12 trophies that are collecting dust and Johnny doesn't give a damn anymore because he has 12 gotdarned trophies already. At least with a medal, I can throw it in a keepsake box. Johnny still isn't going to care, but at least it's out of the way.

Don't get me wrong. I'm cool with giving the kids a certificate and a medal at the year end pizza party.
   54. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:57 PM (#5769597)
Unless I get memorably awful service, of which I can recall only a couple of instances in my life, 20 percent is my bare minimum. More like 25 percent, really. I'm usually in the 30 percent range. I usually don't spend a whole lot on eating out, though, so even at that rate I'm probably dropping only $20ish in total a most.
   55. Michael Paulionis Posted: October 17, 2018 at 09:57 PM (#5769598)
16. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: October 17, 2018 at 01:43 PM (#5769034)
We recently let go a millennial where I work. She was hired to be a SQL developer and I don't know who interviewed her, but it quickly became obvious that all she knew about SQL was how to spell it. When given a task she didn't understand, her attempts to work through it were mostly asking other people to do it for her while at the same time asking them to invent hypothetical business questions so she could work on her coding skills. All the while, she was in the office exactly 8.0 hours a day (in a salaried position), although working much less in actuality when you consider the hours each day she was on her phone texting or watching videos or whatever or just plain away from her desk. She didn't report up through my group, but I had direct line of sight to her desk in our soul-sucking "open office," so I saw it all. When told directly by her team lead that her work wasn't getting done on time, was of poor quality, and that she was spending entirely too much time on her phone every day, nothing changed.

Most of our new college hires and interns I've worked with have been fine, but her memorable example goes a long way toward understanding how the stereotype developed.


I read this and all I can tell you is that it sounds less like your office has an SQL developer problem....it sounds like it has an HR/administration problem. It sounds to me like she wasn't expected to meet any expectations at any time (vetting/interview, introduction, evaluation). This may have been the worst example of insubordination from your POV, but it also sounds like it isn't the only case of a poor co-worker. Speaking as someone who has worked in more than a few mismanaged work environments...as one might say: the call might be coming from inside the house.

As for the 8.0 hours a day...if I was grossly unqualified at performing my job, the 1st thing I would make sure of was spending the least amount of time possible at the office for a variety of reasons (fear of being exposed being key). What did you expect her to do? Notice at 5 PM that she hadn't done anything all day and then start to get to work? If someone shows you they are incompetent and no one fails to call it what it is, the whole office is pretty culpable.

This might also been in effect: The Dunning-Kruger Effect
   56. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 17, 2018 at 10:01 PM (#5769611)
Probably late to the party.. but I am not anti-participation award. I worked in youth sports for long enough to generally acknowledge that most kids aren't going to play beyond high school (to be really honest, middle school) and if they want some sort of memento to commemorate a season that might recall fond memories at some point later in life, so be it.


Something to be said for that. I remember the postseason awards presentation after my final year of youth baseball (3 years in the 8-10-year-olds league, 2 years in the 11-12-years-old league) & hoping against hope that I'd get some sort of trinket to acknowledge, if nothing else, 5 years of showing up. (Season #3 was actually a damned good one, as my mid-Sept birthday gave me a several-months jump over just about all my competitors ... though somehow I didn't make either all-star team that year, as I did the previous season & also my final season, neither of which was remotely deserved. Maybe they were specifically looking for a good-field no-hit kid.) Nope. Nada.

I was ... well, "crushed" is probably too melodramatic a word, but it's not particularly inaccurate either.

Within 3 years, I decided I was an anarchist. And I've never really moved on from that.

I. Blame. SOCIETY. MISTER PRESIDENT!
   57. asinwreck Posted: October 17, 2018 at 10:06 PM (#5769614)
When will the "old man yells at cloud" tag get added to this post? (Note: Am old.)
   58. stig-tossled, hornswoggled gef the typing mongoose Posted: October 17, 2018 at 10:11 PM (#5769625)
When will the "old man yells at cloud" tag get added to this post? (Note: Am old.)


Get a millennial to do it.
   59. Michael Paulionis Posted: October 17, 2018 at 10:53 PM (#5769721)
And screw Chili Davis. Good riddance.

As a Cubs fan who also has also followed the Cardinals closely over the years, Davis reminds me of Tony La Russa. La Russa used to expect every Cardinal to fit within his narrow definition of the type of human being he thought everyone else needed to be. La Russa used to do the same passive-aggressive b.s. with any player who didn't walk like him, talk like him, think like him, etc. Was it successful??? Yeah, I guess. In the same way that it is successful in boot camp to weed out the rebels and questioners from the silent, loyal warriors. Unfortunately, our society has evolved. It's up to the La Russa's and the Davis' to evolve just as much as it has been expected of the old-school GM's that accepted no personal responsibility for their failure to evolve like Dave Stewart & Omar Minaya

I don't doubt the fact that Ozzie Smith, Adam Kennedy, J.D. Drew, Rick Ankiel, Scott Rolen, Anthony Reyes, Colby Rasmus, Shelby Miller weren't all difficult people, but I always felt like Cardinal fans were overly eager to enable a flawed teacher/mentor over & over again by blaming the students.

What's more likely: 1) Kris Bryant, Anthony Rizzo & Co. are a bunch of lazy, entitled babies unwilling to listen to the new boss? OR... 2) Chili Davis is an instructor that is limited in his effectiveness to deal with different types of reasonable personalities?

I say #2.
   60. Michael Paulionis Posted: October 17, 2018 at 11:29 PM (#5769780)
Something to be said for that. I remember the postseason awards presentation after my final year of youth baseball (3 years in the 8-10-year-olds league, 2 years in the 11-12-years-old league) & hoping against hope that I'd get some sort of trinket to acknowledge, if nothing else, 5 years of showing up. (Season #3 was actually a damned good one, as my mid-Sept birthday gave me a several-months jump over just about all my competitors ... though somehow I didn't make either all-star team that year, as I did the previous season & also my final season, neither of which was remotely deserved. Maybe they were specifically looking for a good-field no-hit kid.) Nope. Nada.

I was ... well, "crushed" is probably too melodramatic a word, but it's not particularly inaccurate either.


Yeah, that pretty much wraps up my baseball playing career as well. I played 2 years before hanging up the old cleats (actually, I probably didn't even have cleats by that level). I was a bad baseball player, and I pretty much knew it (even if I still loved the game). My theory is that the trophies given out in early childhood are a lot less problematic when compared to the high school/college system that builds up every above average star quarterback/ace pitcher into their community's own personal Roy Hobbs.

With all the Brett Kavanaugh talk going on, I've been trying to get to the heart of Kavanaugh's true level of athletic prowess. It's funny, because to me, he is my idea of the stereotypical participation trophy winner. It's only he was either too drunk, naive, or spoiled to understand how mediocre he really was. What's more likely: the Ralph Club President & his classmates were all really the football/basketball phenoms they liked to assume they were at Georgetown Prep? or more likely... All the privileged prep schools played against each other and since they were all equally awful athletes, they all grew up with an inflated sense of their athletic prowess.

I can imagine him showing up at Yale Basketball tryouts and getting punked by 6-11 Chris Dudley on day 1. It was likely at that point, he figured the rest of his undergraduate days would be best spent doing what he better at....getting blackout drunk.
   61. Spahn Insane Posted: October 18, 2018 at 12:37 AM (#5769882)
Post 59 is terrific.
   62. Zonk is One Individual Posted: October 18, 2018 at 12:58 AM (#5769928)
and her hourly rate is actually the same I made 20 years ago at the same place.... $2.13 an hour.


No jokes..but is that even legal?


Yes - basically, it's pegged to the minimum wage... Like most states, I think - there's a 'tipped credit' allocation.

Now, the minimum wage is higher now than it was 20 years - $5.15 vs $7.25 today - but when she told me, I looked it up and when the federal minimum wage rose to $7.25, Indiana just upped its state 'tip credit' to $5.12 from the prior $3.03... leaving the wage rate at the same $2.13 for tipped employees.

So basically? You could say that it was the state that made the determination that 15% should become 18% or 20%.

To be fair, it was exceedingly rare that I didn't make better than minimum wage - and over the course of a pay period, it most certainly never worked out to minimum wage or lower (i.e., might work an occasional dead shift - but more than made up for it with a busy Saturday, etc).

Of course, there was - and apparently, they don't do it anymore luckily for her - a promotion that the chain used to run that I always dreaded... 'fajita-rita' Monday... Double order - meant to be shared - normally something like 18.99 for 10 bucks and little 10 oz margaritas that were normally something like 2.99 for a buck. ####### regularly came in with the EXACT price of one double order + 4 margaritas... something like $14.65 or thereabouts + $1... which came out to something like 6 or 7%. If you got a particularly generous couple of #######, you got a 10, a 5, and single... so $1.35 -- but it was not at all unusual for $14.65 exactly plus an extra dollar.

I mean, I never adulterated anything - but those nights? Most sorely tempted ever.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
BarrysLazyBoy
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (December 2018)
(630 - 5:30am, Dec 17)
Last: Baldrick

NewsblogRed Sox owe $12 million in luxury tax, showing why they'd want to shed payroll
(9 - 4:18am, Dec 17)
Last: Scott Ross

NewsblogWhy gambling used to scare baseball and why it doesn’t anymore
(60 - 2:56am, Dec 17)
Last: yest

NewsblogMLB: Mets to sign catcher Wilson Ramos
(16 - 12:51am, Dec 17)
Last: Howie Menckel

NewsblogTHE HALL OF FAME VALUE STANDARD (Bill James rank 25 worst players in HOF & 25 best not in the HOF)
(95 - 11:34pm, Dec 16)
Last: Sunday silence

NewsblogNY Post: Lenny Dykstra reveals his new life as an amateur Torah scholar
(4 - 11:25pm, Dec 16)
Last: Sunday silence

Hall of Merit2019 Hall of Merit Ballot Discussion
(354 - 9:53pm, Dec 16)
Last: Howie Menckel

NewsblogOT: Soccer Thread (The Berhalter Thread?)
(206 - 9:46pm, Dec 16)
Last: Mefisto

Hall of Merit2019 Hall of Merit Ballot
(16 - 9:34pm, Dec 16)
Last: Kiko Sakata

NewsblogJeurys Familia finalizes 3-year deal to return as likely setup man
(17 - 9:32pm, Dec 16)
Last: Russlan thinks deGrom is da bomb

NewsblogOT - NBA Thread (2018-19 season kickoff edition)
(3709 - 9:20pm, Dec 16)
Last: tshipman

NewsblogThibs' Hall of Fame Tracker
(502 - 7:18pm, Dec 16)
Last: SoSH U at work

Newsblog2019 BBWAA HALL OF FAME BALLOT
(130 - 2:19pm, Dec 16)
Last: snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster)

NewsblogCardinals prospect Griffin Roberts suspended 50 games for a drug of abuse
(20 - 1:57pm, Dec 16)
Last: snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster)

NewsblogCampaign to make Negro League bobbleheads
(4 - 1:31pm, Dec 16)
Last: Sunday silence

Page rendered in 0.5283 seconds
46 querie(s) executed