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Thursday, May 30, 2013

ESPN : Granderson Funds New Stadium For Alma Mater

University of Illinois trustees have agreed to a deal in which New York Yankees star Curtis Granderson will pay for most of a new baseball stadium at his alma mater, the University of Illinois-Chicago. Trustees voted Wednesday to name the new stadium after Granderson, who announced in February that he will donate $5 million to the project. The total cost is projected to be $7 million. The open-air, brick-and-stone stadium will seat 1,200 and is expected to open in 2015. The plan calls for using the field for Flames games and events for Chicago Public Schools and youth organizations.

Nice gesture, especially considering Granderson is in his free agent year, with the Yankees’ budget and his spate of injuries creating some uncertainty about Curtis’ future earnings.

The Yankee Clapper Posted: May 30, 2013 at 12:36 AM | 28 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: ballparks, charity, chicago, college baseball, new york yankees, stadiums

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   1. OPS+ Posted: May 30, 2013 at 08:14 AM (#4455478)
If I won a substantial amount of money in the lottery, one of the first things I would do is donate money to the various sports programs that I've been a part of. I'd love to give my high school a new turf soccer field.
   2. depletion Posted: May 30, 2013 at 08:19 AM (#4455481)
Way to go, Curtis.
   3. Styles P. Deadball Posted: May 30, 2013 at 08:35 AM (#4455491)
UIC's baseball field has an absolutely gorgeous view of the city.

It's also very close to the site of the old West Side Park.

Nice job, Curtis.
   4. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: May 30, 2013 at 09:05 AM (#4455511)
You never hear much about UIC. I always thought it was kind of odd that most states had their flagship university out in the boonies and only a satellite or branch campus in the major city. I guess that makes sense, though, since they are land grand universities and they probably went outside the cities for, you know, the cheap available land.
   5. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: May 30, 2013 at 09:08 AM (#4455514)

If I won a substantial amount of money in the lottery, one of the first things I would do is donate money to the various sports programs that I've been a part of. I'd love to give my high school a new turf soccer field.


Word. The West Essex Fencing team would quickly find itself the recipient of ten brand new FIE caliber electric foils, ten sabres, six epees (because really), new reels, new roll out piste, and two new olympic style scoring boxes. Plus replacement blades, jackets, masks, lames, gloves, shoes, body cords, plastrons. Plus all this again for the girls team in addition to about 30 of those plastic boob protectors. Oh, and a kickass bus full of snacks and soda.
   6. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: May 30, 2013 at 09:18 AM (#4455521)
Plus an endowment to pay the best coach in the world $100,000 a year to work there. Stefano Cirioni, come on down!
   7. GregD Posted: May 30, 2013 at 10:03 AM (#4455572)
You never hear much about UIC. I always thought it was kind of odd that most states had their flagship university out in the boonies and only a satellite or branch campus in the major city. I guess that makes sense, though, since they are land grand universities and they probably went outside the cities for, you know, the cheap available land.
I think most came down to political infighting as this is true even of state universities that preceded the land grant act. Basically when states got established (outside of the original colonies) the first splits were regional (which often also corresponded to different crop patterns like the corn/wheat divide in parts of the Midwest.) So the big three to divvy up when states were organized were state capitol, university, and prison. And it was traditional to put them in different regions to appease factions. Iowa went Fort Madison, Iowa City, Des Moines which sort of divided the state since the western region wasn't that settled. But other states--Nebraska, Minnesota, Ohio--did it differently. In some states where the principal city was already obvious, the first territorial and state legislatures (which often were divvied by county) were disproportionately rural so struck back against urban dominance by spreading the wealth. At the time when these universities were established there was lots of land near cities since cities were so much smaller so it would have been easy to put universities there if they wanted to.
   8. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: May 30, 2013 at 10:17 AM (#4455592)
You never hear much about UIC. I always thought it was kind of odd that most states had their flagship university out in the boonies and only a satellite or branch campus in the major city. I guess that makes sense, though, since they are land grand universities and they probably went outside the cities for, you know, the cheap available land.


Well, in the Big 10, Illinois, Iowa, and Indiana fit that mold. But Ohio, Wisconsin, Nebraska, and Minnesota have the flagship in the Capital, and Michigan and Minnesota quite close to the principal city. Not sure what the flagship University is in Pennsylvania. If Penn State, then it fits the bill. If Penn, then not.

Exceptions in the SEC are Texas, Louisiana, South Carolina (Capital)

Exceptions from other states:

Colorado
California
Washington
Oklahoma
Nevada
Utah
Lawrence, KS is practically a suburb of KC
Tucson is not exactly in the sticks
   9. GregD Posted: May 30, 2013 at 10:22 AM (#4455601)
If Penn State, then it fits the bill. If Penn, then not.
Penn is private. Penn State's main campus is the flagship with secondary but near flagships in Pittsburgh (Pitt) and Philly (Temple) and other Penn States and colleges across the state.
   10. Tim Wallach was my Hero Posted: May 30, 2013 at 10:51 AM (#4455645)
I think most came down to political infighting as this is true even of state universities that preceded the land grant act. Basically when states got established (outside of the original colonies) the first splits were regional (which often also corresponded to different crop patterns like the corn/wheat divide in parts of the Midwest.) So the big three to divvy up when states were organized were state capitol, university, and prison. And it was traditional to put them in different regions to appease factions. Iowa went Fort Madison, Iowa City, Des Moines which sort of divided the state since the western region wasn't that settled. But other states--Nebraska, Minnesota, Ohio--did it differently. In some states where the principal city was already obvious, the first territorial and state legislatures (which often were divvied by county) were disproportionately rural so struck back against urban dominance by spreading the wealth. At the time when these universities were established there was lots of land near cities since cities were so much smaller so it would have been easy to put universities there if they wanted to.

I had never understood why most american universities were located in the middle of nowhere. In Quebec, the state U has campuses in many smaller towns (in their downtowns, actually), but its most important campus (UQAM) is right in downtown Montreal, not too far from the HEC, Concordia and McGill. Montreal is also in a quite urban setting, and so is Laval in Quebec City. We have no "college towns" per say. The same is true of many state and private U in the Canada.
   11. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: May 30, 2013 at 11:04 AM (#4455668)
I had never understood why most american universities were located in the middle of nowhere.


Again, "most" aren't. Every large city has 2 or more major universities. OK, the main U of Illinois campus is in the middle of nowhere, but Chicago has Northwestern, Loyola, DePaul, UIC, University of Chicago. Penn State is in the middle of nowhere, but Philly has Penn, Temple, St Joe's, Villanova, Drexell, LaSalle. There are a lot of American colleges in the middle of nowhere simply because there are a LOT of American colleges.

   12. GregD Posted: May 30, 2013 at 11:06 AM (#4455672)
As in many things, the decentralized system--not just in the federal government but at the states where seats were often apportioned by counties--meant a rural over-representation and a commitment to types of geographic spread that just doesn't happen in centralized systems. We don't have a National Reserve; we have a Federal Reserve with branches spread across the country. We don't have a National University; we have a bunch of state universities. Some of the impacts are good, some bad, but the influence is almost everywhere.
   13. SOLockwood Posted: May 30, 2013 at 11:06 AM (#4455673)
re: Tuscon

Phoenix got the capitol, Flagstaff got the prison, Tuscon got the college.
   14. Swedish Chef Posted: May 30, 2013 at 11:08 AM (#4455677)
I had never understood why most american universities were located in the middle of nowhere.

That's a pattern in parts of Europe too (like Cambridge, Oxford, Lund, Uppsala, Göttingen, Leyden), except that they have been around some centuries more.

Oh, and it's a very nice gesture of Granderson. Josh Sale should take notes.
   15. SoSH U at work Posted: May 30, 2013 at 11:20 AM (#4455693)
Oh, and it's a very nice gesture of Granderson. Josh Sale should take notes.


Hey, he was also freely doling out his money, making up for the smaller increments with higher velocity.

   16. GregD Posted: May 30, 2013 at 11:24 AM (#4455700)
Again, "most" aren't. Every large city has 2 or more major universities. OK, the main U of Illinois campus is in the middle of nowhere, but Chicago has Northwestern, Loyola, DePaul, UIC, University of Chicago. Penn State is in the middle of nowhere, but Philly has Penn, Temple, St Joe's, Villanova, Drexell, LaSalle. There are a lot of American colleges in the middle of nowhere simply because there are a LOT of American colleges.
I think the point is about public universities, thus the comparison to UQAM.

Most top private colleges (outside of the slacs) were founded in cities by city leaders. Some of those cities (Providence, St. Louis) aren't as central now as they were then but universities have big legacy benefits.

If you go through the top public universities, you get Berkeley, which is now part of the SF megalopolis but wasn't when founded; UCLA which was the second u in the system but became a world leader, Virginia placed in Charlottesville not Richmond, Michigan where Ann Arbor was much more isolated from Detroit at its founding, UNC where Chapel Hill was an outpost to make sure that Raleigh and Wilmington didn't dominate it (at a time when Durham literally didn't exist), William and Mary which has an even older history, UW where the then non-existent town of Madison got the state capitol and university because it was halfway between Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien, similar scenario with Austin which got both because it was made up to be a counter to Houston and Columbus which got both to counter the power of Cleveland and Cincinnati, Illinois which is apart from both the big city and the capital, Indiana which is ditto, Florida which is ditto, Maryland which is ditto, Connecticut which is ditto, Georgia which is ditto, Rutgers which is ditto, Iowa which is ditto, Missouri which is ditto and so on. Going by ranking Washington, Minnesota, and some of the many UC schools would be the exceptions (though the UC schools are a product of the boom of the entire system and are themselves intentionally spread out.)

Some of the places became large cities over time--Madison, Columbus, Austin--but weren't at all at the time even in context.
   17. SOLockwood Posted: May 30, 2013 at 01:37 PM (#4455898)
Virginia placed in Charlottesville not Richmond


In the home town of the man who founded it - Thos Jefferson

William and Mary which has an even older history


put in the then-capitol of the colony

   18. vortex of dissipation Posted: May 30, 2013 at 01:47 PM (#4455913)
Curtis Granderson is a good man.
   19. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 30, 2013 at 04:53 PM (#4456128)
As a proud son of Champaign, IL, I'll have you know it's most certainly not "in the middle of nowhere." Why, it's only a little over 2 hours from Chicago!
   20. smileyy Posted: May 30, 2013 at 06:01 PM (#4456173)
The "Land Grant University" concept is at play here too, where the Federal Government gave unused federal lands for the construction of universities. That helps explain why many of them are where they are (at-the-time, unused land)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land-grant_university
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_land-grant_universities
   21. Pirate Joe Posted: May 30, 2013 at 08:16 PM (#4456274)
Penn is private. Penn State's main campus is the flagship with secondary but near flagships in Pittsburgh (Pitt) and Philly (Temple) and other Penn States and colleges across the state.



This is simply incorrect. Penn State has the exact same status in Pennsylvania that Pitt and Temple (and for that matter, Lincoln University, an HBU in Philadelphia) have. All four of those schools are completely independent of the others. None are actually state schools by what that term is generally taken to mean. They are all what are called "state related" schools. In short, the state of Pennsylvania supplies all four schools with money every year, at this point it's less than 10% of yearly budget, in exchange for those schools charging Pennsylvania residents cheaper tuition than out of state students. The state also gets the right to appoint a couple of members of each school's board of trustees, theoretically as a watchdog over the state's money. In just about all other ways the four schools operate as private schools that own all their own assets and make all their own decisions independent from the state.

Pennsylvania also has state schools, state owned and state operated Universities. Those schools would be schools like Slippery Rock, Indiana, California, Clarion and others. There are 14 of them in all, scattered across the state.

Also, for the record Pitt has branch campuses just like Penn State does, although not nearly as many. I think Temple has one or two as well.


   22. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: May 30, 2013 at 08:22 PM (#4456284)
Good description. I don't know of any Temple branch campuses, unless it's an MBA program in a strip mall somewhere. They just acquired the Fox Chase Cancer Center though, and have other affiliated hospitals.

I believe Pitt-Johnstown and Pitt-Greensburg are four-year institutions, which none of the Penn State branch campuses are. Pitt-Titusville and Pitt-Bradford are not.
   23. Mike Emeigh Posted: May 30, 2013 at 08:27 PM (#4456291)
Both the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill) and North Carolina State University (Raleigh) are part of the North Carolina State University system. UNC is the flagship (indeed it's the nation's oldest public university) but not exactly in the sticks. NC State wasn't found until 100 years after UNC. There are branch campuses in every major metro area (Greensboro, Charlotte, Asheville) and some in not-so-major areas (UNC Pembroke, Appalachian State, East Carolina).

-- MWE

   24. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: May 30, 2013 at 08:33 PM (#4456301)
UNC Pembroke put some billboards up near Pittsburgh when I was there. I swear they did. What the heck was up with that? It's not one of the eight North Carolina state colleges anyone has heard of. Apparently it's located on an Indian reservation near Fort Bragg? Who the heck would travel more than 50 miles to go there, let alone from Pennsylvania?
   25. Pirate Joe Posted: May 30, 2013 at 08:45 PM (#4456311)
I believe Pitt-Johnstown and Pitt-Greensburg are four-year institutions, which none of the Penn State branch campuses are. Pitt-Titusville and Pitt-Bradford are not.



Pitt-Bradford is also a four year institution.

At this point most, if not all, of the Penn state branch campuses actually do have some four year degree programs. When they first proposed it how ever many years ago it was (five maybe) there was a big outcry among the actual states schools because they correctly looked at the Penn State branch campuses as nothing more than community colleges with the Penn State name attached to them. The state schools felt that allowing those schools some four year programs would cut into their student bases. They ended up coming to some kind of agreement, the details of which I do not remember off the top of my head, and Penn State was allowed to start offering four year programs at at least some of those schools.


   26. GregD Posted: May 30, 2013 at 08:49 PM (#4456316)
UNC Pembroke put some billboards up near Pittsburgh when I was there. I swear they did. What the heck was up with that? It's not one of the eight North Carolina state colleges anyone has heard of. Apparently it's located on an Indian reservation near Fort Bragg? Who the heck would travel more than 50 miles to go there, let alone from Pennsylvania?
They were also on the Jersey Turnpike. They must have been trying to raise their SAT scores.

It's a fascinating school with the Lumbee connection but it is an unusual pitch to Northeasterners.

Both the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill) and North Carolina State University (Raleigh) are part of the North Carolina State University system. UNC is the flagship (indeed it's the nation's oldest public university) but not exactly in the sticks. NC State wasn't found until 100 years after UNC. There are branch campuses in every major metro area (Greensboro, Charlotte, Asheville) and some in not-so-major areas (UNC Pembroke, Appalachian State, East Carolina).
When UNC was founded and for about 3/4 of a century thereafter, Chapel Hill was amazingly difficult to reach. As Durham literally did not exist, there was nothing else in the area, either, just a small town around the college. The NC Railroad did not go there, so it was like a full day carriage ride from Raleigh, which was the point. Raleigh and Wilmington wouldn't accept the other getting the college. They finally finished the state university railroad--with a convict labor system that killed a couple of the workers--and that started to make Chapel Hill connected; you finally got an influx of people in town for graduation and alumni day and so on, stuff that was totally dormant before. Durham was incorporated after the Civil War and started to grow in the 1880s, and the university grew rapidly in the 1890s (after being near death in the 1870s) and eventually you got the very cosmopolitan area that is there now. But it was definitely in the sticks even for 1870s North Carolina before the railroad came.
   27. Graham & the 15-win "ARod Vortex of suck" Posted: May 30, 2013 at 09:49 PM (#4456401)
UIC's baseball field has an absolutely gorgeous view of the city.

It's also very close to the site of the old West Side Park.

Nice job, Curtis.


If my image search didn't mislead me, then you are absolutely right.

Photo
   28. BDC Posted: May 30, 2013 at 10:13 PM (#4456430)
There are a lot of American colleges in the middle of nowhere simply because there are a LOT of American colleges

To some extent, though, "college" in America has often meant a place where young men (and a bit later, young women) could go to have a campus life in a sheltered vale away from the corrupt city. Even Harvard isn't in Boston. And as Harvard came to seem too close to Boston (and Cambridge too big a city in its own right), the various colleges of New England were founded over the next couple of centuries in increasingly remote places that could isolate young people from bad influences: Amherst, Williamstown, and the like. Some of which in turn became more urbanized (Amherst has sprawled even in the past 20 years), and some of which are still pretty flipping hard to get to (Williamstown).

You see this even in urban campuses. NYU seems quintessentially urban, but for a long time their main campus was on a hilltop in the Bronx (which has since become Bronx Community College). Columbia used to be downtown (near the World Trade Center site, in fact), and then midtown, and moved to Morningside Heights when that was a pretty remote part of Manhattan, fleeing the city until the city enveloped it for good.

Sheer need for land is of course part of this trend, but so too is a sense that colleges should be ivory towers or cities on the hill or other such metaphors.

UIC was an attempt to reverse the trend when the Chicago Circle campus was built in the mid-20th century. In the humanities, at least, it leapfrogged even the Champaign-Urbana campus into prominence when Stanley Fish went there as dean about 15 years ago and proceeded to hire everybody who was anybody in critical theory; but things have reverted a bit in the past 10 years, since Fish went his way.

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