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Wednesday, August 10, 2011

ESPN: Meyers: The folly of Angels’ Mike Scioscia (INSIDER)

It’s hard to overstate just how poor a hitter Mathis truly is. For his career, he has a .197 batting average in 1,299 plate appearances. According to Baseball Reference, there have been just three others players in history to amass 1,300 PAs while batting below the Mendoza Line, and two of them, Mike Ryan and Ray Oyler spent a much of their careers in the 1960s, arguably the most pitcher-friendly era in baseball history. (Even the guy for whom the Mendoza Line was named actually had a career batting average of .215.) In other words, when you’re that bad of a hitter, they don’t let you get the chance to amass 1,300 PAs because you’ve already proven you don’t belong in the majors.

Dan Szymborski Posted: August 10, 2011 at 04:48 PM | 45 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: angels

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   1. birdlives is one crazy ninja Posted: August 10, 2011 at 04:55 PM (#3897128)
The link doesn't work.

I realize I'm not the first person to point out Scioscia's stubbornness regarding Mathis, and I certainly won't be the last. But at this point, putting him out there is simply hubris.

Sort of like Buck insisting on Vlad batting clean up.
   2. andrewberg Posted: August 10, 2011 at 05:00 PM (#3897133)
I hope Scioscia sees Drew Butera rifle a ball down to second and decides he absolutely has to have him.
   3. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: August 10, 2011 at 05:06 PM (#3897142)
Actually 4 other non-pitchers: Ryan .193, Fritz Buelow .188, Oyler .175 and Bill (worst player in history and it's not close) Bergen .170, in a mind numbing 3228 PA's.
   4. Dan Szymborski Posted: August 10, 2011 at 05:08 PM (#3897145)
Link should work now.
   5. Matt Welch Posted: August 10, 2011 at 05:18 PM (#3897159)
Scioscia with catchers is like Dick Williams with second basemen.
   6. Dave Spiwak Posted: August 10, 2011 at 05:32 PM (#3897171)
Career OPS+

Bill Bergen: 21
Mario Mendoza: 41
Fritz Buelow: 45
Ray Oyler: 48
Mike Ryan: 51
Jeff Mathis: 51

Truly some historically bad company -- Buelow and Bergen were born before the invention of the ligh bulb.
   7. AROM Posted: August 10, 2011 at 05:37 PM (#3897177)
Why does MLB require that the DH can only be used to hit for the pitcher? I'd love to see them DH for Mathis when Dan Haren (career .227 hitter) starts.
   8. The Piehole of David Wells Posted: August 10, 2011 at 05:40 PM (#3897181)
Scioscia with catchers is like Dick Williams with second basemen.


I like this game. Scioscia with catchers is like Randy Smith with Brad Ausmus.
   9. BDC Posted: August 10, 2011 at 05:43 PM (#3897189)
OK, Scioscia's incompetent. Now could the Angels please get out of the pennant race? :-D
   10. Shredder Posted: August 10, 2011 at 05:46 PM (#3897190)
It's the National League mindset. Scioscia just doesn't think it's fair if he doesn't have one pitcher-quality hitter in the lineup. Unfortunately, the organization has bought into that completely, and they now routinely start three or four.
Why does MLB require that the DH can only be used to hit for the pitcher? I'd love to see them DH for Mathis when Dan Haren (career .227 hitter) starts.
Well, I assume it's because the reason the rule was introduced was so that we wouldn't have to watch pitchers hit, but I don't believe other levels of baseball mandate this. I know a kid who was not a pitcher in high school, but got DH'd for. They subsequently called it "getting Sebestyened".

I keep hoping that in MLB: The Show's Road to the Show mode they will realize that you can create a great pitcher who is also a great hitter. I have a guy who would be the perfect pitcher/DH. He could start once ever five games, and DH the other four. So far the system won't let it happen.
   11. Srul Itza Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:04 PM (#3897215)
OK, Scioscia's incompetent. Now could the Angels please get out of the pennant race?


From the start of the article:

For the most part, it's hard to criticize Mike Scioscia. The Los Angeles Angels' manager has reached the playoffs six times in his 11 full seasons at the helm (including a World Series win), and his club consistently outplays its Pythagorean record, which is a strong indication he knows how to manage bullpen and bench. It would be hard to name five managers in baseball who are better than Scioscia. Because of that, it makes his one glaring blind spot -- his insistence on playing Jeff Mathis regularly -- all the more mind-blowing.
   12. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:09 PM (#3897220)
Just for kicks I was perusing Mathis' BBREF pages
1st round draft pick, 4 times in BA's top 100...
Not totally hopeless in the minors, .277/.340/.445 in nearly 3000 PAs, had some pop...

of course that minor league line is propped up by his .323/.384/.500 line in Rancho Cucamonga in the Calif League
he went on to hit .237/.320/.406 in the Texas League (league was .269/.340/.407) I'm gonna guess that his Texas League MLEs bear more than a passing similarity to his subsequent MLB numbers.

Hit the PCL at age 22, and hit .278/.342/.502 (league: .278/.350/.442)
repeated at age 23: .289/.333/.430
age 24: .244/.295/.376

To use an old Bill James expression regarding mles, sometimes you have to let the air out first before looking at them- Angels' prospects play in very hitter friendly parks and leagues- you have to take an awful lot of air out of their numbers before dealing with them. An .844 OPS in the PCL in a good hitting year is nothing, when Mathis was hitting .278/.342/.502, REAL hitters (MLB caliber not stars or anything), like Josh Willingham hit .324/.455/.676; Rickie Weeks .324/.455/.676; Scott Hairston .311/.384/.608; Dan Johnson .324/.424/.549...Ronny Cedeno: .355/.403 .518

I like the Ronny Cedeno comp- at Mathis' absolute BEST in the high minors he fell nearly 100 OPS short of Ronny effing Cedeno's best, and what do you know- Mathis' career MLB OPS is 75 points worse than Cedeno's- and Cedeno can't hit either.

Mathis is likely no worse a hitter than he was at age 20 - trouble is that he's no better.
   13. PreservedFish Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:14 PM (#3897228)
Hit the PCL at age 22, and hit .278/.342/.502 (league: .278/.350/.442)
repeated at age 23: .289/.333/.430
age 24: .244/.295/.376


Mathis is likely no worse a hitter than he was at age 20 - trouble is that he's no better.


Sounds like he might be quite a bit worse.
   14. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:24 PM (#3897240)
Only tangentially related but... why does Mike Napoli only have 263 PA for Texas despite putting up a 162 OPS+? Has Napoli been hurt? Or is Ron Washington doing his best Mike Scioscia impression?
   15. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:28 PM (#3897245)
Sounds like he might be quite a bit worse.

That's just his PCL progression- essentially his record shows two spike years age 20 in the Calif and 22 in the PCL-
but lots of guys look like they had spikes in the Calif league- and his first year in the PCL was a very high offense year even by PCL standards- his year two decline actually mirrored the league as a whole- his year 3? well he just had a bad year- .244/.295/.376 in the PCl translates to something even worse (believe it or not) than Mathis actual MLB numbers. He also appeared to "crash" as a 21 year old- I don't think there is a pattern - he wasn't improving or declining, just normal random variation.
   16. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:35 PM (#3897253)
Another question, this one not at all related, but what the hell.

Rany mentioned on his podcast with Joe Sheehan that it's the AL teams that have the best W-L records over the past century. I realize part of it's probably a Yankees thing, but is another reason for it that there's no DH in the NL, which means that the spread between teams is smaller?

I'm imagining a league filled with league average teams, as an extreme example. It seems clear to me that it would be hard to get a 100 win team out of this league, let alone 105 wins or whatever. On the other hand, when the teams vary widely in talent, it would be easier to get a 100 or 105 win team. The fact that there's no DH would seem to reduce the talent spread amongst the NL teams, leaving them with slightly closer W-L records, and therefore not as many teams with 100 wins.

Am I missing something?

EDIT: Er, other than the fact that the DH has only been around 40 years.
   17. Mike Emeigh Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:37 PM (#3897255)
why does Mike Napoli only have 263 PA for Texas despite putting up a 162 OPS+?


Napoli was on the DL for most of the second half of June (strained oblique), missing 19 games. He's played in all but six games since he's been back, and started all but two of the games he's played in. Before the injury he'd played in 46 of 66 games, starting 39 of those.

If you look at his usage pattern, he's been more or less a regular starter since the end of April after a scorching start to the season. Washington sat him for two games in May when a prolonged slump dropped him to .185/.342/.424, but once he got back in the lineup he picked it up and he's been mostly excellent since that point.

-- MWE
   18. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:40 PM (#3897256)
Only tangentially related but... why does Mike Napoli only have 263 PA for Texas despite putting up a 162 OPS+?


I'm going t guess he was either hurt or benched in June hitting .179/.233/.214 in just 8 June games after hitting after hitting .206/.320/.444 in 21 May games... He has of course been a beast since and even seems to [finally] be playing every day...

Interestingly, his minor league numbers are not that much better than Mathis', but he did put up a .880 OPS in the Texas League- compared to Mathis' .747, and he really didn't play much in AAA

Napoli hit .932 in the Cal League- Mathis had hit .884, Napoli then had a .133 edge in AA and .86 in AAA (though Napoli had less than 200 AAA PAs)

Napoli has gone on to have a nearly 300 point OPS edge in the majors...
   19. Mike Emeigh Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:41 PM (#3897259)
is another reason for it that there's no DH in the NL, which means that the spread between teams is smaller?


I don't think it's specifically the DH that caused the spread between teams to be larger in the AL; I think it's a combination of that and the fact that the Yankees and Red Sox (and to a lesser extent the Angels) have skewed the talent distribution in the AL.

-- MWE
   20. Vance W Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:44 PM (#3897266)
What did Sciosia have against Napoli anyway?

Apparently, he was not thought of as much of a defender but in Texas he has received and thrown well and doesn't seem to have a game-calling problem. Oh, and he puts up a huge OPS.

Essentially, if the Angels had only kept Napoli and signed Beltre instead of Wells they would be crushing the AL West.
   21. The Good Face Posted: August 10, 2011 at 06:45 PM (#3897267)
Only tangentially related but... why does Mike Napoli only have 263 PA for Texas despite putting up a 162 OPS+? Has Napoli been hurt? Or is Ron Washington doing his best Mike Scioscia impression?


A little bit of both I think, although Napoli has been white hot the past couple of weeks (and he's been playing every day during that stretch), so his numbers are a bit deceptive. When he was sitting more frequently, he wasn't sporting a 162 OPS+. Still, the guy can hit, and he really should be starting at C for 90% of the league.

Edit - Looks like #17 was way ahead of me.
   22. Rants Mulliniks Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:01 PM (#3897279)
What did Scioscia have against Napoli anyway?


Maybe the same thing that Alex Anthopoulous had against him. Trading him straight up for Frank ####### Francisco is one of the stupider trades I've ever seen, both at the time it was made in in hindsight. I'm not saying Toronto should have necessarily held onto him because they are fine at 1b and C, but he should have been able to get a lot more out of him than that.
   23. The Good Face Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:04 PM (#3897286)
What did Sciosia have against Napoli anyway?


From what I've read it was a twofold problem; first, Sciosia apparently loves Mathis. Adores the guy. And second, it seems like a textbook case of fixating on what a player does poorly and ignoring what he does well. Sciosia didn't like Napoli's defense, thought he had "bad hands," whatever that means, and didn't think he was good at handling pitchers/calling a game. Some of that may even be true, but it ignores the fact that Napoli can flat out hit and Mathis is a terrible hitter even for a catcher.

Even smart people who are good at their jobs have blind spots, and I'm guessing the Mathis/Napoli thing was one of Sciosia's.
   24. Halofan Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:13 PM (#3897295)
I realize I'm not the first person to point out Scioscia's stubbornness regarding Mathis

Translation: You are paying ESPN Insider to deliver analysis that the blogs deliver a month earlier for free.
   25. t ball Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:20 PM (#3897307)
You are paying ESPN Insider to deliver analysis that the blogs deliver a month earlier for free.


Oh, brother. That's just plain petulant.
   26. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:22 PM (#3897310)
I don't think it's specifically the DH that caused the spread between teams to be larger in the AL; I think it's a combination of that and the fact that the Yankees and Red Sox (and to a lesser extent the Angels) have skewed the talent distribution in the AL.


Seems reasonable.
   27. BDC Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:40 PM (#3897333)
We're still seeing quite a bit of Yorvit Torrealba behind the plate in Texas, which is actually fine with me: (1) Napoli can also play 1B, (2) Napoli can DH (though lately Torrealba has been DHing quite a bit, for some reason), and (3) Torrealba has started hitting well lately (which explains [2] to some extent). Having two guys share catching alternately is probably a good idea for the Rangers when possible rather than one everyday guy and an occasional backup, not least because it has generally been 101 freaking degrees at game time lately. The problem with using the other at DH is if something goes wrong, you lose the DH for the rest of the game when your DH comes in to catch; but that wasn't an issue early on, luckily (and lately Taylor Teagarden has been around as 3rd catcher).
   28. Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:42 PM (#3897336)
Why does MLB require that the DH can only be used to hit for the pitcher?

Because absolutely everything about the DH rule has to suck. Done and done.

Mathis did lay down a pretty nifty two strike bunt last night. So there's that.

Finding out that a former catcher greatly overvalues catcher defense ranks pretty high on the water is wet scale.
   29. BWV 1129 Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:43 PM (#3897338)
Some managers, even good ones, make the mistake of overvaluing the things that made them good as players. Scioscia was an excellent defensive catcher who had great rapport with his pitchers, he was brought up in a system that valued the pitcher-catcher relationship, and that's what he believes in.

Mathis is and was a better defensive catcher than Napoli. The gap is, of course, nowhere near the gap between them offensively, but if you make the assumption that the pitcher-catcher relationship is inseparable from your pitching, and you use such measures as CERA to measure that, you run the risk of finding yourself in a mindset where you're selecting a catcher based on entirely on his defensive prowess, and offense is just secondary; in fact, you might start evaluating catchers as you would pitchers, and no pitcher gets booted from the rotation because he can't hit.

Scioscia, of course, never got to this extreme with Mathis-Napoli, because the offensive gap was just so huge. Napoli always got more playing time when both were healthy, and when Kendry(s) Morales got hurt last year, Scioscia had no problem putting Napoli at first base and letting him rake.

But he has come to this extreme, or close enough to it, in comparing Mathis to Hank Conger. The offensive difference between Conger and Mathis is nowhere near the difference between Napoli and Mathis, but it is still substantial: Conger had an 86 OPS+ in the majors this year to Mathis' current 41 (though he was in the 50s, as I recall, when Conger was sent down). But Conger was dispatched to AAA to "work on his defense" -- so now you have a 23-year-old catcher hitting 312/391/558 in the PCL, and you have a catcher in the majors hitting 185/229/267.

And how awful was Conger's D, anyway? I ran this when he was sent down, so the Mathis numbers are a few weeks out of date, but:

Conger is 8-for-56 in throwing out basestealers (14.3%), Mathis is 6-for-42 (14.3%). Conger allows .256 PB per 100 innings, Mathis allows 1.193. Conger allows 4.092 WP per 100 innings, Mathis allows 4.057. Angel pitchers have an RA of 3.73 with Conger and a 3.37 with Mathis.

Conger has made more errors, though. If you take out strikeouts from PO, Conger has a fielding percentage of .886 while Mathis has one of .982.

Somehow, under total zone, this all adds up to Mathis being exactly average defensively (huh?), and Conger being -4 runs so far, which prorates out to -14 over a full season. The BIS numbers show nearly identical split. I’m a bit skeptical that 4 errors in ~50 chances adds up to 4 runs, especially given the lower frequency of PB, but maybe it does.

Anyway, Conger is hitting 214/297/357, coming out to -1.5 batting runs per 100 PA, while Mathis is hitting 194/243/281, coming out to -5.8 runs per 100 PA.

Their playing time has been pretty similar; Mathis has 6 more PA. AROM’s system has Conger as 7 runs better offensively and Mathis as 4 runs better defensively so far, coming out to three runs (.3 of a win) in favor of Conger.


What bothers me most about this is the lack of accountability. Mathis sucks, he has always sucked, and at his age there is no reasonable expectation that he's going to stop sucking. They pretend he's a good defender behind the plate; he's not, he's just less bad than the other guys. They pretend he's good at handling pitchers; if he is, he's no different than the other guys on the team (Ervin Santana's recent run of dominance has been caught by Bob Wilson -- who incidentally has been a better hitter than Mathis at every level from AA on up). And yet it's the other guys who are never good enough. Napoli's D isn't good enough. Conger's D isn't good enough. Mathis' isn't good enough, either! There's no way this isn't harming the team, to see someone suck so much at every aspect of the game and get a pass at it, while the guys just a bit worse than him in one aspect but worlds better in another get sent down or get shafted for playing time. It's all bullshit. #### this.
   30. AROM Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:48 PM (#3897346)
Mathis did lay down a pretty nifty two strike bunt last night. So there's that.


And shocked the world with a 2 out, 2 run double after the Yankees walked the two batters in front of him.

But then he went out and called a series of bad pitches to allow the Yankees to tie the game up.
   31. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:55 PM (#3897355)
Some managers, even good ones, make the mistake of overvaluing the things that made them good as players. Scioscia was an excellent defensive catcher who had great rapport with his pitchers, he was brought up in a system that valued the pitcher-catcher relationship, and that's what he believes in.


Also since Scioscia didn't have a lot of power and didn't hit for average he was considered while playing to be a poor hitter, a stereotypical good glove/bad bat guy, actually he was a better than average hitting catcher- his batting average was, for the era, decent, he drew walks and had some pop, doubles and so on- his career OPS+ was 99- it's just that no single facet of that offense looked good by itself- he was NOTHING like Mathis as a player which in my mind makes his fascination with Mathis so odd- Scioscia was odd in that he really had no major flaws- no major strengths save the intangibles- but no major flaws- Mathis has major gaping flaws that are obvious to even the casual observer- but Scioscia seems oblivious.
   32. BWV 1129 Posted: August 10, 2011 at 07:55 PM (#3897357)
Mathis vs. Wilson:

At AA:
Mathis: 237/320/406 in 605 PA
Wilson: 281/350/425 in 622 PA

At AAA:
Mathis: 273/328/445 in 1203 PA
Wilson: 291/349/430 in 832 PA

Playing major league ####### baseball:
Mathis: 197/259/304 in 1299 PA
Wilson: 210/275/358 in 182 PA

Grr.
   33. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:00 PM (#3897362)
Also since Scioscia didn't have a lot of power and didn't hit for average he was considered while playing to be a poor hitter, a stereotypical good glove/bad bat guy, actually he was a better than average hitting catcher


One of my favorite Bill James lines:

Scioscia had arms like a blacksmith but hit 7 home runs a year anyway.
   34. BWV 1129 Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:01 PM (#3897366)
As Sycophant points out, Scioscia was a solid offensive player, particularly for his position -- but I honestly don't know if he knows that.
   35. Spivey Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:08 PM (#3897369)
Napoli appears no worse than average defensively as a catcher this year. And he's better than Yorvit Torrealba, who is a virtuoso at giving up wild pitches and passed balls.
   36. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:13 PM (#3897373)
But then he went out and called a series of bad pitches to allow the Yankees to tie the game up.


Are we closer to analyzing game calling ability these days? Does your WAR stat take into account something like CERA? (I know CERA in and of itself is kind of worthless.)

I imagine the best catchers would match the pitcher's strengths with the hitter's weaknesses, taking into account game situation. But the pitcher shaking the catcher off, or the manager calling pitches from the dugout, would throw this out of joint.
   37. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:24 PM (#3897382)
Mathis vs. Wilson:


One minor nitpick, league average for Wilson's years in AA was 341/413 and in AAA it was .344/.430, meaning his OPS+ in AA was 106 and 101 in AAA.
league average for Mathis's years in AA was 340/405 and in AAA it was .350/.443, meaning his OPS+ in AA was 94 and 94 in AAA.

So looking at the minors and MLB it appears likely that Wilson has a 10 or so OPS+ edge on Mathis...
The trouble is that having a 10 OPS+ edge on Mathis does not mean you are any good, it just means that you suck less than Mathis. Really the Angels need to get a real MLB starting caliber player back there.
   38. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:29 PM (#3897389)
AROM's WAR has Mathis as replacement level... with a 41 OPS+...
   39. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:41 PM (#3897397)
-- but I honestly don't know if he knows that.


From what I've read Mike Schmidt has no idea that he was as great a hitter as he was- he honestly believes his Ks cost his team runs (and Ks likely do have some slight negative value compared to other outs- just no where near the negative value conventional baseball wisdom would seemingly assign), and he honestly believes he was too passive and took too many pitches and drew too many walks and therefore didn't drive in the runs he should have...

Back in the day, and I'm going to oversimplify, I think good hitting catchers fell into two groups- those who hit for a high average (i.e., reached .300- or at least .290) and those who hit home runs (15+), those who did not do either were generally lumped in the public consciousness into a great fungible mass of generically poor hitting catchers. Now Scioscia was a well regarded layer but that was due more to his perceived leadership and defensive abilities, as a hitter most saw him as being indistinguishable from someone like Bob Boone or Bruce Benedict
   40. vortex of dissipation Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:54 PM (#3897402)
Now Scioscia was a well regarded layer but that was due more to his perceived leadership and defensive abilities


I think the ladies had something else in mind when they said that. :-)
   41. Matt Welch Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:56 PM (#3897403)
he was considered while playing to be a poor hitter

That's not how I remember it, growing up in Southern California. I have it more that he was seen as a good-average, take-a-walk guy who had no peer at blocking the plate.
   42. Matt Welch Posted: August 10, 2011 at 08:57 PM (#3897405)
BWV 1129 -- While your comments are awesome & spot on, I would just add that in the last week or three Conger was up, he *looked* just terrible behind the plate; mechanics all out of whack.

That said, Mathis regularly threw the ball into center field for about 3 years there.....
   43. OCF Posted: August 10, 2011 at 09:00 PM (#3897407)
Why does MLB require that the DH can only be used to hit for the pitcher?

I'm pretty sure that in NCAA ball, the DH can only be used to hit for the pitcher. But the rule is different, anyway. It makes the position of pitcher and the position of DH totally independent slots that might be occupied by the same person.

For instance: when he was at Long Beach State, Jason Vargas was the regular DH and the Sunday (which is to say, #3) starting pitcher. When he was both the starting pitcher and the DH in the same game, he could be relieved on the mound and yet still stay in the game as the DH even though he was out as the pitcher. That's the independence I was talking about. (I'll add that, at the time, Vargas was the best hitter on the LBSU team, better than Troy Tulowitzki. Mostly he had a very high OBP.)

Scioscia was a solid offensive player, particularly for his position

But there was the question of how best to use him. His main offensive virtue was his OBP - but would you really bat him leadoff or 2nd, given that he ran like like a catcher.
   44. BWV 1129 Posted: August 10, 2011 at 09:37 PM (#3897423)
While your comments are awesome & spot on, I would just add that in the last week or three Conger was up, he *looked* just terrible behind the plate; mechanics all out of whack.

I don't know; I didn't really notice him looking that bad, but since I watch most of the games hours after they happen, I may sometimes miss certain nuances.

However, and I know you agree, aesthetics != results.
   45. ecwcat Posted: August 11, 2011 at 12:13 AM (#3897508)
Napoli was not used regularly by Ron Washington, even after that drug addict in the outfield got hurt.

Washington believed Napoli's bad reputation from Mike S.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/gl.cgi?id=napolmi01&t=b&year=2011

Anyway, this writer is truly nitpicking. Mike S is a great manager and Yankees killer.

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