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Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Ex-Cubs phenom Prior retires at 33

SI coverage of Prior’s debut. 

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The Tribune confirmed a Twitter report by Mike Beradino of the St. Paul Pioneer Press, who said he ran into Prior in a hotel lobby at the winter meetings in Florida and was told that the 33-year-old right-hander is “officially retired” after his latest setback while with the Cincinnati Reds’ Triple-A team. Beradino reports that Prior is considering a position in the San Diego Padres’ front office.

SI coverage of Prior’s debut. 

Heinie Mantush (Krusty) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 09:38 AM | 65 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: chicago cubs, dusty baker, mark prior, padres, tinstaapp

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   1. zonk Posted: December 10, 2013 at 10:56 AM (#4614952)
Ahh... memories... Girardi with a pinch-hit single driving in a key insurance run... 33 finger Alfonseca with the save....

All the snark has been done, so I'll just say that this makes me really, really sad. Mark Prior had a truly special arm and for a while, it really did seem like he was going to be the guy to lead the Cubs to the promised land.

He was pretty darn good in his 2nd professional year at age 21 -- but that line the following year in 2003.... 211 IP... 245 Ks... just 50 BBs and 15 HRs... an ERA+ of 173... led NL pitchers in WAR (7.4), 3rd in ERA, 2nd in wins, top 10 in every pitching category -- probably deserved the CYA.

It was a magical season. It really felt like the Cubs had found "our" Seaver, "our" Clemens, "our" Doc Gooden.... In a very strong way, it even took the sting out of the 2003 postseason collapse. The Cubs were still supposed to be a year or two away, and besides -- with perennial CYA candidate leading a rotation that also had kids like Zambrano, Cruz, still-just 26 Kerry Wood... it was only a matter of time. Teams with an ace like that win the WS sooner or later, that's just how the world works.

When you've got a pitcher that good, you're destined to take home a title. It's just a matter of what season it happens.

Sigh.

If I could visit just one place on vacation - it would be the alternate universe where Mark Prior just blew past 200 wins, wrapped up his 5th CYA, and the most burning offseason question is whether the Cubs can threepeat.
   2. GregD Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:01 AM (#4614959)
$12 million total earnings.

If that's not proof of how much the current system rips off young guys who gets hurt, what is?

What kind of contract could Prior have signed after 2003 or even after 2005 if he had been a free agent?
   3. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:04 AM (#4614964)
That's so sad, I'd always held out just a bit of hope that he'd be able to make it back to the majors in one form or another. As zonk noted above, he was such a special pitcher and a joy to watch.
   4. PASTE Thinks This Trout Kid Might Be OK (Zeth) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:09 AM (#4614968)
I remember years and years ago reading something someone wrote about Wood and Prior--he said that Kerry Wood made pitching at an all-world level look unbelievably hard, like there's no way you could ever do it. Mark Prior made it look easy, like you could go out onto your local field and sling 97 MPH fastballs with movement into the back stop right now.

That stuck in my mind for whatever reason.
   5. Bitter Mouse Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:12 AM (#4614972)
At the time I was completely convinced the Twins should have drafted Prior instead of Mauer. Oops.
   6. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:16 AM (#4614976)
His last game was in 2006. I knew it had been awhile but I would have guess 2008 or 2009. Can't say he didn't stick with it, he pitched in the minors this year and I'm still a little bitter that the Red Sox didn't give him a courtesy call up in 2012. The year was a shitshow but it would have been fun to see Prior throw one inning, hell one pitch, in a Sox uniform.
   7. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:22 AM (#4614981)
$12 million total earnings.

If that's not proof of how much the current system rips off young guys who gets hurt, what is?


That doesn't include his amateur bonus and any money earned since 2006, but while you're right, it also shows how absolutely lucrative MLB is.

To make $12M+ through age 25 is absolutely fantastic money.

   8. vivaelpujols Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:28 AM (#4614987)
To make $12M+ through age 25 is absolutely fantastic money.


Yeah if this were football he would have had his wages retroactively garnished after he got injured.
   9. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:32 AM (#4614993)
If this was corporate America, he'd get a nice $25 million severance package upon his retirement.
   10. GregD Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:36 AM (#4615000)
David Carr got $10 million bonus (like Prior) in the 2002 NFL draft but a contract for $47 million over six years. Possibly Prior would have been cut after five, but still you're talking about additional $20 million or so for him under the NFL's system rather than under MLB's.
   11. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:41 AM (#4615001)
If this was corporate America, he'd get a nice $25 million severance package upon his retirement.

Nah, you've got to break into the $10M p.a., CEO/CFO club before you get the exorbitant buyouts. A guy making $2-3M gets 1-2 salary as severance.
   12. zonk Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:46 AM (#4615008)
Zeth's description in 4 is also how I remember Prior.

Setting aside all the hullabaloo about perfect motions and injury-proof what-not, Prior just looked so natural pitching. Balanced, easy - almost lackadaisical. In fact, when he gave up hits - it almost seemed like his motion had lulled him to sleep, so he'd have to wake up and bear down on the next pitch.
   13. Don Geovany Soto (chris h.) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:54 AM (#4615016)
Setting aside all the hullabaloo about perfect motions and injury-proof what-not, Prior just looked so natural pitching. Balanced, easy - almost lackadaisical. In fact, when he gave up hits - it almost seemed like his motion had lulled him to sleep, so he'd have to wake up and bear down on the next pitch.


I remember hearing some writer comparing Wood and Prior after Prior's debut. He said that with Wood, people knew what was coming but couldn't make contact, whereas with Prior they just had no idea what was coming. No idea if that was complete nonsense or what, but I do remember that I let my 9-year-old son stay up past his bedtime to watch Prior's debut. It was quite a performance.
   14. Moses Taylor, Moses Taylor Posted: December 10, 2013 at 12:03 PM (#4615023)
Sad.
   15. CFBF Is A Golden Spider Duck Posted: December 10, 2013 at 12:11 PM (#4615033)
I remember watching game three of the 2003 LDS between the Braves and Cubs. It was played in Chicago, Prior was pitching and it was apparently ungodly cold; actually, BB-Ref indicates it was a perfectly reasonable 54 degrees with a slight wind, but I also remember Marcus Giles being bundled up like he was on an expedition to Antarctica, so...eh.

Anyway, Prior threw a complete game, and while his line was outstanding-but-not-extraordinary (two hits, four walks, one run, 133 pitches, a game score of 82), it was one of those performances where you knew your guys were never going to hit him. Something about the way the ball was coming out of his hand, perhaps combined with the weather, just utterly killed any hope.
   16. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: December 10, 2013 at 12:20 PM (#4615047)
A. Pitchers break more than hitters
B. $12M is not nothing

But this is why I don't rip on guys like Longoria who sign relatively team-friendly deals when they're young. I mean, just throwing out numbers, if you were given the choice of:

20% chance of $12M and 80% chance of $100M

or

100% chance of $60M

Which do you take? Honestly, while $12M is a lot of money, once you deduct agent fees and taxes, what are you left with? $5M? That's enough to live very comfortably from age 30 to the end of your life, but you're not really "rich" in the sense of having multiple houses and private jets so you can spend summers on the French Riviera.
   17. eddieot Posted: December 10, 2013 at 12:24 PM (#4615049)
I wonder how much actual big league service time he has. If he's over 10 years he'll collect about $100,000 annually in pension benefits and he has health care for life. Not riches for sure, but not bad. Plus some network or team will pay him something to be Mark Prior.
   18. jobu Posted: December 10, 2013 at 12:28 PM (#4615053)
Very sad to see this.

My wife and I went to Wrigley Field to see his massively hyped debut, and he was awesome.

For sale, Prior jersey, never worn
   19. PreservedFish Posted: December 10, 2013 at 12:32 PM (#4615056)
One of the thing I remember clearest is that Prior had "the best mechanics since Tom Seaver."

Baseball Prospectus has a writer (Doug Thorburn) who writes almost exclusively on pitching mechanics. I'm not honestly sure if one word of his judgments ought to be trusted.
   20. Nasty Nate Posted: December 10, 2013 at 12:39 PM (#4615064)
It was a magical season. It really felt like the Cubs had found "our" Seaver, "our" Clemens, "our" Doc Gooden....


This is one of the best feelings a baseball fan can get.
   21. zonk Posted: December 10, 2013 at 12:59 PM (#4615074)
Prior did have beautiful mechanics.

He got slagged in 2003 -- averaging about 115 pitches a start, 125 in September and 120 in the playoffs. Then hurt his achilles in 2004, rushed back, his mechanics started to fall apart, but he looked back on track by the end of the season. He had various problems in 2005 - then a broken elbow on a comebacker - and that's when the wheels really fell off health-wise.

Between the collision injury with Giles, the achilles problem, the broken elbow on a comebacker, and a bad back -- on top of the Baker abuse -- Prior simply had a lot of issues that would become precursors to more 'standard' elbow and shoulder issues.
   22. eddieot Posted: December 10, 2013 at 01:04 PM (#4615079)
Looked it up, Prior has just over 6 years of service time (which is kind of shocking when you think about it.) He'll probably get about $65K a year plus medical in pension benefits. Hope he lands in a front office like TFA says. By all accounts he was a smart guy with a lot to offer.
   23. zonk Posted: December 10, 2013 at 01:14 PM (#4615089)
Just to be clear in 21 -- I'm not laying all of Prior's physical travails at the feet of Baker.... Prior had as much awesomely bad luck after his pro debut as he had awesomely good luck in the genetic gift departments when it comes to his arm. There's plenty of blame to be shared by the entire organization, which seemed to have a really, really dreadful medical staff that was constantly misdiagnosing and a dugout/FO staff that was stuck in the stone age of "rub some dirt on it, it'll be fine". However, there's little doubt that Prior shouldered an inordinately difficult workload - often in situations where it wasn't necessary, in an organization that sort of just shrugged about such things.

If one were to put together a team of players you'd just like to push the reset button on -- somehow magically re-birth them as 20something wunderkinds, press start and see if things would turn out differently, building the pitching staff is very easy to do.... but I still Prior is the ace of such a team. Maybe guys like Herb Score, Rick Ankiel, etc join him -- but Prior really did look like he would be something absolutely special. He had the command of Maddux and the stuff of Pedro -- and was just learning how to harness it all when things fell apart.
   24. PASTE Thinks This Trout Kid Might Be OK (Zeth) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 01:16 PM (#4615095)
I think that's a bit hyperbolic, command of Maddux and stuff of Pedro. It was more like command of Curt Schilling and stuff of John Smoltz. Which is still an inner circle guy if he gets a full career.
   25. Hack Wilson Posted: December 10, 2013 at 01:26 PM (#4615112)
My wife and I went to Wrigley Field to see his massively hyped debut, and he was awesome.


My sister bought 4 tickets pre-season to "a" game. Yeah it turned out to be that game. I was offered $100 for a ticket, but they weren't mine (no I wouldn't have taken the deal). I know of two co-workers who said they bought standing room tickets. Our seats were first row in back of the visiting team's (Pirates as I recall) bullpen. There were scouts sitting next to us who guaranteed Prior would be a star.

Yeah I will always hate Dusty.
   26. zonk Posted: December 10, 2013 at 01:31 PM (#4615117)
I don't know... up to age 23, Pedro had a 8.8 K/9, 0.7 HR/9 and 7.0 H/9.

Maddux -- and I'll even exclude his dreadful 1987 and just give him his 1988 and 1989 -- had a 3.0 BB/9 and 1.69 K/BB.

Prior through his age 23 season had 10.68 K/9, 0.8 HR/9, 7.7 H/9, 2.4 BB.9, and 4.45 K/BB

   27. Lassus Posted: December 10, 2013 at 01:32 PM (#4615118)
This is one of the best feelings a baseball fan can get.

Like the one we had from Harvey.

I need to sit down.
   28. PreservedFish Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:13 PM (#4615179)
I don't know... up to age 23, Pedro had a 8.8 K/9, 0.7 HR/9 and 7.0 H/9.

Maddux -- and I'll even exclude his dreadful 1987 and just give him his 1988 and 1989 -- had a 3.0 BB/9 and 1.69 K/BB.

Prior through his age 23 season had 10.68 K/9, 0.8 HR/9, 7.7 H/9, 2.4 BB.9, and 4.45 K/BB


Well, this is hardly the best way to look at it.

   29. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:17 PM (#4615183)
For sale, Prior jersey, never worn

"Hell," I said, "I love you enough now. What do you want to do? Ruin me?"
"Yes. I want to ruin you."
"Good," I said. "That's what I want too.”
   30. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:18 PM (#4615186)
“You expected to be sad in the fall. Part of you died each year when the leaves fell from the trees and their branches were bare against the wind and the cold, wintery light. But you knew there would always be the spring, as you knew the river would flow again after it was frozen. When the cold rains kept on and killed the spring, it was as though a young person died for no reason.”
   31. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:19 PM (#4615187)
“I’m not brave any more darling. I’m all broken. They’ve broken me.”
   32. zonk Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:19 PM (#4615190)


Well, this is hardly the best way to look at it.


What's a better way?
   33. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:22 PM (#4615195)
If that's not proof of how much the current system rips off young guys who gets hurt, what is?

What kind of contract could Prior have signed after 2003 or even after 2005 if he had been a free agent?


Take it up with "Hall of Famer" Marvin Miller.
   34. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:24 PM (#4615201)
Baseball Prospectus has a writer (Doug Thorburn) who writes almost exclusively on pitching mechanics. I'm not honestly sure if one word of his judgments ought to be trusted.

Despite all the studies and spreadsheets and words and anti-Dusty screeds, neither they nor anyone else has the slightest ####### clue why pitchers break.
   35. PreservedFish Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:37 PM (#4615233)
What's a better way?


Come on. This is easy. If you're trying to say that someone had the "control of Maddux," you don't look at Maddux at age 23, you look at him when he had the best control any of us have ever seen. You might as well say that Prior had the the longevity of Jamie Moyer.
   36. jobu Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:38 PM (#4615236)
"Oh, Mark," Bartman said, "we could have had such a damned good time together."

..."Yes," Mark said. "Isn't it pretty to think so?"

   37. zonk Posted: December 10, 2013 at 02:53 PM (#4615248)
Despite all the studies and spreadsheets and words and anti-Dusty screeds, neither they nor anyone else has the slightest ####### clue why pitchers break.


Sure we do.

Pitchers break because throwing a baseball at a velocity and twists and turns required to do it professionally put a tremendous amount of strain on the arm, elbow, and shoulder. The amount of torque generated simply is not something the human body -- especially the modern human body which hasn't needed to throw stones at saber toothed tigers in thousands of years -- is well-suited to do.

We have have studies going back better than 10 years showing the stresses put on ligaments, joints, and muscles throwing a pitch.

We can further see that tired arms -- tired pitchers -- do things that put additional stress beyond the mere baseline stress of pitching on those elbows, ligaments, and shoulders. We also know that certain motions are gentler on those body parts -- 3/4 and sidearm are well known to be easier on the shoulder especially than a pure overhand delivery (like Prior).... It's one thing I've read cited for Randy Johnson's ability to stay healthy under a huge workload.

The things we really don't know are those -- at the current time -- unquantifiable differences in physiology that cause make a Livan Hernandez able to just throw and throw and throw and throw while a Stephen Stasbourg or Mark Prior breaks down so easy. Our science is likewise not yet so far advanced that we can see in real-time, strain, fraying, and stress being put on a muscle, tendon cartilage (but I bet it will be in 10 years).

We know quite a bit.... just not enough to definitively, at a very granular level -- figure out when and how to pitch a guy.... and we still need pitchers while those details get worked out.
   38. zonk Posted: December 10, 2013 at 03:03 PM (#4615264)
What's a better way?



Come on. This is easy. If you're trying to say that someone had the "control of Maddux," you don't look at Maddux at age 23, you look at him when he had the best control any of us have ever seen. You might as well say that Prior had the the longevity of Jamie Moyer.


I thought you had a better metric...

I think an age 23 comparison is perfectly valid.... I even excluded Maddux's age 21 season when he clearly wasn't ready. By the end of age 23 - Maddux was already one of the best young pitchers in baseball, was already being lauded for his command, and was well on his way to becoming "Greg Maddux".
   39. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: December 10, 2013 at 03:28 PM (#4615298)
I don't know... up to age 23, Pedro had a 8.8 K/9, 0.7 HR/9 and 7.0 H/9.

Maddux -- and I'll even exclude his dreadful 1987 and just give him his 1988 and 1989 -- had a 3.0 BB/9 and 1.69 K/BB.

Prior through his age 23 season had 10.68 K/9, 0.8 HR/9, 7.7 H/9, 2.4 BB.9, and 4.45 K/BB

You can't compare those number straight up. In 1992, Pedro's first half season, the league k/9 in the NL was 5.9. The league leader was 7.9. In 2002, Prior's first season, RJ and Schilling had k/9's over 11, and the league average was 6.8. Drawing a straight comparison is nonsensical.
   40. PreservedFish Posted: December 10, 2013 at 03:39 PM (#4615313)
I think an age 23 comparison is perfectly valid.... I even excluded Maddux's age 21 season when he clearly wasn't ready. By the end of age 23 - Maddux was already one of the best young pitchers in baseball, was already being lauded for his command, and was well on his way to becoming "Greg Maddux".


It's a nonsense comparison. Unless you are suggesting that we should assume that Prior would improve to the same extent that Maddux did, which is a nonsense assertion.
   41. PreservedFish Posted: December 10, 2013 at 03:41 PM (#4615317)
Look, it's like saying that Avisail Garcia has the power of Jose Bautista, the batting eye of Sammy Sosa and the hitting ability of Roberto Clemente.
   42. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: December 10, 2013 at 03:41 PM (#4615318)
It's a nonsense comparison. Unless you are suggesting that we should assume that Prior would improve to the same extent that Maddux did, which is a nonsense assertion.

Yes. a 3 BB/9 is fine and all. But many young players manage that. 99.9% don't develop into Maddux, who for the last 3500 or so innings of his career never had a season over 2. And many under 1.
   43. Bourbon Samurai Posted: December 10, 2013 at 04:41 PM (#4615383)
If he's over 10 years he'll collect about $100,000 annually in pension benefits and he has health care for life.


how much do mlb players pay in union dues to get this?
   44. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 05:02 PM (#4615406)

how much do mlb players pay in union dues to get this?


One million dollars.
   45. Bourbon Samurai Posted: December 10, 2013 at 05:54 PM (#4615452)
I mean, I know that's a joke, but 1 million dollars now in exchange for a $100k pension and lifetime health care is a pretty good deal.
   46. Cabbage Posted: December 10, 2013 at 05:56 PM (#4615456)
Sure, Baker/Hendry/etc. get some of the blame, but I see Prior as ultimately a tragic figure. Threw 95 like it was easy, beautifully simple mechanics that gave impeccable control, and he could even hit a bit. All the tools in the world, but his mother held him by his right labrum when she dipped him into the River Styx.
   47. Moeball Posted: December 10, 2013 at 07:10 PM (#4615525)
Sad day.

As a San Diegan I had great pride in local boy Prior and hoped to see him blaze across the major league sky like a bright star.

It didn't quite work out that way.

But, in October of 2003, even people who weren't from Chicago or Boston were hoping to see a Cubs/BoSox WS - that would have been such a classic - can you imagine the possible matchups such as Prior vs. Pedro?

And it came soooo close to happening!

(Sigh)Oh, well.
   48. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: December 10, 2013 at 07:13 PM (#4615529)
As a San Diegan I had great pride in local boy Prior and hoped to see him blaze across the major league sky like a bright star.

It didn't quite work out that way.

He shone bright, and burned up quickly. Seems like an apt metaphor actually.
   49. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: December 10, 2013 at 09:39 PM (#4615600)
Prior is considering a position in the San Diego Padres’ front office.


So what do we think happens first, he mangles his finger with a stapler, he breaks his foot by rolling over it with his desk chair, what?
   50. Home Run Teal & Black Black Black Gone! Posted: December 10, 2013 at 09:39 PM (#4615601)
A shame for Cubs fans. Overcoming the Prior/Woods duo was definitely the climax of the Marlins 2003 run. The World Series victory felt like the denouement to winning the NLCS.
   51. greenback calls it soccer Posted: December 10, 2013 at 09:58 PM (#4615608)
Mark Mulder is making a noises about a comeback.
   52. McCoy Posted: December 10, 2013 at 10:07 PM (#4615615)
If I had to guess I would guess that soft tossers are less fragile than hard throwers. If you're some pitcher that can put everything into it and throw it 92 but are good enough to get hitters out at 88 mph and do so you will last longer than some guy putting everything into it and throwing 95.

Guys like Livan and Greg lasted so long because they weren't putting everything they had into every pitch they threw.
   53. zonk Posted: December 10, 2013 at 10:46 PM (#4615640)
Christy Matthewson wrote about precisely that a century ago -- the idea that a pitcher must learn to when to crank it up and more often, when to hold it back.

Can't remember where I read it, but I also recall reading that pitchers who threw more 3/4 or even sidearm tended to be more durable, and this was perfectly logical because physiologically, it's easier on the key body parts of a pitcher than a straight overhand motion.
   54. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:29 PM (#4615665)
Can't remember where I read it, but I also recall reading that pitchers who threw more 3/4 or even sidearm tended to be more durable, and this was perfectly logical because physiologically, it's easier on the key body parts of a pitcher than a straight overhand motion.


Fastpitch softball pitchers can, and often do, throw pretty much throw every game.
   55. Bourbon Samurai Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:50 PM (#4615677)
I have rarely had a sports experience better than living in Chicago in 2003. I am not a Cubs fan, but the energy in the city that year was just incredible. You'd go into bars during the cubs game and anybody was your friend.
   56. PASTE Thinks This Trout Kid Might Be OK (Zeth) Posted: December 10, 2013 at 11:57 PM (#4615681)
Christy Matthewson wrote about precisely that a century ago -- the idea that a pitcher must learn to when to crank it up and more often, when to hold it back.


Yeah, that worked a century ago.
   57. Ardo Posted: December 11, 2013 at 12:43 AM (#4615696)
I saw Mark Prior pitch a rehab start in Lansing, MI when I was an undergraduate at Michigan State. The place was packed. Prior went three, overpowering the Class A kids with his smooth, easy form, and - get this - was relieved by Carlos Marmol, who worked the final six innings and earned the win.

Marmol was a starter then but the same guy we see now: dominant stuff, next to zero command.
   58. Squash Posted: December 11, 2013 at 12:46 AM (#4615697)
Can't remember where I read it, but I also recall reading that pitchers who threw more 3/4 or even sidearm tended to be more durable, and this was perfectly logical because physiologically, it's easier on the key body parts of a pitcher than a straight overhand motion.

Personally, I used to throw straight over the top and my arm would hurt like crazy. When I moved down to 3/4 it was a sea change. Far less pain, elbow pain in particular.

For all the various Prior injury stories, to me it seems like that collision with Giles is really what did it.
   59. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: December 11, 2013 at 01:14 AM (#4615708)
Mark Mulder is making a noises about a comeback.

Creaking, popping noises.
   60. Athletic Supporter can feel the slow rot Posted: December 11, 2013 at 02:02 AM (#4615719)
Yeah, that worked a century ago.


How soon we forget the exploits of Jack (The Jack) Morris.
   61. McCoy Posted: December 11, 2013 at 09:34 AM (#4615767)
I saw Prior pitch in 2003 in Philly. Was not a great game.
   62. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: December 11, 2013 at 09:44 AM (#4615773)
Prior was still putting up good strikeout numbers (walk numbers not so much) in the Yankees and Red Sox systems in 2011-2012, any idea what sort of stuff he still had?
   63. Dan Evensen Posted: December 11, 2013 at 10:56 AM (#4615810)
Yeah, that worked a century ago.

It can still work today. I remember seeing Livan Hernandez pitch this game against the Marlins at Nationals Park. His stuff was so soft people sitting around me swore they could hit him (I was sitting about 15 rows up, first base side). He sure had great movement, though, and Marlins hitters were off balance all day.
   64. Transmission Posted: December 11, 2013 at 06:59 PM (#4616291)
Exhuming something I wrote months ago on another Prior thread....

These are the saddest of possible words,

Prior, Zambrano, and Wood.

A trio of ex-Cubs with tendons interred,

Prior, Zambrano, and Wood.

Stoically pitching through undiagnosed troubles,

turning an elbow joint

into a muddle.

Arms that were silenced with unforeseen struggles

Prior, Zambrano, and Wood.
   65. PASTE Thinks This Trout Kid Might Be OK (Zeth) Posted: December 11, 2013 at 08:19 PM (#4616336)
Bravo for the nice adaptation, but... Zambrano had a pretty long career for a pitcher.

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