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Saturday, April 20, 2013

FCC Has No Issue With David Ortiz’s Pregame Speech, Says He “Spoke From the Heart”

Even Grandpa Al Lewis is in shock.

David Ortiz encapsulated all of the emotion and passion that was present in Saturday’s pregame ceremonies at Fenway Park when he took to the microphone.

In Ortiz’s first game back, he thanked the city and law enforcement, and also dropped the f-bomb stating, “This is our [expletive] city.” Red Sox nation didn’t seem to have a problem with the sentiment, and neither did the Federal Communications Commission.

Julius Genachowski, the chairman of the FCC, tweeted from the certified FCC Twitter account that they, “stand with Big Papi and the people of Boston.”

Repoz Posted: April 20, 2013 at 06:33 PM | 171 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: red sox

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   101. cardsfanboy Posted: April 21, 2013 at 02:54 PM (#4421278)
I see a lot of people listing big events in their lifetimes, but I am surprised that nobody(unless I missed it) said the Rodney King riots. Maybe because I wasn't that far from it at the time, but that was a huge event. (I imagine that Andy and a few of the oldsters would have mentioned the Harlem riots also)

I do agree with those who note that we pay disproportionate attention to news in our backyard and not enough to suffering outside of it. I would suspect that 75+% of Americans are not aware that this also happened during the past week, for example:


Honestly, I miss a lot of worldwide news because regardless of the partisan aspect of our own news networks, the rest of the worlds is a lot worse. It's always tough to get a quality factual story(most of the rest of the world news is on par with Fox news for accuracy/factuality from my limited experience)
   102. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 02:54 PM (#4421279)
I'm thankful I don't have cable during times like this.


This, more or less, in that I think I would've overdosed after the first day or so.

Otherwise, helluva week for me to be on vacation. I doubt that I've exchanged 50 words with other human beings (as opposed to my cats, who come to think of it did just about nothing to hold up their ends of the conversation), period, in the last 9 days. (I stayed at home for the duration.)
   103. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: April 21, 2013 at 03:22 PM (#4421326)
I see a lot of people listing big events in their lifetimes, but I am surprised that nobody(unless I missed it) said the Rodney King riots. Maybe because I wasn't that far from it at the time, but that was a huge event. (I imagine that Andy and a few of the oldsters would have mentioned the Harlem riots also)

Sure, those should have been in there, but like I said, I'm sure there are others I missed. You're definitely right about those two events, which dominated the news for many days.

OTOH the Washington riots were huge, but they (and other riots that were taking place at the same time) were directly connected with the King assassination, so I considered them part of that.
   104. bigglou115 Posted: April 21, 2013 at 03:45 PM (#4421359)
I've always been confused by a lot of people's need to grieve over things like this. Feel empathy, fine. Feel sad, that's healthy. Feel angry or a wounded sense of national pride, probably shouldn't overdo that one but I can see it. But grieving is for those who were affected. Those who were directly affected in some way, who were there or knew someone who was. Going into an active state of grief is odd. There are some who are, of course, being dusingenuous, but there are many who aren't, and I don't get that.

I'm not trying to be dismissive, empathy isn't a strong skill of mine so I'm legitimately curious. But I doubt the families or the victims care that 99% of America just went back to their lives as normal. To grieve seems the province of others, if I were affected I'd be insulted that someone else claimed to share in my personal pain.
   105. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 04:07 PM (#4421381)
God I hope I live long enough for a positive event to be the biggest event of my lifetime.


I'm trying to imagine what is likely to happen in Pingu's lifetime that would satisfy him.

Let's assume Pingu is around 40 (just missed the moon landing). That gives him 45 years roughly. Here's some things I could conceive him witnessing:

1- discovery of extraterrestrial life

2- a final agreement with international acceptance between Israel and the Palestinians based on a two-state solution

3- man landing on Mars

4- resurrection of a complex extinct species like the wooly mammoth or passenger pigeon

5- a reduction in cancer mortality on the scale of ~ 80%

6- a cure for spinal cord injury-based paralysis

7- an effective vaccine for HIV

8- development on a commercial scale of controlled fusion to generate electricity

9- Cuba and the United States restore full diplomatic and commercial relations

10- A commercially successful electric motor fully capable of replacing the internal combustion engine is developed

11. Commercial quantities of alluvial gold is discovered on Mars

12. Man colonizes space

13. The second amendment is repealed or modified to allow effective control of mass murder (this one will be sure to get Kehoskie's hackles riled)

14. It is discovered that the moon once sustained life

15. a medically feasible method is developed to rejuvenate human cells

   106. bigglou115 Posted: April 21, 2013 at 04:13 PM (#4421391)
13. Your stances on gun control aside I question whether the repeal of a portion of the bill of rights leads us any place we want to go, used to be a lefty would take that stance instead of a conservative.

14. According to Jim Marrs's book, Aliens used the moon as a spaceship to leave they're dying world and have been keeping tabs on us for years. Apparently they warned Armstrong to leave space alone after Apollo 11 and when we didn't they were responsible for Apollo 13 and both Shuttle disasters. Keep in mind this is presented as non fiction by the same mind who wrote the definitive book on the JFK assassination.
   107. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 04:25 PM (#4421413)
Was it on broadcast TV, or just cable? If it was just on cable, they don't have jurisdiction, right? Or am I missing something really obvious?


Live radio coverage.
   108. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 04:26 PM (#4421416)

The fall of the Berlin Wall and USSR were probably the most significant events of my lifetime other than 9/11. The Soviets were the enemy in pretty much the entire pop culture and education of my youth, and then when I was 12 (in a process that was likely more gradual than I remember it), they weren't. That was a pretty positive event.

I remember the emotions and the physical feelings of 9/11/01 probably more than any other day in my lifetime. The Boston Marathon bombing, despite being a much smaller scale attack, elicited many of those same feelings, in a way that terrorism further from home has not, for better or for worse. Part of it was finding out about the attacks in real time; as bad as they were, the initial information indicated that things could have been much worse.
   109. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 04:37 PM (#4421429)
9/11 and Columbine were by far the ones that played out the largest in my own world, though I think Columbine only makes that list because I was about the same age as those guys. As far as epochal, earth-shaking events, it's 9/11, and may there never be another thing that big again.
   110. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 04:39 PM (#4421436)
The Challenger explosion wasn't mentioned but that was kind of a biggie.
   111. bigglou115 Posted: April 21, 2013 at 05:01 PM (#4421470)
It just occurred to me that people are short selling the positives of this generation. We saw the election of the first black president for crying out loud. How is that not monumental. We see confirmation bias in sports writing all the time, lets at least consider it could be at play in out memories of recent history.
   112. The Yankee Clapper Posted: April 21, 2013 at 05:14 PM (#4421478)
13. The second amendment is repealed or modified to allow effective control of mass murder . . .

Gun control advocates have mostly been unwilling to pursue the Constitutional Amendment route, so that'd be quite a change. But why not repeal the 4th, too, and really cut down on crime? Then there is the 5th . . .
   113. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 06:26 PM (#4421523)
Falling of the Berlin Wall was bigger than 9/11.
   114. bunyon Posted: April 21, 2013 at 06:51 PM (#4421536)
Falling of the Berlin Wall was bigger than 9/11.

Had the US not dramatically changed course, both domestically and internationally, you might be right. But given the reaction of the world's only superpower, I'm not sure.
   115. The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 07:35 PM (#4421565)
No, the falling of the Berlin Wall was definitely bigger than 9/11. 9/11 by itself might be a bigger event, but the end of the Cold War is by far and away the most important single event of my lifetime (born in the early 80s).
   116. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 07:42 PM (#4421570)
9/11 by itself might be a bigger event, but the end of the Cold War is by far and away the most important single event of my lifetime (born in the early 80s).


But isn't the beginning of another global war at least as important? And this one is proving harder to stomp out and threatens to go on indefinitely.
   117. The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:01 PM (#4421581)
Within 10 years of the start of the Cold War, we had the second part of the Chinese Civil War and the Korean War. Both were far deadlier and are still unresolved as of today. Each was worse than anything involving the "GWOT" even if you include Iraq. And if you remember, the Cold War lasted about 40 years. And was a massively bigger threat to world peace than any conflict between a group of ####### fundamentalists and the rest of the world. Hell, North Korea and India/Pakistan are bigger threats to life right now than the conflict which was idiotically called the "war on terror."

I mean, come on. 12 years after 1945 we were in the midst of a multigenerational period where we were on the brink of nuclear annihilation.

eta: I'm not saying 9/11 wasn't a very important event, I'm just saying that people are really forgetting how huge the Cold War was and how massive the end of the Warsaw Pact and the end of Soviet Russia was.

Additionally, 9/11 wasn't the "beginning" of another global war, Al Qaeda was hitting US targets for years before then. USS Cole, Khobar Towers, the African Embassy bombings. It's just that it was the first time in living memory that the US mainland had taken a serious attack... and Boston is getting a lot of attention because it's the first time in a dozen years that a similar high profile terrorist attack has happened in the United States.
   118. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:13 PM (#4421596)
Had the US not dramatically changed course, both domestically and internationally, you might be right. But given the reaction of the world's only superpower, I'm not sure.

Umm, the 250 million plus people living in the Soviet Union and its satellites beg to differ with you.
   119. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:13 PM (#4421597)
I mean, come on. 12 years after 1945 we were in the midst of a multigenerational period where we were on the brink of nuclear annihilation.


So, you're not worried then about a Pakistan civil conflict that results in fundamentalists gaining control of a stockpile of weaponized nuclear missiles? I am.

And at least the Russians and Chinese were rational. I haven't detected much rationality from Al Queda yet. All of I've seen from them is a nihlistic religious fervor that causes them to kill without pity or regard for self.
   120. The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:17 PM (#4421605)
How old are you PP? Because you're really, really ignorant of history.
   121. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:20 PM (#4421610)
Falling of the Berlin Wall was bigger than 9/11.

Yeah, despite what I wrote above, I agree with this. 9/11 was the more immediate moment, in that I can remember exactly where I was when I heard about it, and almost everything I did that day. I'm a New Yorker, I have close friends who lost relatives in the attacks (I also know a guy who, 10 years later, told me I indirectly saved his life that day--I was responsible for his torn ACL that caused him not to take the subway to work). But the end of the Cold War was a bigger deal.
   122. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:20 PM (#4421611)
Enough older than you to be able to understand things beyond their surface superficiality, Grasshopper.
   123. The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:27 PM (#4421618)
Look, if you can't get that this "war" you're talking about started over half a decade than the moment you're saying it did, you shouldn't be the one talking about understanding "surface superficiality."

eta: You sound like a 20 year old PoliSci 101 student. Drop in some misunderstanding of Thucydides and the similarity is perfect. If you're significantly older than me, that is not in your favor.
   124. BDC Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:35 PM (#4421628)
9/11 was the more immediate moment, in that I can remember exactly where I was when I heard about it, and almost everything I did that day. … But the end of the Cold War was a bigger deal

That's the key dynamic. Some things (Dealey Plaza, Challenger, 9/11) come out of the absolute blue; others (moon landing, fall of Soviet Union) come on gradually; and others, just as significant (women's rights, the Internet, globalized economy) happen so gradually that there's no watershed event one can reasonably connect with them. You pretty much have to compare them separately.

If you were to ask me the most significant "thing" that's happened in my lifetime (1959-), it might be the transformation of China from an anarchic, nostalgic state under the Cultural Revolution to the unprecedentedly productive economic power it is today. But "when" did that happen?
   125. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:40 PM (#4421638)
Look, if you can't get that this "war" you're talking about started over half a decade than the moment you're saying it did, you shouldn't be the one talking about understanding "surface superficiality."


We didn't invade two countries until after 9/11. Even you should be able to detect a before/after distinction there.
   126. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:49 PM (#4421652)
No, the falling of the Berlin Wall was definitely bigger than 9/11. 9/11 by itself might be a bigger event, but the end of the Cold War is by far and away the most important single event of my lifetime (born in the early 80s).

Concur.
   127. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: April 21, 2013 at 08:56 PM (#4421664)
Falling of the Berlin Wall was bigger than 9/11.

Isn't that kind of apples and oranges? 9/11 the event was far more of an instigator of future events than the fall of Berlin Wall. The Berlin Wall itself didn't singlehandedly cause a chain of events the way 9/11 did.

OTOH the fall of the Berlin Wall was symbolic of a much bigger historical shift. But by the time of the Wall's destruction, the Communist game in Europe was pretty much over, and it was only a matter of time before its complete collapse from within. So IMO 9/11 was the more historically important event of the two.

   128. The Yankee Clapper Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:07 PM (#4421671)
The Berlin Wall itself didn't singlehandedly cause a chain of events the way 9/11 did.

Might be semantics, but the same forces that led to the fall of the Berlin Wall, led to the liberation of Eastern Europe. Once the Soviet military stopped propping up the satellite regimes, they all fell, as did the Soviet Union. Quite a chain of events
   129. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:11 PM (#4421679)
Cold War ending (whether we point to the symbol of the Wall falling down, or other events) is the biggest event/development in my lifetime (born mid 70s). Slight tangent: Perhaps we'll see more in the near future (Fx is trying with The Americans) but there's a ton of good Cold War material that needs to be tapped by TV/Motion Pictures. The bench of material is thin over the past decade or so, for slightly obvious reasons.

Lives of Others a notable exception.
   130. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:11 PM (#4421682)
Might be semantics, but the same forces that led to the fall of the Berlin Wall, led to the liberation of Eastern Europe. Once the Soviet military stopped propping up the satellite regimes, they all fell, as did the Soviet Union. Quite a chain of events

And the collapse was very rapid. All the satellite states, and then the subject SSRs were freed in short order.

Truly one of the great moments in human history. I get goosebumps thinking about it.
   131. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:13 PM (#4421684)
Slight tangent: Perhaps we'll see more in the near future (Fx is trying with The Americans) but there's a ton of good Cold War material that needs to be tapped by TV/Motion Pictures. The bench of material is thin over the past decade or so, for slightly obvious reasons.

I've been reading John LeCarre's spy novels recently. Really, really good stuff.

The British, Alec Guinness miniseries of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and Smiley's People are also excellent.
   132. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:14 PM (#4421686)
Perhaps we'll see more in the near future (Fx is trying with The Americans) but there's a ton of good Cold War material that needs to be tapped by TV/Motion Pictures.


Not familiar with Herb Philbrick, I see.
   133. cardsfanboy Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:18 PM (#4421689)
wrong thread
   134. Pingu Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:23 PM (#4421696)
It just occurred to me that people are short selling the positives of this generation. We saw the election of the first black president for crying out loud. How is that not monumental. We see confirmation bias in sports writing all the time, lets at least consider it could be at play in out memories of recent history.


Lots of great things have happened in my lifetime, but if I were asked the question mrams asked his grandfather, unfortunately it would be 9/11, followed probablly by Oklahoma bombing, and maybe then by this last week, assuming it doesnt fade significantly with time.

Looking at PPs list, I regain some amount of hope. Contact with extraterrestial life would almost certainly top a list. A cure for cancer might, but I doubt that would be an event, more like an accomplishment of decades of painstaking research, and we'd never quite know if it was cured for good.

The problem is that for each of those 'good' possibilities, I could imagine just as many 'bad'

WWIII, nuclear or biological weapons released ANYWHERE on earth, severe natural disaster, #### a direct asteroid impact, massive environmental change driven disasters, the collapse of the US worse than great depression...etc....etc.

Here's for holding out hope!
   135. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:25 PM (#4421703)
Perhaps we'll see more in the near future (Fx is trying with The Americans) but there's a ton of good Cold War material that needs to be tapped by TV/Motion Pictures.


Not familiar with Herb Philbrick, I see.

"Citizen. Communist. Counterspy!"
   136. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:39 PM (#4421722)
Social critics often cite the alien invader movies of the 50's like Invaders From Mars and Invasion of the Body Snatchers , with some validity I think, as quasi-anticommunist propaganda movies.

I know when I first saw Invaders From Mars on TV in the early 60's, I couldn't sleep without nightmares for about 2 weeks.
   137. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 09:51 PM (#4421737)
Invasion of the Body Snatchers also gets cited as an anti-McCarthyism exercise. Talk about pulling double duty ...

I envy you seeing Invaders from Mars so young (assuming that you were indeed quite young in the early '60s, as I certainly was). I was 29 when I finally caught it on cable (I'd seen the so-so Tobe Hooper remake in the theatre a couple of years earlier). Effective as hell, even then.
   138. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 10:02 PM (#4421756)
Effective as hell, even then.


OMG did that movie scare the living bejeesus out of me. There was a wood behind my house with a hill about the same distance and height as the one the spaceship landed behind. I couldn't walk through that wood for 6 months, I was so traumatized. It was worse than taking a shower right after seeing Psycho.
   139. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: April 21, 2013 at 10:04 PM (#4421758)
As much as people harp on negative stuff, we (in many ways) have it better than any generation in human history. Wealthier, healthier, more educated. So, buck up friends!
   140. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 10:10 PM (#4421765)
OMG did that movie scare the living bejeesus out of me. There was a wood behind my house with a hill about the same distance and height as the one the spaceship landed behind. I couldn't walk through that wood for 6 months, I was so traumatized. It was worse than taking a shower right after seeing Psycho.


The closest thing I can compare to that from my childhood viewing experiences was watching The Beginning of the End (giant grasshoppers invade, I think, Chicago) & then walking outside into our rather rural backyard & hearing the locusts (I guess) go at it out in the woods. Brrrrrrrrr.
   141. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 10:35 PM (#4421796)
#134, do you think 9/11 was a bigger event than the moon landing? I suspect that even if you were 92 and had lived through all the things mrams' grandfather had, you would not have named the moon landing and most likely would have named some negative event. I might be wrong, but I suspect the problem is you look at things differently, not that you lived in a fundamentally different time.

It seems to be the nature of things that positives happen more gradually over time, but negatives happen as more discrete events, although there are exceptions in both cases. The advances in information technology and communications over my lifetime have been "bigger" than 9/11 in my opinion, both on a global scale and to me personally. (I would likely never have reconnected with my wife, a former college acquaintance, without Facebook, and we likely wouldn't have sustained a 4-year long distance relationship without cell phones or email.) But that isn't a discrete event the way that a lot of other things, many of them negative, are.
   142. Pingu Posted: April 21, 2013 at 10:48 PM (#4421803)
#134, do you think 9/11 was a bigger event than the moon landing? I suspect that even if you were 92 and had lived through all the things mrams' grandfather had, you would not have named the moon landing and most likely would have named some negative event. I might be wrong, but I suspect the problem is you look at things differently, not that you lived in a fundamentally different time.

It seems to be the nature of things that positives happen more gradually over time, but negatives happen as more discrete events, although there are exceptions in both cases. The advances in information technology and communications over my lifetime have been "bigger" than 9/11 in my opinion, both on a global scale and to me personally. (I would likely never have reconnected with my wife, a former college acquaintance, without Facebook, and we likely wouldn't have sustained a 4-year long distance relationship without cell phones or email.) But that isn't a discrete event the way that a lot of other things, many of them negative, are.


Well I think you about nailed it.

Of course 9/11 wasnt the most important event in history, but I took the question as what the biggest event for my personally was. Though I'd like to think I'm not such a negative old fart that if something good happened I wouldnt recongnize it as such, 9/11 certainly has been the event that most impacted me on a personal level. But I was thinking about events in the discrete, you're definitely right, the good takes a while to marinate into something better.

Maybe I should just gleam positive and say the day of my birth was the most important event of my life. Cant be a soul in the world who argues with that one.
   143. Publius Publicola Posted: April 21, 2013 at 10:51 PM (#4421806)
The advances in information technology and communications over my lifetime have been "bigger" than 9/11 in my opinion,


Just want to mention that those improvements also enabled 9/11.
   144. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: April 21, 2013 at 10:52 PM (#4421809)
Maybe I should just gleam positive and say the day of my birth was the most important event of my life. Cant be a soul in the world who argues with that one.


Have you forgotten where you're posting?
   145. Pingu Posted: April 21, 2013 at 10:57 PM (#4421814)
I'd like to see them try.
   146. Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer Posted: April 22, 2013 at 12:15 AM (#4421864)
In the Berlin Wall vs 9/11 discussion, I would expand the "End of the Cold War" to include a number of other stunning events that snowballed in a short amount of time. What made all of that timeline amazing was that a number of pretty big deals were occurring over the course of about a year, but it took the fall of The Wall to just make it official. Consider:

1989:
February: USSR withdraws from Afghanistan
June: Poland has sort of free elections, Solidarity wins a bunch of seats
October: Hungary officially allows non-Communist parties. Erich Honecker gets the boot after 20 years in charge of East Germany. Eastern Europeans start openly crossing the border from Hungary into Austria without penalty.
November: Berlin Wall falls.
December: Romania revolts, violently takes over, executes dictator Ceausescu. Vaclav Havel, a brilliant poet who had been in jail, becomes president of Czechoslovakia.
1990:
Baltics split from USSR
Germany reunified.
1991:
USSR dissolves, Gorby steps down, Warsaw Pact dissolved...

I mean, that's a crazy amount of huge change in a historically small amount of time. I think people under the age of about, perhaps, 30 might have a hard time fully appreciating how wild this change of events was.

I am 39, and I think I probably have a hard time fully appreciating how crazy the moon landing must've been. It still amazes me to look up at the moon and realize that people have been there, and it happened less than 70 years after the Wright Brothers were working on airplanes.

Nobody on this thread is putting Pearl Harbor in the context of events here, probably because nobody here is old enough to have lived through it (you'd have to be in your 80s to have appreciated it in real time, yes?), but I'd imagine Pearl Harbor and 9/11, appropriately adjusted for technological and communication differences, would have created very similar feelings for their eras.
   147. Mayor Blomberg Posted: April 22, 2013 at 12:19 AM (#4421865)
I'm rather shocked that no one on this site mentioned the 2004 W.S. (much as I thot it sucked) as a major event.
   148. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 22, 2013 at 12:21 AM (#4421868)
Not familiar with Herb Philbrick, I see


contemporary cinema/television, I mean, of course. Hell, I doubt there will ever be a Cold War era piece better than Dr. Strangelove.
   149. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 22, 2013 at 12:25 AM (#4421869)
Good post Balboni's Trainer. I was thinking about those events and trying to recall the order, and all of the events, it really was remarkable. A rather strange way of looking at this is to find some '88 Olympic events to watch Seoul or Calgary and check out the results and then find some footage from Barcelona or Lillehammer (or was it Albertville?) and then check the results. WTF? All of the flag changes, the anthems, the names. It totally rearranged all kinds of life.
   150. Walt Davis Posted: April 22, 2013 at 12:35 AM (#4421871)
The big positive events of my life (events, not including gradual changes like women's rights)

Moon landing

Aaron's 715

.... the world kinda sucked in the late 70s and early 80s but I was having fun ...

fall of the Wall

apartheid ending without a violent revolution -- it was obviously coming to an end but no way I thought Afrikaaners would go without a fight nor did I expect there to be no reprisals.

Obama election -- nothing to do with politics, I didn't expect to see a black person elected president in my lifetime

And I'd trade 'em all for a Cubs WS championship! :-)
   151. Srul Itza At Home Posted: April 22, 2013 at 01:06 AM (#4421880)
The fall of the Berlin Wall and USSR were probably the most significant events of my lifetime other than 9/11. The Soviets were the enemy in pretty much the entire pop culture and education of my youth, and then when I was 12 (in a process that was likely more gradual than I remember it), they weren't. That was a pretty positive event.


I sort of feel that way, except I was 34 when the wall fell. The US-Soviet standoff and all its spin-offs seemed the largest salient fact about the World and how it operated -- and then just like that, POOF, it was gone.

The Moon Landing did not seem all that big a deal to me, just because it was such a long and careful project getting there. By Apollo 10 it was inevitable.
   152. McCoy Posted: April 22, 2013 at 01:09 AM (#4421881)
Biggest positive events in my life:

Bears' 1985-86 season and Super Bowl championship.

Michael Jordan and the Bulls of the 90's being 6 time champions.

1989 Chicago Cubs season.

1998 Chicago Cubs season.

The various 50 year anniversaries of WWII and more specifically D-Day.

Operation Desert Storm/Shield.

Star Wars/Empire Strikes Back/Return of the Jedi and the rereleases of those movies.

Sopranos

The Food Network.
   153. Srul Itza At Home Posted: April 22, 2013 at 01:18 AM (#4421884)
But isn't the beginning of another global war at least as important? And this one is proving harder to stomp out and threatens to go on indefinitely.



That's how we felt about the Cold War. And then, after a mere 44 years, it was suddenly over.

The current War against Islamo-Fascism has only been going on for 12 years. G
   154. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: April 22, 2013 at 01:58 AM (#4421894)


For specific events the moon landing was huge, as was the greatly reduced threat of nuclear annihilation once the wall fell. The assassination of King after the assassination of Kennedy was a horrible time; with all the death in Vietnam it felt like a true, low ebb. With the election of Nixon it was as if the country, if not the world had entered some new, insane phase of hatred and bloodlust. Obama's election, not because he's been the sort of president I would have liked, but because for so long it seemed impossible. I guess there's nothing George Bush and John McCain can't accomplish when they put their little minds to a thing.
   155. Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer Posted: April 22, 2013 at 08:00 AM (#4421928)
Another "event" that you can't put on this list because it is not possible to define it in a single moment is the creation/expansion/application of the Internet. It's been around for, what, 20 years, and it has dramatically changed the world already. It is fundamentally changing the economy (making it truly global in far faster, efficient fashion than it otherwise ever could have been), and it is causing generations of spin-off industries and products unimaginable even 10 years ago.

Related to this is the advent of mobile communications in an extremely sophisticated, yet affordable, way. If I had told you ten or 15 years ago that you would have a phone in your pocket that would eliminate the need for:

- a phone book
- a calendar/planner
- a calculator
- an atlas
- a desktop friggin' computer
- a landline in your home or office
- much of your "snail mail"
- a video game console
- a radio or CD player
- an alarm clock
- a physical edition of a newspaper
- books
- a TV
And I'm not even talking about stuff like social media, because we didn't even have something quite like that to replace.

Do we find these brothers in Boston in four days without everybody having a smart phone? Remember, when the guy in Boston who got carjacked by the two brothers Thursday night leave his cell phone in the stolen car, the police are still able to ping the phone to effectively put a tracking device in the vehicle.

Again, I don't know where the nexus of mobile technology and the Internet fits in this list of big events, but it is a very positive, remarkable technological advance, and worth mentioning somewhere in here.
   156. Arbitol Dijaler Posted: April 22, 2013 at 08:21 AM (#4421934)
And I'm not even talking about stuff like social media, because we didn't even have something quite like that to replace.


Our moms' basements.
   157. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: April 22, 2013 at 08:28 AM (#4421939)
Again, I don't know where the nexus of mobile technology and the Internet fits in this list of big events, but it is a very positive, remarkable technological advance, and worth mentioning somewhere in here.


The general changes in day to day ordinary life are arguably as big as the events listed throughout this thread. I don't know how to rank them but I'm not that old (42) and I am blown away by the changes in my day to day life. Not to diminish the incredible tragedies and incredible successes of the last 4 decades but the basic stuff...I was explaining rabbit ears to a friend's son recently and you could tell he couldn't even comprehend. "Wait, you had 5 channels total?"
   158. villageidiom Posted: April 22, 2013 at 08:28 AM (#4421940)
Another "event" that you can't put on this list because it is not possible to define it in a single moment is the creation/expansion/application of the Internet. It's been around for, what, 20 years, and it has dramatically changed the world already.
20 years? 1993? I was using the internet 6 or 7 years before that, and it existed long before.

   159. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: April 22, 2013 at 08:31 AM (#4421941)
I see a lot of people listing big events in their lifetimes, but I am surprised that nobody(unless I missed it) said the Rodney King riots. Maybe because I wasn't that far from it at the time, but that was a huge event.


I was in New Hampshire, about as far as you can get, and that one was a huge deal there too.
   160. Dale Sams Posted: April 22, 2013 at 08:34 AM (#4421945)
"Wait, you had 5 channels total?"


I've often threatened my "bored" kids with limiting their TV time to ABC, NBC, CBS and PBS. (No FOX for you brats!)
   161. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: April 22, 2013 at 08:38 AM (#4421950)
But isn't the beginning of another global war at least as important? And this one is proving harder to stomp out and threatens to go on indefinitely.


That's how we felt about the Cold War. And then, after a mere 44 years, it was suddenly over.

The current War against Islamo-Fascism has only been going on for 12 years.


I'm not sure that I'd agree with the narrow definition of Islamo-Fascism that's implicit in your 12 year time frame, unless you think that Haj Amin al-Husseini or Gamal Abdel Nasser were democratic socialists. And where's the Gorbachev or the Solzhenitsyn or the Walesa who might be the counterforces to the Islamo-Fascists in our current War?
   162. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: April 22, 2013 at 06:39 PM (#4422581)
Islamo-what, now?

I may be moving to an extremely isolated area for a few months while I build a house. With a top notch phone can I really get internet service, and enough bandwidth to plug the phone into a desktop and have it run that and a decent monitor, all without a landine?

If I can, what does that kind of thing cost?
   163. Howie Menckel Posted: April 22, 2013 at 07:44 PM (#4422639)

"1993? I was using the internet 6 or 7 years before that, and it existed long before."

I think 1996 was the AOL explosion for the 'average Joe' - before that, it didn't seem like 'everybody' was on the internet...

   164. The Yankee Clapper Posted: April 22, 2013 at 09:03 PM (#4422771)
I was explaining rabbit ears to a friend's son recently and you could tell he couldn't even comprehend. "Wait, you had 5 channels total?"

And you had to get out of the chair to change the channel on the actual TV. Life was hard!
   165. Jolly Old St. Nick Still Gags in October Posted: April 22, 2013 at 09:34 PM (#4422812)
And you had to get out of the chair to change the channel on the actual TV. Life was hard!

And that's not even getting into the ghost question. Or the flickering screens, those Satan-driven flickering screens.
   166. cardsfanboy Posted: April 22, 2013 at 09:57 PM (#4422847)
"1993? I was using the internet 6 or 7 years before that, and it existed long before."

I think 1996 was the AOL explosion for the 'average Joe' - before that, it didn't seem like 'everybody' was on the internet...


Sounds about right, but Compuserve was pretty big several years before that, it might not have been everybody having it, but a significant chunk of the population had it.
   167. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 22, 2013 at 10:18 PM (#4422868)
And that's not even getting into the ghost question. Or the flickering screens, those Satan-driven flickering screens.


And the TV's had a horizontal hold knob, at least our Magnavox did. Try explaining that to someone under 30.

was explaining rabbit ears to a friend's son recently and you could tell he couldn't even comprehend.


My favorite rabbit ears story was one NYD bowl day (a huge day in our household) and Nebraska was playing Michigan in the Fiesta Bowl on NBC (mid 80s) in the late morning/early afternoon and we had a lot of heavy snow either the night before or that morning and, the old tin foil wrapped around the TV's antenna wasn't helping, so my Dad managed to get up on the roof, I swear he had a bathrobe and slippers on and was trying to clear off the Aerial Antenna we had on the roof of our house. Such a reckless and mostly feeble effort to improve the reception, only to see Harbaugh lead a wild 2nd half comeback against our Huskers.
   168. Random Transaction Generator Posted: April 23, 2013 at 01:03 AM (#4422981)
I'm turning 42 soon(ish) and here are the biggest events in my life (non-sports, non-personal, Canadian), chronologically:

Reagan assassination attempt - I wasn't even 10 yet, but I remember thinking how weird it was that someone would try to shoot someone famous. Assassinations were just things that happened in the past.

Falklands War - The first televised war I remember being able to watch. Being Canadian, we were obviously gungho for the Commonwealth.

San Ysidro McDonald's massacre - As a kid, this really gripped my mind for a long time. I associated McD's with happy times, and that some random guy could randomly shoot people for no reason? I had a hard time coming to grips with that.

Challenger Disaster - Just so shocking to me, that "heroes" could die like that.

Chernobyl Disaster - I remember being extremely worried about radiation.

Fall of Berlin Wall/Soviet empire - This would probably rank as the happiest event in my life (non-sports, non-personal). It was like a giant boulder was lifted off our shoulders. No more nuclear annihilation!

Magic Johnson is HIV positive - Sorta sports related, but when one of the greatest athletes on the planet can get HIV, it's suddenly not just something that could happen to someone else. And since I was 20 at the time, that meant something.

Gulf War - being old enough to be in the army at the time (but no American), it really hit home. Plus, it was the time when CNN/24-hour news really meant something to me (as we had cable at university), and I was hypnotized by the TV for hours at a time.

Email and the web - I went to University of Waterloo, and they had a very advanced computer department. I was taking computer courses (during my BMath degree) and was using email all the time. I also got to dabble in the early days of WWW, and even had the first Toronto Maple Leafs web page. I know, because it was the only one listed in the "Internet Yellow Pages" book that came out then. Even back then, I knew this was something HUGE.

End of Apartheid - The existence of apartheid seemed so grotesque, it was amazing to see Mandela freed and then for free elections (and no horrific civil war).

Quebec referendum - Thankfully, 50.58% of Quebecers didn't want to split the country apart, but it was the biggest single election night tension I felt in my life.

Oklahoma City bombing - I didn't think any single event would make me so sick to my stomach to see/hear/read.

Columbine - This one moved ahead of the San Ysidro attack as the worst mass shooting in my mind.

9/11 - I never really thought I could go a day without thinking about it, and probably didn't for at least 6 months. I think watching the replays OVER and OVER again was a mistake on my part. I'd say this is the biggest moment of my life (non-personal).

Boxing Day Tsunami - Most horrific natural disaster I can think of in my life time.

Hurricane Katrina - for humanitarian and political reasons.

The near collapse of the economy - I'm married, I own a house, I have a retirement fund, I have investments, and I remember being TERRIFIED about the economic news I was hearing in September (from the economy blogs and podcasts). So much so, it completely distracted me from any political news at the time.

The election of Barack Obama - A black man IS president? Really? In my lifetime? Wow. (I think this was almost a bigger moment for my parents, since they were alive during the segregation era.)

Death of OBL - The boogey-man is dead!

   169. Greg K Posted: April 23, 2013 at 04:45 AM (#4423001)
was explaining rabbit ears to a friend's son recently and you could tell he couldn't even comprehend.

I'm about to turn 30 in a month, and I'm probably among the last cohort to have much experience with rabbit ears. My university dorm had cable in the common room, but if you have a personal TV (my second year I scored a sweet 12 inch built-in VHS model!) you'd just get the antenna. CBC came through fairly well, so hockey was no problem. Global worked too, CTV depended on the day.

My list of events is quite similar to Random Transaction's (if you eliminate the first chunk that I was too young for)...though I remember my dad did wake us up to watch live footage of Ceausesco's overthrow. I had a very odd relationship with the Soviet Union as a child. I was just 8 when the USSR collapsed, but I was very interested in it because A) I was a geography nerd, and B) being a younger brother I developed very early on a tendency to root for underdogs/villains/the guys no one else rooted for. My brother always got to choose which side he'd represent in any games, so I learned to love the roles I was left with. My dad also has a dry sense of humour so I think he encouraged me, or at least didn't discourage me from some odd behaviour. On May Day in grade two I marched to school with a giant Soviet flag on a pole, which was...interesting.

I'd probably add the proposed coalition/prorogued parliament of a couple years ago, and the riots in the UK from last year (or two years ago?)

For positive memories, the massive days-long power-outage in North America about 5-6 years ago was a lot of fun. I'm sure for many people losing power for that long caused all sorts of serious problems, but for me it was great fun.

   170. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: April 23, 2013 at 06:39 AM (#4423007)
In 1995 what percentage of the population in the US had the net? 10?

A 75 mhz cpu computer went for 3k. Woohoo!
   171. Dan Evensen Posted: April 23, 2013 at 07:44 AM (#4423022)
1993? I was using the internet 6 or 7 years before that, and it existed long before.

BBSes are not the same as the internet.

Wikipedia is your friend:

TCP/IP network access expanded again in 1986 when the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNET) provided access to supercomputer sites in the United States from research and education organizations, first at 56 kbit/s and later at 1.5 Mbit/s and 45 Mbit/s. Commercial internet service providers (ISPs) began to emerge in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The ARPANET was decommissioned in 1990. The Internet was commercialized in 1995 when NSFNET was decommissioned, removing the last restrictions on the use of the Internet to carry commercial traffic. The Internet started a rapid expansion to Europe and Australia in the mid to late 1980s and to Asia in the late 1980s and early 1990s.


I think 1996 was the AOL explosion for the 'average Joe' - before that, it didn't seem like 'everybody' was on the internet...

I believe it was a bit later than 1996. At the very least, my family didn't have stable internet access until 1998 or so. Again, from the same article:

During the late 1990s, it was estimated that traffic on the public Internet grew by 100 percent per year, while the mean annual growth in the number of Internet users was thought to be between 20% and 50%.


tl;dr: Learn to internet.

-----

Honestly, I miss a lot of worldwide news because regardless of the partisan aspect of our own news networks, the rest of the worlds is a lot worse. It's always tough to get a quality factual story(most of the rest of the world news is on par with Fox news for accuracy/factuality from my limited experience)

It depends on where you get your information from and what your language skills are.

I've had good experiences relying on BBC radio for English language world news. I haven't listened to NPR for over half a decade.

In German, I trust the Süddeutscher Zeitung, though I'd probably read the Frankfurter Allgemeine if I actually lived in Germany. Der Spiegel is superior to any American news magazine currently on the market.

For family reasons (my wife is from Kaohsiung, Taiwan), I keep my Chinese news reading mostly to the pro-DPP Liberty Times. Since we're living in Shenyang, of course, my daily newspaper reading is the local government controlled rag (the Liaoshen Wanbao). It's not great for news on the international or even national scale, but its coverage of events in Liaoning Province is actually excellent. Those not familiar with the contemporary mainland Chinese media would be surprised at the latitude these outlets have in reporting local events.

Naturally, when I read in Korean, I read the Rodong Sinmun for all the updates on the Great Leader and Juche Thought. It also provides excellent denouncements of the imperialist Westerners.

Seriously, though, the Chosun Ilbo is excellent. However, I don't follow South Korean politics closely enough to know the partisan difference between the various media outlets. This may change as my language skills slowly improve.

As far as the FOX News comparison goes, I think you could make a very good case that the ultra-partisan television and newspaper coverage in Taiwan is just as bad. The nice thing is that you can usually piece the actual story together by combining the pro-KMT and pro-DPP accounts. Television news from mainland China (and I include the clearly biased Phoenix TV) is probably worse than FOX News, though local news stations generally provide good coverage of gossipy local stories (stuff like people falling down dead outside of hospitals).

I don't think you can say the same thing for news in Germany or Austria, unless you read Der Bild / Die Kronen Zeitung. From what I've seen, the same applies to South Korean news, though certain topics (especially anything dealing with North Korea) tend to be over-sensationalized.

-----

I'm about to turn 30 in a month, and I'm probably among the last cohort to have much experience with rabbit ears.

I'm 28, turning 29 in June, and I remember fiddling around with rabbit ears. Of course, it's probably because my parents never subscribed to cable television. I was also slow to make the transition from VHS to DVD, and only managed to complete converting most of my old baseball tapes to DVD in 2010.

My parents also didn't own a computer capable of running Windows 95 until 1997 or 1998 (can't remember exactly). There was a time when I was proud of my DOS 6.2 skills.

-----

Edited to remove non-alphabetic characters, which all show up as ???.
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