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Monday, February 12, 2018

Former MLB pitcher Esteban Loaiza arrested with 44 pounds of heroin and cocaine

And here is a coincidence:  He made 44 million in his career.  What an idiot.

shoewizard Posted: February 12, 2018 at 11:39 AM | 161 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: drugs

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   1. Traderdave Posted: February 12, 2018 at 01:20 PM (#5623597)
Esteban was a pitcher of
curve balls or heavy drugs....
   2. PreservedFish Posted: February 12, 2018 at 01:26 PM (#5623606)
When I was a kid I played this computer game Pizza Tycoon where you rent a restaurant space, buy tables and chairs, buy ingredients, design a pizza menu, purchase advertising, etc. Like Sim City for pizza parlors.

For some reason there was this whole side part of the game where you could do stuff for the mafia. First you just start delivering documents or something, small stuff. It was lucrative and you could make money more easily doing that than by operating the pizza shop. Customers would complain about uncomfortable chairs or something and even if you were profitable maybe you didn't really have the cashflow to make an investment like that, so you call up the mafia and ask for odd jobs.

Pretty soon you're running heavy drugs and machine guns and bazookas and #### and you're making so much more money than any pizzeria could ever make you. Easy to get carried away.

In the game, though, if you got caught with 44 pounds of heroin, you could just exit without saving and try again.
   3. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 12, 2018 at 01:32 PM (#5623613)
For some reason there was this whole side part of the game where you could do stuff for the mafia.

Because pizza parlors are owned by Italians, and Italians are in the mafia. Duh.
   4. shoewizard Posted: February 12, 2018 at 01:32 PM (#5623614)
Sounds like the neighborhood pizza joint I grew up across the street from on Long Island.

EDIT: yes it was owned by Italians, the guy that owned it was definitely mobbed up, and I just looked on Google Maps...the freaking place is an art gallery now !
   5. Zach Posted: February 12, 2018 at 01:51 PM (#5623627)
For some reason there was this whole side part of the game where you could do stuff for the mafia.

I've been to a pizza place like that. The people from my institute were going to a German Physical Society meeting in Hamburg, and we had been travelling all day Sunday to get there. We were staying in a little place in the suburbs, and we were starving. So we set out to find some place to eat, only to discover that there's nothing deader than the German suburbs after dark on a Sunday night (except possibly the original owner of the pizza shop, but I'm getting ahead of myself).

We finally find this little storefront pizza shop filled with some sketchy Middle Eastern guys, who are completely befuddled by orders like "Eine pizza, bitte. Nichts darauf." (One pizza, nothing on it.) After a long wait, we got our completely unremarkable pizzas and made our way back to the hotel.

If you told us that place was a sham storefront for a drug ring, I don't think a single one of us would have been surprised.

   6. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 12, 2018 at 01:53 PM (#5623628)
Well, duh. If it was 51 pounds of heroin and cocaine, Loaiza would've had to pay an additional baggage fee.
   7. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 12, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5623629)
Good.

If they can add a charge for fraud when I paid $27 for him in a 2005 roto auction, I support that too.
   8. Nasty Nate Posted: February 12, 2018 at 01:58 PM (#5623633)
If they can add a charge for fraud when I paid $27 for him in a 2005 roto auction, I support that too.
He was coming off of a 5.70 ERA. That's buyer error.
   9. Tin Angel Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:08 PM (#5623637)
Was that wrong? Should I have not done that?
   10. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:10 PM (#5623638)
If they can add a charge for fraud when I paid $27 for him in a 2005 roto auction, I support that too.

He was coming off of a 5.70 ERA. That's buyer error.


And he won 21 games while leading the AL in Ks the year before! But hey - if you want to propose that the conspiracy is bigger than all that, that it was a carefully plotted endeavor to juice auction day bidding, coordinated false sleeper lists, etc... I can believe it.
   11. McCoy Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:17 PM (#5623646)
I thought Loaiza was part of the old trivia game of max home runs by taking the positional home run leader of each team and adding them up. But it turns out I was thinking of Esteban Yan of the rays.
   12. PreservedFish Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:20 PM (#5623649)
If you told us that place was a sham storefront for a drug ring, I don't think a single one of us would have been surprised.


I stumbled into a Chinese joint like this recently, in Flushing's Chinatown where they have these labyrinthine malls full of little dumpling shops, cell phone stores, money wiring services, etc. It was a tea parlor or something. I walked in, and there was only one seated table, a bunch of older men that turned around and shot daggers with their eyes at me. Metaphorical daggers, thankfully. They were also all smoking, which is enough of a rarity in NYC nowadays to make one suspicious.

A friend of mine that works for the State Dept told me he once attended an FBI conference of some sort where one of the speakers said that "you could not believe how many small businesses are actually fronts for money laundering schemes." If you see a laundry or mattress store or restaurant that seems to have no customers, doesn't try to land any, and yet never closes, odds are pretty good that it's a front.
   13. eddieot Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:25 PM (#5623654)
I feel like the MLBPA should be doing a better job of protecting players with financial planning. This guy made $44 million and was reduced to selling drugs? How about taking the first 5 percent of each player's MLB salary and investing it in some solid long-term plan that the player can't touch until 5 years after his retirement? Consider it part of their union dues.

Call it the Bobby Bonilla Plan.
   14. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:28 PM (#5623660)
A friend of mine that works for the State Dept told me he once attended an FBI conference of some sort where one of the speakers said that "you could not believe how many small businesses are actually fronts for money laundering schemes." If you see a laundry or mattress store or restaurant that seems to have no customers, doesn't try to land any, and yet never closes, odds are pretty good that it's a front.

For the Chicagoans among us, that might answer my decade-old questions about the Capt. Nemo's sub shop on Ashland just north of Addison.
   15. villageidiom Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:32 PM (#5623666)
Per Wikipedia and USA Today:
(Jenni) Rivera married baseball player Esteban Loaiza in 2010. They filed for divorce in 2012 just months before her death, but it was never finalized.
Rivera, along with six others, died in a plane crash near Iturbide, Nuevo León on December 9, 2012.
The company that owns a luxury jet that crashed and killed Mexican pop superstar Jenni Rivera is under investigation by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, and the agency seized two of its planes earlier this year as part of the ongoing probe.

DEA spokeswoman Lisa Webb Johnson confirmed Thursday the planes owned by Las Vegas-based Starwood Management were seized in Texas and Arizona, but she declined to discuss details of the case. The agency also has subpoenaed all the company's records, including any correspondence it has had with a former Tijuana mayor who U.S. law enforcement officials have long suspected has ties to organized crime.

The man widely believed to be behind the aviation company is an ex-convict named Christian Esquino, 50, who has a long and checkered legal past.

...It remained unclear Thursday exactly what caused the crash and why Rivera was on Esquino's plane.
I imagine there will now be some questions, if not already, whether he had anything to do with his wife dying in the crash of a drug-running plane only a couple months after she filed for divorce.
   16. Shibal Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:36 PM (#5623668)
Because pizza parlors are owned by Italians, and Italians are in the mafia. Duh.


There's a reason pizza parlors and the mafia are connected. The Sicilian mafia set up dozens of small pizza shops to smuggle in herion and launder cash in the US. Donnie Brasco (real world name Joe Pistone) was the key source of information about it. Louis Freeh and Rudy Giuliani made their bones prosecuting the case (the Pizza Connection case). The trial began in September 1985 and ended in March 1987, biggest mafia trial in history I believe.

I imagine the pizza game played on that history.
   17. shoewizard Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:38 PM (#5623672)
I imagine there will now be some questions, if not already, whether he had anything to do with his wife dying in the crash of a drug-running plane only a couple months after she filed for divorce.


You think he was going all Pablo Escobar causing a plane crash to get to one person on board ? Kinda doubt that.
   18. Tin Angel Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:43 PM (#5623682)
I imagine the pizza game played on that history.


Or maybe they just watched Goodfellas.
   19. frannyzoo Posted: February 12, 2018 at 02:49 PM (#5623689)
You think he was going all Pablo Escobar causing a plane crash to get to one person on board ? Kinda doubt that.

You ever been married, Shoewizard? Rational actions and being married are often at cross purposes.
   20. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: February 12, 2018 at 03:00 PM (#5623701)
For the Chicagoans among us, that might answer my decade-old questions about the Capt. Nemo's sub shop on Ashland just north of Addison.

There was a sports video store on North Broadway (I think) 15-ish years ago. It had regular video store shelves with a VHS every three feet. There was no way that was a legitimate store.
   21. Omineca Greg Posted: February 12, 2018 at 03:11 PM (#5623718)
I used to hang out at a restaurant that, unbeknown to us, dealt drugs. Maybe 30 years ago. It was a 24 hour place on Broadway in Vancouver, which is very centrally located to get to after an evening of carousing. We'd go there after everywhere else was closed. It wasn't the only 24 hour place in Vancouver (although for a city that size, even now, V-Town sucks in that regard.), but we liked it because it had the coolest jukebox. Nothing but blues, R&B, and soul jazz from the 50s and the 60s. It was a very generic restaurant, I didn't really understand the blues connection, the food was just OK, and they always seemed to be vaguely peeved about having to serve us (we were always the only ones there, so we figured they could be showing a bit more hospitality to regular customers). We would go there every Friday night, with a stack of quarters, and eat dry ribs or nachos or fried chicken (they did have pretty good fried chicken) while listening to the coolest music. Remember kids, before the internet, it was hard to get a hold of obscure blues records. They delivered 24 hours too, which nobody else did, and that should have been the tip off that something wasn't on the up and up.

Well, it turned out they were run by organised crime, and all the 24 hr deliveries were heroin and cocaine, and one day they got busted, and we had to find another place to go.

But I've still got the memories. On our way out every Saturday 3am morning, we would drop in one more quarter and play this one.
   22. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 12, 2018 at 03:40 PM (#5623741)
For the Chicagoans among us, that might answer my decade-old questions about the Capt. Nemo's sub shop on Ashland just north of Addison.


Still open?

They have (had?) good chili... and the Italian Beefs are (were?) also quite, quite good.

But yeah, I used to eat there quite often - lived just a few blocks from it.... and over the course of dozens of visits, I never - EVER saw another patron in it. Ever.
   23. Bourbon Samurai, what price fettucine? Posted: February 12, 2018 at 03:43 PM (#5623744)
For the Chicagoans among us, that might answer my decade-old questions about the Capt. Nemo's sub shop on Ashland just north of Addison.


Wow, I haven't lived in Chicago in almost fifteen years but I was JUST thinking about that Captain Nemo's. They did have good soup.
   24. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 12, 2018 at 03:50 PM (#5623750)
According to all available google evidence, Nemos is still open... Huh.

The thing I loved about their Italian Beef is that unlike a lot of the hot dog stands (Murphy's or Byron's just to name a couple), they actually seem to leave the beef in the au jus to cook rather than just giving it a few minutes of dipping.

This is a key component of a good Italian beef. You cannot just take the pre-packaged rump slices and dip them in stock.... the long, slow simmering is essential. Precious few places in Chicago seemed to understand this -- and NOBODY outside of Chicago does.

The proper consistency of a good Italian beef is damn near shredded beef.... not lunch meet slices dipped in juice.
   25. Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington Posted: February 12, 2018 at 03:52 PM (#5623752)
I used to live just south of Addison on Ashland, and yeah, never went in Nemo's either and never saw anyone in there.

I guess we know where the next meetup is going to be.
   26. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 12, 2018 at 03:58 PM (#5623756)
Sounds like we were all quasi-neighbors - my first apartment in the city was at Addison & Greenview in 1998-2000. The Nemo's is still open as far as I can tell, although even the cardboard cutouts of the people in the windows are starting to look a little uncertain.
   27. . . . . . . Posted: February 12, 2018 at 03:59 PM (#5623757)
Pizza place across the street from my high school (in Manhattan) was busted by the FBI for running coke and money laundering. That’s just what slice joints in NY do. It’s a cash business.
   28. reech Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:00 PM (#5623758)
Zonk: #7

If they can add a charge for fraud when I paid $27 for him in a 2005 roto auction, I support that too.


You win the site today.
   29. McCoy Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:04 PM (#5623760)
Around about 1990 my family bought a restaurant on the lakefront of lake Michigan in southeast Wisconsin. They are Italians. My uncle who was running the restaurant went around town introducing himself to the restaurant neighborhood. Unbeknownst to him he wandered into a mob front that was being watched by the FBI. So the FBI bring the smart people they are saw an Italian business owner go into a mob front and figured they had a new player in town. So they bugged his phones. Lasted about a month or two before they realized he was just a legit business man.
   30. Graham & the 15-win "ARod Vortex of suck" Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:06 PM (#5623761)
#29 - How did your uncle figure out the FBI was bugging his phones?
   31. Stormy JE Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:06 PM (#5623762)
Twenty kilos?!? Damn, in order to exhaust that supply, you'd need your September call-ups to be promoted by the middle of May.

#justsayin
   32. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:06 PM (#5623763)
The thing I loved about their Italian Beef is that unlike a lot of the hot dog stands (Murphy's or Byron's just to name a couple), they actually seem to leave the beef in the au jus to cook rather than just giving it a few minutes of dipping.

Leaving the beef in the au jus is all well and good, but don't let's get me started on the practice of soaking the entire damn thing. Completely defeats the entire purpose of having a sandwich in the first place, which is to bring some structural integrity to what would otherwise be a mess. "Yes, I'll have the Italian beef sandwich, please, but I'd like you to turn it into a disgusting amorphous wet blob." Might as well put some f***ing mayo on it while you're at it.
   33. Stormy JE Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:07 PM (#5623765)
#29 - How did your uncle figure out the FBI was bugging his phones?
Who'd make up someone named Regina? It's the capital of Saskatchewan.
   34. dlf Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:08 PM (#5623766)
On our way out every Saturday 3am morning, we would drop in one more quarter and play this one.


Roughly around the time you were hanging out at that place in Vancouver, I was bartending along the Gulf Coast. The house band at the place I stayed the longest always closed out its set with a medley of both that and this one.

Edit: But instead of the instrumental from McDuff, the house band played this one.
   35. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:09 PM (#5623767)
Leaving the beef in the au jus is all well and good, but don't let's get me started on the practice of soaking the entire damn thing. Completely defeats the entire purpose of having a sandwich in the first place, which is to bring some structural integrity to what would otherwise be a mess. "Yes, I'll have the Italian beef sandwich, please, but I'd like you to turn it into a disgusting amorphous wet blob."

We will never see eye to eye on barbecue.
   36. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:15 PM (#5623771)
Leaving the beef in the au jus is all well and good, but don't let's get me started on the practice of soaking the entire damn thing. Completely defeats the entire purpose of having a sandwich in the first place, which is to bring some structural integrity to what would otherwise be a mess. "Yes, I'll have the Italian beef sandwich, please, but I'd like you to turn it into a disgusting amorphous wet blob." Might as well put some f***ing mayo on it while you're at it.


When they ask you "wet, dry, or dipped" - they're not propositioning you :-)

   37. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:18 PM (#5623774)
Another good one for a proper Beef is Al's...
   38. Bourbon Samurai, what price fettucine? Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:26 PM (#5623778)
I always considered Al's to be the gold standard. I never got an italian beef at Captain Nemo's for some reason. I got some kind of weird sandwich that had hard-boiled eggs in it, and the lentil soup, which was excellent.
   39. McCoy Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:27 PM (#5623780)
Yeah, dipping the whole thing is just wrong. Give me a cup and let me do it myself.

As for the bugging thing it was pretty sloppy. There was a weird pause at the beginning of s phone conversation on the phone and I think eventually somebody in law enforcement stopped by and asked him some questions about why he was at so and so's place.
   40. McCoy Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:28 PM (#5623781)
Re 33. I don't get it
   41. Steve Parris, Je t'aime Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:36 PM (#5623786)
Another good one for a proper Beef is Al's...

Oh yeah. I lived by the one on Taylor St. in 1999. I didn't realize there were others - is that one the original?
   42. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:38 PM (#5623787)
I always considered Al's to be the gold standard. I never got an italian beef at Captain Nemo's for some reason. I got some kind of weird sandwich that had hard-boiled eggs in it, and the lentil soup, which was excellent.


Yeah - I might put Portillo's neck-and-neck and with them (though, I have no reports on any potential quality slippage since the original owners sold out a few years ago), but Al's always had convenience going for them.
   43. Endless Trash Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:38 PM (#5623788)
Cool story but, isn't it a bigger sign that they are a front if they are not open? Like why would they be open for business for 24 hours if they are trying to run drugs?

I live in Vancouver and am always more suspicious of the places that are in great locations but are inexplicably closed on Friday nights. Or the pizza place from where we tried to order a half dozen times and every time we were told they couldn't make any pizza because they ran out of flour or whatever.
   44. Booey Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:38 PM (#5623789)
Not quite the same thing, but while we're on the subject of businesses that are fronts for illegal activities...how many Asian massage parlors are legit? Any of them? I swear, it seems like a new one opens up every few weeks or so these days. I can literally think of probably 15 or so within a 10 minute drive from my work, most which just popped up within the last year or two. Sometimes they're right across the street from each other or just a half block further down the road. I don't know how any legitimate spa could survive with so much direct competition in the same area.
   45. Commissioner Bud Black Beltre Hillman Fred Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:38 PM (#5623790)
Re 33. I don't get it

Link
   46. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:44 PM (#5623792)
Oh yeah. I lived by the one on Taylor St. in 1999. I didn't realize there were others - is that one the original?


Yeah - the little Italy one is the original.

I vaguely the one I used to frequent on Clark is relatively new (where "relatively" means less than 10-15 years old).
   47. BrianBrianson Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:47 PM (#5623795)
Yeah, I worked at a store, two doors down was a clothing/junk store that I think opened like once a month from 10-4.

That place must've been a front.
   48. McCoy Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:56 PM (#5623801)
It you're open 24 hours a day you have a reason to be open and making deliveries. The local pizza joint where my family restaurant is was out still is a place to get drugs from. They had a few stores so I don't know if this stuff was run by the Black sheep or something
   49. Omineca Greg Posted: February 12, 2018 at 04:57 PM (#5623802)
Cool story but, isn't it a bigger sign that they are a front if they are not open? Like why would they be open for business for 24 hours if they are trying to run drugs?

I think this is directed to me. This place was actually selling drugs, not just laundering money for drugs. Like the delivery guy would get out of his car, and instead of bringing you a Greek Salad, he'll have brought you heroin (probably you could get it with feta if you wanted, I don't know). You're right, it seems like an odd business plan, if the idea is to to launder money, then you really want an easy restaurant to run with no other connection to the drug trade, and I don't see the advantage of having a storefront when you're a drug dealer, but I don't know, not my field of expertise. We had a drug paraphernalia shop here in PG that was selling weed and meth out the back door for about a year and a half before they got caught. I knew they were doing it, and I'm not a user, so I don't know how the RCMP didn't know.
   50. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 12, 2018 at 05:01 PM (#5623804)
We had a drug paraphernalia shop here in PG that was selling weed and meth out the back door for about a year and a half before they got caught.

Seems like maybe not the most clever front in terms of concealing a drug dealing business.
   51. Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim Posted: February 12, 2018 at 05:10 PM (#5623813)
There was a stretch of years where, every Friday night, my wife and I would just pick a direction, drive until we were hungry, and then stop at the first interesting restaurant we came across for dinner. One night, we stopped at this hookah lounge in Anaheim that shared a lot with a Neptune's Lagoon — hourly spa rentals for all you folks needing a soak. There were a bunch of very nice cars in the parking lot... too nice. We go anyways. As we walk into the restaurant, we noticed that only one table was occupied, and by about eight or nine MidEastern types. Big dudes, all of them, and all wearing big bulky jackets. They were smoking and gambling, playing some card game I didn't immediately recognize. What I DID recognize was that they were betting from bills being pulled out of huge rolls, like the kind you see gangsters use on Law & Order or a Frontline special. I was concerned. I could feel my wife crush my hand.

We walk in, they all turn and look at us with a quizzical look. Not mean or anything, just... "Really? Here?" One guy stands up with a sigh, and shows us to a table as far away as possible from the one they were at, then goes back to his game. My wife and I both sit in the corner, so we're both facing out because we're both pretty sure we're going to die that night, and wanted to see it coming. The place was decorated in some combination of Istanbul tourist trinkets and American garage sale kitsch, mediocre landscape paintings and old tin boxes flanking all sorts of hookahs that were covered in dust and had clearly not been touched in months.

One of the younger guys at the table stands up, grabs some menus, comes over, and asks us very pleasantly what we'd like. I wanted to say, "I'd like to get out alive," but just asked what he recommended. We get the dinner special for two, along with a couple of beers he insisted would go great with the food. For the next hour, we had one of the greatest dining experiences of my life. There was lamb and chicken and all sorts of amazing vegetable plates — and with every different dish that came out, one of the big dudes would bring it over, tell us about what it was and how they made it and what spices they used, and how each one of their dishes came directly from one of their mothers or grandmothers. They even cooked a little extra for us to have an entire second meal.

If I had to bet, I'd say those guys were gun runners, but they were fun, friendly, and could really cook. Scariest meal I ever had, but so, so good. The Neptune Lounge is still there, but the hookah place is now a friendly little grill. Too bad. I would totally risk my life to have another meal there.
   52. Omineca Greg Posted: February 12, 2018 at 05:21 PM (#5623820)
It just occurred to me! Endless Trash and I can plan a BC Meet Up! That would be awesome, make everybody jealous about what a good time we're going to have, kibitz about restaurants and bars (Alibi Room? If you say so! My son was telling me about a place that during happy hour gives you a free pound of wings with every pint. I am intrigued) and then because there's just the two of us, we can brag about our perfect attendance.
   53. shoewizard Posted: February 12, 2018 at 05:22 PM (#5623821)
You ever been married, Shoewizard? Rational actions and being married are often at cross purposes.


35 years. Yeah, her staying with me this long definitely not rational, so I see your point.
   54. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: February 12, 2018 at 05:27 PM (#5623824)

If you see a laundry or mattress store or restaurant that seems to have no customers, doesn't try to land any, and yet never closes, odds are pretty good that it's a front.

I've long suspected that every palm reading / fortune telling storefront in NYC is really a front for drugs or prostitution or something like that.
   55. McCoy Posted: February 12, 2018 at 05:33 PM (#5623828)
Stores that are closed often or have odd hours are usually legit. They're usually opened by people who run it as a hobby or nowadays have a significant online presence.
   56. bachslunch Posted: February 12, 2018 at 05:54 PM (#5623846)
Tried Italian beef at two spots when I went to Chicago a few years ago. Al’s was darned good, but liked the sandwich at Mr. Beef even better. Got it dunked in beef juice and garnished with peppers and giardiniera both times.

Only tried a Chicago dog at Portillo’s but it was excellent.
   57. Bourbon Samurai, what price fettucine? Posted: February 12, 2018 at 07:17 PM (#5623887)
Portillo's is my usual choice if I gotta do all my chicago greaseball eating in one go.

Oh man, Mr. Beef was great too. Someday I'm gonna take a couple days off and just drive around eating all the chicago stuff I ate in my early 20s.
   58. michaelplank has knowledgeable eyes Posted: February 12, 2018 at 07:28 PM (#5623893)
This thread, full of talk of money laundering and Chicago, reminds me that I still gotta finish watching Ozark.
   59. Omineca Greg Posted: February 12, 2018 at 07:41 PM (#5623899)
Two things:

1. For those not in the know, 44 pounds is 20kg. Coincidence? Probably not.

2. I liked LA Hombre of Anaheim's story.
   60. Endless Trash Posted: February 12, 2018 at 07:48 PM (#5623907)
You know it's funny. I have lived in BC my entire life, and my parents live in Prince George, but I had never before now heard the term "Omineca" and I had no idea your handle referred to there.

The "free pound of wings with every pint" happy hour is at a place literally called The Pint. I know it well.
   61. GGC Posted: February 12, 2018 at 08:10 PM (#5623913)
60 posts and no Yankee Chatterers showed up to call Loiaza "TTAS Esteban Loiaza"?
   62. chisoxcollector Posted: February 12, 2018 at 08:21 PM (#5623917)
I have to admit, I’m surprised to see Portillos brought up in a discussion of good Italian Beefs. Al’s is definitely a step above Portillos.

My favorite spot is a bit out of the way. Maxwell’s Beef on 63rd in Downers Grove.
   63. BDC Posted: February 12, 2018 at 08:37 PM (#5623925)
When I lived in Queens, there were quite a few shops – delis, bodegas, takeout places – that all had identical signs in the window, these old-timey corny black-and-white drawings of somebody with a cup of coffee and the legend COFFEE THAT HITS THE SPOT. They didn't feature any brand name or any identifying features associating them with anything. Some of these places barely sold coffee – some tobacco shop or something, why would you go in there for coffee. I often wondered if the signs were there to show that a merchant had paid their protection money. But I guess that would be fanciful. I hope.
   64. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 12, 2018 at 08:43 PM (#5623929)
We had a drug paraphernalia shop here in PG that was selling weed and meth out the back door for about a year and a half before they got caught.

Seems like maybe not the most clever front in terms of concealing a drug dealing business.
"It's so crazy it just might work!"
   65. Howie Menckel Posted: February 12, 2018 at 08:57 PM (#5623936)
One of the younger guys at the table stands up, grabs some menus, comes over, and asks us very pleasantly what we'd like. I wanted to say, "I'd like to get out alive," but just asked what he recommended.

this thread is great anyway, but that segment takes the cake

does not hurt that I have been to Chicago about 75 times (yes really) and Vancouver 7-8 times, but it's not necessary
   66. Omineca Greg Posted: February 12, 2018 at 09:05 PM (#5623938)
You know it's funny. I have lived in BC my entire life, and my parents live in Prince George, but I had never before now heard the term "Omineca" and I had no idea your handle referred to there.

That's incredible! Not only can we have a BC meet-up, when you're in town, we can have an Ominecan meet-up. If you're here when Eric L is here on his way to Tuk, that would be the best BBTF meet up...EVER! The BX, The Black Clover, Kask, Twisted Cork, my only regret is that we only have Seven Nights To Rock

I got seven nights to rock
I got seven nights to roll
Seven nights, I'm gonna have a whirl
Seven nights with a different girl
Seven nights to rock
I got seven nights to roll

Monday, at sister Suzy's ball
Tuesday, at the old dance hall
Wednesday, at the road house inn
Thursday, at the lion's den
Friday, at the chatter box
Saturday and Sunday, everybody rocks

Seven nights to rock
I got seven nights to roll
Seven nights, I'm gonna have a whirl
Seven nights with a different girl
Seven nights to rock
I got seven nights to roll

I got seven nights to rock
I got seven nights to roll
I got seven nights, I'm gonna show my face
With a different chick and in a different place
Seven nights to rock
Seven nights to roll

Monday, I'm gonna rock with Jane
Tuesday, it's gonna be Lorraine
Wednesday, I'm taking Nancy Lee
Thursday, it's Betty Lou and me
Friday, I'm gonna jive with Sue
Saturday and Sunday, any chick will do

Seven nights to rock
I got seven nights to roll
Seven nights, I'm gonna show my face
With a different chick and in a different place
Seven nights to rock
I got seven nights to roll


Yeah, the Omineca thing is a bit of shorthand, it's a phrase that gets some play here, but I way overuse it. Prince Georgian, PIGGIE, The Regional District Of Fraser-Fort George dweller, all those names are weak! If you say, "The Omineca" up here, it means something, but the way I use "Ominecan"...nah, there's nobody, besides me, who is identifying as Ominecan...well somebody from Fort St James maybe HA!(just a bit of Ominecan humour there).

I feel a bit like Daffyd Thomas right now.

Anyway, let me know next time you're up, I guarantee you, The First BBFT Omineca Meet-Up, it will be epic!

Or we can do it at that place in Vanopolis that gives you a pound of wings with each pint.

Either way...I'm good.
   67. Howie Menckel Posted: February 12, 2018 at 09:07 PM (#5623940)
Nick Lowe lives!
   68. Endless Trash Posted: February 12, 2018 at 10:18 PM (#5623962)
Hahaha, that is so great. I believe that I have been to every single one of those fine establishments, save maybe the black clover. Not sure if I've been there. My parents live pretty close to the BX and quite like it. We had nachos there in November. I'll let you know the next time I am up.
   69. Srul Itza Posted: February 12, 2018 at 10:21 PM (#5623966)
Because pizza parlors are owned by Italians


When I lived in NYC, in the 70s-80s, they were mostly owned by Greeks.
   70. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: February 12, 2018 at 10:26 PM (#5623967)
This is a key component of a good Italian beef. You cannot just take the pre-packaged rump slices and dip them in stock.... the long, slow simmering is essential. Precious few places in Chicago seemed to understand this -- and NOBODY outside of Chicago does.


Ahem! I make slow cooker Italian beef semi regularly. I cook a 3 pound bottom round in the broth about 5-6 hours until shredable. Then I shred it, put it back in, and let it cook another hour or so.

edit: The best part is, when the beef is mostly gone, I make soup out of the remaiing beef and broth. Cooked with fresh carrots, celery, and onions, served over egg noodles.
   71. shoewizard Posted: February 13, 2018 at 12:14 AM (#5623995)
#66, great link, great song
   72. KronicFatigue Posted: February 13, 2018 at 12:40 AM (#5623999)
One of the younger guys at the table stands up, grabs some menus, comes over, and asks us very pleasantly what we'd like. I wanted to say, "I'd like to get out alive," but just asked what he recommended.


Reminded me of a situation I got myself into trying to watch the Italy World Cup final in '06. At the time, I was young and living in an Italian section of Newark, and there was a coffee shop near the bus stop I took. It was very much Tony Soprano and the gang just hanging outside Satriale's, but since I saw them every morning I was on a head nodding basis, and I thought I could ask them if they knew a good place to watch the final.

I politely asked the man closest to me, but the person further away kept answering. I didn't know who to make eye contact with b/c that second guy was pretty far away. Eventually, they both started laughing at me because they were closing down the streets and having a huge block party for the final. Huge sigh of relief, and I had a cool place to watch the game, and a small story to tell my friends.

The week after the match, I thanked the same gentlemen for a great time. The guy got all serious and told me "don't thank me, go over there and thank Antonio." He points to ANOTHER coffee shop, smaller, and slightly off the main street. It too had a satriale's "hang outside all day" crew of guys, but I was NOT on a head nodding basis with them. I did NOT want to walk over there. But he made an offer I couldn't refuse.

That was the longest walk of my life. Halfway through I noticed every pair of eyes on me. I couldn't remember what I was supposed to do with my arms when I walked. Do they sway? Am I supposed to sway my arms? Oh man, I was losing it.

My first line sunk like a stone. Asking which one of them was Antonio was not the right move. I was supposed to know who Antonio was. Once I explained that I was there to thank him and how great a time I had watching the match, they really lightened up. I complimented the italian sausage and Antonio leaned in and asked "do you want to know where I get it?"

No. No I didn't.

I forget his answer, but he said that you can't get it like that anymore. That they aren't allowed to sell it, but for HIM, they of course made an exception. There was a twinge of anger when he said that they can't sell it anymore. I politely acted impressed, bid them a good day, and backed away slowly. As I went to my usual bus stop, the first crew asked how it went while guffawing over themselves. They knew exactly what they were doing to me.

To this day, I wish I knew what his exact answer was, because for the life of me I can't imagine why someone wouldn't be allowed to sell sausage.


   73. OCF Posted: February 13, 2018 at 12:57 AM (#5624001)
Because pizza parlors are owned by Italians

When I lived in NYC, in the 70s-80s, they were mostly owned by Greeks.


Some of the ones around here (SoCal) are owned by Persians.
   74. Gold Star - just Gold Star Posted: February 13, 2018 at 01:57 AM (#5624008)
When I lived in NYC, in the 70s-80s, they were mostly owned by Greeks.
Some of the ones around here (SoCal) are owned by Persians.
Here in LA, my go-to Middle Eastern/Mediterranean joint is run by Armenians.
   75. Gold Star - just Gold Star Posted: February 13, 2018 at 01:59 AM (#5624009)
Ahem! I make slow cooker Italian beef semi regularly. I cook a 3 pound bottom round in the broth about 5-6 hours until shredable. Then I shred it, put it back in, and let it cook another hour or so.
Gonna need a recipe, pls.
   76. dejarouehg Posted: February 13, 2018 at 03:38 AM (#5624018)
When I lived in NYC, in the 70s-80s, they were mostly owned by Greeks.


Where I live in Long Island now, like the diners, most of the pizza places are Greek-owned. Growing up in the 5 Towns in the 70's-80's, many were Italian-owned and long believed to be mobbed up. The most infamous though was the Sherwood Diner on Rockaway Tpke, by JFK, maybe the only diner that wasn't Greek-owned.
   77. dejarouehg Posted: February 13, 2018 at 03:43 AM (#5624019)
I feel like the MLBPA should be doing a better job of protecting players with financial planning. This guy made $44 million and was reduced to selling drugs?


The MLBPA already got him a 6-figure pension and healthcare! Do they have to wipe his ### also?

Perhaps the reality is that he's just a scumbag.
   78. TomH Posted: February 13, 2018 at 08:12 AM (#5624038)
CC Sabathia arrested with 44 lbs of belly fat
   79. Rennie's Tenet Posted: February 13, 2018 at 08:54 AM (#5624056)
I politely acted impressed, bid them a good day, and backed away slowly. 


Such a chance you missed. What was expected was that you would playfully pretend to slap him around until he gave up all his sausage secrets. It's like a little game they play.
   80. asinwreck Posted: February 13, 2018 at 05:58 PM (#5624564)
I prefer Johnnie's in Elmwood Park to Portillo's or Al's.
   81. eddieot Posted: February 14, 2018 at 10:06 AM (#5624796)
The MLBPA already got him a 6-figure pension and healthcare! Do they have to wipe his ### also?

Yes, I get that, but 62 is a long way away for some of these guys. They can start drawing pension checks at 45 but at a drastically reduced rate. And you can't eat healthcare. I'm saying it would take a very minimal effort for anyone who has made $5M or more, and these days that's almost any player that gets to arbitration, to set up a basic annuity. It's in the MLBPA's best interest.
   82. eddieot Posted: February 14, 2018 at 10:14 AM (#5624801)
I'm a Portillo's guy for Chicago beef but at the risk of spouting heresy I like Philly-style roast beef better. Nick's Old Original or Dinic's is definitely worth a visit if you only know Chicago beef. There is a reason Philadelphia is the Best Sandwich City in America.
   83. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 14, 2018 at 10:31 AM (#5624821)
I'm a Portillo's guy for Chicago beef but at the risk of spouting heresy I like Philly-style roast beef better. Nick's Old Original or Dinic's is definitely worth a visit if you only know Chicago beef. There is a reason Philadelphia is the Best Sandwich City in America.


I have no ill will towards Philly's sandwiches - I'll still take a good Italian Beef before anything else - but sure, a cheesesteak is a fine sandwich... definitely inner circle.

That said, there used to be a really good cheesesteak place in Chicago, too -- Philly's Best. They get their amoroso rolls from Philly and in their heyday, I thought they would certainly hold their own against the Philadelphia standards (I've tried most of the top ones on various visits and certainly make it a point any time I'm in Philly).

Unfortunately, their quality seems to have dropped. It was noticeable before I left town - and during a visit a few months back, gave 'em another shot and see that they generally continue going in the wrong direction (they've also, apparently, slimmed down their grinder menu -- the pepperoni grinder was another awesome slice of heart attack but apparently, they no longer do them). At their height, though? Garlic butter, more than ample meat portions, they don't skimp on the cheese, etc. Not sure if they changed owners or what. I know they opened a few additional shops and likewise moved storefronts a few years ago... but 5-6-7+ years ago?
   84. Steve Parris, Je t'aime Posted: February 14, 2018 at 10:41 AM (#5624829)
Nick's Old Original or Dinic's is definitely worth a visit if you only know Chicago beef.

Huge Dinic's fan. I changed jobs from center city to Wilmington a year ago, and the food is what I miss most.
   85. McCoy Posted: February 14, 2018 at 10:44 AM (#5624830)
I've never been enamored with cheesesteaks and Chicago beef and Italian beef in general has always struck me as rather dry. The meat has had all of the juices and flavors stewed out of them and what you're left with is a dry and raspy piece of meat that you have to try and cover that up with pickled veg and juice. Give me a nice slow roasted thinly sliced roast beef with some swiss and caramelized onions and some jus to dip it in. Call it a French Dip and you've got yourself the best sandwich there is.
   86. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 14, 2018 at 12:27 PM (#5624920)
To this day, I wish I knew what his exact answer was, because for the life of me I can't imagine why someone wouldn't be allowed to sell sausage.

It's probably not so much the selling of the sausage that's not technically legal as it is the putting rivals and informants into industrial meat grinders and making them into sausage. The selling is just considered gauche.
   87. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 14, 2018 at 12:30 PM (#5624922)
That said, there used to be a really good cheesesteak place in Chicago, too -- Philly's Best. They get their amoroso rolls from Philly and in their heyday, I thought they would certainly hold their own against the Philadelphia standards (I've tried most of the top ones on various visits and certainly make it a point any time I'm in Philly).

Unfortunately, their quality seems to have dropped.

Sir, your problem is solved - next time you're back in Chicago, get thee to Monti's in Albany Park. Spahn introduced me to this place. It's a great neighborhood restaurant/bar run by Philly expats.
   88. Bourbon Samurai, what price fettucine? Posted: February 14, 2018 at 01:25 PM (#5624951)
That said, there used to be a really good cheesesteak place in Chicago, too -- Philly's Best.


Philly's best did a solid deep dish, too. We used to get a spread from them once in awhile for get togethers. I haven't eaten it since 2003, so I can't vouch for what its like now
   89. PreservedFish Posted: February 14, 2018 at 01:57 PM (#5624973)
I was in Philly last year and I was surprised when several chef residents I met there told me that they didn't really like cheesesteaks all that much. All preferred the local roast pork & broccoli rabe sandwich.
   90. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 14, 2018 at 01:57 PM (#5624974)
Philly's best did a solid deep dish, too. We used to get a spread from them once in awhile for get togethers. I haven't eaten it since 2003, so I can't vouch for what its like now


Oh yeah - they did... it was basically a crapton of cheese and crapton of sauce in a crust bowl (which is just how I like it!). I used to think their pizza sauce was pretty good, too.
   91. . . . . . . Posted: February 14, 2018 at 02:03 PM (#5624978)
I was in Philly last year and I was surprised when several chef residents I met there told me that they didn't really like cheesesteaks all that much. All preferred the local roast pork & broccoli rabe sandwich.


With sharp provolone. That's what ties it all together.
   92. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 14, 2018 at 02:09 PM (#5624985)
I was in Philly last year and I was surprised when several chef residents I met there told me that they didn't really like cheesesteaks all that much.

I can totally see where Philly chefs would be over the cheesesteak by now.
   93. Zonk was SHOCKED by #6! Posted: February 14, 2018 at 02:10 PM (#5624986)
With sharp provolone. That's what ties it all together.


Cheez whiz... the answer is the whiz.
   94. PreservedFish Posted: February 14, 2018 at 02:24 PM (#5624999)
I can totally see where Philly chefs would be over the cheesesteak by now.


If I had to guess I would say that there's some annoyance at the fact that people define the city's culinary scene by these cheesy sandwiches. If someone asks me for the best bagel or pizza or pastrami in NYC, I am super excited to talk to them and eat with them. But we all know NYC has a million amazing things to eat - that there's some great pizza or pastrami somewhere doesn't weigh heavily on the rest of the dining world. These Philly fellows just kind of sighed and were like "I don't really like cheesesteaks actually." Zero pride. Can't help that the most famous cheesesteak spots are total tourist traps, or so I'm told.
   95. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: February 14, 2018 at 02:28 PM (#5625002)
Former MLB pitcher Esteban Loaiza arrested with 44 pounds of heroin and cocaine


nearly 100 posts and nobody's asked how this affects his Hall of Fame chances?
   96. BDC Posted: February 14, 2018 at 02:31 PM (#5625006)
In Philadelphia you want hoagies anyway. Specifically you want them at Mama Marie's in Pitman, New Jersey. I don't recommend South Jersey for a heck of a lot of things, but the hoagies at Mama Marie's are exceptional.
   97. . . . . . . Posted: February 14, 2018 at 02:32 PM (#5625007)
But we all know NYC has a million amazing things to eat - that there's some great pizza or pastrami somewhere doesn't weigh heavily on the rest of the dining world.


FWIW, sous vide machines have made insanely good home pastrami not only possible, but easy. I can only do Sicilian pies in my apartment oven, and god help the man who tries to make a bagel at home (it's actually possible, but an epic pain in the ass). But pastrami now can be replicated without the steamer and smoker.
   98. Traderdave Posted: February 14, 2018 at 02:57 PM (#5625018)
But pastrami now can be replicated without the steamer and smoker.


It CAN be, and I use sous vide to make it every fall, but it really should be smoked. Liquid smoke just doesn't do it, plus it's only available hickory.

The smoker sous vide combo turns out ribs that are worth both killing & dying for.
   99. Jefferson Manship (Dan Lee) Posted: February 14, 2018 at 03:14 PM (#5625040)
nearly 100 posts and nobody's asked how this affects his Hall of Fame chances?
And for that matter, how does this affect Frank Tanana?
   100. eddieot Posted: February 14, 2018 at 03:22 PM (#5625047)
Also the most famous cheesesteak spots are total tourist traps, or so I'm told.

That's true of many cities and their specialties. I've had some of the worst NY style pizza at any one of the Famous Original Ray's locations and don't get me started on Papaya Dog.

To be fair, Pat's and Geno's serve up a decent cheesesteak, but you really need to seek out the local neighborhood joints like Dalessandro's or Chick's across the river in Cherry Hill, or Shank's, to get a sublime cheesesteak. Of the touristy joints I like Jim's on South Street.
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