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Monday, February 12, 2018

Former MLB pitcher Esteban Loaiza arrested with 44 pounds of heroin and cocaine

And here is a coincidence:  He made 44 million in his career.  What an idiot.

shoewizard Posted: February 12, 2018 at 11:39 AM | 161 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: drugs

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   101. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 14, 2018 at 03:29 PM (#5625051)
Also the most famous cheesesteak spots are total tourist traps, or so I'm told.

That's true of many cities and their specialties. I've had some of the worst NY style pizza at any one of the Famous Original Ray's locations and don't get me started on Papaya Dog.

Same here for Lou Malnati's in Chicago. That's gotta be the single most overrated food item, period, on the planet.**

**Except, of course, to the extent that mayonnaise is considered to be edible.
   102. Zonk's Timely Epoch Posted: February 14, 2018 at 03:34 PM (#5625055)
That's true of many cities and their specialties. I've had some of the worst NY style pizza at any one of the Famous Original Ray's locations and don't get me started on Papaya Dog.


Hmmmm... I don't know that I ever had a bad deep dish at any of the more Trip Adviser approved suggestions in Chicago. I mean, I wouldn't necessarily say that Gino's or Malnattis or Giordanos or whatever are the BEST spots, but I'd still put them in the 'great' category. Uno, too, is a tourist trappy - but they make a damn good pie.

My suggestion to people visiting looking for something that doesn't generally show up on such lists was always Pequods.
   103. Zonk's Timely Epoch Posted: February 14, 2018 at 03:35 PM (#5625056)
Same here for Lou Malnati's in Chicago. That's gotta be the single most overrated food item, period, on the planet.**


And onto ignore you go....
   104. Zonk's Timely Epoch Posted: February 14, 2018 at 03:39 PM (#5625061)
The key with Lou's is that -

#1 You must order the butter crust. Stupidly, they don't push it or suggest it - but it's a must.

#2 You gotta get extra sauce. Yeah, they charge for it. Yeah, that's a ripoff. But it is it is.
   105. eddieot Posted: February 14, 2018 at 03:51 PM (#5625063)
I mean, I wouldn't necessarily say that Gino's or Malnattis or Giordanos or whatever are the BEST spots, but I'd still put them in the 'great' category.

I am not a fan of deep dish. I understand the appeal but there is no food that makes me feel more like a big, fat, sleepy load than deep dish. If I had to choose I'd go Giordano's, but not something I would seek out.

My favorite Chicago joint is the Twin Anchors. On a recent business trip I went solo and sat at the bar two consecutive nights. It was awesome and the bartenders rocked. Terrific food and tons of character.
   106. Batman Posted: February 14, 2018 at 03:58 PM (#5625066)
I like how quickly this thread turned away from heroin and cocaine and toward things I am addicted to.
   107. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:05 PM (#5625069)
Uno, too, is a tourist trappy - but they make a damn good pie.

No they don't!

That's gotta be the single most overrated food item, period, on the planet.

Let me guess, you rate pizza based on structural integrity?

I understand the appeal but there is no food that makes me feel more like a big, fat, sleepy load than deep dish.

It makes me feel better about myself when I order it with spinach. It cancels out the several pounds of cheese, I rationalize to myself.
   108. Traderdave Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:11 PM (#5625074)
Uno, too, is a tourist trappy - but they make a damn good pie.

No they don't!


My first blowjob was performed by an Uno's waitress, so it will always be the GOAT pizza.
   109. Zonk's Timely Epoch Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:12 PM (#5625075)
No they don't.


Great.

Now the entire Gonfalon Cubs thread is turning into a great big [IGNORED COMMENT] for me.

FWIW - my preference/feelings on deep dish was always that it's a strictly a dine out thing. I don't think it does well the next day so I far prefer/only really enjoy it when I could just stuff myself and let someone else deal with the leftovers, if any.

Generally speaking, if it was just me or a couple other people and we were lazy, I'd usually prefer to stick with thin crust.
   110. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:12 PM (#5625076)
And onto ignore you go....

Hey, it's not my fault you apparently like undercooked tomato sauce and weird-tasting crust that leaves a film on the roof of your mouth.

My suggestion to people visiting looking for something that doesn't generally show up on such lists was always Pequods.

However, we can agree on this - although the secret is out. The place is almost always packed now.
   111. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:19 PM (#5625084)
My first blowjob was performed by an Uno's waitress, so it will always be the GOAT pizza.

I hope you gave a positive Yelp review.

FWIW - my preference/feelings on deep dish was always that it's a strictly a dine out thing.

I only eat it a few times a year, maximum. It's great but not something I can do regularly.
   112. . . . . . . Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:22 PM (#5625088)

It CAN be, and I use sous vide to make it every fall, but it really should be smoked. Liquid smoke just doesn't do it, plus it's only available hickory.

The smoker sous vide combo turns out ribs that are worth both killing & dying for.


Meh, the smoke flavor in pastrami should be subtle; the spicing & brining is much more important. I agree with you about liquid snoke not cutting it for ribs, or brisket made BBQ style, etc, which really need to be finished in a smoker (or on a grill with a ton of smoke chips, at minimum) but pastrami seems to be a perfect match for the sous vide.
   113. Lassus Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:27 PM (#5625090)
and don't get me started on Papaya Dog.

Newsletter subscribed to. And I love hot dogs.

The only pizza I've ever had that I'd go (and did multiple times) out of my way for was at Oasis Pizza, on SE Hawthorne in Portland. I've had plenty of very very good pizza, but it's goddamned pizza, FFS.
   114. Traderdave Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:33 PM (#5625100)
pastrami seems to be a perfect match for the sous vide.


Texture-wise, yes, most obviously. But liquid smoke just aint got the magic. Pastrami does not need heavy, long duration smoke like ribs and brisket but a couple hours at fairy low temp (175F or so) really does it right.

And speaking of pastrami, that's the rib plate. I make Korean style in short ribs with smoker/sous vide combo that are excellent (just did a batch this weekend). Email me if you want recipe.
   115. Batman Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:38 PM (#5625107)
My first blowjob was performed by an Uno's waitress, so it will always be the GOAT pizza.
Damn. And I thought free mozzarella sticks was a good coupon.
   116. bigglou115 is not an Illuminati agent Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:41 PM (#5625110)
which really need to be finished in a smoker (or on a grill with a ton of smoke chips, at minimum)


Nope. Ditch the smoker, used a charcoal grill set to low heat (about 225) and offset the meat. Put a pan of water under it. Add a handful of smoking wood every 15 minutes for the first hour. Then just be patient, usually takes me about 5 1/2 to 7 hours depending on the outdoor temperature. Skip the crutch, put your sauce on, throw it on direct heat to chat the sauce and your good to go.

Long story short, the smoke should all be applied at the beginning.
   117. Eddo Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:45 PM (#5625116)
Same here for Lou Malnati's in Chicago. That's gotta be the single most overrated food item, period, on the planet.

Disagree. Lou's thin crust is my go-to (and in the rare case I'm getting deep dish, it's there or Uno).
   118. Traderdave Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:47 PM (#5625118)
IS 116 for brisket or something else?
   119. bigglou115 is not an Illuminati agent Posted: February 14, 2018 at 04:54 PM (#5625125)
IS 116 for brisket or something else?


Should mainly apply to ribs, but you should also smoke brisket early. Rule of thumb is if a smoke ring is considered good then you want the smoke on early, otherwise do it late.
   120. Traderdave Posted: February 14, 2018 at 05:09 PM (#5625143)
119

If you're opening the hood every 15 minutes to add wood, there's no way you're keeping the temperature stable, which is already hard enough to do with charcoal.
   121. Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington Posted: February 14, 2018 at 05:25 PM (#5625156)
I'll agree with Elroy on Uno's (bye-bye zonk), but in general have felt his food opinions in this thread are not representative of the rest of us Chicagoans.
   122. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 14, 2018 at 05:35 PM (#5625168)
in general have felt his food opinions in this thread are not representative of the rest of us Chicagoans.

What can I say, I'm iconoclastic like that.
   123. Traderdave Posted: February 14, 2018 at 06:24 PM (#5625208)
The posts about pastrami got me thinking....


I have made pancetta by dry curing pork belly. Would a beef rib plate dry cure into something worth eating? A beef pancetta, to coin a phrase.

Anyone have a thought?
   124. PreservedFish Posted: February 14, 2018 at 07:01 PM (#5625233)
Beef bacon is a thing, smoked or unsmoked. Somehow I've never tried it ... not sure how, given that I've spent much of my career working for and running restaurants and butcher shops that use whole animals.

But I've made lamb bacon many times with excellent results.
   125. asinwreck Posted: February 14, 2018 at 07:05 PM (#5625236)
Giordano's suffered quality control problems in recent years. Unstable ownership may have had something to do with it.
   126. PreservedFish Posted: February 14, 2018 at 07:08 PM (#5625241)
The first time I had pizza at Patsy's in Harlem was one of the very very few food experiences I've had that can be properly termed "revelatory." I was about 15 and I don't know if the pizza was really as extraordinary as I thought that it was. And I have no idea if it's the same quality as it once was.
   127. BDC Posted: February 14, 2018 at 07:08 PM (#5625242)
Some of the best deep-dish pizzas I remember having were at Renaldi's on Broadway in Chicago – 2827 North, not all that far from Wrigley Field. But that was 13-14 years ago – I remember being there right after Nomar Garciaparra was traded to the Cubs, and then a couple of other times in the mid-2000s. I am not sure I could digest it anymore, and the last time I walked past Renaldi's, the place looked like it was falling apart.
   128. bigglou115 is not an Illuminati agent Posted: February 14, 2018 at 07:56 PM (#5625267)

If you're opening the hood every 15 minutes to add wood, there's no way you're keeping the temperature stable, which is already hard enough to do with charcoal.


For an hour. At around 225 your barely doing any cooking in the first hour. The stable temperature isn't as big a concern at that point. There's 5 hours left for stable temp cooking. If you have a properly configured offset that's better, but most offsets are terrible.

I'd also point out it takes practice and a chimney to pre light charcoal. I know exactly how much to add every time I open the lid.
   129. . . . . . . Posted: February 14, 2018 at 08:22 PM (#5625272)
The first time I had pizza at Patsy's in Harlem was one of the very very few food experiences I've had that can be properly termed "revelatory." I was about 15 and I don't know if the pizza was really as extraordinary as I thought that it was. And I have no idea if it's the same quality as it once was.


It tastes the same to me as it did when I was 18. But it is good (and by good I mean ####### fantastic) for about 5 minutes, since they insist on serving it on those metal trays that ruin the crust!

I like NY style pizza so much more than the in vogue neopolitan style, but neopolitan is starting to chase true NY style out of NYC, or at least out of Manhattan. I mean there is still a #### ton of NY style available at slice joints but I mean sit down places like a patsy's or totonnos selling high quality pizza. In my neighborhood all that's really left is Nicks, or going 30 blocks up to patsys. I cant stand San matteo. We used to have a totonnos offshoot BitD. Now closed.
   130. PreservedFish Posted: February 14, 2018 at 08:53 PM (#5625279)
One can only hope that Naples itself is now overrun with hipster NYC-style pizzerias.
   131. McCoy Posted: February 14, 2018 at 09:38 PM (#5625296)
You want a hoagie from WaWa's, of course.
   132. McCoy Posted: February 14, 2018 at 09:40 PM (#5625298)
My Aunt has worked at Twin Anchors for over 30 years now. She was an extra in that Minnie Driver-David Duchovney movie that shot some scenes there. She got me Ryne Sandberg's autograph one time when he came in.

The best and only good deep dish pizza is Connie's Pizza.
   133. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 14, 2018 at 10:36 PM (#5625314)
Loaiza's 1st court appearance today; pleads not guilty and has his bail increased by $50K to $250,000. Facing 20+ years, and no pizza, if convicted.
   134. Busted Flush Posted: February 14, 2018 at 11:53 PM (#5625323)
My Aunt has worked at Twin Anchors for over 30 years now. She was an extra in that Minnie Driver-David Duchovney movie that shot some scenes there. She got me Ryne Sandberg's autograph one time when he came in.

As Twin Anchors is hands down the greatest establishment in Chicago, it is now on McCoy to call in family favors to host the next Chicago BBTF meet up.
   135. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: February 15, 2018 at 01:42 AM (#5625330)
Anybody else use a big green egg? Or other such devices? I love it. The temp stability is tremendous. Great to use all winter. Brisket, oysters, shoulders, chicken. It would be dangerous if I ever decided to work from home.
   136. Chicago Joe Posted: February 15, 2018 at 02:03 AM (#5625333)
Jesus, McCoy, that's your choice? Better come to the softball game this year so Incan spike you!
   137. McCoy Posted: February 15, 2018 at 06:44 AM (#5625342)
I've wanted to buy a Green egg but I've never used one or seen one in action so I'm hesitant to make the investment. I'm looking to buy a bigger grill this year as I'm currently working off of my GF two burner Weber. It's decent but can't do all the things I want to do with an outside cooker nor big enough.


Re Connie's. I'll have you know that I've brought outsiders to Connie's and brought Connie's to outsiders and they have down prefer it to the other style of Chicago deep dish
   138. PreservedFish Posted: February 15, 2018 at 09:47 AM (#5625382)
This is what I want. I will buy a Santa Maria or Argentine style grill within the next year or three. After that my long-term ambition project is to build my own pizza oven. My super long-term and potentially prohibitively expensive, dangerous or downright impossible DIY project is to dig out a cheese / salumi aging cave.
   139. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: February 15, 2018 at 10:21 AM (#5625413)
I was surprised my wife bought it for me (the Egg) without my input. I likely would've wanted to have seen one in action as well. It's very heavy (I have a Large). I just marvel at how long the fire will keep on a load of charcoal (at low temp). I usually smoke a flat (rarely a whole packer) and have never had to add charcoal during the cook. I will admit I don't use it much for any 'direct' grilling, and I know it can get insanely hot. I still use a more traditional gas grill for any direct grilling.
   140. manchestermets Posted: February 15, 2018 at 10:33 AM (#5625425)
If I could have the speciality oven of my choice, I would choose a tandoor.
   141. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 15, 2018 at 10:42 AM (#5625429)
If I could have the speciality oven of my choice,

Godwin in 10...9...8...
   142. Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington Posted: February 15, 2018 at 10:44 AM (#5625435)
Connie's is awesome.
   143. Zonk's Timely Epoch Posted: February 15, 2018 at 10:46 AM (#5625436)
/Ignore off

Connie's is overrated and as it is well-known to be white sox fan pizza, I think a couple off Cubs fans should feel ashamed for lauding it.

/Ignore back on
   144. Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington Posted: February 15, 2018 at 10:51 AM (#5625439)
Ignore yourself, Connie's is sold at Wrigley.

That's the type of #### White Sox fans care about, not Cubs fans.
   145. Zonk's Timely Epoch Posted: February 15, 2018 at 10:53 AM (#5625442)
Still overrated.
   146. . . . . . . Posted: February 15, 2018 at 10:54 AM (#5625444)
manchestermets Posted: February 15, 2018 at 10:33 AM (#5625425)


If I could have the speciality oven of my choice, I would choose a tandoor.



username checks out

This is what I want. I will buy a Santa Maria or Argentine style grill within the next year or three.


I kind of want to get very good at primal meat grilling, like literally over a fire that's a bundle of sticks.
   147. McCoy Posted: February 15, 2018 at 11:18 AM (#5625465)
My cousin’s husband is from Argentina and he built himself a grill in his backyard. It is apparently the classic Argentinian grill which is a cinder block box elevated on bricks with it open in the front and top. I’d say 4ft by 3ft. You then put a heavy duty grill rack in it that lays about 6 inches above the floor of the box. To cook you take your wood and pile it in a corner and light it on fire. When it gets to coals you shovel them under the grill and cook whatever you want on the grill. You can do high heat or low heat cooking.


My dream kitchen would have a full wok station in it.

For a outdoor pizza oven I’ve mentioned it before but there is an oven called an uuni pizza oven. I think they are on their third iteration. They are slowly making it more and more user friendly and versatile.
   148. McCoy Posted: February 15, 2018 at 11:22 AM (#5625468)
Argentinian grill it basically looks like this but without the top on it
   149. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: February 15, 2018 at 11:37 AM (#5625482)
Anybody use a Blue Star cooktop before? My wife and I are building and I am intrigued by the open flame burners. From what I hear, not a lot of outfits know how to 'service' them, which I suppose makes sense, given you rarely see them, even though they've been around forever.
   150. McCoy Posted: February 15, 2018 at 12:45 PM (#5625526)
Never heard of them. One thing I would caution against when it comes to professional level kitchen equipment is that they tend not to be built for quietness. They all tend to be rather loud. The other thing you have to consider is your gas pipe and it being big enough to pump enough gas into your various pieces of equipment. Most homes have a small pipe so unless you get the right size it doesn't really matter how your equipment is because not enough gas will go through.
   151. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: February 15, 2018 at 02:00 PM (#5625581)
That's good advice McCoy, thank you. My builder had mentioned that later point as well, which explains his level of interest in what direction we were going. The Blue Star boasts 22,000 BTUs of power. I realize much of this is 'ooh and ahh', I just like the open burner design and the better coverage control on pans. (still leaning at a Thermador).
   152. PreservedFish Posted: February 15, 2018 at 02:21 PM (#5625596)
I kind of want to get very good at primal meat grilling, like literally over a fire that's a bundle of sticks.


I do it all the time. Grilling over live fire is tricky because the grease drops and makes the flames come up and unless the fire is absolutely screaming hot, it will leave a bunch of soot on your meat. With a Santa Maria style grill that easily adjusts up and down, it's not a concern, as you can move the meat up and down as your fire allows.

Or you can build a huge fire and let it die down and cook over the coals, as McCoy indicates his family member does. It's very popular these days, but I mostly see it as a fun but more time-consuming and difficult method of grilling over charcoal.
   153. . . . . . . Posted: February 15, 2018 at 02:21 PM (#5625597)
Never heard of them. One thing I would caution against when it comes to professional level kitchen equipment is that they tend not to be built for quietness. They all tend to be rather loud. The other thing you have to consider is your gas pipe and it being big enough to pump enough gas into your various pieces of equipment. Most homes have a small pipe so unless you get the right size it doesn't really matter how your equipment is because not enough gas will go through.


Also, sometimes they can be overpowered for home purposes (they're GREAT for bringing a commercial-kitchen-sized stockpot to a boil; not great for melting chocolate in a tiny double-boiler for hot fudge for 2.)
   154. . . . . . . Posted: February 15, 2018 at 02:25 PM (#5625601)
I do it all the time. Grilling over live fire is tricky because the grease drops and makes the flames come up and unless the fire is absolutely screaming hot, it will leave a bunch of soot on your meat. With a Santa Maria style grill that easily adjusts up and down, it's not a concern, as you can move the meat up and down as your fire allows.

Or you can build a huge fire and let it die down and cook over the coals, as McCoy indicates his family member does. It's very popular these days, but I mostly see it as a fun but more time-consuming and difficult method of grilling over charcoal.


That's what I mean. Back in my prior job when I camped a lot, there were old pros that could pile up some mesquite and produce gorgeous grilled meat. As good as any Argentinian could do on an asador (and I spent a summer as an exchange student in Argentina, so been there, eaten that.)
   155. McCoy Posted: February 15, 2018 at 05:11 PM (#5625730)
For my home I went with a 36 inch range so you get 5 burners with two of them being large whereas in your normal 30 inch 4 burner range you'll be lucky to get one large burner. We also got a pot filler which was one of those dream fulfillments for my GF. Cost a boatload but it does make filling a stockpot much quicker than trying to fill it up with a sink faucet.

Oh and the most important thing we got was a good hood system that exhausted outside. If you're going to cook a lot at home you better have a good exhaust system which means no on those filter systems that simple push exhaust through a filter and pumps it back into your home.
   156. Der-K: downgraded to lurker Posted: February 15, 2018 at 05:18 PM (#5625735)
I enjoy most deep dish (in NC, that means Rosati's which I understand to specialize in double dough) but...
Connie's is really great.
   157. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: February 15, 2018 at 06:06 PM (#5625758)
For my home I went with a 36 inch range so you get 5 burners with two of them being large whereas in your normal 30 inch 4 burner range you'll be lucky to get one large burner. We also got a pot filler which was one of those dream fulfillments for my GF. Cost a boatload but it does make filling a stockpot much quicker than trying to fill it up with a sink faucet.

Oh and the most important thing we got was a good hood system that exhausted outside. If you're going to cook a lot at home you better have a good exhaust system which means no on those filter systems that simple push exhaust through a filter and pumps it back into your home.


We just had this exact discussion. We are not doing the pot filler (it is expensive) and we rarely do pasta, though I make stocks four or five times a year. I'm not going to miss it. We are all over a good hood system for the reasons you stated. I've seen that play before. My wife's locked in on a six burner Thermador with a cast iron griddle (48").
   158. The Fallen Reputation of Billy Jo Robidoux Posted: February 15, 2018 at 07:24 PM (#5625788)
Around about 1990 my family bought a restaurant on the lakefront of lake Michigan in southeast Wisconsin. They are Italians. My uncle who was running the restaurant went around town introducing himself to the restaurant neighborhood. Unbeknownst to him he wandered into a mob front that was being watched by the FBI. So the FBI bring the smart people they are saw an Italian business owner go into a mob front and figured they had a new player in town. So they bugged his phones. Lasted about a month or two before they realized he was just a legit business man.


McCoy, if their last name began with B then I have a good guess as to who that family is.
   159. McCoy Posted: February 15, 2018 at 07:37 PM (#5625795)
Never really understood the functionality of an indoor grill and griddle. They're generally not very useful and you can get a $25 griddle that's probably going to be bigger and more useful than the one that costs thousands of extra dollars.
   160. McCoy Posted: February 15, 2018 at 07:37 PM (#5625796)
Which last name?
   161. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: February 15, 2018 at 09:33 PM (#5625851)
Ooh, can I guess too? I know (of) this family, and one of the old boss' family attorneys (Dominic Frinzi). I was in a stunned gaze as I saw him strut into Court one day (had to be in his mid 80s) opposite my podium at a preliminary hearing one day when I was a very green ADA. I couldn't believe he was still an active bar member.

By the mid 90s that 'B' family was pretty much done mobbing up anything in Milwaukee (area). Huge bust in the early 80s wore them down. Mr. 'Big' died in '93.
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