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Saturday, May 05, 2001

FOXSports.com: Prosecutors: It’s time Strawberry be punished

Although I have sympathy for Strawberry, his celebrity shouldn’t get him out of jail time.

Jim Furtado Posted: May 05, 2001 at 03:04 PM | 4 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
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   1. scruff Posted: May 08, 2001 at 04:03 AM (#67391)
Well said John. It is a joke that we put someone in prison for taking drugs. The guy isn't hurting anyone, except himself and his family. Putting him in prison doesn't help either. The guy is sick, both physically and mentally. If he is dying, let him go in peace and let him do what he wants, as long as he isn't hurting anyone else. If he isn't let him work this problem out.

As a society we have much bigger problems than putting drug addicts in our already overcrowded jails. If someone is stealing or committing violent crimes to get drug money, that is different. But people like Robert Downey and Darryl Strawberry aren't doing anything to anyone. Everyone likes to talk about people getting off the hook because of their celebrity, but in this case, they are both being overzealously prosecuted because of their celebrity.

Our prosecutors and lawmakers need to get their priorities straight. In 300 years people are going to look back at the way our society persecutes people addicted to drugs in the same light that we see people who persecuted "witches" 300+ years ago. They'll say, "what the hell were our ancestors thinking? How could they be so stupid?"
   2. scruff Posted: May 08, 2001 at 04:03 AM (#68177)
Well said John. It is a joke that we put someone in prison for taking drugs. The guy isn't hurting anyone, except himself and his family. Putting him in prison doesn't help either. The guy is sick, both physically and mentally. If he is dying, let him go in peace and let him do what he wants, as long as he isn't hurting anyone else. If he isn't let him work this problem out.

As a society we have much bigger problems than putting drug addicts in our already overcrowded jails. If someone is stealing or committing violent crimes to get drug money, that is different. But people like Robert Downey and Darryl Strawberry aren't doing anything to anyone. Everyone likes to talk about people getting off the hook because of their celebrity, but in this case, they are both being overzealously prosecuted because of their celebrity.

Our prosecutors and lawmakers need to get their priorities straight. In 300 years people are going to look back at the way our society persecutes people addicted to drugs in the same light that we see people who persecuted "witches" 300+ years ago. They'll say, "what the hell were our ancestors thinking? How could they be so stupid?"
   3. scruff Posted: May 08, 2001 at 04:03 AM (#68451)
Well said John. It is a joke that we put someone in prison for taking drugs. The guy isn't hurting anyone, except himself and his family. Putting him in prison doesn't help either. The guy is sick, both physically and mentally. If he is dying, let him go in peace and let him do what he wants, as long as he isn't hurting anyone else. If he isn't let him work this problem out.

As a society we have much bigger problems than putting drug addicts in our already overcrowded jails. If someone is stealing or committing violent crimes to get drug money, that is different. But people like Robert Downey and Darryl Strawberry aren't doing anything to anyone. Everyone likes to talk about people getting off the hook because of their celebrity, but in this case, they are both being overzealously prosecuted because of their celebrity.

Our prosecutors and lawmakers need to get their priorities straight. In 300 years people are going to look back at the way our society persecutes people addicted to drugs in the same light that we see people who persecuted "witches" 300+ years ago. They'll say, "what the hell were our ancestors thinking? How could they be so stupid?"
   4. JimFurtado Posted: May 08, 2001 at 03:17 PM (#67392)
Aren't we talking about two different questions?

The first question is whether drug addicts should be sent to prison. Our society currently says yes. As a result we have laws on the books which punish people for drug possession. Whether those laws are right or wrong is irrelevant regarding Strawberry's situation. If as a society we decide the laws are wrong, then we can change the laws. We could then free Strawberry of his responsibility regarding this transgression.
   5. JimFurtado Posted: May 08, 2001 at 03:17 PM (#68178)
Aren't we talking about two different questions?

The first question is whether drug addicts should be sent to prison. Our society currently says yes. As a result we have laws on the books which punish people for drug possession. Whether those laws are right or wrong is irrelevant regarding Strawberry's situation. If as a society we decide the laws are wrong, then we can change the laws. We could then free Strawberry of his responsibility regarding this transgression.
   6. JimFurtado Posted: May 08, 2001 at 03:17 PM (#68452)
Aren't we talking about two different questions?

The first question is whether drug addicts should be sent to prison. Our society currently says yes. As a result we have laws on the books which punish people for drug possession. Whether those laws are right or wrong is irrelevant regarding Strawberry's situation. If as a society we decide the laws are wrong, then we can change the laws. We could then free Strawberry of his responsibility regarding this transgression.
   7. scruff Posted: May 08, 2001 at 05:22 PM (#67393)
The average person would not have been caught in the first place. The average person would most likely not have been subjected to drug testing at work. I've been drug tested once on the last 3 jobs I've had. And that was when I first started the job, I was never tested again after that. It should not be major league baseball's responsibility to test it's employees for drugs, and those findings should be confidential if they must test. They fine you $250,000 for discussing a stinking waiver request, and nothing for blowing the lid on something that could ruin a man's life. They actually announce it. If I were to fail a drug test now, they'd send to me to rehab, and my insurance would pay for it. I wouldn't go before a judge, that's for sure.

Also, if I had been a rehabbing drug addict, my new employer wouldn't have known about my past history, I'd have a clean slate when I started the new job. In the case of Robert Downey, my pusher wouldn't have tipped the police and told them what hotel room I was doing drugs in, because an overzealous police department wanted to nail the celebrity, and made it worth the pusher's while. Comparing their situation to the average citizen just doesn't work. The corner office VP in corporate america that is popping prescription drugs to keep up with the grind never has to deal with his problems in front of a prosecutor and a judge.

I do agree that we should change the laws of our society if we don't like them. But you can't say that just because something is the law, it is just. Slavery, was against the law once. White, male, landowners used to be the only ones allowed to vote. The speed limit used to be 55. But we have a publicized "war on drugs", the general public is brought up to think drug addicts are evil people that should be jailed. So we get no outpouring for change, they are all just lowlifes anyway, right?

Whether or not the laws are right or wrong is relevant to Straw's situation. If the law wasn't to punish people for possesion of drugs he wouldn't be in this situation. That's what I was speaking out against. The people of Florida have bigger fish to fry than a cancer patient who is on drugs and not hurting anyone but himself. They've got real criminals to deal with.
   8. scruff Posted: May 08, 2001 at 05:22 PM (#68179)
The average person would not have been caught in the first place. The average person would most likely not have been subjected to drug testing at work. I've been drug tested once on the last 3 jobs I've had. And that was when I first started the job, I was never tested again after that. It should not be major league baseball's responsibility to test it's employees for drugs, and those findings should be confidential if they must test. They fine you $250,000 for discussing a stinking waiver request, and nothing for blowing the lid on something that could ruin a man's life. They actually announce it. If I were to fail a drug test now, they'd send to me to rehab, and my insurance would pay for it. I wouldn't go before a judge, that's for sure.

Also, if I had been a rehabbing drug addict, my new employer wouldn't have known about my past history, I'd have a clean slate when I started the new job. In the case of Robert Downey, my pusher wouldn't have tipped the police and told them what hotel room I was doing drugs in, because an overzealous police department wanted to nail the celebrity, and made it worth the pusher's while. Comparing their situation to the average citizen just doesn't work. The corner office VP in corporate america that is popping prescription drugs to keep up with the grind never has to deal with his problems in front of a prosecutor and a judge.

I do agree that we should change the laws of our society if we don't like them. But you can't say that just because something is the law, it is just. Slavery, was against the law once. White, male, landowners used to be the only ones allowed to vote. The speed limit used to be 55. But we have a publicized "war on drugs", the general public is brought up to think drug addicts are evil people that should be jailed. So we get no outpouring for change, they are all just lowlifes anyway, right?

Whether or not the laws are right or wrong is relevant to Straw's situation. If the law wasn't to punish people for possesion of drugs he wouldn't be in this situation. That's what I was speaking out against. The people of Florida have bigger fish to fry than a cancer patient who is on drugs and not hurting anyone but himself. They've got real criminals to deal with.
   9. scruff Posted: May 08, 2001 at 05:22 PM (#68453)
The average person would not have been caught in the first place. The average person would most likely not have been subjected to drug testing at work. I've been drug tested once on the last 3 jobs I've had. And that was when I first started the job, I was never tested again after that. It should not be major league baseball's responsibility to test it's employees for drugs, and those findings should be confidential if they must test. They fine you $250,000 for discussing a stinking waiver request, and nothing for blowing the lid on something that could ruin a man's life. They actually announce it. If I were to fail a drug test now, they'd send to me to rehab, and my insurance would pay for it. I wouldn't go before a judge, that's for sure.

Also, if I had been a rehabbing drug addict, my new employer wouldn't have known about my past history, I'd have a clean slate when I started the new job. In the case of Robert Downey, my pusher wouldn't have tipped the police and told them what hotel room I was doing drugs in, because an overzealous police department wanted to nail the celebrity, and made it worth the pusher's while. Comparing their situation to the average citizen just doesn't work. The corner office VP in corporate america that is popping prescription drugs to keep up with the grind never has to deal with his problems in front of a prosecutor and a judge.

I do agree that we should change the laws of our society if we don't like them. But you can't say that just because something is the law, it is just. Slavery, was against the law once. White, male, landowners used to be the only ones allowed to vote. The speed limit used to be 55. But we have a publicized "war on drugs", the general public is brought up to think drug addicts are evil people that should be jailed. So we get no outpouring for change, they are all just lowlifes anyway, right?

Whether or not the laws are right or wrong is relevant to Straw's situation. If the law wasn't to punish people for possesion of drugs he wouldn't be in this situation. That's what I was speaking out against. The people of Florida have bigger fish to fry than a cancer patient who is on drugs and not hurting anyone but himself. They've got real criminals to deal with.
   10. Cris E Posted: May 08, 2001 at 10:18 PM (#67394)
scruff -

Yes and no : some jobs do hold employees to a higher standard of behavior, act more proactively to root it out and react more strongly to stop it. Not only do jobs requiring higher govt security test quite agressively, but professions where you can write prescriptions or handle drugs follow you closely if you have a problem and overcome it.

But Straw wasn't caught in some high profile sting: he was out soliciting prostitutes one night and got picked up like a common john. He later skipped out on a court mandated treatment program to go get high. The guy has problems that average people face, and he succeeds or fails like an average person. I'll easily conceed that some of his trouble has been brought on by his fame and his employer's oversight of his recovery. But some was not, and it's trouble he might have found himself in without the aid of baseball. Drug problems happen to all sorts of people, and lots of guys you'll never hear of get arrested for soliciting every night.

Also, just because a law is unjust doesn't mean you don't obey it while it is in force. Go ahead and get it changed, but while you're working on it you still live under the current laws. No free passes for laws you don't like.
   11. Cris E Posted: May 08, 2001 at 10:18 PM (#68180)
scruff -

Yes and no : some jobs do hold employees to a higher standard of behavior, act more proactively to root it out and react more strongly to stop it. Not only do jobs requiring higher govt security test quite agressively, but professions where you can write prescriptions or handle drugs follow you closely if you have a problem and overcome it.

But Straw wasn't caught in some high profile sting: he was out soliciting prostitutes one night and got picked up like a common john. He later skipped out on a court mandated treatment program to go get high. The guy has problems that average people face, and he succeeds or fails like an average person. I'll easily conceed that some of his trouble has been brought on by his fame and his employer's oversight of his recovery. But some was not, and it's trouble he might have found himself in without the aid of baseball. Drug problems happen to all sorts of people, and lots of guys you'll never hear of get arrested for soliciting every night.

Also, just because a law is unjust doesn't mean you don't obey it while it is in force. Go ahead and get it changed, but while you're working on it you still live under the current laws. No free passes for laws you don't like.
   12. Cris E Posted: May 08, 2001 at 10:18 PM (#68454)
scruff -

Yes and no : some jobs do hold employees to a higher standard of behavior, act more proactively to root it out and react more strongly to stop it. Not only do jobs requiring higher govt security test quite agressively, but professions where you can write prescriptions or handle drugs follow you closely if you have a problem and overcome it.

But Straw wasn't caught in some high profile sting: he was out soliciting prostitutes one night and got picked up like a common john. He later skipped out on a court mandated treatment program to go get high. The guy has problems that average people face, and he succeeds or fails like an average person. I'll easily conceed that some of his trouble has been brought on by his fame and his employer's oversight of his recovery. But some was not, and it's trouble he might have found himself in without the aid of baseball. Drug problems happen to all sorts of people, and lots of guys you'll never hear of get arrested for soliciting every night.

Also, just because a law is unjust doesn't mean you don't obey it while it is in force. Go ahead and get it changed, but while you're working on it you still live under the current laws. No free passes for laws you don't like.

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