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Monday, May 05, 2014

From No. 1 draft pick to prison inmate: The Matt Bush story

I interviewed Bush at Hamilton Correctional Institution in Jasper, Florida, close to the Georgia line. He has been incarcerated since the spring of 2012 and our crew represented his first visitors.

Bush was tired and moving slowly when he showed up in the room selected for our chat. We conversed intimately in an old, exceptionally hot, minimally ventilated, out-of-service infirmary. The prison staff had neglected to alert Bush of our impending arrival, he said.

An interesting jailhouse interview with Matt Bush. Kapler has been doing some really good work lately.

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: May 05, 2014 at 11:54 AM | 108 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: crime, general, san diego padres, tampa bay rays

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   101. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 07:54 AM (#4701857)
Are you saying that you can read into a person's mind/intentions/beliefs, etc. merely based upon the words he chooses?


I take it you are not familiar with our resident 'philosopher' Gaelan?

If you are not, the answer to your question (speaking on Gaelan's behalf) is yes.
   102. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 07:56 AM (#4701858)
Religion helps an awful lot of people. Even if you don't believe, you should be able to see there are a lot of positive "side effects". For some people that's helping the poor, for some it's fighting addiction.



I agree with this.


I do too. It's a shame people #### it up so much.
   103. Mr. Bouton's Greenie Fetish Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:16 PM (#4702479)
Don't try to read minds, because you are flat out wrong here. I know a number of addicts. I have studied addiction and addiction treatment. I understand that no one chooses to be an addict and it can seem impossible to break the addiction. I still see 12 step programs as just a back door to religious indoctrination.


I respect that you have studied addiction and addiction treatment, but have you ever witnessed a 12 step program in action? Because what you are saying does not match reality.

I am fiercely agnostic, and so avoided any form of 12 step program as my perception was that the "higher power" was God, and that I was expected to accept religion as part of attending.

Virtually every counselor I'd worked with strongly recommended a 12 step program, and stated to me that the higher power absolutely did not have to be God, and that while there may certainly be religious principles involved, all walks of life were welcome.

Based on that I began attending meetings, and it absolutely helped. I did not feel any pressure to observe or practice any religion of any kind, even though there were clearly devout people in the room.

Further, the process of those meetings, and more importantly the people I met in those meetings, provided an extremely powerful support mechanism and a new way for dealing with my addiction. It was enlightening, humbling, inspiring, and many other things, all in one. This is true of the number of different 12 step meetings I attended - it wasn't always the same meeting with the same people.

No, it may not be 100% successful, but then, as others have noted, addiction can be (sure, isn't always) extroadinarily hard to overcome.
   104. Bug Selig Posted: May 07, 2014 at 06:01 PM (#4702582)
Religion helps an awful lot of people. Even if you don't believe, you should be able to see there are a lot of positive "side effects". For some people that's helping the poor, for some it's fighting addiction.


Religion causes a lot of harm, Even if you do believe, you should be able to see that there are a lot of negative "side effects". For some people that's fraud, for some it is access to trusting children.

Your statement is absolutely true. As it it's opposite. Many of the best people I know are very religious. Many of the worst people I know are even more religious.
   105. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: May 07, 2014 at 06:16 PM (#4702585)
What Gaelan said.

Being sorry for what happened is fundamentally different from being sorry for what you did.
   106. CrosbyBird Posted: May 10, 2014 at 06:34 AM (#4703925)
Regardless of your intentions, it is impossible to accept responsibility though the use of the passive voice. Impossible. The form excludes the content.

I wouldn't go that far.

"All of the harm was caused by me. The person to blame is me."

That's the passive voice but a pretty clear statement of responsibility. It's not "mistakes were made."
   107. PreservedFish Posted: May 10, 2014 at 12:15 PM (#4704038)
I think the problem with "mistakes were made" isn't just that it's passive but that it actually eliminates the subject of the phrase. The meaning is: "somebody made mistakes."
   108. Sunday silence Posted: May 10, 2014 at 03:28 PM (#4704146)
I respect that you have studied addiction and addiction treatment, but have you ever witnessed a 12 step program in action? Because what you are saying does not match reality.

I am fiercely agnostic, and so avoided any form of 12 step program as my perception was that the "higher power" was God, and that I was expected to accept religion as part of attending.


same here. I asked about the religious bit and my counselor looked me in the eye and with a wink said "the only requirement is you have to have a desire to quit."

Literally that is the only requirement in AA, MA, NA etc.


Virtually every counselor I'd worked with strongly recommended a 12 step program, and stated to me that the higher power absolutely did not have to be God, and that while there may certainly be religious principles involved, all walks of life were welcome.

Based on that I began attending meetings, and it absolutely helped. I did not feel any pressure to observe or practice any religion of any kind, even though there were clearly devout people in the room.

Further, the process of those meetings, and more importantly the people I met in those meetings, provided an extremely powerful support mechanism and a new way for dealing with my addiction. It was enlightening, humbling, inspiring, and many other things, all in one. This is true of the number of different 12 step meetings I attended - it wasn't always the same meeting with the same people.


same effect here.

what I noticed about talking to people day after day every day, is that at a certain point those people start to fill the void in your life that was filled by alcohol/drugs.

I could literally feel it. When I couldnt get to a meeting it was the exact same feeling as when I couldnt get drugs/alchol. At first that seemed strange/impossible, but after a while I began to make a connection into what was going on in my brain. Those people, and all that stuff associated with meetings e.g. coffee, cookies, conversation, jokes stuff like that. That stuff began to fill some void.
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