Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Monday, November 02, 2009

Giuliani bumped from World Series seats for Michelle Obama

According to the Post, America’s Former Mayor was bumped from his favorite seats near the dugout in Yankee Stadium on the first night of the World Series to get him, and wife Judi, away from Michelle Obama. A source blames “the White House.”

To add insult to injury, Mrs. Obama ended up not using the seats because of the rain.

The Post, which says that Giuliani has a history of not having much of a sense of humor about this kind of thing, noted that the Yankees won when he was back in his favorite seat for the next game. His favorite seat is apparently the one where the cameras can catch him talking to players.

Thanks to Rach.

Repoz Posted: November 02, 2009 at 12:15 AM | 132 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: phillies, special topics, yankees

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 2 of 2 pages  < 1 2
   101. McCoy Posted: November 02, 2009 at 06:56 AM (#3374323)
Well, he should have been a little more humorous then in his tough guy schtick since the train thing was pretty funny and clever.
   102. Home Run Teal & Black Black Black Gone! Posted: November 02, 2009 at 07:01 AM (#3374327)
I enjoy the guns blazin' attitude. Regardless, your aesthetic standards conveniently dovetail with your political beliefs in this thread, and I find that unlikely to be coincidental.
   103. CFiJ Posted: November 02, 2009 at 07:17 AM (#3374335)
I have to say, nowhere in Tokyo ever made me as nervous as some of the bad neighborhoods of Minneapolis.
   104. McCoy Posted: November 02, 2009 at 07:26 AM (#3374339)
My political beliefs in this thread? What are my political beliefs in this thread?
   105. Forsch 10 From Navarone (Dayn) Posted: November 02, 2009 at 08:44 AM (#3374355)
Scariest Chicago place I ever walked was down an alley in the Western part of Uptown near the Riviera.

Uptown's a very strange neighborhood. We looked at buying a place in Buena Park, but it was pretty gang-infested. It's kind of the opposite of the South Side, where you have an archipelago of reasonably safe, livable neighborhoods surrounded by blight. On the North Side, though, you have these violent pockets like Uptown/Humboldt Park/parts of River North/parts of Albany Park/parts of Avondale surrounded by highly inhabitable areas. There's a history to all of this, of course, but it's still an interesting phenomenon.
   106. Swedish Chef Posted: November 02, 2009 at 09:57 AM (#3374360)
I question the notion that New York is the safest large city in the world, barring authoritarian nations. Is it safer than Tokyo or Stockholm?

Large city? Now that was funny. Pretty safe provincial backwater maybe.

Though they do have a crazy burglar in Stockholm that has been known to enter through open sixth story windows, I really would like to ask him if he's aware that it is pretty easy to open most doors with a crowbar.
   107. The NeverEnding Torii (oh oh oh oh oh oh oh oh oh) Posted: November 02, 2009 at 12:06 PM (#3374365)
I have to say, nowhere in Tokyo ever made me as nervous as some of the bad neighborhoods of Minneapolis.


MPLS is the safest city in America, according to Forbes Magazine. (I also remember seeing it way up there in other recent 'safest major cities' polls.)
   108. sunnyday2 Posted: November 02, 2009 at 01:14 PM (#3374372)
Surely Rudi pays for the seat just like Joe Sixpack/Plumber, right?
   109. Flynn Posted: November 02, 2009 at 02:22 PM (#3374398)
There's something to be said for voting for opposition party canidates in areas where one party dominates local politics.

Indeed. Too bad the SF Republican Party is more wingnut than moderate.
   110. zonk Posted: November 02, 2009 at 02:22 PM (#3374400)
There's something to be said for voting for opposition party canidates in areas where one party dominates local politics.




This is true, for a lot of reasons.


I don't know...

I didn't vote for Daley last time out, but if he runs again - and I think it's probably no more than 50/50 he does - I think I would in the next election, all things considered.

I'm amused at the heat he's taken over the parking meter lease - generally speaking, not a big fan of privatization, but that lease deal is basically plugging holes in the budget this year and probably next without any tax or fee hikes.
   111. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: November 02, 2009 at 02:24 PM (#3374402)
I lived in NYC pre-Giuliani (1990-1993), and the claim that the city was some sort of urban hell hole during that period is pretty ridiculous. THere's no question that the crime rate declined significantly during his admin. (and the cause of that decline is open for debate), but the city wasn't exactly Beirut when he took office.
   112. HCO Posted: November 02, 2009 at 02:47 PM (#3374410)
To grasp the importance of Rudolph Giuliani's two-term administration as mayor of New York, you have to remember what a mess the city was under Giuliani's predecessor. Mayor David Dinkins led a city where garbage went uncollected for three years, where a still-unknown number of children died of cholera, where two in every three residences were destroyed by arson in any given year, where the average woman was sexually assaulted at least three times every day (the rate for men was slightly higher).

With an infant mortality rate slightly above 100 percent and an adult unemployment rate even higher than that, the Big Apple had been reduced to a one-crop economy, making the city a virtual subsidiary of the United Fruit Company. In New York's crime-plagued subterranean labyrinths, entire subway trains routinely vanished without a trace, with all passengers aboard.

The handful of New Yorkers who had not been killed outright by street gangs were left to suffer from untreated AIDS, with the result that by 1991 the city's population had dropped to zero, the tumbleweeds blowing down Broadway adding little cheer to the Omega Man nightmare-scape that had once been America's proudest and most bustling city.

- Tim Cavanaugh
   113. Brian Posted: November 02, 2009 at 04:16 PM (#3374510)
The article is about how someone who is actually a fan and goes to a lot of games got bumped by a pol who didn't even bother to show and the immediate, Pavlovian response was to attack Giuliani. Forget his politics, an impossibility for some here apparently, but that sucks.
   114. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: November 02, 2009 at 04:21 PM (#3374516)
He might've been responding to the guy who suggested we have Giuliani get hit by a train.


That would be me. And obviously, I was over the top -- such a deed would of course inconvenience any number of commuters.
   115. Van Lingle Mungo Jerry Posted: November 02, 2009 at 05:00 PM (#3374563)
Brian, Giuliani didn't get bumped from the game - he and his third wife got bumped from one pair of (presumably free) excellent seats to another. I was watching the game and he and a parka-wearing Judy were shown sitting IN THE FRONT ROW on more than one occasion. No sympathy is required here.
   116. Joey B. "disrespects the A" Posted: November 02, 2009 at 05:58 PM (#3374618)
To add insult to injury, Mrs. Obama ended up not using the seats because of the rain.

Given the staggering number of personal servants Queen Michelle requires with her everywhere she goes, I'm surprised that she didn't just demand one of them hold a parasol over her head for the entire game.
   117. Cabbage Posted: November 02, 2009 at 06:02 PM (#3374622)
Uptown's a very strange neighborhood. We looked at buying a place in Buena Park, but it was pretty gang-infested.

I'm at the edge of uptown. My entirely ordinary apartment building is surrounded by quite a few enormous single-family homes -- I think the guy on the end of the block is a Swiss diplomat. At the same time, there are a couple of homeless guys who sleep next to the old unused Maryville Academy building (an altogether strange bit of architecture), and that's as close to my building at the garage where the diplomat parks his Audi.

The sketchy area of uptown is very defined, which makes it pretty weird. My wife has heard the cops harassing the homeless people to stay within a certain area ("Hey, I thought I told you not to come south of Montrose!")

[edited for spelling]
   118. CFiJ Posted: November 02, 2009 at 06:21 PM (#3374635)
MPLS is the safest city in America, according to Forbes Magazine. (I also remember seeing it way up there in other recent 'safest major cities' polls.)
That doesn't surprise me. Certainly I don't think Minneapolis is on the same plane as Chicago. Rather, that just reflects how "safe" Tokyo feels.
   119. Dewey, Soupuss Not Doomed to Succeed Posted: November 02, 2009 at 06:37 PM (#3374645)
The sketchy area of uptown is very defined, which makes it pretty weird. My wife has heard the cops harassing the homeless people to stay within a certain area ("Hey, I thought I told you not to come south of Montrose!")

That's classic Chicago police tactics, and it extends across the city. You have high-crime neighborhoods literally across the street from low-crime neighborhoods, with very little spillover, because of the tacit agreement everyone has to stay on their side of the street.
   120. Moses Taylor World Re-Tour 2.0: Warszawa Posted: November 02, 2009 at 06:50 PM (#3374661)
I didn't vote for Daley last time out, but if he runs again - and I think it's probably no more than 50/50 he does - I think I would in the next election, all things considered.

Daley is 100% running again. He's going to die in office, just like his old man.
   121. SandyRiver Posted: November 02, 2009 at 06:53 PM (#3374663)
MPLS is the safest city in America, according to Forbes Magazine. (I also remember seeing it way up there in other recent 'safest major cities' polls.)


That doesn't surprise me. Certainly I don't think Minneapolis is on the same plane as Chicago. Rather, that just reflects how "safe" Tokyo feels.

That (the Forbes rating) was my impression the one time I visited MPLS, in 1993 for an urban forestry conference. One of the evening choices at the gathering was a Twins game (saw Dave Winfield's 3,000th, sharp run-scoring grounder in the 9th), and when it went to extra innings and the bus had to depart, a bunch of us opted to stay until the Twins pulled it out, in the 14th, IIRC. We then walked almost 2 miles west to the hotel, beginning about 1 AM, and the only person we encountered in the "all-concrete" part of town was an older fellow soloing (very well) in Dixieland trumpet. Maybe the fact there were about 10 of us in the group was also a factor in our non-exciting stroll.
   122. Esoteric Posted: November 02, 2009 at 06:56 PM (#3374665)
That's classic Chicago police tactics, and it extends across the city. You have high-crime neighborhoods literally across the street from low-crime neighborhoods, with very little spillover, because of the tacit agreement everyone has to stay on their side of the street.
Yup. In Hyde Park, you were fine on the 60th St. side of the Midway -- where the southern border of UofC runs and where I spent 95% of my time -- but god help you if you crossed past 61st. (I could never understand my friends who chose to live in the rowhouses behind the law school.) It literally looks like France during the Allied invasion in some places: creepy moonscape-like wastelands of crumbling abandoned tenements, vast empty blocks with nothing but concrete and weeds, and not a person to be seen. And that's during the daytime. At night...well, don't hang around there at night, for chrissakes.
   123. Lassus Posted: November 02, 2009 at 07:14 PM (#3374691)
It literally looks like France during the Allied invasion in some places: creepy moonscape-like wastelands of crumbling abandoned hovels, vast empty blocks, and not a person to be seen. And that's during the daytime. At night...well, don't hang around there at night, for chrissakes.

This is going to sound weird to a lot of folks, but I've lived in all kinds of bad areas all over the country - including having a national guardsman posted on my South-Central block in 1992 Los Angeles post-riots - but easily one of the weirdest and most frightening areas I ever encountered was the early/mid-nineties Tenderloin in San Francisco. Make all the jokes you want about the city, but that was not a place you wanted to be at any hour. It reeked of menace and violence.
   124. Kiko Sakata Posted: November 02, 2009 at 07:21 PM (#3374701)
In Hyde Park, you were fine on the 60th St. side of the Midway -- where the southern border of UofC runs and where I spent 95% of my time -- but god help you if you crossed past 61st.


Yeah, as I think I mentioned upthread, I lived on the wrong side of the Midway - 6022 S. Drexel. There was a mayoral election when I lived there (Daley's first full term) and my polling place was less than two blocks from my apartment. But it was two blocks south to 62nd street and that was two blocks farther than I was willing to walk in that direction.
   125. cercle Posted: November 02, 2009 at 07:26 PM (#3374706)
After years of telling us how he had made the city safe again Guiliani, post-9/11, then started giving speeches around the country touting his leadership in a time of crisis, implying that without him the city would have descended into utter chaos.

I'll give him credit for his role in lowering the crime rate in the city, but the idea that we would have burned this place the f'in ground if he hadn't . . . well, I don't really know what he did other than encourage us to shop and go out to eat . . . is pretty offensive.
   126. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: November 02, 2009 at 07:34 PM (#3374715)
easily one of the weirdest and most frightening areas I ever encountered was the early/mid-nineties Tenderloin in San Francisco. Make all the jokes you want about the city, but that was not a place you wanted to be at any hour. It reeked of menace and violence.


And it's where I live now. I kind of like it, but then I've pretty much always lived in sketchy areas: keeps the rents down.
The Tenderloin's been one of SF's worst neighborhoods for 100+ years, which is odd for a few reasons. Every election, the mayoral candidates promise to "clean up" the TL, and it never happens. Likewise, every new police chief promises to "clean up" the TL, and it never happens -- last year, one of the local weeklies demonstrated that you could buy crack within two blocks of the TL police station (in any direction). And it's right next to the theater district and Union Square (big fancy shopping area), so there's this weird transformation over a very short distance from fancy hotels & restaurants to people dealing crack & prescription pills, and crapping on the sidewalks.

At least one of the Union Square hotels literally blacks out the TL on the little maps of the area they give out -- just gets a felt-tip pen & obliterates the area. HERE BE DRAGONS!

EDITs: grammar, etc.
   127. Dewey, Soupuss Not Doomed to Succeed Posted: November 02, 2009 at 07:42 PM (#3374721)
At least one of the Union Square hotels literally blacks out the TL on the little maps of the area they give out -- just gets a felt-tip pen & obliterates the area. HERE BE DRAGONS!

That's not very helpful to those guests looking for crack whores, though.

I never felt scared in the Tenderloin when I lived in San Francisco - I got offers to purchase all manner of illegal goods and services, but never actually threatened. There are neighborhoods in Chicago where you just don't let the sun go down on you if you don't "belong" there. Sad but true.
   128. aleskel Posted: November 02, 2009 at 07:42 PM (#3374723)
since I missed most of this thread, I just wanted to chime in on the Guiliani/NYC crime issue. Rudy deserves some credit, certainly, but not nearly the credit his supporters have always insisted on. Yes, crime declined under his administration, but:

1) There's no evidence that "broken windows" was the cause, and it was found to have not worked in other cities

2) The most likely contributor to the decline (other than nation-wide cultural developments) was the expansion of the NYPD, which started under Dinkins and excellerated after the passage of the 1994 federal crime bill
   129. SandyRiver Posted: November 02, 2009 at 08:15 PM (#3374770)
This is going to sound weird to a lot of folks, but I've lived in all kinds of bad areas all over the country - including having a national guardsman posted on my South-Central block in 1992 Los Angeles post-riots - but easily one of the weirdest and most frightening areas I ever encountered was the early/mid-nineties Tenderloin in San Francisco. Make all the jokes you want about the city, but that was not a place you wanted to be at any hour. It reeked of menace and violence.

My (Caucasian) son lived in the Tenderloin circa 1992-93 and had some "interesting" stories, like having a bottle broken over his head. (It happened about 5 yards from his apt bldg door when he stopped to argue with 5 guys of about his age - 20 or so - instead of just saying "Good night" and going home.)

However, his scariest TL moment came later, after he'd moved out and had a security cop job. He cut across the district going home one afternoon, wearing his "pseudo-cop" uniform, and wondered at all the hard stares coming his way; normally the folks there employed careful indifference to police. About halfway across he remembered, "Oh, Rodney King's attackers were acquitted today." and for the rest of his route it was a "change undies" experience.
   130. HCO Posted: November 03, 2009 at 04:30 AM (#3375540)
I never felt scared in the Tenderloin when I lived in San Francisco - I got offers to purchase all manner of illegal goods and services, but never actually threatened.


I go to the Loin at least once a year and that's exactly how I feel. It's like Hamsterdam.
Page 2 of 2 pages  < 1 2

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
rr
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOMNICHATTER 9-22-2014
(33 - 2:12pm, Sep 22)
Last: SoSHially Unacceptable

NewsblogYoung fan throws back Jeter foul
(9 - 2:11pm, Sep 22)
Last: Barry`s_Lazy_Boy

NewsblogMLB: Braves fire GM Frank Wren; John Hart to take over interim position
(59 - 2:07pm, Sep 22)
Last: Russlan is fond of Dillon Gee

NewsblogPhilly Sports: Chico Ruiz’s dash for home began the 1964 Phillies’ unraveling
(3 - 2:04pm, Sep 22)
Last: Jesse Barfield's Right Arm

NewsblogStephen Strasburg pitching like the Nationals’ Game 1 starter
(11 - 1:57pm, Sep 22)
Last: boteman is not here 'til October

NewsblogB.J. Upton Signs With Braves
(92 - 1:54pm, Sep 22)
Last: Davo Dozier

NewsblogCalcaterra | The Padres are going to keep Bud Black as their manager for 2015
(8 - 1:43pm, Sep 22)
Last: Baldrick

NewsblogOT: NFL/NHL thread
(8044 - 1:34pm, Sep 22)
Last: stanmvp48

Newsblog10 teams that will soon face Jeter-like consquences with stars
(7 - 1:25pm, Sep 22)
Last: BDC

NewsblogCorey Kluber strikes out 14 in second straight start
(8 - 1:21pm, Sep 22)
Last: RoyalsRetro (AG#1F)

NewsblogHBT: Talking head says Jeter is “a fraud” and “you are all suckers”
(162 - 1:13pm, Sep 22)
Last: Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip

NewsblogRoyals encounter problem with online sale of playoff tickets
(37 - 1:03pm, Sep 22)
Last: SoSHially Unacceptable

NewsblogOT August 2014:  Wrassle Mania I
(209 - 12:48pm, Sep 22)
Last: andrewberg

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-22-2014
(14 - 12:48pm, Sep 22)
Last: Eric J can SABER all he wants to

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread, September 2014
(362 - 12:42pm, Sep 22)
Last: Commissioner Bud Black Beltre Hillman

Page rendered in 0.4550 seconds
52 querie(s) executed