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Saturday, December 30, 2017

Heyman | Here’s How Much It’ll Cost Stanton To Be A Yankee

How much will it cost him to say at a Motel 6?

It isn’t an exact calculation, but noted tax expert Josh Rossman of Port Jefferson Station, N.Y., says that if Stanton chooses to live in New York City, he will have to pay an additional $29 million in taxes on the $295 million remaining in his record $325 million contract.

Stanton benefited by being a Florida resident the first three years of his contract, but his backloaded part will be heavily taxed as a Yankee. Rossman estimated he could save about $11 million of the $29 million loss by living in the suburbs rather than New York City. But assuming he’s in any of the five boroughs, he’ll be slammed.

Jim Furtado Posted: December 30, 2017 at 06:14 PM | 78 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: giancarlo stanton, yankees

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   1. TVerik, who wonders what the hell is "Ansky" Posted: December 30, 2017 at 08:32 PM (#5598935)
In the last twenty years, I estimate that 15% of Yankees maintained a home in NYC.
   2. eric Posted: December 30, 2017 at 08:37 PM (#5598938)
So, I don't know anything about tax law, professional athletes, or NYC, but...

I wonder how many of them have an official residence out in the suburbs and then stay somewhere within the city? I can't imagine these guys want to have to commute an hour+ every day they have a game, and they certainly have the money to afford convenience. Having a mailing residence outside the city and a little 1 BR closer to the stadium is probably still cheaper than paying all that tax, at least for the guys in the stratosphere of income. I'm sure there must be some exploitable loopholes to get that de facto arrangement.
   3. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: December 30, 2017 at 08:41 PM (#5598939)
Athletes should be like corporations and live inside a P.O. Box in the Caymans.
   4. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: December 30, 2017 at 09:07 PM (#5598943)
Teams that live in no-tax states should have to pay revenue sharing to teams in taxed states to even out their unfair advantage in recruiting free agents.
   5. Cblau Posted: December 30, 2017 at 09:54 PM (#5598952)
OTOH, NY doesn't tax intangible assets as Florida does, so maybe he'll be better off. (I'm referring to stocks and bonds, not clubhouse chemistry or productive outs.)
   6. Jose is an Absurd Doubles Machine Posted: December 30, 2017 at 10:48 PM (#5598972)
Could a player include a modified no trade clause in his contract that bumps his salary if he is traded to certain jurisdictions?
   7. cercopithecus aethiops Posted: December 30, 2017 at 10:54 PM (#5598975)
Or maybe just include a regular old no trade clause. You know, like the one Stanton has in his contract? Then the player could use it to negotiate a salary bump in exchange for accepting a trade to a higher tax city or state.
   8. cercopithecus aethiops Posted: December 30, 2017 at 10:57 PM (#5598979)
I'm not a tax lawyer either, so I don't understand how repeal of the SALT deduction hurts people who are paying AMT anyway.
   9. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: December 30, 2017 at 11:21 PM (#5598986)
Are they including the cost to Stanton's self-respect and humanity?
   10. ptodd Posted: December 30, 2017 at 11:29 PM (#5598989)
I remember Jeter having problems with the state of NY over his residency. He claimed Florida but had an apartment at Trump Tower and they ended up settling in private.

Not an expert But Stanton would be a fool to change his residency to NY (suburbs or city). The state and city would treat him as a nonresident, which would permit them to levy tax only on the income earned on “duty days" -- basically, days on which the Yankees play or practice -- within the state. Any income not taxed in New York -- or allocated to another state in which He plays for the Yanks -- will be sourced to Florida and escape taxation. There probably is not much difference for his MLB salary regardless, but endorsement revenue and investment income should show a big savings

Stanton needs only be in NY 90 days a year. Rent a suite for 6 months during the season and thats it.
   11. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: December 30, 2017 at 11:37 PM (#5598994)
I think the Yankees are hoping for closer to 98 or 99.
   12. Commissioner Bud Black Beltre Hillman Posted: December 30, 2017 at 11:51 PM (#5599002)
The NYer had an article a while back on NYC residency tax.

In order to “earn a tax day,” as he put it, he usually left town on Friday before midnight, even if his wife stayed at the apartment. Robertson’s driver had to be on alert: as long as they crossed the Queens border en route to Locust Valley by midnight, Robertson didn’t have to “waste” a Saturday as a New York day. Even one minute of a day spent in the city counts as a day of residence.
No wonder Jeter didn't waste time talking to the press.
   13. Howie Menckel Posted: December 31, 2017 at 01:16 AM (#5599017)
In the last twenty years, I estimate that 15% of Yankees maintained a home in NYC.

in the ballpark, for sure. Westchester County, NY and Bergen County, NJ being the main alternatives - and more comfortable-feeling turf for many incoming athletes.
   14. Hysterical & Useless Posted: December 31, 2017 at 07:21 AM (#5599021)
I remember that NYer piece, and my thought was, my gawd, what an #######. To work so hard to cut your tax bill, rather than just enjoying the fact that you get to live in frigging New York City?

I mean, I realize that lots of people don't want to live in the city, and if they don't want to, they shouldn't. But if you actually do live in the city, and use the facilities, going to such lengths to keep money flowing to your driver and your accountant and your car dealer rather than to the city treasury seems pretty darn peculiar to me.

I hope Stanton pulls an Olerud and lives in town and takes the 4 train to games.

Happy New Year's Eve everybody.
   15. Adam Starblind Posted: December 31, 2017 at 09:39 AM (#5599030)
can't imagine these guys want to have to commute an hour+ every day they have a game,


If you mean an hour+ round trip, I don't see what the big deal is. There are some ritzy suburbs within about a half hour of Yankee Stadium that I imagine would be very appealing to players who do not prefer urban life.
   16. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: December 31, 2017 at 09:50 AM (#5599032)
Or maybe just include a regular old no trade clause. You know, like the one Stanton has in his contract? Then the player could use it to negotiate a salary bump in exchange for accepting a trade to a higher tax city or state.


But that only compensates players who have no trade clauses. What about everyone else? What about the unfair financial advantage these franchises have where every dollar they offer a player is worth more than a dollar from other teams? I remember a lot of high-minded sanctimonious talk about economic fairness in baseball, obviously this is an issue at the very heart of economic fairness. Teams in no-tax states need to have the playing field leveled for their unfair and unearned advantage.
   17. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: December 31, 2017 at 10:36 AM (#5599036)
I remember that NYer piece, and my thought was, my gawd, what an #######. To work so hard to cut your tax bill, rather than just enjoying the fact that you get to live in frigging New York City?
To take this back to Stanton, I have no idea what his personal preferences are, but if he likes urban life then there's no better city to be wealthy and famous in. He might view the trade-off, settling for being insanely wealthy in Manhattan instead of being very insanely wealthy in Bergen County, as a worthwhile price to pay.
   18. GregD Posted: December 31, 2017 at 11:23 AM (#5599042)
To take this back to Stanton, I have no idea what his personal preferences are, but if he likes urban life then there's no better city to be wealthy and famous in. He might view the trade-off, settling for being insanely wealthy in Manhattan instead of being very insanely wealthy in Bergen County, as a worthwhile price to pay.
I love Manhattan and lived there nine years and there's no place I'd rather live if everything else were equal. But I wonder if athletes would actually say it's a better place to wealthy and famous than Miami or LA or even Atlanta. For an athlete with certain types of cultural aspirations, definitely. And arguably for those with some types of business aspirations. But in terms of just being a fun place to be?

On avoiding the city tax, I knew a couple of people who did it, but they were people who truly had two places of residence and intended to be in both places a bunch and so took pains to make sure they didn't over-shoot the city residency by a day or two, which would be a foolish way to incur a big tax bill. In that circumstance, when your ideal time in NYC might vary between 150-200, it's easy to see why you'd make sure you came in at 182 days and not 184. The people who want to be in NYC all the time but are just organizing their life around gaming it seem to be in a less fun position.
   19. McCoy Posted: December 31, 2017 at 11:46 AM (#5599046)
I'm not sure how Atlanta gets on the list. Most of the Atlanta is a dump as compared to say NYC or LA. It is a nice enough place but most of Atlanta is run down and needs to be renovated.
   20. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: December 31, 2017 at 11:52 AM (#5599049)
Any multi-multi-millionaire who chooses his place of residence primarily for tax considerations is a sad human being.
   21. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: December 31, 2017 at 12:24 PM (#5599052)
Any multi-multi-millionaire who chooses his place of residence primarily for tax considerations is a sad human being.

Seriously? If you could live in Scarsdale, or Rye, or Greenwich (or pick your ritzy suburb) and pay 5% less taxes, you wouldn't?

It's not like these athletes have to take Metro North and the subways when they want to go to Manhattan. They have drivers.
   22. GregD Posted: December 31, 2017 at 12:33 PM (#5599055)
I'm not sure how Atlanta gets on the list. Most of the Atlanta is a dump as compared to say NYC or LA. It is a nice enough place but most of Atlanta is run down and needs to be renovated.
It wouldn't be my choice either but there are tons of athletes who live year-round in Atlanta. Clubs/music/etc. Hip-hop impresario Kevin Lee (Coach K) has a whole thing on this in his interview for a recent New Yorker piece, on what it's like to come from anywhere else to Atlanta and see how many black professionals there are and how much of your life you can live in a mostly black world. On a lower level, it has been for 30 years a major magnet for black college graduates elsewhere in the US for the same reasons.
   23. The Duke Posted: December 31, 2017 at 12:47 PM (#5599057)
Atlanta a dump! Ha, people who come to Atlanta never leave. I can’t beleive how many people I know who have quit their job here rather than accepting a transfer out of town. I’ll admit, it’s not a cultural Mecca but it’s a great place to live. I’ve lived in several Midwest cities, Chicago, NY, Paris, northern Europe London, and Massachusetts and Atlanta and only london ranks higher on my list than Atlanta. Massachusetts ranks last but mostly for the weather.
   24. BDC Posted: December 31, 2017 at 01:06 PM (#5599065)
I would imagine that most really well-off pro athletes live on huge lots in interchangeable lavish recently-built Sunbelt suburbs, those that don't live on even huger lots out in the woods nearer their deer leases.
   25. Jose is an Absurd Doubles Machine Posted: December 31, 2017 at 01:15 PM (#5599068)
Seriously? If you could live in Scarsdale, or Rye, or Greenwich (or pick your ritzy suburb) and pay 5% less taxes, you wouldn't?


I would live where I was happiest. Finances would be a part of that of course but there is far far more than that at work. Just as an example I live in a small town about 40 minutes north of Boston. I could have a much larger house and a much larger plot of land but I would have an hour and a half commute instead of a 30 minute commute (I don't work in the city anymore). It's a trade off like so many other things. One of my co-workers lives in Maine and commutes nearly two hours each way 4 days a week but has a huge house and his daughter is in a great school.

I have no idea what Stanton or any other athlete wants but I suspect like the rest of us each of them has their own opinion of what is and is not important.
   26. Hysterical & Useless Posted: December 31, 2017 at 01:19 PM (#5599070)
Seriously? If you could live in Scarsdale, or Rye, or Greenwich (or pick your ritzy suburb) and pay 5% less taxes, you wouldn't?


Oh my gawd no. Are you kidding? Scarsdale?????

   27. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: December 31, 2017 at 01:26 PM (#5599072)
Any multi-multi-millionaire who chooses his place of residence primarily for tax considerations is a sad human being.

Seriously? If you could live in Scarsdale, or Rye, or Greenwich (or pick your ritzy suburb) and pay 5% less taxes, you wouldn't?


Are you nuts? With that kind of money? And in your 20's or 30's? Suburbs are fine if you can't afford city living, but no modern day pro athlete is in that situation.

It's not like these athletes have to take Metro North and the subways when they want to go to Manhattan. They have drivers.

They can also probably afford to buy a Manhattan parking space for when they might need a car, and save themselves the hassle of being stuck in traffic. Drivers can't avoid traffic.

And what's the big deal about having to use the subways? What are you afraid of? Cooties?

Not to mention that pretty much everything in midtown Manhattan is within walking distance to and from the sort of residential areas where most rich Manhattanites would choose to live. You might try walking yourself sometime.
   28. BDC Posted: December 31, 2017 at 02:03 PM (#5599083)
And now that I think of it, a few seconds Googling revealed that Stanton has just acquired a brand-new three-story penthouse in Miami. I have no idea what he intends to do with that penthouse, but it's quite possible he'll just live there in the offseason, stay in a hotel room the 80-100 nights a year the Yankees play at home or in Flushing, and basically just live like many an enormously wealthy person, ie wherever the heck he wants :)
   29. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: December 31, 2017 at 03:17 PM (#5599095)
Oh my gawd no. Are you kidding? Scarsdale?????

I wouldn't live there, just naming ritzy suburbs.


They can also probably afford to buy a Manhattan parking space for when they might need a car, and save themselves the hassle of being stuck in traffic. Drivers can't avoid traffic.


Ummm, you know the Yankees don't play in Manhattan, right? The drive from Tribeca or SoHo or wherever he'd live to the Yankee Stadium is longer than that from the suburbs.

Stanton's only going to be in NY when he's playing baseball. He won't want to trigger NYS residency, which would expose all his income to NY taxes.

And what's the big deal about having to use the subways? What are you afraid of? Cooties?

The subways are constantly delayed. Haven't you heard any of the coverage of how crappy the system performance has become? Not to mention the lovely odors, pan handlers, and random mental cases.

And now that I think of it, a few seconds Googling revealed that Stanton has just acquired a brand-new three-story penthouse in Miami. I have no idea what he intends to do with that penthouse, but it's quite possible he'll just live there in the offseason, stay in a hotel room the 80-100 nights a year the Yankees play at home or in Flushing, and basically just live like many an enormously wealthy person, ie wherever the heck he wants :)

Yup.
   30. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: December 31, 2017 at 03:31 PM (#5599103)
My response wasn't specifically about Stanton. If Stanton wants to live in Miami, more power to him. But your constant trashing of city life is just tiresome, and makes you sound like nothing but a sour old man. Not everyone is as afraid of city life as you obviously are.

The subways are constantly delayed. Haven't you heard any of the coverage of how crappy the system performance has become? Not to mention the lovely odors, pan handlers, and random mental cases.

As if highways never get crowded, with delays that can last up to an hour or more. And as if having to deal with a few panhandlers or random food smells is the end of the world. I spent plenty of time in the Manhattan of the 70's, when the subways had a few problems, and it never deterred me or millions of New Yorkers from using them. Life can't always be lived in a glass enclosed bubble.
   31. Walt Davis Posted: December 31, 2017 at 03:44 PM (#5599108)
I'd pick New Rochelle with a prime-age Laura Petrie then laugh while the Yanks try to collect insurance after my career-ending injury from tripping over an ottoman.
   32. The Yankee Clapper Posted: December 31, 2017 at 03:51 PM (#5599109)
Are you nuts? With that kind of money? And in your 20's or 30's? Suburbs are fine if you can't afford city living, but no modern day pro athlete is in that situation. . . . Not to mention that pretty much everything in midtown Manhattan is within walking distance to and from the sort of residential areas where most rich Manhattanites would choose to live. You might try walking yourself sometime.

Not everyone has the same preferences. A married player with kids might find a place in the suburbs with a large yard and a pool a better fit for his family than a fancy high-rise condo. Stanton is a single guy, so that may not be a factor, but he would probably do a lot less strolling around Manhattan than the anonymous rich who are not likely to encounter their fans going about the daily tasks of living.

If a player is going to live in Florida for the offseason and spring training, and be out of town for road games, it's not that difficult to arrange your schedule to reduce your NYC & NYS tax liabilities. The higher the income, the greater incentive to do so, but some are more influenced by incentives than others.
   33. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: December 31, 2017 at 04:28 PM (#5599113)
Life can't always be lived in a glass enclosed bubble.

If you make $25M a year it can.

   34. Hysterical & Useless Posted: December 31, 2017 at 04:46 PM (#5599118)
The subways are constantly delayed. Haven't you heard any of the coverage of how crappy the system performance has become?


Recent problems with the subway have been massively overstated. System performance was appalling in the late 70s-early 80s but had improved hugely. During the worst years, getting booted off a train because it had to be taken out of service was pretty much a weekly occurrence. I couldn't tell you the last time that happened to me; probably at least a decade.

Now get off my stoop and go play in traffic! :-)

   35. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: December 31, 2017 at 05:34 PM (#5599126)
Life can't always be lived in a glass enclosed bubble.

If you make $25M a year it can.


Which I'm sure would be your ideal situation. You must have led a terrific life.
   36. Blastin Posted: December 31, 2017 at 06:24 PM (#5599140)
Why are you people so mad so often? Jesus.

I'm a subway fanboy since I admittedly grew up spending time with my parents on subways and felt more distance from them (and from the world in general) once we spent more time driving, but if I had Stanton money? Fly me to the park. Do it.
   37. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: December 31, 2017 at 07:06 PM (#5599145)
I never have any complaints using the subway the half dozen times each year I'm in the city, but I don't think I'd like using it every day. Certainly not if I were as recognizable a figure as Stanton is.

To build on what Blastin said, Stanton should have himself flown in to RF by helicopter each game, like Steve Nebraska in The Scout.
   38. GregD Posted: December 31, 2017 at 08:01 PM (#5599155)
To build on what Blastin said, Stanton should have himself flown in to RF by helicopter each game, like Steve Nebraska in The Scout.
was told today that there is Uber helicopter in Dubai
   39. Brian Posted: December 31, 2017 at 08:38 PM (#5599163)
I take the subway every weekday and the performance is fine 99% of the time. Personally, my favorite way to get from NYC to YS is the boat. Very relaxing.
   40. Tin Angel Posted: December 31, 2017 at 08:39 PM (#5599164)
Anyone else interested in donating to/starting a Patreon for Stanton to help recoup some of those tax losses?
   41. ReggieThomasLives Posted: December 31, 2017 at 09:53 PM (#5599173)
Seriously? If you could live in Scarsdale, or Rye, or Greenwich (or pick your ritzy suburb) and pay 5% less taxes, you wouldn't?


It’s a bit more than 5%, it’s the difference between taking home 53% of your paycheck and 48%, essentially it’s 10% more.
   42. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 01, 2018 at 01:07 AM (#5599184)
I can't imagine these guys want to have to commute an hour+ every day they have a game, and they certainly have the money to afford convenience.
Well, it's not like they have to drive themselves, so it's not quite the same hardship it is for the rest of us.

EDIT: I see Snapper made that point.
   43. McCoy Posted: January 01, 2018 at 06:20 AM (#5599192)
If I was single I'm not sure why I would want to live in Scarsdale. It's a nice enough place but I'm not sure some 20 something year old millionaire is going to find the place to be awesome.
   44. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 01, 2018 at 11:47 AM (#5599227)
I can't imagine these guys want to have to commute an hour+ every day they have a game, and they certainly have the money to afford convenience.


Well, it's not like they have to drive themselves, so it's not quite the same hardship it is for the rest of us.

Yes, there's nothing quite like the quiet satisfaction of being stuck in a Chris Christie traffic jam in the back seat of a stretch limo. Just think of all the tweets you can tweet!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

If I was single I'm not sure why I would want to live in Scarsdale. It's a nice enough place but I'm not sure some 20 something year old millionaire is going to find the place to be awesome.

Well, neither snapper nor David are exactly 20-something millionaires, and I can see why the thought of being surrounded in a city full of life-stealing Democrats would be less than their ideal situation.
   45. BDC Posted: January 01, 2018 at 12:28 PM (#5599235)
It's a wonder more athletes aren't delayed in traffic, and not just in New York. Most people are late to work once in a while. I guess ballplayers mostly leave pretty early, or stay pretty near. Pascual Perez is the most famous no-show, but I seem to remember Rick Leach getting lost on the subway at some point. There are probably more cases that you don't hear about, or simply forget after a day or two.
   46. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 01, 2018 at 12:42 PM (#5599240)
It's a wonder more athletes aren't delayed in traffic, and not just in New York. Most people are late to work once in a while. I guess ballplayers mostly leave pretty early, or stay pretty near. Pascual Perez is the most famous no-show, but I seem to remember Rick Leach getting lost on the subway at some point. There are probably more cases that you don't hear about, or simply forget after a day or two.

Don't players generally arrive several hours before the game? If so, then even a fairly long delay wouldn't preclude their arrival by the time that the game began, and in that case it's unlikely that their late arrival would rate more than a minor footnote.
   47. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 01, 2018 at 12:52 PM (#5599242)
Yes, there's nothing quite like the quiet satisfaction of being stuck in a Chris Christie traffic jam in the back seat of a stretch limo. Just think of all the tweets you can tweet!
I think your geography needs some work. And, yes, tweeting, or reading BBTF, or a book, or a newspaper, or sleeping, or writing a novel. Whatever. When you have privacy and a chauffeur, you can get a lot accomplished.
   48. BDC Posted: January 01, 2018 at 01:03 PM (#5599252)
Don't players generally arrive several hours before the game? If so, then even a fairly long delay wouldn't preclude their arrival by the time that the game began

Sure, but ballclubs frown on guys missing pre-game rituals too. I reckon it happens, but gets downplayed in the media unless the event is of Matt-Harvey proportions.
   49. McCoy Posted: January 01, 2018 at 01:10 PM (#5599260)
Well, for the most part half of the players are visiting players and they generally get taken to the park via a chartered bus.
   50. PreservedFish Posted: January 01, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5599262)
Holy smokes. From the New Yorker article:

If he failed to demonstrate by “clear and convincing evidence” that he hadn’t been in the city on even one of the disputed days, he would be deemed a resident and would owe New York City income tax for the year 2000. In his case, the sum amounted to $26,702,341, plus interest


Ok, now I get it. If you're already going to be spending some 40% of your time at your primary home outside of the city borders and in your multiple vacation homes, then yeah, it's probably worthwhile to get that to 51%.
   51. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 01, 2018 at 01:35 PM (#5599269)
Sure, but ballclubs frown on guys missing pre-game rituals too. I reckon it happens, but gets downplayed in the media unless the event is of Matt-Harvey proportions.
The Harvey situation was that he didn't call in, not that he was late. If you're supposed to be there at 3:00 p.m and you call at 2:30 and say, "Accident on 87; traffic's at a standstill and we haven't moved for 40 minutes," that's a bit different.
   52. Brian Posted: January 01, 2018 at 09:11 PM (#5599391)
I'd imagine many of today's players would watch video of the opposing SP for that night on his device of choice while being driven to the park.
   53. Lassus Posted: January 02, 2018 at 08:32 AM (#5599434)
Seriously? If you could live in Scarsdale, or Rye, or Greenwich (or pick your ritzy suburb) and pay 5% less taxes, you wouldn't?

Good Christ, no. ####### Greenwich? Over the West Village? Rye has a few trees at least. Scarsdale is also pretty gross. No, I wouldn't. Especially at that income level.
   54. Adam Starblind Posted: January 02, 2018 at 08:34 AM (#5599435)
A lot of posts dedicated to speculation about whether Stanton would prefer to live in the city or the suburbs.
   55. McCoy Posted: January 02, 2018 at 08:43 AM (#5599436)
Thanks for the summary of the thread.
   56. Rally Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:22 AM (#5599443)
My guess is Stanton cares more about enjoying his baseball career than optimizing his tax rate. Otherwise he would have stayed in Florida, or allowed the Marlins to trade him to St Louis. I actually don't know what tax rates are in STL, but I'm sure they aren't as bad as NYC or SF.
   57. Swoboda is freedom Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:26 AM (#5599446)

Ok, now I get it. If you're already going to be spending some 40% of your time at your primary home outside of the city borders and in your multiple vacation homes, then yeah, it's probably worthwhile to get that to 51%.


When I first moved to London, I had to keep a diary of where I was. I wanted to keep under the 183 days, or else I would have to pay British taxes. I travelled for work so much that it was pretty easy, nd I would often just decide to stay a weekend where I was, rather than fly back and then head back on Monday. After a couple of years, I gave in. I was travelling less and had established more social contacts in London, so had more of a reason to go back.
   58. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:27 AM (#5599447)
Good Christ, no. ####### Greenwich? Over the West Village? Rye has a few trees at least. Scarsdale is also pretty gross. No, I wouldn't. Especially at that income level.
Whereas I'd pay 5% more in taxes not to have to live in the city.
   59. Blastin Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:30 AM (#5599449)
Whereas I'd pay 5% more in taxes not to have to live in the city.


Now pretend you are a young, single person of color, originally from a different major city, with unlimited means.




Sometimes this "white guys yell at each other" habit on BBTF is so bizarre.

   60. Jose is an Absurd Doubles Machine Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:36 AM (#5599453)
Now pretend you are a young, single person of color, originally from a different major city, with unlimited means.


There are young, wealthy, single people of color who prefer the burbs.

I have no idea what Stanton would prefer of course. Do we know where he lived as a Marlin?
   61. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:39 AM (#5599454)
Now pretend you are a young, single person of color, originally from a different major city, with unlimited means.

Sometimes this "white guys yell at each other" habit on BBTF is so bizarre.


The large majority of rich male athletes of all colors seem to prefer living in 5000+ sq. ft. houses on multi-acre estates. If you don't actually work in the downtown area, an apartment or condo is always going to be inferior, for the same amount of money, to a house in the closest suburbs.

City living has got to be intolerable if you're immediately recognized by hordes of fans. If you're simply running from your door to your limo to go anywhere, you might as well be in the burbs.
   62. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:41 AM (#5599455)
To be sure, if I had Stanton's money, I would probably own a place in the city where I could crash if I wanted. But I sure as heck wouldn't live there regularly.
   63. Blastin Posted: January 02, 2018 at 09:48 AM (#5599461)
Oh I was not saying that he would prefer the city automatically btw. I was saying "I'm not sure your (plural) perspective is the way he thinks."

Truth be told, I'd buy a house in the suburbs and rent a crash pad.
   64. Swoboda is freedom Posted: January 02, 2018 at 10:07 AM (#5599477)
Good Christ, no. ####### Greenwich? Over the West Village? Rye has a few trees at least. Scarsdale is also pretty gross. No, I wouldn't. Especially at that income level.

I think a ballplayer might have different priorities. First of all, most ballplayers are not city people. A lot are from different countries. They might find the city a little intimidating. If they have kids, they might prioritize schools (like Denny Neagle). The commute from Rye or Greenwich would actually be shorter than Tribeca or the West Village.

The days are long with few days off, with a lot of travel. They have to get to the park, work out, get ready for the game. It is not like they have a lot of free time to explore. Finally, a lot of them are not intellectuals who want to visit the museums.

I think it might be different if you played for the Knicks or Rangers. They have more days off, the games are at MSG, though the training facilities are outside of the city.
   65. Adam Starblind Posted: January 02, 2018 at 10:14 AM (#5599480)
Jose Reyes'[s] Manhasset home listed for sale

Just weeks after purchasing another home on the North Shore -- in Old Brookville -- former Met Jose Reyes put his Manhasset house on the market Oct. 21. The 11-room home is listed for $4.495 million with Lisa Paladino of Shawn Elliott Luxury Homes & Estates
   66. Lassus Posted: January 02, 2018 at 10:28 AM (#5599487)
I think a ballplayer might have different priorities.

Well, sure, all your points are totally valid; but he was asking people in the thread.

I mean, even if it was an option, I wouldn't move back to the city at this point, I'd grown weary. But if tomorrow it was a choice between Manhattan and Scarsdale or Greenwich? The former every time.
   67. Swoboda is freedom Posted: January 02, 2018 at 10:50 AM (#5599505)
I mean, even if it was an option, I wouldn't move back to the city at this point, I'd grown weary. But if tomorrow it was a choice between Manhattan and Scarsdale or Greenwich? The former every time.

I live in Westchester and it is not really an option. If I had $5 million to buy a house, then maybe. But with 2 kids, the city is not affordable. We know a couple that moved back into the city. Their kids went to college and they bought a brownstone in Brooklyn. Total gut job and the place was still crazy pricing. They both work in the city, so it made a lot of sense.
   68. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 02, 2018 at 11:14 AM (#5599524)
To be sure, if I had Stanton's money, I would probably own a place in the city where I could crash if I wanted. But I sure as heck wouldn't live there regularly.


I would.

If I had Stanton's career to get that money - I probably wouldn't get the same level of enjoyment out of it I would otherwise, but if I just had Stanton's money and either no career or at least a standard, M through F workweek (even with potentially long hours/weekends on occasion), I'd absolutely be living smack dab in the city in probably the nicest penthouse to be found.

Living in some Westchester mansion wouldn't be terrible - but even if it means simply ringing up the driver to cart me into the city, sitting in traffic in the back of a limo isn't THAT much better than sitting in traffic driving yourself.... though, I suppose I'd need a few dozen dry runs sipping on a cocktail in the back to say so with certainty.
   69. Rally Posted: January 02, 2018 at 11:35 AM (#5599544)
Living in some Westchester mansion wouldn't be terrible - but even if it means simply ringing up the driver to cart me into the city, sitting in traffic in the back of a limo isn't THAT much better than sitting in traffic driving yourself....


I guess it depends on how you set up your limo. If I had Stanton's money I would consider living on a mansion estate outside the city and getting to the ballpark by helicopter. Consider, but not necessarily follow through. I'd have to consider the safety record of the helicopter vs. auto. Don't want to be remembered like Thurman Munson and Cory Lidle. (Yes, I know Munson was nowhere near NYC and both were in airplanes, not helicopters, but helicopters aren't exactly safe).
   70. Lassus Posted: January 02, 2018 at 12:09 PM (#5599582)
I live in Westchester and it is not really an option. If I had $5 million to buy a house, then maybe. But with 2 kids

Something that also doesn't apply to me. Utterly dependent and subjective.


There are a couple of utterly amazing super-modern Bauhaus-y bazillion-dollar homes I've passed by on the Harlem/Hudson line I'd consider over the city, sure. But even THEN, just thinking that, I'd be "Boy, I'd really prefer to be able to travel not as far to all these cool restaurants I can afford" if I was. It's really just what sort of lifestyle you're after.
   71. Zonk, Genius of the Stables Posted: January 02, 2018 at 12:29 PM (#5599598)
I guess it depends on how you set up your limo. If I had Stanton's money I would consider living on a mansion estate outside the city and getting to the ballpark by helicopter. Consider, but not necessarily follow through. I'd have to consider the safety record of the helicopter vs. auto. Don't want to be remembered like Thurman Munson and Cory Lidle. (Yes, I know Munson was nowhere near NYC and both were in airplanes, not helicopters, but helicopters aren't exactly safe).


Yeah - I guess.... but you're still sitting somewhere for an hour+ waiting to get to where you want to go, even with a TV, xbox, full bar and hey - maybe even a not-so-special-but-attractive-someone to keep you company.

Of course, the more I think about it - with Stanton's money, perhaps my horizons would also expand well beyond just gotham - so maybe I'd be less inclined to be walking distance from Gramercy Tavern or whatever...
   72. Adam Starblind Posted: January 02, 2018 at 12:39 PM (#5599607)
It's really just what sort of lifestyle you're after.


And nevertheless, the thread persisted.
   73. eric Posted: January 02, 2018 at 02:16 PM (#5599676)
One other benefit to having a regular residence in a lower-tax area, and a small place to crash nearer the stadium, is keeping the groupies separate from the day-to-day life (and any wives or girlfriends). Two birds, one stone.
   74. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 02, 2018 at 02:44 PM (#5599696)
I live in Westchester and it is not really an option. If I had $5 million to buy a house, then maybe. But with 2 kids, the city is not affordable. We know a couple that moved back into the city. Their kids went to college and they bought a brownstone in Brooklyn. Total gut job and the place was still crazy pricing. They both work in the city, so it made a lot of sense.

If you really want to find a Manhattan bargain, what about a 3 floor townhouse with a basement, 11 rooms, 4 baths and a garden, on 11th St in the West Village, for the princely sum of $75,000?

Okay, that's one of many offerings in the July 19, 1953 Sunday Times (p.117), and there's the little matter of inflation, but even in today's dollars that would "only" amount to $690,000. Hell, even Mrs. JOSN and I might be able to afford that, and I've never hit 59 home runs in a season.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If I had Stanton's money I would consider living on a mansion estate outside the city and getting to the ballpark by helicopter. Consider, but not necessarily follow through. I'd have to consider the safety record of the helicopter vs. auto.

Not to mention you'd have the lingering thought that some evil hacker from Boston might cripple your helicopter's engine. Those bastards will stoop to anything.
   75. Rally Posted: January 02, 2018 at 03:07 PM (#5599723)
Okay, that's one of many offerings in the July 19, 1953 Sunday Times (p.117), and there's the little matter of inflation, but even in today's dollars that would "only" amount to $690,000.


Looking around the area on the realtor app, looks like a 20 million house today. That's almost as bad as baseball inflation. In 1953 75k was paid to Ralph Kiner and Stan Musial. The only guy who made more was Ted Williams at 85. Bring 1953 into today's economics and Kiner/Stan are probably making 25-30 and Ted around 35.
   76. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 02, 2018 at 03:09 PM (#5599729)
To each his own. I grew up in a sleepy Westchester suburb (there were a few Yankees who lived in our town at the time) and live in Manhattan now. They were both great in different ways but as a 30-something with no kids, I love living in the city. If I had Stanton's money and taxes weren't an issue, I'd probably own a nice apartment in Manhattan that I lived in, and a house within driving distance on the water somewhere when I wanted to get out of the city for a few days.

Also, you certainly don't need a $5 million home to raise 2 kids in NYC.
   77. dlf Posted: January 02, 2018 at 03:37 PM (#5599753)
they might prioritize schools (like Denny Neagle).


I think it was a different former Rockie - Mike Hampton - who prioritized schools. Neagle's priorities appear to be based on proximity to extra-educational opportunities.
   78. Swoboda is freedom Posted: January 02, 2018 at 04:22 PM (#5599779)
If I had Stanton's money I would consider living on a mansion estate outside the city and getting to the ballpark by helicopter. Consider, but not necessarily follow through. I'd have to consider the safety record of the helicopter vs. auto.

I remember Kobe Bryant used to commute by helicopter. This was LA though, so his commute would have been pretty bad. You can get to Yankee Stadium pretty easily (1/2 hour) by car from Rye.

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