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Thursday, January 11, 2018

How a very talented baseball fan is bringing baseball cards back in style by hand - CBSSports.com

Neat.

Jim Furtado Posted: January 11, 2018 at 08:11 AM | 38 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: art, baseball cards

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   1. McCoy Posted: January 11, 2018 at 09:27 AM (#5604494)
Reminds me of the artists that will do a sculpture on a pencil tip. Ya gotta love hipsters.
   2. Man o' Schwar Posted: January 11, 2018 at 12:09 PM (#5604666)
They're nice, but I'm not interested unless I can pull a superfractor 1/1 auto chromium dual bat/jersey relic parallel of that Bill Ripken card.
   3. PreservedFish Posted: January 11, 2018 at 12:17 PM (#5604681)
I own some woodblock print baseball cards made by a French hipster artist. She's stopped doing it, so I presume their value has gone through the roof: Unusual baseball injuries.
   4. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 11, 2018 at 12:23 PM (#5604687)
I wholeheartedly support this man.
   5. Man o' Schwar Posted: January 11, 2018 at 12:24 PM (#5604689)
I own some woodblock print baseball cards made by a French hipster artist. She's stopped doing it, so I presume their value has gone through the roof: Unusual baseball injuries.

I bought some of those as well. They're very cool. Sorry to hear she stopped doing them.
   6. PreservedFish Posted: January 11, 2018 at 12:29 PM (#5604691)
I think that some jewelry design thing or similar that she was doing became very successful, so she didn't have time for the baseball stuff anymore. She had a closeout sale, and I bought my favorite t-shirt from her during it. Can't find a photo of it. It's a baseball sleeve shirt with a knuckleball on chest that says "knuckleball!"
   7. OsunaSakata Posted: January 11, 2018 at 03:38 PM (#5604880)
This work and Mancini are kind of primitivist. I prefer something like what Gary Joseph Cieradkowski has: http://infinitecardset.blogspot.com/

When I collected cards as a kid they had just begun to add action shots to the posed portraits. I guess I had a sense then of the pictures that had interesting style, regardless of the player depicted. I think those were the ones where the colors tended to pop out of the card. I really didn't get interested again until Upper Deck. It wasn't the speculative frenzy, but their aesthetic beauty.
   8. Man o' Schwar Posted: January 11, 2018 at 03:59 PM (#5604899)
When I collected cards as a kid they had just begun to add action shots to the posed portraits. I guess I had a sense then of the pictures that had interesting style, regardless of the player depicted. I think those were the ones where the colors tended to pop out of the card. I really didn't get interested again until Upper Deck. It wasn't the speculative frenzy, but their aesthetic beauty.

I like the old cards for their beauty, in the same way that I love the look of late 19th century/early 20th century postage stamps. I know that the more modern, glossy or chrome cards are clearer and sharper, but I've yet to see a modern set that comes close to the appeal of some of those 1930s Goudey sets.
   9. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 11, 2018 at 04:07 PM (#5604907)
I know that the more modern, glossy or chrome cards are clearer and sharper, but I've yet to see a modern set that comes close to the appeal of some of those 1930s Goudey sets.

Completely agree, in a slightly different way - I don't think Topps produced a bad design from 1961-71. Granted, some of that may have to do with the fact that those were the out-of-reach "old cards" when I collected as a kid in the late '80s. The new cards just look busy and loud to me. Much like the kids on my lawn.
   10. jmurph Posted: January 11, 2018 at 04:19 PM (#5604916)
I think there's a big difference between the glossy early Upper Deck cards, which I think looked great, and the deeply silly "refractor" nonsense that apparently dominates the market now. A normal action shot with like a purple splash behind it is somehow very exciting, I guess.
   11. PreservedFish Posted: January 11, 2018 at 05:04 PM (#5604957)
This work and Mancini are kind of primitivist. I prefer something like what Gary Joseph Cieradkowski has: http://infinitecardset.blogspot.com/


Wow, you're a connoisseur of this, huh?
   12. dejarouehg Posted: January 12, 2018 at 09:21 AM (#5605302)
I don't think Topps produced a bad design from 1961-71. Granted, some of that may have to do with the fact that those were the out-of-reach "old cards" when I collected as a kid in the late '80s. The new cards just look busy and loud to me. Much like the kids on my lawn.


The 1971 look is my favorite, which is probably because it was the first year I was able to go to the candy store and by the 3 section plastic package for myself. It took me a while to realize that almost all the card pictures - certainly in the early 70's - were taken at YS1, Shea or spring training.

   13. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: January 12, 2018 at 09:25 AM (#5605305)
I always liked the portrait cards rather than the action cards. In practice it seemed that all the action cards were just of a hitter swinging the bat or a pitcher doing his follow-through.
   14. Greg Pope Posted: January 12, 2018 at 09:57 AM (#5605335)
"very talented"? These cards look like the portraits of famous people that are on display outside the 4th grade hallway in my kids' elementary school.

I mean, they're better than what I could draw, but I'm terrible.
   15. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 12, 2018 at 11:03 AM (#5605378)
   16. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: January 12, 2018 at 11:20 AM (#5605386)

I mean, they're better than what I could draw, but I'm terrible.


You seem to be judging them on how closely they resemble a photograph. Why?
   17. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: January 12, 2018 at 11:27 AM (#5605395)
A normal action shot with like a purple splash behind it is somehow very exciting, I guess.

The appeal -- for those who chase these nonsense cards -- is strictly in the manufactured scarcity that makes pulling one of these from a pack like hitting all the right numbers on a lottery scratch-off ticket if you get a hot rookie or young superstar. Take it to eBay and look for the biggest fool while the base set cards go in the trash.
   18. Booey Posted: January 12, 2018 at 11:33 AM (#5605398)
From the article:

"Once I select a player, I'll look through the cards for interesting poses/expressions, fun hairstyles/sideburns, great '70s uniforms, or whatever else makes the card distinctive," he said. "I have the most trouble drawing clean-cut normal-looking people, so if a guy has a card with scraggly hair, shades, or a big mustache, I'll probably choose that one."


He must love the current trend of long hair and beards then. He'd be a kid in a candy store with the Nationals roster of hippies, hobos, and Vikings.
   19. Ziggy's screen name Posted: January 12, 2018 at 11:38 AM (#5605401)
I was always a fan of the 1949 Leaf set. It's baseball pop art. (And ahead of it's time, considering that it's from the 40s.)
   20. Elvis Posted: January 12, 2018 at 11:48 AM (#5605409)
I'm with Greg Pope on this. This is the kind of thing that if your buddy showed you, you'd go, "Hey, that's neat." But you'd never think about it again and you certainly wouldn't mention it to other people you know.

I'd extend the time frame that Billy Ripken mentioned, in both directions. From 1952-1977, almost all of the Topps designs are great. I'd make an exception for '59 and '62 - but I know a lot of people who love the '62 set.
   21. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: January 12, 2018 at 12:07 PM (#5605425)
Not a fan of 1970 or 1968 Topps. The gray borders in 1970 are pretty blah and the 1968 burlap border is just too weird. My favorites are 1965 and 1977.
   22. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 12, 2018 at 12:24 PM (#5605440)
From 1952-1977, almost all of the Topps designs are great. I'd make an exception for '59 and '62 - but I know a lot of people who love the '62 set.

Eh, IMO '72 was pretty awful, and '73-'74 were just blah. '75...garish. After that, a pretty solid run of blah until...I guess maybe '84? That one was pretty good.

EDIT: I think my opinion might have something to do with the use of white cardstock up until '70, now that I think about it. It made even an admittedly nondescript design like '70 seem brighter and "pop" a bit more compared to, say, '76, which was also basic but just strikes me as dull.
   23. ajnrules Posted: January 12, 2018 at 12:34 PM (#5605453)
From 1952-1977, almost all of the Topps designs are great. I'd make an exception for '59 and '62 - but I know a lot of people who love the '62 set.

I like most of those, but I was never a big fan of 1967 Topps. Sure, the name and the team don't get in the way of the picture so you get a big picture of the player, but this was in the days before action shots so you get a bunch of headshots or posed shots. The cards just seem pretty bland to me. I do like how the back makes up for it with two illustrations about the player, but that green is just meh.

I know a lot of fans of the psychedelic fans of 1972 and 1975, but I'm not a big fan either.

My favorite designs may be the 1952, 1962 and the 1971. I like how the stars bordering the player's names and facsimile signature give it a marquee feel in 1952. I like how the bottom right edge of the picture curls up in 1962 to resemble pages from a book. And I like the black borders of 1971 (even if it makes it almost impossible to find any in mint condition but I don't really care about that) and the all lower case lettering of the names. I also liked how they put an actual headshot of the player in the back that year.
   24. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 12, 2018 at 12:50 PM (#5605470)
From 1952-1977, almost all of the Topps designs are great.

I only collected cards seriously from 1953 to 1956, but I don't see how anything could beat their 1953 set. Satchel Paige, for instance. It was the last year that the cards feature original artwork rather than photographs.

And if you like photographs rather than paintings, then the 1953 Bowmans were as "pure" as can be. No text, just a photo, like Stan the Man or Pee Wee.
   25. Greg Pope Posted: January 12, 2018 at 12:52 PM (#5605474)
You seem to be judging them on how closely they resemble a photograph. Why?

I'm the first one to admit knowing nothing about art. When I see a Picasso or a Pollack, I just don't get it.

But I didn't judge the art. I questioned the talent. What I basically said was that pretty much any 4th grader could do this. So that doesn't say "very talented" to me.
   26. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 12, 2018 at 01:06 PM (#5605487)
So that doesn't say "very talented" to me.

Well yeah, but no one is going to click on the headline "How a baseball fan with approximately as much artistic talent as an average 4th grader is bringing baseball cards back in style by hand."
   27. Booey Posted: January 12, 2018 at 02:04 PM (#5605541)
TBF, the average 4th grader probably has as much artistic ability as the average adult, since most adults probably don't practice drawing much beyond elementary school anyway. I know I was a much better artist at 10 than I am now.

Edit: None of this disputes the larger point being made, of course.
   28. Elvis Posted: January 12, 2018 at 02:05 PM (#5605542)
Not a fan of 1970 or 1968 Topps. The gray borders in 1970 are pretty blah and the 1968 burlap border is just too weird.


Yeah, I almost put '68 as an exception but the colored circle at the bottom saves it for me. And the gray border definitely holds the '70 set from being one of the best ever but the backs of those are baseball card perfection.
   29. PreservedFish Posted: January 12, 2018 at 02:20 PM (#5605557)
This guy is definitely better than an average fourth grader. He is like an above average fourth grader. 80th percentile maybe.
   30. Man o' Schwar Posted: January 12, 2018 at 02:51 PM (#5605591)
Not a fan of 1970 or 1968 Topps. The gray borders in 1970 are pretty blah and the 1968 burlap border is just too weird. My favorites are 1965 and 1977.

1965 was always my favorite - I think it's the best design Topps ever came up with. I agree about 1970, but I like 1968. I thought 1969 was good as well. Really, the whole run from 1965-1969 was terrific.

Put me in the camp of people who didn't like 1962 (and I didn't like it when they did it again in 1987). The fake wood borders just aren't for me.
   31. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: January 12, 2018 at 03:18 PM (#5605616)
1965 was always my favorite - I think it's the best design Topps ever came up with.

Me too, and I fear for my wallet that one day I'm going to want to make a high-grade run at it.
   32. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 12, 2018 at 04:04 PM (#5605652)
The fake wood borders just aren't for me.

In fairness, real wood borders would have been impracticable for any number of reasons.

Me too, and I fear for my wallet that one day I'm going to want to make a high-grade run at it.

You and me both...now that I'm an adult with what is shaping up to be a decent amount of disposable income, I have these pangs of temptation every so often to buy the cards my inner 10-year-old still thinks would be awesome to own.
   33. The Duke Posted: January 12, 2018 at 07:02 PM (#5605750)
I love the action shots of the early 70s sets. For some reason, that style of photography did a better job of bringing the game to the card holder than today’s action shots. Many of them are more “candid” shots of players talking or leading off base - I though they were far more interesting than the real action shots they show today. But you always love the cars of your youth
   34. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 12, 2018 at 07:55 PM (#5605766)
I like the old cards for their beauty, in the same way that I love the look of late 19th century/early 20th century postage stamps. I know that the more modern, glossy or chrome cards are clearer and sharper, but I've yet to see a modern set that comes close to the appeal of some of those 1930s Goudey sets.

Well, if you want to go back aways, there's never been a set more beautifully produced than the Turkey Reds of the late 19th century.
   35. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 12, 2018 at 08:16 PM (#5605775)
But you always love the car[d]s of your youth


there's never been a set more beautifully produced than the Turkey Reds of the late 19th century.

Sometimes it's just too easy.
   36. Leroy Kincaid Posted: January 12, 2018 at 09:59 PM (#5605817)
I don't care for the cartoonish look the players had in most sets of the 1950's. The 60's had too many head-shots of guys not wearing a cap. Who's that? The equipment manager?
   37. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 12, 2018 at 11:01 PM (#5605833)
I like the '62 set, I have a few HOFers in that set, thanks Dad. My least favorite is 86. I like the 79 and 82 sets a lot.
   38. jobu Posted: January 12, 2018 at 11:06 PM (#5605834)
As far as independently drawn baseball cards go, these are great: Fungo Baseball Cards

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