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Friday, July 27, 2018

How Twitter Has Become Locker Room Poison

Jason Witten’s Social Media Commandments

1. Don’t read your mentions good or bad—the feedback that matters is from your coach and those you respect.
2. Don’t reply to a negative; keep your eye above the spectator line.
3. Negative social media is often not indicative of the real world.
4. Use social media as a way to stay informed and connect.
5. Don’t post anything that wouldn’t make your family proud.

Article is written about NFL locker room’s by NFL player Jason Witten but (ask Josh Hader) has some relevance to MLB players as well.  I think he does a good job not coming across as a get off my lawn type but having some good suggestions.

Jose is an Absurd Force of Nature Posted: July 27, 2018 at 03:37 PM | 28 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: nfl, social media

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   1. Man o' Schwar Posted: July 27, 2018 at 04:12 PM (#5717029)
I think if I were in the public eye, I'd take the "no social media at all" approach. Because no matter what, there are going to be people out there looking to comb through your tweets, Facebook posts, Instagram photos, and whatever else, and use them to criticize you.

Don't give them any ammunition.
   2. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: July 27, 2018 at 05:52 PM (#5717088)
I think if I were in the public eye, I'd take the "no social media at all" approach. Because no matter what, there are going to be people out there looking to comb through your tweets, Facebook posts, Instagram photos, and whatever else, and use them to criticize you.

I agree with you, but you're talking about a world obsessed with "branding".

Don't give them any ammunition.

About the only advice I'd give to anyone who thinks they have to use Twitter is not to say anything you're not willing to repeat in public. It'd spare a lot of people a lot of grief.
   3. Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim Posted: July 27, 2018 at 06:43 PM (#5717126)
Twitter is everything poison.
   4. McCoy Posted: July 27, 2018 at 06:49 PM (#5717129)
If you want to do branding just pay someone to manage your social media output. Athletes definitely don't need social media to land multi million dollar endorsement contracts.

Athletes use social media for the same reason everyone else does. Because they think they are important and people want to know what they are up to and believe in.
   5. I Am Not a Number Posted: July 27, 2018 at 06:55 PM (#5717137)
Athletes definitely don't need social media to land multi million dollar endorsement contracts.

But they need multimedia to share their wisdom about all manner of things. For instance, we in the general public need to be made aware of the non-spherical nature of our planet. Who better to impart such scientific insight than a professional athlete?
   6. catomi01 Posted: July 27, 2018 at 07:01 PM (#5717141)
5. Don’t post anything that wouldn’t make your family proud.


This still might backfire, depending on your family.
   7. Man o' Schwar Posted: July 27, 2018 at 07:12 PM (#5717148)
Athletes use social media for the same reason everyone else does. Because they think they are important and people want to know what they are up to and believe in.

The thing is, I never find myself wondering what a particular athlete or celebrity thinks about something. "I might buy this Big Mac tonight, but I need to know what Anna Kendrick thinks about McDonalds first" or "Does Omar Epps recommend seeing the new Ant Man movie?". Who cares? That's true about politics, world events, religion, and basically any other topic you can think of.

I'm on Instagram, but only to follow accounts that feature pictures and videos of adorable little dogs. They never say anything but "woof", and that's fine with me.
   8. Endless Trash Posted: July 27, 2018 at 07:22 PM (#5717152)
6. Do not use social media if you have had anything to drink. Anything at all.
   9. The Duke Posted: July 27, 2018 at 08:38 PM (#5717193)
Silent George Hendrick was a man many years ahead of his time
   10. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: July 27, 2018 at 10:01 PM (#5717217)
About the only advice I'd give to anyone who thinks they have to use Twitter is not to say anything you're not willing to repeat in public. It'd spare a lot of people a lot of grief.


Pretty good advice for most settings, to be frank. Be honest, be open, be unafraid, be thoughtful.
   11. Baldrick Posted: July 27, 2018 at 10:16 PM (#5717226)
The thing is, I never find myself wondering what a particular athlete or celebrity thinks about something. "I might buy this Big Mac tonight, but I need to know what Anna Kendrick thinks about McDonalds first" or "Does Omar Epps recommend seeing the new Ant Man movie?". Who cares? That's true about politics, world events, religion, and basically any other topic you can think of.

This is a perfectly valid opinion, but it is not one shared by the vast majority of social media users, who in fact do care what their favorite famous people think about stuff.
   12. PreservedFish Posted: July 27, 2018 at 10:36 PM (#5717234)
I don't think it's valid to assume that Twitter is exclusively frivolous off-topic chatter. If you're a big Omar Epps fan, Twitter is probably the best way to keep abreast of his latest artistic endeavors.
   13. Howie Menckel Posted: July 27, 2018 at 10:52 PM (#5717242)
Twitter is everything poison.

it can be - but the poisoner is usually one's own self.

I've mentioned before - if you have a Twitter account, you get to be the producer and the director. and if you like, even the actor.

as Fish notes, you can choose to only follow people whom you admire, follow political people who inspire you, follow athletes you can't stand so your blood boils.... bottom line is, if you hate the input you see on Twitter, that's on you.

if you are on Twitter already but on the fence about it because of how it makes you feel - then cull the herd of follows.

what I do is, whenever someone I follow (and it's around 200; people who follow 1K+ people is another angle for another day) tweets something that annoys me - and if it mentions the President, a yellow card is issued in my mind because I don't go there for that, either way - I look at their previous week's tweets and decide if they provide enough value to live to see another day in my feed. (and if you have a decent-sized following, the same happens to you. it might even be you lose out if you aren't political enough. I always tell people with a respectable following: you'll likely lose someone every week no matter what, so relax. and if your message resonates, you'll have a net gain every week as well.)

if not, they may be revived if someone else I follow RTs them here and there, and I decide I was fortunate not to miss that.

and if you have any kind of following at all, you won't even notice if a close family member drops you.
:)
   14. vortex of dissipation Posted: July 28, 2018 at 12:58 AM (#5717268)
The thing is, I never find myself wondering what a particular athlete or celebrity thinks about something. "I might buy this Big Mac tonight, but I need to know what Anna Kendrick thinks about McDonalds first" or "Does Omar Epps recommend seeing the new Ant Man movie?". Who cares? That's true about politics, world events, religion, and basically any other topic you can think of.


I think it depends. If it's within a celebrity's field of endeavor, what he or she thinks can be interesting. For example, after Bruce Springsteen mentioned that he liked the music of Thea Gilmore, whom I had heard of, but never actually listened to, I sought out her music and discovered I really liked her. I had to Google Omar Epps, because I'm not familiar with him, but apparently he's an actor, so yes, if he recommended the new Ant Man movie, that would have some validity. For things outside of the celebrity's area of expertise, I'd be a bit more wary.
   15. cardsfanboy Posted: July 28, 2018 at 01:47 AM (#5717275)
I get that since baseball fans are generally 50+ year olds, that this group here would have a problem with social media's mere existence, but it's a thing, it has value, and it has much longer term future for these athletes than a commercial deal for a local dealership. Social media allows a person to go beyond their one known marketable status and prove that they have more to offer than just hitting a baseball or tackling a quarterback. Athletes have an 8 - 12 year shelf life for the most part, at the same time they are going to make millions of dollars, and then they hope to turn that money into something more than just hookers and blow.

You have your Curt Schilling's who wanted to be a video game mogul, and potentially a us senator or more. You have Shaq wanting to be an actor. You have plenty of athletes out there that want to be musicians or at least backers behind music acts. And you are giving these guys millions of dollars at a young enough age that they can dream of a great future with that money and their drive and intelligence in theory. Social media is a way to do that. If you think your future is in politics(and there is no reason for an athlete to think they shouldn't be in politics) then you can start creating your message at a young age and develop a following.

At the same time, as pointed out, many people don't really craft a coherent message with a plan before posting, and those people probably need to have someone help them craft their message, while still setting up a system that allows them to post a quick thought, but create a check and balance to prevent mistake posts. Literally all Roseanne needed to have was one person check her tweets before she posted anything and she would still have a top rated tv show under her own name.(no excuse for the resident in chief, his followers are jonestown like, so he could say or do anything and no one will care)
   16. cardsfanboy Posted: July 28, 2018 at 02:01 AM (#5717277)
I had to Google Omar Epps, because I'm not familiar with him, but apparently he's an actor, so yes, if he recommended the new Ant Man movie, that would have some validity. For things outside of the celebrity's area of expertise, I'd be a bit more wary.


why? We listen to politics from a reality tv show guy.... and a large percentage of the "experts" on many news shows are just dabblers with no real experience in the field. While many actors and actress's have actually gone to college and studied something other than their profession. And it's not like joe plumber is some type of political expert. There is no reason to dismiss a celebrity take on something while accepting an opinion from your buddy from grade school. Now of course you should never take anyone 100%, but heck whenever someone who has money is talking about supporting something that is potentially against their financial interest, I'm going to take them a bit seriously. So when a white male celebrity talks about financial inequality of minorities or women, yes I'm going to pay attention to them a bit more than a white male politician talks about 'no financial inequality' between minorities and females. When people are talking against their own interest, I usually pay a bit more attention (unless they are plainly stupid and don't realize that they are talking against their own interest)


Ultimately people aren't single focused on a subject, (I mean I know baseball, comic books, helicopters, computers, computer programming, retail, I.T., military, bowling, and could probably carry on conversations about a dozen different subjects at a relatively high level such as evolution or physics, at least enough to satisfy a populist argument on it) and even within a subject there are always different viable intelligent arguments to be made from different point of views. You just need to weigh the different viewpoints and look at who is saying what. I mean just because a CEO for Comcast is an expert on the subject of net neutrality, it doesn't mean I will accept their argument as more viable than say Jon Oliver on the same subject? In fact, 10 out of 10 times, I'm taking Jon Oliver's point of view on that subject over the CEO of Comcast.
   17. cardsfanboy Posted: July 28, 2018 at 02:23 AM (#5717278)
Basically imagine if someone is telling you, that the only thing you can talk about is whatever is related to your job, and that you are not allowed to have an opinion on any subject other than your job? So if you are a computer programmer, you should not talk about music. If you work retail, you should not talk about politics. If you are an athlete, don't ever talk about religion. If you are a lawyer you should never talk... (actually that one makes sense, just shut up, you are pure evil... :) ) if you are a musician, you can't talk about healthcare etc....


That just seems so wrong on so many levels. If I have a voice and I want to talk about human trafficking, then it makes sense for me to use that voice and bring up issues. And even less important issues, I should still be allowed to say, without it getting dismissed simply because I'm a celebrity who has a job of acting, as if I do that 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Obviously in comparison to say a neutral expert in the field on a debatable topic (or even a non-debatable topic) their opinion should carry stronger weight... I get that. I mean for every Ashton Kutcher who lends a voice to human trafficking, you get a Jennie McCarthy lending their voice to goobly gook... I mean vaccines causes autism....or Kyle Irving to flat earthers... so sure, I'm not saying they know everything, but it's not like your brother bob has any more credulity. So you take it at face value and evaluate it as you would anything else anyone else has ever said to you.

   18. dlf Posted: July 28, 2018 at 08:18 AM (#5717288)
I just took a look at my twitter feed. It is almost all folks from the investing world with a focus on VCs (a16z, Ben Horowitz, Morgan Housel, Patrick O'Shaugnesy, Greylock, etc.) business schools (Sloan, Wharton, etc.), a couple of comedy related items (Calvin & Hobbes, A Small Fiction, etc.) and a very small number of sports related folks. There are some from those categories who veer into politics (Calcaterra, Marc Benioff, Elon Musk, etc.) but when the noise gets too high for the signal generated, I move on and, with almost 100% success, I don't read the reply to the folks I follow or their responses to those replies as that is, like Ivory Soap, 99.44% pure venom.

I'm pretty sure that the only folks who follow me on Twitter are bots or an occasional person I know in real life who stumbled upon me, who doesn't realize that I *never* post anything. My FB account is under the name of a one-time MLB player from the 1950s who basically is forgotten to the world. The account exists solely for an OOTP league where communication moved from email and a bulletin board to FB a couple of years back.
   19. BDC Posted: July 28, 2018 at 08:58 AM (#5717291)
It took me a long time to figure out what to use Twitter for. Finally I noticed that there are numerous accounts that only post fine-art images. I dropped everybody else and just started following them. I post and retweet these images occasionally, but almost nobody follows me or notices what I put up. That's fine; the whole purpose of my Twitter account now is to see and learn about new (or old/new-to-me) artists.

In that way Twitter can be tweaked to be analogous to Usenet or Reddit, zeroing in on a topic or a few topics of interest to the user (as dlf notes). I imagine there are lots of Twitter users who treat it that way. It's surprisingly flexible and useful. I do still follow LeVar Burton, since he was for some reason the first person suggested to me when I joined Twitter 9-10 years ago. LeVar posts every time he has a latte. He's perhaps no Omar Epps when it comes to acting chops, but the man can tweet.
   20. perros Posted: July 28, 2018 at 09:49 AM (#5717300)
what I do is, whenever someone I follow (and it's around 200; people who follow 1K+ people is another angle for another day) tweets something that annoys me - and if it mentions the President, a yellow card is issued in my mind because I don't go there for that, either way - I look at their previous week's tweets and decide if they provide enough value to live to see another day in my feed. (and if you have a decent-sized following, the same happens to you. it might even be you lose out if you aren't political enough. I always tell people with a respectable following: you'll likely lose someone every week no matter what, so relax. and if your message resonates, you'll have a net gain every week as well.)


Sounds like a second job.
   21. Omineca Greg Posted: July 28, 2018 at 10:31 AM (#5717310)
Finally I noticed that there are numerous accounts that only post fine-art images.

When you were in Sverige, did you get a chance to see Midvinterblot?

That's one hell of a painting.

In Göteborg, we saw Nordic Summer Evening.

You see the way they want to totally do each other like rabid weasels, but instead they're looking at the sun go down on a lake?

That's some serious circumpolar ####, right there.
   22. Howie Menckel Posted: July 28, 2018 at 10:45 AM (#5717315)
Sounds like a second job.

more like 'part of the job.'
   23. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: July 28, 2018 at 11:07 AM (#5717317)

There is no reason to dismiss a celebrity take on something while accepting an opinion from your buddy from grade school.
Sure there is. You should care more about what your friends think than what random strangers think.

Now of course you should never take anyone 100%, but heck whenever someone who has money is talking about supporting something that is potentially against their financial interest, I'm going to take them a bit seriously. So when a white male celebrity talks about financial inequality of minorities or women, yes I'm going to pay attention to them a bit more
Wait, you think virtue signaling is against the financial interests of celebrities?

At the same time, as pointed out, many people don't really craft a coherent message with a plan before posting, and those people probably need to have someone help them craft their message, while still setting up a system that allows them to post a quick thought, but create a check and balance to prevent mistake posts. Literally all Roseanne needed to have was one person check her tweets before she posted anything and she would still have a top rated tv show under her own name.(no excuse for the resident in chief, his followers are jonestown like, so he could say or do anything and no one will care)
If all one is trying to do is build ones brand, then one might as well just hire a PR company to run one's twitter account.
   24. BDC Posted: July 28, 2018 at 11:41 AM (#5717323)
When you were in Sverige, did you get a chance to see Midvinterblot?


Umn, no. That's one weird artwork. Once in Bornholm, in Denmark, I did see The Mysterious Wedding at Pistoia, which is equally, well, mysterious.

In Göteborg, we saw Nordic Summer Evening


Yes, midsummer and its possibilities seem to do strange things to the Scandinavian psyche. Munch painted a lot of midsummer scenes. You can follow him on Twitter!
   25. Zach Posted: July 28, 2018 at 01:31 PM (#5717353)
About the only advice I'd give to anyone who thinks they have to use Twitter is not to say anything you're not willing to repeat in public. It'd spare a lot of people a lot of grief.


Pretty good advice for most settings, to be frank. Be honest, be open, be unafraid, be thoughtful.


That's the opposite of what he says. You're saying be unafraid. He's saying you should act like you're being watched. Which, sadly, is closer to my opinion on the matter.
   26. Zach Posted: July 28, 2018 at 01:37 PM (#5717354)
The thing I hate about social media is how it causes people to focus on a tiny aspect of their personality and amplify it to the point that they start acting like raging narcissistic jerks.
   27. Hysterical & Useless Posted: July 29, 2018 at 03:31 PM (#5717679)
or celebrity thinks about something. "I might buy this Big Mac tonight, but I need to know what Anna Kendrick thinks about McDonalds first"


If Anna Kendrick wants to tell me personally what she thinks about McDonald's or anything else, I'll be right there, ready to listen and share my own thoughts. Sadly, I don't think this will ever come to pass.
   28. Fancy Crazy Town Banana Pants Handle Posted: July 29, 2018 at 03:42 PM (#5717685)
But they need multimedia to share their wisdom about all manner of things. For instance, we in the general public need to be made aware of the non-spherical nature of our planet. Who better to impart such scientific insight than a professional athlete?

#EarthIsNotASphere #TeamOblateSpheroid

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