Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Thursday, February 07, 2013

Hoyer Calls Connection To Schilling’s PED Accusations ‘Preposterous’

There’s a freakin’ pants load here…wheel in the Hoyer Lift!

Both Cubs President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein and Hoyer were members of the Red Sox organization in 2008.

“The first I ever heard of that was this morning when I saw it, so clearly, no, it didn’t ring true to me at all,” Hoyer said Thursday on The McNeil & Spiegel Show on 670 The Score. “I can tell you it would be preposterous that Theo or I would be involved in that. So I can comment for the two of us. I obviously wasn’t there. I don’t know the story he’s talking about so I can’t comment on the rest of it. I can tell you certainly it wasn’t Theo or me.”

...Hoyer responded Thursday by saying he has never been involved in a direct conversation about a player using PEDs.

“In my position going from intern to baseball operations all the way to assistant GM and GM it’s never something I’ve ever been confronted with, no,” Hoyer said. “But it is something that is a constant discussion in baseball because whether it’s a guy tests positive or there’s suspicions, it’s something people talk about, but it’s never something I’ve ever been directly confronted with.”

Repoz Posted: February 07, 2013 at 03:22 PM | 162 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: cubs, red sox

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 2 of 2 pages  < 1 2
   101. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:37 AM (#4365610)
BTW, Dale should get credit for one of the most successful threadjacks in the history of the site.
   102. OsunaSakata Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:39 AM (#4365613)
Here's a plug for Cul de Sac. I knew the cartoonist Richard Thompson when we were in college, although at different institutions, and he was nicknamed Pudsy. He announced in 2009 that he has Parkinson's disease.
   103. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:47 AM (#4365618)
Put me in the Bloom County was and still is awesome camp... I'll take it over Doonesbury any day of the week.

Breathed was taking potshots at Donald Trump before anyone in the nation knew that doing so was the real reason Trump existed.


Deflating Trump's ego? There's a difficult target...

Doonesbury made its share of Trump jokes, but it was also willing to take on people and issues that were much more controversial. See, for example, the storyline about Andy Lippincott's long, losing battle with AIDS. A strip like this one still has real punch even 20 years after it first ran.
   104. bobm Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:47 AM (#4365619)
It was a weird time. America's poisoned soul, its fast buck, #### in the well, #### anything id was in full, freakish flower. We thought we'd scraped Nixon, the original zombie pol, off the bottom of our collective shoe and rid ourselves of his verminous ilk, but here was Ronnie Reagan, the shambling, grinning monster from California, daddy to all the vicious, soulless hucksters now selling out the country from the halls of Congress. In 1989, too senile to impeach, Reagan left us a steaming turd of deregulation on the Oval Office carpet--his legacy--fertilizing the political soil for capitalism's permanent gangster class.


The 1980s kicked the crap out of the 1960s and 1970s.
   105. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:51 AM (#4365625)
I loved Calvin's father. Some of the best strips were the father messing with Calvin.


A memorable strip to me was when the father told Calvin that the sun sets in Flagstaff, Arizona and is the size of a quarter.
   106. Bitter Mouse Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:53 AM (#4365628)
The 1980s kicked the crap out of the 1960s and 1970s.


Decades are like baseball, they are "best" when we reach a certain age and then decline. Yard. Off. Get.

Seriously though all decades have their + and -. Musically it is hard to beat the 60s though.
   107. Lassus Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:58 AM (#4365635)
...but it was also willing to take on people and issues that were much more controversial. See, for example, the storyline about Andy Lippincott's long, losing battle with AIDS. A strip like this one still has real punch even 20 years after it first ran.

I know the perceived self-importance outweighs any good for Esoteric, but it's for strips and issues like that and homelessness and PTSD for soldiers that still make me wonder what he's reading.
   108. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:03 AM (#4365639)
And the absolute worst strips ever are "Mother Goose and Grimm" and "Barney and Clyde"

Er, no -- that would be "Mallard Fillmore."


One-note political hack strips don't even qualify for the award. You can add Prickly City into that category. Whenever the right wing wants to complain about affirmative action, those two might serve as Exhibits A and B in the realm of comic strips. The only liberal counterpart I can think of to them would be that unbelievably lame thing ("The Strip") that runs in the Sunday Review section of the NY Times. It's a tenth rate ripoff of Tom Tommorow's "This Modern World", and I can't figure out how it ever got in there to begin with.
   109. Mike Webber Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:04 AM (#4365641)
The Non-Adventures of Wonderella are generally pretty entertaining.
   110. The District Attorney Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:08 AM (#4365645)
Reading Doonesbury for the past couple decades has been like eavesdropping on a random dorm room conversation: I can't figure out who anyone is, they seem to be talking about stuff that they at least think is important, it's not particularly funny or compelling but is interesting enough to briefly absorb, I then move on with my life and never think about it again. If someone wants to argue that this reflects my inattention and general failings as a reader, I'm not gonna argue, but that's been my experience.

Let me give a shameless plug for my friend, who will very soon be debuting an iOS webcomic reader app, Comic Chameleon.
   111. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:11 AM (#4365651)
Reading Doonesbury for the past couple decades has been like eavesdropping on a random dorm room conversation: I can't figure out who anyone is, they seem to be talking about stuff that they at least think is important, it's not particularly funny or compelling but is interesting enough to briefly absorb, I then move on with my life and never think about it again. If someone wants to argue that this reflects my inattention and general failings as a reader, I'm not gonna argue, but that's been my experience.

Pretty much any continuity strip with strong identifiable characters that you only read sporadically is going to present the same problem. It's neither you nor Trudeau who's at fault.
   112. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:14 AM (#4365655)
Pretty much any continuity strip with strong identifiable characters that you only read sporadically is going to present the same problem. It's neither you nor Trudeau who's at fault.


Yeah, you can accumulate a lot of internal continuity in 40 years of daily strips.
   113. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:15 AM (#4365657)
And the absolute worst strips ever are "Mother Goose and Grimm" and "Barney and Clyde"

Er, no -- that would be "Mallard Fillmore."


That makes me chuckle. The Denver Post used to run "Doonsbury" on the editorial page, and then all the whiny Dittoheads started crying so they picked up Filmore and ran it alongside. Then they stopped running Doonsbury, leaving Filmore unopposed. I wrote a letter to the editor decrying the resulting lack of balance and demanded that to provide a counterweight they run another strip that was either funny or well-drawn.
   114. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:21 AM (#4365663)
What's even more pathetic about strips like Mallard Fillmore and Prickly City is that some conservatives actually present them as evidence that "conservatives have a sense of humor, too."
   115. phredbird Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:30 AM (#4365669)
If someone wants to argue that this reflects my inattention and general failings as a reader, I'm not gonna argue, but that's been my experience.


this reflects your inattention and general failings as a reader. i finally win one!

seriously, for all its innovation and high level of writing, some of doonesbury's stuff falls flat. he's had trouble with some of his characterizations. ron headrest was dumb. i didn't think he handled the bushes well, either, and i hate those @ssholes.

the whole 'red rascal' arc is just really boring. joanie and rick's kid is pretty uninteresting, i think. zipper, on the other hand, is inspired. trudeau's finding his rhythm again with some of the other younger generation characters like mike's daughter and her husband. that said, i don't get uptight about missing an occasional doonesbury. i'm more into pearls before swine, sally forth and lio.
   116. The District Attorney Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:39 AM (#4365681)
this reflects your inattention and general failings as a reader.
How dare you!
   117. Lassus Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:51 AM (#4365688)
joanie and rick's kid is pretty uninteresting, i think.

When Trudeau went on his hiatus I was in 7th grade, and we got an assignment to draw a recent important news event and to convey our opinion.

I did a drawing of a small crowd around a couple, happy and celebrating post-birth, fawning over a baby while someone walked away, only their back, hands in pockets. It had the whole long-shadows noir thing going on. I mean, Im' sure the drawing SUUUUCKED (it looks awesome in my head, trust me) but I was pretty proud of the concept despite having absolutely no artistic talent whatsoever.

When I tried to explain it to the art teacher I got the blankest of blank stares you have ever seen in your life. I think I got a C- and some kind of comment on what constituted an important event.
   118. zenbitz Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:05 PM (#4365697)
Best metal and punk rock is all from 1975-1988.
Concur on fims, although the special effects suffer these days.


Concur on Tom the Dancing Bug.
   119. Matt Clement of Alexandria Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:10 PM (#4365701)
All y'all read the Comics Curmudgeon, right?
   120. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:18 PM (#4365710)
That's kind of dirty pool, complaining that a daily strip isn't able to match a weekly. You think Wattterson might have been able to up his game a bit if he'd had six more days to work on every comic? Not to mention that by the '80s, nobody had the same sort of freedom with panel sizes that McKay enjoyed.

1925 vs. 2013
   121. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: February 08, 2013 at 12:46 PM (#4365722)
The link in 119 is fantastic. I hadn't seen that.
   122. Srul Itza Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:03 PM (#4365731)
Were the 80s a good time for _anything_?


Coke. The party never stopped.
   123. Bob Tufts Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:08 PM (#4365736)
I knew the cartoonist Richard Thompson


I prefer Richard Thompson performing "1952 Vincent Black Lightning"
   124. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:12 PM (#4365737)
When Trudeau went on his hiatus I was in 7th grade, and we got an assignment to draw a recent important news event and to convey our opinion.

I did a drawing of a small crowd around a couple, happy and celebrating post-birth, fawning over a baby while someone walked away, only their back, hands in pockets. It had the whole long-shadows noir thing going on. I mean, Im' sure the drawing SUUUUCKED (it looks awesome in my head, trust me) but I was pretty proud of the concept despite having absolutely no artistic talent whatsoever.

When I tried to explain it to the art teacher I got the blankest of blank stares you have ever seen in your life. I think I got a C- and some kind of comment on what constituted an important event.


WHY DIDN'T YOU INCLUDE AN EXCLAMATION POINT!!!!!
   125. Fernigal McGunnigle has become a merry hat Posted: February 08, 2013 at 01:47 PM (#4365763)
The 1980s kicked the crap out of the 1960s and 1970s.


In terms of music, I've always been a huge proponent of the 70s. A lot of what was best about the 60s trailed into the early 70s, and a lot of what was best about the 80s actually occurred in the late 70s. If you're a reggae person, then the 70s are head and shoulders above all other decades combined. The 70s were probably the last decade in which there was significant overlap between jazz that is vibrant and jazz that is mainstream. The 70s were the last gasp of what we might call first-wave soul (i.e., not the extremely slick studio soul that appeared later). The golden age of funk started at the end of the 60s and ran through much of the 70s. Disco. Krautrock. Glam. Prog rock had its heyday in the early/mid 70s. Led Zeppelin. Early peak metal. Punk in the middle and at the end. New wave at the very end. Oh yeah, outlaw country.

I prefer Richard Thompson performing "1952 Vincent Black Lightning"


Lots of Fairport Convention's best stuff is from the 70s. Nick Drake was 69-74.

   126. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:15 PM (#4365779)
The 60's had a few major advantages over the 70's musically speaking: the Beatles, the Velvet Underground, and maybe early Motown and early Dylan. Those are pretty significant, but as noted, the 70's had a lot of other stuff: Exile on Main Street, Nick Drake, Abba, Talking Heads, Fleetwood Mac, Led Zeppelin, the Ramones, David Bowie, The Clash, Marvin Gaye, Bob Marley and reggae generally, Stevie Wonder, Kraftwerk...

edit: And All Things Must Pass of course.
   127. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:25 PM (#4365787)
The last 10 years seem sort of blah for music and movies. A lot of good stuff has come out, but there aren't many movies or albums that really leap out at me. For movies, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind stands out. Wall-E, the Bourne movies, Lord of the Rings, Moulin Rouge are some others. Few albums really stand out. Is that just a function of my age? Or do we just need more time to get perspective?
   128. Matt Clement of Alexandria Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:28 PM (#4365788)
Few albums really stand out.
The album is over, man. The elevation of the album as the proper unit of popular music developed in the mid to late 60s alongside technology, with help from some clever marketing by record companies. (For a variety of reasons, the album-centered theory of music took hold much more strongly among rock fans than among fans of pop, soul, r&b or hip-hop.)

Thanks to digital music forms, the song once again rules as the proper unit of popular music. And folks are making great songs.
   129. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:43 PM (#4365797)
That's fair, but there aren't a ton of songs that really stand out either IMO. I'm not arguing that we don't have any good music -- there are lots of good solo artists and bands out there making quality stuff. It's just that there have been few songs that are inner circle GREAT. Hey Ya, Time to Pretend, and Poker Face are a few that stand out.
   130. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:45 PM (#4365798)
Yeargh, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder had significant output in the 60s as well as the 70s. Pop vs. more mature stuff, sure, but both were very, very popular and productive in the 60s.
   131. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:46 PM (#4365799)
Sure, but I think they peaked in the 70's. Same with the Stones.
   132. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: February 08, 2013 at 02:50 PM (#4365801)
Actually, I'm going to contradict myself a little: Crazy in Love, Hey Ya, and Poker Face are right up there with the best dance/pop songs of all time.
   133. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:10 PM (#4365804)
Yeargh, I'd say both Motowners had extended peaks. Gaye's early Motown is quite soulful. Wonder cranked out the hits. But I can see liking the 70s Gaye and Wonder better. [EDIT: I like them just as much on either side of the decade divide.] The Stones, sorry, but they peaked early and then put out mostly similar sounding chunka-chunka songs for the majority of their recording career, IMO.
   134. Misirlou was a Buddhist prodigy Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:27 PM (#4365814)
I loved Calvin's father. Some of the best strips were the father messing with Calvin.



A memorable strip to me was when the father told Calvin that the sun sets in Flagstaff, Arizona and is the size of a quarter.


And this one
   135. SoSH U at work Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:35 PM (#4365820)
I loved Calvin's father. Some of the best strips were the father messing with Calvin.



This one was my favorite involving Calvin's dad.

   136. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:46 PM (#4365828)
Mr. Speaker, the great state of me casts all its ballots for "How do they know the load limit on bridges, Dad?"
   137. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:46 PM (#4365829)
#134 is the one I was thinking of.
   138. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: February 08, 2013 at 03:50 PM (#4365833)
I always find it peculiar when people bemoan the state of music today because their framework is almost inevitably the music that is popular/known. If you look beyond the mainstream, there's a lot of amazing stuff being made.
   139. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:01 PM (#4365840)
That's part of the reason I raised the issue of needing more time for perspective. The Talking Heads weren't well known in 1979, but they were making amazing music. It's like that old joke about the Velvet Underground -- only a few thousand people bought their albums when they first came out, but every one of those people went on to form a band.

That said, most of what we consider great music was also fairly popular at the time it was made.
   140. Ron J2 Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:11 PM (#4365847)
#16 I asked for and received the first two volumes of the complete Bloom County (including the early stuff that never made it into any collections -- I thought I had everything, but there was stuff there I'd never seen before). It's hit and miss, but there's an awful lot of very good stuff.
   141. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:16 PM (#4365851)
I would say what the last decade has for it that did not exist previously is the sheer diversity and quantity of music that is available to anyone with an Internet connection. The "best" music today probably isn't objectively better than the best music from previous decades, but the types of music I like either didn't exist then or weren't accessible to a suburban high school kid without a lot of digging through the crates. (There's also the added benefit of being able to listen to samples of things before you buy them, which you didn't used to have, the ability to buy music by song rather than album, not to mention things like Pandora, all of which allow someone with limited resources to get more musical variety for their buck).
   142. Ron J2 Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:29 PM (#4365857)
#105 My favorite father moment was his response to Calvin asking how they knew how much weight a bridge could carry.
   143. zenbitz Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:31 PM (#4365858)
Aliens, Batman, Back to the Future, Baron Munchausen, Beetlejuice, Blade Runner, Brazil, The Empire Strikes Back, Ghostbusters, Predator, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Robocop, The Shining, Star Trek II, Time Bandits, The Terminator . . .


You forgot:
John Carpenter's: Escape from New York, The Thing, Big Trouble in Little China, They Live
David Cronenbergs': Scanners, Videodrome, The Dead Zone, They Fly, Dead Ringers
John Hughes: Breakfast Club, Wierd Science, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 'Planes, Trains and Automobiles'
Most of the Cohen Brother corpus is post 1990 but still had Blood Simple and Raising Arizona

Midnight Run
Real Genius
In the Cusack category: The Sure Thing, Better off Dead, Tapeheads, Say Anything, Sixteen Candles (John Hughes)




   144. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:42 PM (#4365864)

#143 How could you forget the original Die Hard? Basically the prototype for the modern action movie.
   145. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: February 08, 2013 at 04:58 PM (#4365877)
Raging Bull, Stand By Me, Full Metal Jacket, The Shining
   146. phredbird Posted: February 08, 2013 at 05:28 PM (#4365884)
Or do we just need more time to get perspective?


we just need more time. f'rinstance, i really really like 'adaptation' but have no idea how it will age. i recently watched benjamin button again, and was surprised about how much i liked it. i hope it goes on to achieve some cult status.
   147. Tippecanoe Posted: February 08, 2013 at 05:49 PM (#4365889)
Liked, never loved, Bloom County, so, comparing them to 50's outfielders, 80's comics go like this: Calvin and Hobbes is Mays (brought the most joy to watch), The Far Side is Mantle (peaked with the best laughs above replacement), and Bloom County is Robinson. Peanuts is Williams -- an obvious immortal, still capable, but aging and rapidly losing range.
   148. zenbitz Posted: February 08, 2013 at 06:35 PM (#4365902)
@144... list is not meant to be complete, but I was done with lunch/imdb surfing!
@145s are all good too, although The Shining was in the original list.
   149. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: February 08, 2013 at 06:58 PM (#4365909)
@144 - I considered 'Die Hard', but are action movies considered 'genre'? I always thought the term referred to SF, fantasy, and horror. I stand to be corrected, as ever.

As a kid in the 80s, it always seemed like some of the strangest, most wildly imaginative stuff out there was being made for children. 'Flight of the Navigator', 'Explorers', 'Short Circuit', 'Neverending Story' - they weren't always good, but they really went for it. Was this the influence of out-there Japanese animation for kids pushing the boundaries, post-Star Wars ambition, or just really, really good drugs?
   150. Walt Davis Posted: February 08, 2013 at 09:58 PM (#4365944)
I certainly know how influential Peanuts was - the bleakness just never resonated with me.

The most depressing site on the internet -- three-panel Peanuts
   151. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:02 PM (#4365946)
"3eanuts" is imitating the earlier site "Garfield Minus Garfield."

Another depressing takeoff.
   152. odds are meatwad is drunk Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:09 PM (#4365947)
I always loved the different snow men calvin would make.. the all time best is 3 of then standing around a car looking shocked and one one the ground in peices in front of the car. Just all sorts of awesome
   153. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: February 08, 2013 at 10:42 PM (#4365954)
I always find it peculiar when people bemoan the state of music today because their framework is almost inevitably the music that is popular/known. If you look beyond the mainstream, there's a lot of amazing stuff being made.


Biff--got three suggestions you want to share, of the kind we'd tend to overlook?
   154. Misirlou was a Buddhist prodigy Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:12 PM (#4365959)
I always loved the different snow men calvin would make..


It's a sorrid story
   155. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:15 PM (#4365960)
Biff--got three suggestions you want to share, of the kind we'd tend to overlook?

I will but my tastes lean more towards the metal end of the spectrum so they sort of have a limited audience. I've been listening to a lot of Agalloch lately (doom/black metal), and the track Falling Snow is particularly apt given the current state of affairs in the Northeast. (Warning - death vocals which are a turnoff for most people.) I always recommend Porcupine Tree (prog rock/prog metal) because they're my favorite band and they have a very diverse catalog. The song Where We Would Be is an excellent pop song which could appeal to anyone. My favorite release from last year was Devin Townsend's Epicloud, which was pop metal (if that's even a thing). My recommended song from that CD is Save Our Now.
   156. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:19 PM (#4365962)
Thanks. Metals not really my metier, but I'll take a listen.
   157. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 08, 2013 at 11:30 PM (#4365966)
To get back to the original story, this follow-up article seems to indicate MLB found Schilling's testimony was NOT credible.
   158. The District Attorney Posted: February 09, 2013 at 12:19 PM (#4366102)
Growing up a classic rock fan, it seems like 1971 was the anno mirabilis when a lot of great artists (or even not-so-great artists) put out great material -- Janis Joplin's Pearl, Yes' The Yes Album and Fragile, Jethro Tull's Aqualung, Leonard Cohen's Songs of Love and Hate, the Stones' Sticky Fingers, the Doors' L.A. Woman, Paul McCartney's Ram, Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, Rod Stewart's Every Picture Tells a Story, Joni Mitchell's Blue, Black Sabbath's Master of Reality, the Allman Brothers' At Fillmore East, Funkadelic's Maggot Brain, the Who's Who's Next, John Lennon's Imagine, T. Rex's Electric Warrior, Led Zeppelin IV, Sly and the Family Stone's There's a Riot Goin' On, the Kinks' Muswell Hillbillies, David Bowie's Hunky Dory... But, it's all totally subjective of course, and it seems pretty silly to argue that one period of time is objectively better than another.

I will say that, without radio, MTV, or even "albums" to give some sort of centralization and guideposts to the process, finding music now feels like more of an obscure pursuit. Of course, it's basically impossible for the music most easily accessible to you to exactly correlate with the music you'd enjoy the most, so it's always been necessary to do outside research. But it seems like more, now.
   159. Dr. Vaux Posted: February 09, 2013 at 01:40 PM (#4366112)
I think the '80s were the greatest era for 12-tone music.
   160. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: February 09, 2013 at 01:58 PM (#4366119)
Of course, it's basically impossible for the music most easily accessible to you to exactly correlate with the music you'd enjoy the most, so it's always been necessary to do outside research. But it seems like more, now.

On the other hand, it's certainly a lot easier to do outside research these days.
   161. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: February 09, 2013 at 02:01 PM (#4366120)
I think the '80s were the greatest era for 12-tone music.


It was certainly the best era for Tommy Tutone music.
   162. Commissioner Bud Black Beltre Hillman Posted: February 09, 2013 at 02:15 PM (#4366131)
Got a ton of music at college and basically let my collection stagnate since then. But between friends recommendations, "related artists", MOG/Pandora suggestions and my local college radio station, I've found a ton of new stuff in the last year (Woods, Castanets, Wooden Shjips + Moon Duo, Napolean IIIrd, DIIV, Rocket Juice, Health, James Yorkston, The Vessels, Tame Impala, Flying Lotus, Matt Baldwin, Follakzoid....). That list runs from folk to something-resembling-shoegaze to reggae to indie to post-rock to beats to pop to weird ass crap I can't even categorize; I gotta imagine that whatever your musical taste, there's some interesting stuff out there right now and, with the music streaming services and AllMusic and such, you can actually find it and hear it. It is a glorious time for music fans.
Page 2 of 2 pages  < 1 2

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Phil Birnbaum
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOT: Politics - December 2014: Baseball & Politics Collide in New Thriller
(5047 - 7:50pm, Dec 19)
Last: tshipman

NewsblogTrading Justin Upton means the Braves are in full rebuilding mode | Mark Bradley blog
(75 - 7:50pm, Dec 19)
Last: bigglou115

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 12-19-2014
(10 - 7:47pm, Dec 19)
Last: bobm

NewsblogFull Count » Source: Red Sox close to deal sending Will Middlebrooks to Padres for Ryan Hanigan
(9 - 7:40pm, Dec 19)
Last: Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer

NewsblogAmazin' Avenue - Cohen: Mets and Rockies discussing Troy Tulowitzki deal with Noah Syndergaard as the centerpiece
(30 - 7:30pm, Dec 19)
Last: Non-Youkilidian Geometry

NewsblogJerry Crasnick on Twitter: "Jake Peavy has agreed on 2 yr deal with
(9 - 7:02pm, Dec 19)
Last: AT-AT at bat@AT&T

NewsblogThe 2015 HOF Ballot Collecting Gizmo!
(110 - 7:02pm, Dec 19)
Last: Kiko Sakata

NewsblogOT: Monthly NBA Thread - December 2014
(739 - 7:02pm, Dec 19)
Last: Booey

NewsblogHow the Rays lost the City Council vote - DRaysBay
(4 - 6:55pm, Dec 19)
Last: RMc is a fine piece of cheese

NewsblogMax Scherzer not a realistic option, New York Yankees' Randy Levine says - ESPN New York
(66 - 6:47pm, Dec 19)
Last: bobm

NewsblogThe 4 surprisingly quiet teams of the MLB offseason
(26 - 6:43pm, Dec 19)
Last: bobm

NewsblogOT: NFL/NHL thread
(9173 - 5:25pm, Dec 19)
Last: Moses Taylor, Moses Taylor

NewsblogOT: Wrestling Thread November 2014
(159 - 5:04pm, Dec 19)
Last: NJ in DC (Now with Wife!)

Hall of MeritMost Meritorious Player: 1960 Ballot
(10 - 4:34pm, Dec 19)
Last: DL from MN

NewsblogRoyals sign Kris Medlen to two-year deal - MLB Daily Dish
(31 - 3:11pm, Dec 19)
Last: Dan Lee is some pumkins

Page rendered in 0.4770 seconds
48 querie(s) executed