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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Jack White, Eddie Vedder, and Paul Simon take in a Seattle Mariners game

I have a sudden urge to play The Jam’s “Thick As Thieves”.

mbd

Not since Ken Griffey Jr., Alex Rodriguez, and Edgar Martinez were lighting up pitchers in the 1990s has Seattle seen this much star power at its ballpark. Three generations of rock royalty, Jack White, Eddie Vedder, and Paul Simon attended today’s Mariners-Rangers game at Safeco Field.

White just finished up a two-night residency at Seattle’s Paramount Theatre. During night two, he dedicated his performance of “Steady As She Goes” to Vedder, who was in attendance.

Repoz Posted: August 27, 2014 at 06:32 PM | 200 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: mariners

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   1. The District Attorney Posted: August 27, 2014 at 06:46 PM (#4780335)
   2. frannyzoo Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:00 PM (#4780341)
Richard Dreyfuss, Bill Hader and a circa-1975 Jeff Bridges take in a baseball game...or make that a circa-1985 Daniel Stern instead of Bill Hader.
   3. mos def panel Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:02 PM (#4780343)
What, no Garfunklin' in Seattle?
   4. Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:11 PM (#4780354)
Not since Ken Griffey Jr., Alex Rodriguez, and Edgar Martinez were lighting up pitchers in the 1990s has Seattle seen this much star power at its ballpark. Three generations of rock royalty, Jack White, Eddie Vedder, and Paul Simon attended today’s Mariners-Rangers game at Safeco Field.
I've seen all three in concert. I love all three. I want to hug that picture.
   5. DKDC Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:19 PM (#4780358)
I'm still pissed at Jack White for playing a <45 minute set the last (and I mean, last) time I paid to see him live.

I saw Simon live a few years ago, and he was a ton of fun (and in contrast to White, played a full set despite a voice that comes and goes).

Vedder I just find incredibly annoying, and I'm exactly in the wheelhouse age for a potential Vedder fan.
   6. toratoratora Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:23 PM (#4780360)
I've seen all three also and I'd say PS is at least 2.0 WS (Wins above replacement level White Stripes show). Pearl Jam was as high as 1.8 and as low as 1.3, depending on the show.
S&G at Central Park now, that was at least a 3.2 WS, for historical "never thought I'd see these two on a stage together again" factors if nothing else.
   7. Chris Fluit Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:26 PM (#4780362)
I've seen all three in concert. I love all three. I want to hug that picture.


I'm only 2 for 3, though I'd love to see Jack White play live some time.
   8. Danny Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:31 PM (#4780369)
   9. ReggieThomasLives Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:38 PM (#4780373)
At least Vedder is a really nice guy, unlike that thievin douche Simon.
   10. Jim (jimmuscomp) Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:44 PM (#4780377)
#9 has it right.
   11. tshipman Posted: August 27, 2014 at 07:47 PM (#4780380)
At least Vedder is a really nice guy, unlike that thievin douche Simon.


Vedder might be a nice guy, but 90% of his band's output is unlistenable. And I like Seattle grunge.

Graceland is the best album made by anyone in that picture.

/hottake
   12. frannyzoo Posted: August 27, 2014 at 08:09 PM (#4780389)
To reiterate some of the above, Googling "Paul Simon a*shole" is good for an evening's entertainment. Think musical equivalent "Heart of Darkness" mixed with the typical musician's egomania/neurotics.
   13. vortex of dissipation Posted: August 27, 2014 at 08:35 PM (#4780409)
This interview with Steve Berlin of Los Lobos, detailing how Paul Simon stole one of their songs for his Graceland album, is a must read. It's the biggest diss of one musician by another musician that I've ever read.
   14. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 27, 2014 at 08:49 PM (#4780421)
Saw White Stripes in Memphis one night, then drove back to my then-gf's apartment in North Little Rock. I had a dental appointment the next morning, I think to get a temporary crown replaced with a permanent. Turned on the car radio, & 9/11 was in the process of happening.

Good thing they're no longer together, I guess; I'd be afraid to see them again, I think.
   15. vortex of dissipation Posted: August 27, 2014 at 09:14 PM (#4780449)
And Simon may be a song thief, but was born in 1941 and grew up in Queens. There's a very good chance he could be a good guy to take in a game with - he might have some interesting stories about games he saw growing up...
   16. eddieot Posted: August 27, 2014 at 09:40 PM (#4780475)
Seen all three. Love all three. Simon is a brilliant songwriter, based on his ability to embrace multiple genres effectively. White is an amazing performer and I consider myself lucky to have seen him just as the White Stripes exploded. Twice, he blew away the bands he opened for, by a lot. He's a tremendous live performer. Pearl Jam generates a lot of hate and they are my least favorite of the three, but seriously, that have a handful of great songs and Vedder has proven himself worthy of rock star status. Personally, I love this photo!
   17. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: August 27, 2014 at 09:48 PM (#4780485)
I love Jack White, but my baby's in love with Eddie Vedder
   18. bunyon Posted: August 27, 2014 at 09:52 PM (#4780487)
It's safe to say none of us would enjoy sharing a radio on a road trip.
   19. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:04 AM (#4780596)
t's the biggest diss of one musician by another musician that I've ever read.


I take it you're not counting Kenny G as a musician.
   20. PeteF3 Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:18 AM (#4780602)
Simon crapped out albums that were better than anything Los Lobos have ever done, long before they existed as a unit. Interesting that David Hidalgo has never to my knowledge said anything about this issue. At worst this seems to be an issue over just how much Berlin & co. "contributed" to All Around the World. Just the plain act of collaborating doesn't automatically entitle you to songwriting credit if you didn't contribute to the melody or the lyrics.
   21. theboyqueen Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:38 AM (#4780606)
Simon crapped out albums that were better than anything Los Lobos have ever done


The stealing stuff is overblown, but this is simply not true. Simon's best stuff craps over all of the above though.

To get all hipster, my favorite Jack White thing was a White Stripes song called "Hand Springs" that was part of a split 7 inch with the Dirtbombs that came with a pinball zine called Multiball. I bought the zine because I loved pinball and the Dirtbombs. I think that was the first thing I ever heard from the White Stripes. That single must be worth something now; I wonder if I still have it.

Actually the "Hello Operator" b/w "Jolene" single is one of the great double sided 45s of the past 30 years, at least. Which may not be saying much.

I can kind of admire Pearl Jam in the Status Quo/Grand Funk Railroad sense of a band who do almost nothing interesting musically and yet exist successfully for eons with no mainstream notice whatsoever.

I would compare them to Rush, but I kinda love Rush.
   22. theboyqueen Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:47 AM (#4780608)
Also Paul Simon, David Hidalgo, and Jack White are three awesome guitar players (who play very different styles, obviously). I could pick any of them out from a mile away.
   23. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: August 28, 2014 at 01:07 AM (#4780616)
Los Lobos


These guys actually played at my high school graduation party in SoCal in 1987...The party was in my best friends backyard.
It was pretty damn good.
   24. vortex of dissipation Posted: August 28, 2014 at 01:28 AM (#4780625)
I take it you're not counting Kenny G as a musician.


Ah, Pat Metheny. Forgot about that one - point taken!
   25. theboyqueen Posted: August 28, 2014 at 01:40 AM (#4780628)
There is also Kurt Cobain on Pearl Jam...
   26. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 01:50 AM (#4780629)
I prefer Eddie Vedder as an actor.
   27. Lassus Posted: August 28, 2014 at 06:44 AM (#4780649)
These guys actually played at my high school graduation party in SoCal in 1987...The party was in my best friends backyard

I'm not saying I disbelieve you, but Los Lobos opened a number of U2 stadium concerts that year on the Joshua Tree tour. Then again, perhaps your friend was one of the Barrymores.
   28. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: August 28, 2014 at 07:03 AM (#4780651)
#27, oh bugger, I've stuffed the year. It was '83, I graduated from Uni at Berkeley in '87. Foothill high school in Tustin. A friend of mine was a mate of one of the band members.
I turn 50 this year and just seem to forget stuff all the time.
   29. Lassus Posted: August 28, 2014 at 07:11 AM (#4780653)
I turn 50 this year and just seem to forget stuff all the time

Oh, from my age, allow me to tell you I'm sure it started earlier. You've just forgotten that it did. :-D
   30. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 09:38 AM (#4780687)
"So, Paul, what do you think of the Mariners' chances this year? Can they make it to the Series?"

"Well, I would not give you false hope on this strange and mournful day..."
   31. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: August 28, 2014 at 09:47 AM (#4780693)
I don't doubt that Simon is a jerk, but that Los Lobos story isn't very persuasive.
   32. McCoy Posted: August 28, 2014 at 09:52 AM (#4780695)
Pearl Jam was without a doubt my favorite band from the 90's but they did not age well for me at all. I thought the first 3 studio albums were great but No Code basically ended my urge to listen to Pearl Jam and outside of Do The Evolution on Yield that album machine gunned the survivors of my like for Pearl Jam. I'm trying to think of who I listen to now from the 90's but I can't really think of any. The decade didn't really age all that well.
   33. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 09:58 AM (#4780700)
Paul Simon looks sort of like Danny DeVito in that photo. Good lord.
   34. Manny Coon Posted: August 28, 2014 at 11:45 AM (#4780815)
I'm trying to think of who I listen to now from the 90's but I can't really think of any. The decade didn't really age all that well.


I have a completely different set 90's music I listen to now than then. At the time I probably listened to Nirvana, Pearl Jam, REM, Gin Blossoms, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Live, Soul Asylum, Our Lady Peace, the Refreshments and Stone Temple Pilots. Now I listen to Flaming Lips, Wilco, Neutral Milk Hotel, Olivia Tremor Control, Bjork, Pavement and Weezer. I still listen 90's REM and Nirvana just a little bit, but the other stuff not at all, although it might be guilty pleasure if it comes on the radio somewhere.

The 90's I lived and the 90's I go back to are completely different. I think a lot 80's nostalgia was at least a little like this too though, a lot of songs you might at an 80's night weren't necessarily big hits at the time.

Do people that are more into rap still listen to Biggie, Tupac, Snoop and old Wu Tang? From someone who isn't into that culture as much, it seems to have held it's popularity more from the outside.
   35. Alex meets the threshold for granular review Posted: August 28, 2014 at 11:59 AM (#4780828)
My Bloody Valentine, R.E.M., Swans, Radiohead, and the Magnetic Fields are my 90s go-tos - for rock, at least.
   36. McCoy Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:28 PM (#4780854)
In terms of me buying multiple albums:
Pearl Jam
Stone Temple Pilots
Nine Inch Nails
Hole
Garbage
Tori Amos
Bjork
Cranberries
Oasis
+1 I'm not admitting to.

I had a very specific time of interest in music. Basically from when I got a drivers license car to when I got out of school So roughly 1993 to 1997. If you weren't on heavy rotation on the radio during that timeperiod I wasn't going to know about you.
   37. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:31 PM (#4780859)
I still listen to a fair bit of stuff from the '90s: Mano Negra, Godspeed You ! Black Emperor, NIN, etc.
   38. Traderdave Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:38 PM (#4780864)
If you can admit to Pearl Jam & the Cranberries, I'm not sure I want to know what you're not admitting to....
   39. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:44 PM (#4780868)
90's bands I still listen to on a regular/semi regular basis:

Foo Fighters
Counting Crows*
Barenaked Ladies*
Fastball
Sister Hazel
Toad the Wet Sprocket*

*saw in concert recently

   40. Baldrick Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:53 PM (#4780877)
The 90s was great for music. Modest Mouse, Neutral Milk Hotel, all the other Elephant 6 bands, all the Sarah Records bands, Weezer, Sleater-Kinney, Super Deluxe, Aimee Mann, Radiohead, Eels, For Squirrels, Nirvana, Mountain Goats, Uncle Tupelo/Son Volt/Wilco, Smashing Pumpkins, Tool, Hum, Jeff Buckley, Magnetic Fields, Possum Dixon, REM, Rainer Maria, They Might Be Giants, Old 97s, Ani DiFranco, Tori Amos. Tom Petty had a couple very good albums. And I have a taste for ska and punk, too, so there's some serious riches there, too. Heck, I still like the Goo Goo Dolls output in the 90s a lot. And the first Third Eye Blind album is genuinely great. So are the first two Oasis albums. Garbage. Nine Inch Nails. I could go on and on.

And then all the glorious hip-hop from the early 90s. Easily the best era for rap music. I think you could stack up the music from just 1990-1994 against everything in the 21st century and come out ahead.

The major problem for the 90s, from my perspective at least, is that the 'pop' stuff was pretty awful. The sort of light R&B sound that was popular is not nearly as good as the soul music it was aping or the more dance-driven stuff that it evolved into and which ruled the following decade.

Basically, the 90s were great if you like guitar music or old school hip-hop. And if you can wade through the dreck to find the jewels, of course - but you have to do that in any era. I'm just old enough that that I listened to a lot of the artists above somewhat contemporaneously. I went to college in the fall of '99, and Napster soon brought many more of them to my ears. But I'm sure there are still huge holes in my knowledge of the early 90s indie scene. And I occasionally still dig back through some of that stuff and discover new gems.
   41. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 12:59 PM (#4780884)
I worked in college radio in the mid 90s, so I still have a soft spot for a handful of artists from the era, but agree that some of the stuff has not aged well.

Still play a fair amount of Garbage and Bjork among others. Wilco still performs well.
   42. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: August 28, 2014 at 01:16 PM (#4780893)
Speaking for Primates from all corners of the globe, including Australia (Phil Coorey), Canuckistan (Ryan Jones) and Hell (Sam), I'll throw my support behind the previously unmentioned Archers of Loaf.

   43. Kurt Posted: August 28, 2014 at 01:44 PM (#4780909)
It's odd, the 90's stations on XM are in my regular rotation (90's on 9 and Lithium) but I don't really listen to full albums by the bands anymore, except for Ill Communication and Check Your Head. Maybe Superunknown every once in a while.

38 - I bet it rhymes with Shrimp Wizkit.

   44. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 01:47 PM (#4780913)
If I ever start listening to music again (fingers crossed) -- damn you to hell, anhedonia -- I'm pretty sure I'll be happy to put my usual '90s suspects on regular rotation: Mekons (espeically Curse of & I [heart]), Chumbawamba (Shhh & its unauthorized original version, Jesus H. Christ, as well as Anarchy & Swinging with Raymond), the Waco Brothers' ... To the Last Dead Cowboy, Frank Black's Teenager of the Year, House of Love's 2nd s/t, Billy Bragg's Don't Try This at Home, the 148 albums that KMFDM released during the decade, Type O Negative's Bloody Kisses, the Dandy Warhols' Come Down, loads of Fall (especially Code: Selfish, Information Scan & Light User Syndrome), the Raincoats' Looking in the Shadows, the Jack Frost s/t, Pulp's His 'n Hers & Different Class, Grant McLennan's Watershed, Robert Forster's I Had a New York Girlfriend, the Chills' Submarine Bells, Soft Bomb & Sunburnt, Alabama 3's Exile on Coldharbour Lane, Dan Bern's s/t, Sisters of Mercy's Vision Thing, Fur's s/t, the first few Old 97s, Social Distortion's s/t ... tons, really.

Here's hoping.
   45. Ron J2 Posted: August 28, 2014 at 01:55 PM (#4780919)
#38 Vanilla Ice obviously.
   46. McCoy Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:03 PM (#4780925)
Nobody is even close yet.
   47. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:04 PM (#4780926)
Nobody is even close yet.


Celine Dion?
   48. Manny Coon Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:09 PM (#4780931)
Vanilla Ice obviously.


Color Me Badd, All 4 One, Backstreet Boys, Gerardo!

Limp Bizkit, Staind, Korn, early Insane Clown Posse!

Timmy T's "One More Try" on infinite loop.

And so many more to choose from! There is a lot of shame 90's if you know where to look.
   49. Random Transaction Generator Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:11 PM (#4780934)
+1 I'm not admitting to.


Paula Abdul
   50. Shredder Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:23 PM (#4780946)
I'm trying to think of who I listen to now from the 90's but I can't really think of any. The decade didn't really age all that well.
There's a lot of '90s stuff that I still listen to. The first couple Blur albums and a fair amount of Brit-Pop. Ride, Lush, and other shoegaze. I still listen to the first couple Dandy Warhols records, the Pixies, Frank Black, etc. But there's a lot of '90s stuff that I listen to now that I didn't listen to in the '90s, mostly Spritualized, old Super Furry Animals, the Brian Jonestown Massacre, The Apples in Stereo (and all Elephant Six), Guided By Voices, Superchunk. If you look beyond grunge and Brit-pop, there were a lot of good bands just getting underway in the '90s that ended up making some pretty good music.
   51. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:25 PM (#4780948)
POGS!
   52. McCoy Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:27 PM (#4780950)
None of those.
   53. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:43 PM (#4780965)
I like the Cranberries. Ode to My Family is a terrific song.
   54. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:44 PM (#4780966)
I don't mind the Cranberries at all, though I'm pretty sure that all I know them by is their radio hits.
   55. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:47 PM (#4780969)
Dinosaur Jr., Weezer, Stone Roses, Beastie Boys, Matthew Sweet, Achtung Baby and Zooropa, Nirvana of course...lots of great stuff from the early 90s.
   56. DKDC Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:50 PM (#4780973)
#52,

Dave Mathews Band? Nada Surf? The Rentals? Silverchair? The Toadies? Butthole Surfers? Seven Mary Three? Jars of Clay? Sublime? The Verve Pipe?
   57. The Chronicles of Reddick Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:55 PM (#4780975)
The last Soundgarden album "King Animal" was a mixed bag but the last 2 Alice in Chains Albums have been pretty solid. I like Pearl Jam but have had no desire to buy any of the recent albums. the only band that I buy albums from on a semi-regular basis from around that time is The Black Crowes.
   58. Booey Posted: August 28, 2014 at 02:56 PM (#4780976)
Nobody is even close yet.


Hanson. Or Kriss Kross.

I begrudgingly admit to listening to the latter for one summer in Junior High.
   59. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:00 PM (#4780979)
Christian rock?
   60. Lassus Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:02 PM (#4780981)
Hanson wrote some good songs. I don't recall any of them, but I remember thinking so when I heard them, in that other universe of the 90s.

Hey now, nothing bad on Nada Surf. My roommate was the Pete Best of that band. Or rather the Denise Crosby, I guess.
   61. Booey Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:29 PM (#4780997)
MC Hammer? Salt N'Peppa? Mariah Carey? Spice Girls? Britney Spears? Christina Aguilara?

I'm guessing the real answer is less embarrassing than our imaginations.
   62. tshipman Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:36 PM (#4781001)
The real wasteland in music is the period from about 1998 until 2002.

It's just awful. Hip Hop starts becoming super commercialized. Rock music is terrible until we get the new wave minimalism of the Strokes and similar bands.

It's just a barren wasteland in that time frame.
   63. PreservedFish Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:39 PM (#4781004)
Hanson is apparently still performing. And they have a beer called MmmHops. Not a joke.
   64. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:43 PM (#4781006)
The real wasteland in music is the period from about 1998 until 2002.

It's just awful. Hip Hop starts becoming super commercialized. Rock music is terrible until we get the new wave minimalism of the Strokes and similar bands.


Oh, I dunno. I remember doing a top 10 list for the newspaper in Little Rock. Can't remember all my picks, of course, but they included 13 Tales from Urban Bohemia, Journey to the End of the Night, The Friends of Rachel Worth, MDFMK, La Peste, World Coming Down & ... hmmm ... 4 other pretty darned good records. And that's just one year, obviously.
   65. RJ in TO Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:45 PM (#4781008)
Speaking for Primates from all corners of the globe, including Australia (Phil Coorey), Canuckistan (Ryan Jones) and Hell (Sam), I'll throw my support behind the previously unmentioned Archers of Loaf.


You're a good man, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise. The Archers of Loaf were ####### fantastic.

From the 90s, I'm also hugely partial to Gomez.
   66. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:45 PM (#4781009)
Hanson wrote some good songs. I don't recall any of them, but I remember thinking so when I heard them, in that other universe of the 90s.


Adam Schlessinger (of the unmentioned Fountains of Wayne) thought the same. Or, at least he thought it about 1/3 of the Hansons.
   67. villageidiom Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:46 PM (#4781011)
Nobody is even close yet.
George Michael.
   68. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:47 PM (#4781012)
Huge Magnetic Fields, Aimee Mann, E6, Loud Family fan then and now. Late 90s, I got into a lot of Merge bands.

Who did I listen to then but not now? Hmmmm. Rarely in the mood for Radiohead, Elliott Smith, Blur, REM, U2 - no knock on any of them... think I may have simply hit a saturation point (though that may not be permanent for the first three listed). Mostly lost interest in Beck with Sea Change, including his previous work, for some reason. (Midnite Vultures, tho, is still hot stuff.) A few acts I liked, probably because a girl liked them (like the Judybats) or stuff I knew was embarrassing at the time (like Consolidated). More "formal" stuff like the Verlaines fell away.

Not sure if I've "discovered" many 90's acts since then either - the gaps I've filled in predate that point, for the most part.
   69. Depressoteric feels Royally blue these days Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:48 PM (#4781015)
The real wasteland in music is the period from about 1998 until 2002.
A lot of people would say that the best rock group of the modern era peaked during that timeframe -- Radiohead, with Kid A. (I wouldn't agree, simply because I think their peak began with Kid A and didn't truly reach its zenith until 2006's In Rainbows, but there's a strong argument for both sides.)

But yeah, other than that (and maybe Blur's 13), pretty bleak period. Heck, even Pavement put out their worst LP during that era, the surprisingly poor Terror Twilight.

EDIT: Wait, The Flaming Lips put out The Soft Bulletin in 1999. Slightly overrated (their best stuff actually came before that time) but still a great record.
   70. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:49 PM (#4781018)
I like Terror Twilight a lot. (and am near alone in this.)
   71. Depressoteric feels Royally blue these days Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:52 PM (#4781021)
I like Terror Twilight a lot. (and am near alone in this.)
IMO it's got the three singles, all of which are excellent songs ("Spit On A Stranger," "Major Leagues," "Carrot Rope") and...that's about it. "The Hexx" is a great song in its Brighten The Corners-era incarnation ruined by a flaccid remake, "You Are A Light" and "Folk Jam" are semi-interesting, and the rest is as close to garbage as Pavement EVER came. A shockingly dispiriting end to a band that was otherwise supernaturally consistent.
   72. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:52 PM (#4781022)
The real wasteland in music is the period from about 1998 until 2002.

Very true. I having trouble remembering the big hits from that period. A good dividing line might be the release of Yankee Hotel Foxtrot in the spring of 2002. (Although Is This It came out a few months earlier)
   73. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:53 PM (#4781026)
stuff I knew was embarrassing at the time (like Consolidated)


??? I really like the first album & the "This is Fascism" single.
   74. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:54 PM (#4781027)
Ironically, 1998-2002 was a great period for movies.
   75. I am going to be Frank Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:54 PM (#4781028)
McCoy - U2?
   76. DKDC Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:55 PM (#4781030)
Eminem was in his prime during 1998-2002, but it was otherwise a pretty dark time for major label music talent.
   77. Depressoteric feels Royally blue these days Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:58 PM (#4781035)
The one that McCoy isn't admitting to has to be some ephemeral (and non-masculine) pop confection that has little relationship to the rest. Like Boyz II Men or Color Me Badd or TLC or maybe even Madonna.
   78. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 03:59 PM (#4781037)
Eminem was in his prime during 1998-2002, but it was otherwise a pretty dark time for major label music talent.


Enimem from that era always reminds me of Pink (no doubt because the video for "Without Me" always makes me think of the one for "Get the Party Started") from the same time. Missundaztood came out in 11/01 -- good album.
   79. DKDC Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:01 PM (#4781042)
Ephemeral?

From 1990-2002, TLC put out 10 top 10 singles, 4 number 1 singles, 4 multi-platinum albums, and won 5 Grammy's.

Show some respect.
   80. PreservedFish Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:02 PM (#4781043)
To me, Radiohead's triumph, Kid A, is enough on its own to rescue that time period. Of course there were other great albums released during that period but a lot of them were from bands that were already fairly well established (Yo La Tengo, Flaming Lips, Modest Mouse...)

A good dividing line might be the release of Yankee Hotel Foxtrot in the spring of 2002. (Although Is This It came out a few months earlier)

Is This It and White Blood Cells were both released in the summer of 2001. That seemed like a significant moment. And still does, I suppose.
   81. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:08 PM (#4781049)
From 1990-2002, TLC put out 10 top 10 singles, 4 number 1 singles, 4 multi-platinum albums, and won 5 Grammy's.


And, in the person of that one nutjob, burned down 1 mansion.
   82. Lassus Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:12 PM (#4781054)
Yo La Tengo, Flaming Lips, Modest Mouse

I know it's subjective, but I don't think the latter two are in the former's class. I somehow never ended up on the Flaming Lips' train, although lord knows I wanted to. And I flat-out think Modest Mouse sucked, but I might be biased as it was one of the worst live sets I've ever seen in my life.


Adam Schlessinger (of the unmentioned Fountains of Wayne) thought the same. Or, at least he thought it about 1/3 of the Hansons.

One of my all-time favorites. The decline from Welcome Interstate Managers to Traffic and Weather was dizzying. I have actually never heard Sky Full of Holes. I should remedy that.


A truly great band of the late 90s/early 00s was Semisonic. Dan Wilson is an upper-tier songwriter.
   83. Manny Coon Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:15 PM (#4781057)
1998-2002, but it was otherwise a pretty dark time for major label music talent.


Summerteeth is another good record from around then. Of course even though where major label, you'd never hear that or Soft Bulletin on the radio and even Kid A was limited on the radio. Summerteeth/Yankee whatever acclaim they had got Wilco dropped from their label. These days there is some revisionism going on with those though, I've heard them at restaurants and store recently. Daft Punk's Discovery came out in 2001 and is probably more popular now than then.
   84. RJ in TO Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:16 PM (#4781059)
I know it's subjective, but I don't think the latter two are in the former's class. I somehow never ended up on the Flaming Lips' train, although lord knows I wanted to. And I flat-out think Modest Mouse sucked, but I might be biased as it was one of the worst live sets I've ever seen in my life.


The Flaming Lips and Yo La Tengo are both absolutely brilliant bands. I have no problem with considering both to be top tier. With respect to Modest Mouse, I'm honestly not sure if I've ever heard a single song from them.
   85. Manny Coon Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:20 PM (#4781066)
With respect to Modest Mouse, I'm honestly not sure if I've ever heard a single song from them.


How does someone get through 2004 without hearing Float On?

Are they the most indie band with a song on a Kidz Bop record?
   86. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:21 PM (#4781067)
A truly great band of the late 90s/early 00s was Semisonic. Dan Wilson is an upper-tier songwriter.


I remember going nuts trying to figure out who did the great "Singing in My Sleep" (not the Chills song, obviously, though it's excellent as well) when I heard it over the P/A in the Flying Saucer in downtown Little Rock back then.
   87. RJ in TO Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:23 PM (#4781068)
How does someone get through 2004 without hearing Float On?


Accidentally? There are weird gaps in my musical knowledge, of which this is apparently one.
   88. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:27 PM (#4781072)
Accidentally? There are weird gaps in my musical knowledge, of which this is apparently one.


Look up the You Tube video. I'd be surprised if you hadn't heard it.
   89. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:30 PM (#4781077)
Accidentally? There are weird gaps in my musical knowledge, of which this is apparently one.


Hell, I never heard "My Generation," IIRC, till it happened to come on the PA in the plasma center while I was on my back pumping out blood in Tempe circa 1983 (by which time I was quite familiar with Generation X's "Your Generation" & Sham 69's "Whose Generation"). Utterly bizarre, of course, but these things happen.
   90. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:31 PM (#4781078)
gef/Consolidated: The subsequent three albums improved on the Myth of Rock lyrically and (more so) sonically, but all of them were polemics involving politics I didn't totally share. Business of Punishment was the best of the bunch.
They also got me in Meat Beat Manifesto (just as the Disposable Heroes got me into both Consolidated and Charlie Hunter's solo career. But not Spearhead; never Spearhead.)
   91. Lassus Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:31 PM (#4781079)
Look up the You Tube video. I'd be surprised if you hadn't heard it.

I'll have to do this too. I saw them in 1996 (maybe '97) in some club in Seattle and have actively avoided them ever since.
   92. PreservedFish Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:32 PM (#4781080)
I know it's subjective, but I don't think the latter two are in the former's class.


I'm with you on that. Yo La Tengo is a really special band. And they are so smart, friendly, and musically literate that they seem to stand outside of normal trends and eras. Like Phish, but in a good way instead of a bad way.
   93. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:34 PM (#4781083)
gef/Consolidated: The subsequent three albums improved on the Myth of Rock lyrically and (more so) sonically, but all of them were polemics involving politics I didn't totally share. Business of Punishment was the best of the bunch.


Definitely not the case for me. I've played Myth much more than all the subsequent albums combined, but admittedly I prefer its somewhat industrial vibe to the more (IIRC) rap direction they wound up taking. And I have no problem with the politics myself.
   94. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:35 PM (#4781084)
I have no problem with the politics - I just don't agree with them. (I'm a lefty, but very much a capitalist.)
Industrial is a tough nut for me, in general.
   95. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:39 PM (#4781089)
Industrial is a tough nut for me, in general.


I don't sit around & marinate in it or anything, but obviously I have a major weakness for the likes of KMFDM in particular & quite a few of the other (former) Wax Trax acts, along with various other kindred spirits.

Authorities believe early exposure to Throbbing Gristle & especially Cabaret Voltaire was involved.
   96. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:44 PM (#4781096)
I kept trying that stuff (and those artists) - nothing stuck (well, other than MBM, but they were always a little different from the Nitzer Ebbs of the world). What I wanted, as it turned out, was disco-like dance-punk.

Am I alone in not liking Yo La Tengo? They seem like good dudes (and smart and etc...), but other than a song or two, they put me to sleep.
   97. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:47 PM (#4781098)
What I wanted, as it turned out, was disco-like dance-punk.


Examples? Radio 4 & The Rapture come immediately to mind for me; I like that sort of thing just fine.

Am I alone in not liking Yo La Tengo? They seem like good dudes (and smart and etc...), but other than a song or two, they put me to sleep.


The 3 or 4 albums I've heard (from about 12-15 years ago, I suppose) are perfectly pleasant, but I keep hearing a heavy Sonic Youth influence that keeps YLT from sounding sufficiently distinctive to me. Saw them live in Nashville about 14 years ago, but all that really sticks with me is their encore cover of "Borstal Breakout."
   98. Greg K Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:53 PM (#4781107)
90s Bands on my MP3 player...which now that I look at it take up about 85% of the volume:

54-40, Blake Babies, Blur, Bush, By Divine Right, Elastica, Everclear, Fountains of Wayne, Flashing Lights, Hayden, Limblifter, Nerf Herder, Nirvana, No Doubt, Oasis, Ocean Colour Scene, Pavement, Pixies, Pluto, Pulp, Sloan, Stereophonics, Superdrag, Breeders, Cardigans, Delgados, Fugees, Headstones, Inbreds, Lemonheads, Odds, Super Friendz, Tragically Hip, Thrush Hermit, Tool, Travis, Treble Charger, Veruca Salt, Weeping Tile, Weezer.

Cardigans are probably a personal favourite.
   99. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:54 PM (#4781109)
Seriously, nobody else listens to Mano Negra? They're really good. Radio Bemba Sound System (technically a Manu Chao album, but it's all the guys from the band playing together) is probably my favorite non-Talking Heads live album.
   100. Ok, Griffey's Dunn (Nothing Iffey About Griffey) Posted: August 28, 2014 at 04:56 PM (#4781111)
1998-2002, but it was otherwise a pretty dark time for major label music talent.


QOTSA's Rated R was release in 2000, Songs for the Deaf in 2002
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