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Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Kevin Towers, former D-backs, Padres GM, dies | MLB.com

Sad news.

Former Padres and D-backs general manager Kevin Towers has died after a battle with cancer. He was 56.

Jim Furtado Posted: January 30, 2018 at 11:56 AM | 49 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: kevin towers, obituary

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   1. Jeff Francoeur's OPS Posted: January 30, 2018 at 12:04 PM (#5615793)
Wow, awful.
   2. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: January 30, 2018 at 12:06 PM (#5615797)
#### cancer. That is all.
   3. dlf Posted: January 30, 2018 at 12:06 PM (#5615799)
56. Wow, that is young. F cancer.
   4. reech Posted: January 30, 2018 at 12:07 PM (#5615800)
terrible
   5. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 30, 2018 at 12:26 PM (#5615820)
####### awful.

Speaking from inside the field, though, I think we're on the cusp of major field-changing new therapies for treating cancer and we'll see them increasingly reach the clinic as their efficacy and safety become better-established. I often tell people that when my daughter is my age she'll look back at how cancer was treated in the 20th century and think it was one step above bloodletting.
   6. Moeball Posted: January 30, 2018 at 01:14 PM (#5615865)
As to Towers as a GM, credit him with the trade that brought Steve Finley and Ken Caminiti to the Padres which paid dividends in 1996 and 1998. He also arranged the one year lease of Kevin Brown for 1998. So Towers actually did a decent job of getting Bruce Bochy the players he needed.
   7. . . . . . . Posted: January 30, 2018 at 01:57 PM (#5615919)
Speaking from inside the field, though, I think we're on the cusp of major field-changing new therapies for treating cancer and we'll see them increasingly reach the clinic as their efficacy and safety become better-established. I often tell people that when my daughter is my age she'll look back at how cancer was treated in the 20th century and think it was one step above bloodletting.


Can't happen soon enough. When cancer got my dad a few years ago, each drug the doctor (at MSK, no less!) recommended was more than 30 years old. Not only was treatment ineffective and grueling, it was practically prehistoric.
   8. . . . . . . Posted: January 30, 2018 at 01:59 PM (#5615922)
Holy ####, this makes glioblastoma seem like a walk in the park:

Treatment of anaplastic-type carcinoma is generally palliative in its intent for a disease that is rarely cured and almost always fatal, with worse prognosis associated with large tumours, distant metastases, acute obstructive symptoms, and leukocytosis. Death is attributable to upper airway obstruction and suffocation in half of patients, and to a combination of complications of local and distant disease, or therapy, or both in the remainder.

Anaplastic thyroid cancer is extremely aggressive; in most cases death occurs in less than 1 year as a result of aggressive local growth and compromise of vital structures in the neck. ATC in most series has a median survival of 4 to 5 months from the time of diagnosis, with rare long-term survivors.[6]

   9. Bourbon Samurai, what price fettucine? Posted: January 30, 2018 at 03:14 PM (#5615992)
Can't happen soon enough


Agreed. We had my best friend over for dinner this weekend. His dad just went from hale and hearty on columbus day to a stomach ache over thanksgiving to a diagnoses of cancer the next weekend to death by mid-january.
   10. Swoboda is freedom Posted: January 30, 2018 at 06:21 PM (#5616100)
Agreed. We had my best friend over for dinner this weekend. His dad just went from hale and hearty on columbus day to a stomach ache over thanksgiving to a diagnoses of cancer the next weekend to death by mid-january.

My dad died 10 years ago. He was driving home from watching the NCAA Final Four and noticed his vision was blurry in one eye. Next day he goes to eye doctor, before the weekend he had surgery for brain cancer (GBM same one as McCain). He was dead before the New Year.
   11. OsunaSakata Posted: January 30, 2018 at 07:25 PM (#5616127)
Mariners GM Jerry Dipoto and my wife had thyroid cancer surgery in the same year. For both of them, it was the more common, not very aggressive form.
   12. AndrewJ Posted: January 30, 2018 at 07:43 PM (#5616138)
My 46-year-old sister was diagnosed earlier this month with stage 2 breast cancer. After checking with her birth mother, however, she doesn't have the cancer gene -- she'll only need a lumpectomy as opposed to a double mastectomy which should speed up her eventual recovery.
   13. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 30, 2018 at 08:01 PM (#5616153)
Can't happen soon enough. When cancer got my dad a few years ago, each drug the doctor (at MSK, no less!) recommended was more than 30 years old. Not only was treatment ineffective and grueling, it was practically prehistoric.


I’m working on a project with MSKCC right now, and another one with a neuro-oncology group from Mayo. The old approach of killing everything with the hope that the cancer dies first is going to seem as antiquated to our children as treating syphillis with mercury. Immunotherapy and related mark-and-target approaches are changing everything. We finally have weapons that work.
   14. Man o' Schwar Posted: January 30, 2018 at 08:17 PM (#5616163)
His dad just went from hale and hearty on columbus day to a stomach ache over thanksgiving to a diagnoses of cancer the next weekend to death by mid-january.

That's what it was like with my mother. Saw her at Christmas and she seemed fine. In February, she fell and broke her arm. Turned out she had metastatic tumors in her bones. By mid-May she was dead.

Obviously she had been sick and not known it for awhile, but the speed with which she went downhill was just terrible to watch.
   15. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: January 30, 2018 at 08:52 PM (#5616179)
I’m working on a project with MSKCC right now, and another one with a neuro-oncology group from Mayo. The old approach of killing everything with the hope that the cancer dies first is going to seem as antiquated to our children as treating syphillis with mercury. Immunotherapy and related mark-and-target approaches are changing everything. We finally have weapons that work.


I agree based on my own work. They are incredibly expensive weapons, though. Instead of giving molecules, that are only expensive because drug companies need to stay in business, immunotherapy is kind of like giving every patient a personalized bone marrow transplant.
   16. eric Posted: January 30, 2018 at 09:39 PM (#5616203)
Similar story. Good friend, 52, healthy one day (seemingly), diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer the proverbial next, dead within a few months.

Not to turn to more selfish thoughts, but no matter how much I think I've come to terms with my own mortality, it never gets any easier to face. Kevin Towers was younger than I am now back in the late 90's at a time I remember just like yesterday, and now he's dead. My own turn might just be a hop, skip and a jump away. Or just a hop.

I can see why people get more religious as they get older.
   17. Rough Carrigan Posted: January 30, 2018 at 11:15 PM (#5616280)
#5, I was treated for cancer 7 years ago and at one point the doctor was telling me how much better the treatment was than it had been 20 years ago, calling that treatment brutal or barbaric, I forget which. I casually remarked that 20 years from now they'll probably think what you're proposing to me is brutal or barbaric. He was quite offended and, it seemed to me, quite surprised. I wasn't very impressed. But then I was told I wasn't a good patient. I asked too many questions.
   18. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: January 31, 2018 at 01:48 AM (#5616333)
With it being Wednesday morning in Texas, my 16 year old son is starting his 11th day in ICU. Nausea on Friday a week ago turned into more nausea and altered mental status on Saturday resulting in a trip to the ER Saturday night which turned into transfer to another hospital ICU early Sunday morning which turned into a bigger hospital ICU Sunday afternoon all within a span of about 16 hours. Ammonia levels in his blood were so high for the first test (800 for you medical types, 0-30 is "normal" for you non-medical types) that the doctors thought it was a mistake and repeated it. It then climbed another 50% from there to 1200 before they could start dialysis and get it down to where it's now pretty stable in the 20's. The toxicologist working the case said she's never seen levels that high in her career. Doctors still have no idea what caused it, although blood cultures are at another facility for advanced mitochondrial and metabolic testing for what I guess are fairly rare conditions.

MRI shows what the neurologists are calling a "significant" brain injury from the elevated ammonia levels, one which he may not fully recover from. But since he started waking up about 6 days ago (I guess.... the days have all run together since this started), each day he shows more awareness and cognition. He's been intubated all this time and he really wants it out. He's trying to get out of bed. He understands our questions about how he feels and responds appropriately. He's trying to talk through his breathing tube. He moves all 4 limbs and his head vigorously but appropriately, purposeful movements vs flailing. He follows our commands for things like stop biting the breathing tube or stick out his tongue or breathe slower and deeper. Despite the MRI, doctors are encouraged by his progress to this point and the breathing tube could possibly come out as early as later today and they're starting to talk about "when he is moved to a regular room."

We dodged a bullet. One of the doctors said if his will to breathe wasn't so strong, he well could have died before they got the ammonia level down. If you have kids at home, hug them tight tonight. Like Yogi said, youneverknow.
   19. DFA Posted: January 31, 2018 at 02:22 AM (#5616336)
Godspeed #18. I've been to the ER for my 6 year old countless times, it knocks you back...
   20. Count Vorror Rairol Mencoon (CoB) Posted: January 31, 2018 at 05:13 AM (#5616340)
Prayers, PRD, hopefully your son fights all the way back and kicks its ass.
   21. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: January 31, 2018 at 07:32 AM (#5616344)
Geezus. What a totally bizarre thing to hit him out of the blue. My sincerest sympathies.

My daughter was mis-diagnosed with cystic fibrosis by her pediatrician. Because of some colleagues of mine I was able to get her in to see a top specialist in CF the very next day. I remember sitting in the waiting room and my eyes landing on a display where you could sign your child up for Make-A-Wish, and thinking that my life wasn’t worth living if I didn’t have my perfect little girl with me.

The specialist took all of 2 minutes to tell us there was no way she had CF, that her lung capacity was well above-average, and that she almost certainly had an environmental allergy causing her respiratory distress.

I was so angry at the pediatrician for her misdiagnosis that I changed the way I drove to work to protect myself from ever making a snap decision to go by her office and assault her. I’m still angry about it.
   22. . . . . . . Posted: January 31, 2018 at 07:45 AM (#5616346)
PRD, I have a friend whose daughter had a metabolic stroke several years ago from a rare mitochondrial disease (so rare that it didn’t show up on the full genetic testing they’d had done when their daughter was born). Similar type story to yours in many respects, except the girl was younger - 2 or 3.

Anyways, the therapy was tough, and the girl still walks kind of funny, but she’s basically OK. Normal school, no cognitive issues, etc. Her recovery is apparently unusual but brain stuff is hard to predict and she was more responsive than they expected pretty much from day 1.

   23. Bourbon Samurai, what price fettucine? Posted: January 31, 2018 at 09:53 AM (#5616390)
Wow, PRD, prayers for a full recovery.

YR, that's awful. I basically have a full blown panic attack every time I have to take the kids to the doctor anyway, convincing myself something is wrong. If I'd heard that I might have had a stroke.
   24. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 31, 2018 at 09:54 AM (#5616391)
Should I be embarrassed that I confused him with Kevin Malone? (Seriously, there was an outpouring of plaudits for him, and my reaction was, "Wait, I thought nobody liked him." Took me a while to realize my error.) Same age as my mother z"l; I hate cancer.
   25. SoSH U at work Posted: January 31, 2018 at 10:00 AM (#5616394)
Damn, Pat, best wishes to your son and the entire family. That's terrifying.
   26. Dingbat_Charlie Posted: January 31, 2018 at 10:02 AM (#5616397)
PRD, good luck and my thoughts are with you.
   27. dlf Posted: January 31, 2018 at 10:06 AM (#5616399)
PRD ~ I hope all goes well for your son. There can be nothing worse than seeing your child seriously ill. My daughter (who turns 21 today!) had fairly routine surgery eight days ago and the hours in the waiting room were beyond description. And that pales in comparison to what you and your family are dealing with. I know it means basically nothing, but do understand that a bunch of random strangers on a silly baseball board are pulling for you and PRDjr.
   28. Ray (CTL) Posted: January 31, 2018 at 11:03 AM (#5616428)
Melanoma got my dad in September 2011. He was diagnosed in May 2009 and they got it out. Lymph nodes were clear. But it turned out it was in the blood. Came back in September 2010. It was all over the place but the immediate problem was that a tumor had wrapped around his spinal cord and had fractured his vertebrae and his vertebrae was hanging by a thread. Had to have emergency surgery to put a metal cage in for stabilization; he was hours or days from becoming a paraplegic. But of course the root cause of the problem remained, as he had metastatic and systemic disease. It was a rough year. He couldn't so much as lie on his back because of the pain, and so he had to sleep sitting up in a La-Z-Boy chair. And a multitude of other problems and complications -- some that were worse than anything I could have imagined would happen. The point where people start realizing that death is not only inevitable but a step up is a difficult time.

I do wonder whether a heart attack is better. There's no time to say goodbye, but, then, saying goodbye is very difficult too.

At any rate, as only 8K or so people in the US die from melanoma every year it hasn't received the focus and attention that many other diseases have, as far as treatments go. If your disease maps to certain genes (e.g., BRAF) some of the drugs do better but otherwise they're just throwing stuff against the wall and hoping it sticks. We got ipilimumab and he was on Avastin (actually a breast cancer drug) for a while but none of it did much good.

As ever with cancer, of any type, really: get it early, if you can. Obviously all types are different but once it sinks it's tentacles in it becomes a very rocky road, and all bets are off.
   29. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: January 31, 2018 at 11:15 AM (#5616437)
To be honest, although not that many people die of it, there IS a lot of research done on melanoma because it is one of the easiest cancers to detect at early stages, and also it's one of the easiest cancers to study in animal models. But like you say, if it's already metastasized the situation is totally different. Not much we can do.

Some of the interesting genetic research done is now not so much on the tumor, but on the areas where it might metastasize to. The problem, most of the time, is metastasis. The tumor is constantly releasing cells that COULD seed in other areas, but only a tiny number ever do. How do we get that number to zero?
   30. Ray (CTL) Posted: January 31, 2018 at 11:19 AM (#5616440)
You're right -- there is indeed a focus on early detection for skin cancer. I should have noted that.

Really it's the whole ballgame if you're talking about melanoma.

My guess is that "skin cancer" doesn't sound deadly to most people -- it didn't to me, before all of this --so they sort of slough it off. Indeed unless it's melanoma it's fairly manageable. Certainly for basal cell. Squamous cell is more complicated but usually they can handle it.
   31. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 31, 2018 at 11:34 AM (#5616452)

My guess is that "skin cancer" doesn't sound deadly to most people -- it didn't to me, before all of this
My mother was lost to melanoma, too, back in 1999, and that's exactly what my reaction was before I did any research. "Hmm, what's melanoma? A form of skin cancer? Well, that doesn't sound very bad at all." Then I learned that melanoma was really really very much not like normal skin cancer.
   32. . . . . . . Posted: January 31, 2018 at 11:41 AM (#5616459)
Haven't we actually made a ton of progress against metastatic melanoma with immunotherapy? I have an acquaintance who was involved in one of the early clinical trials, was a responder, and is now like, gosh, 3 or 4 years out and still in remission.
   33. Ray (CTL) Posted: January 31, 2018 at 11:59 AM (#5616476)
My mother was lost to melanoma, too, back in 1999, and that's exactly what my reaction was before I did any research. "Hmm, what's melanoma? A form of skin cancer? Well, that doesn't sound very bad at all." Then I learned that melanoma was really really very much not like normal skin cancer.


When I learned that there was an issue and that the dermatologist had stopped in the process of removing what he thought was basal cell and had sent out for a biopsy, I looked up skin cancer online. I first saw basal cell and poked around and was like, eh, nothing here that's too much of a problem. I got to squamous cell and was like, hmm, a bigger problem to be sure, but seems like they can handle it. Then I got to melanoma and within 60 seconds I closed the page. Let's hope it's not that.

A few days later my parents called me at work. I was sitting at my desk. They told me it was melanoma. I felt light headed all of a sudden and the room started spinning and I literally passed out. The next thing I knew I woke up on the floor of my office with the phone on the floor next to me.

I knew it wasn't a good situation.

We did get it out and it looked ok for a while but it was just too deep/long. >8mm as I recall, which was basically the last column on the mortality rate survival rate charts.
   34. Zach Posted: January 31, 2018 at 05:00 PM (#5616786)
Best wishes, PRD.
   35. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: February 03, 2018 at 02:29 AM (#5618511)
Many heartfelt thanks to everyone in this thread. PRD3 (I'm actually PRD Jr) has now been extubated for 12 hours and asleep for the last couple of those. For a kid who got such a dire diagnosis from Neurology a week ago, the comment I'm most struck by was from his nurse today: "I saw the MRIs. Science doesn't explain this."

While now extubated, he asks for water a lot. Who knew being intubated for almost 2 weeks could dry your throat out? He has asked where his phone is. He asked to watch a Pirates of the Caribbean movie in his room (sign of lingering brain damage there? /too soon?). He asked to take his condom catheter off because he didn't like the way it felt and has successfully alerted his evening nurse in time to get the urinal bottle in place when needed. He's short of breath so he runs out of air when he tries to tell or ask us something longer than about 5 or 6 words and that frustrates him. He bent his legs while on his back and raised his butt off the mattress for about 3-5 seconds so his "special pants" could be adjusted (we don't dare use the "d" word around a 16 year old boy). And most importantly, he sat straight up in bed with his back off the mattress so he could lean forward, put his arm around my back, and hug me while saying he loved me. A week ago, I didn't know if I'd ever have that again. To get it even one more time is such a tremendous blessing.

As the days pass from here, I'm sure we'll find things that may not work quite as well and will need some therapy. However initial returns are that he is already very communicative and aware of himself and his surroundings. Large muscle strength and control seems to be pretty good, although his right arm is appreciably weaker than his left. He hasn't tried to read or write anything yet, but it's only been 12 hours and is probably still under some lingering effects of sedation. Aside from the raspy voice, his speech seems to be right on. In short, he looks and acts like a boy who just woke up from a nap and not that he almost died two weeks ago and was in a coma for about a week and a half. It took him a few days to start moving and waking up once the ammonia levels came down, and that had doctors concerned, but PRD3 is just killin' his recovery so far. Now if we only knew what caused it and how to keep it from happening again.
   36. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: February 03, 2018 at 04:41 AM (#5618520)

That's great news, PRD (Jr.).
   37. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: February 03, 2018 at 08:48 AM (#5618536)
Great news to wake up to. Takes the sting out of being one egg short when making breakfast.
   38. Ziggy's screen name Posted: February 03, 2018 at 12:54 PM (#5618630)
I only just now clicked on this thread, and when I got to your initial post I was worried about what I'd see at the end of the page. But I'm really really glad that PRD3 is doing well. Best wishes from a stranger on the internet. I really hope that you can figure out what went wrong and that the kiddo's recovery continues to go well.
   39. Ray (CTL) Posted: February 03, 2018 at 02:54 PM (#5618717)
That's much better news, and best wishes Pat Rapper's Delight.
   40. Bourbon Samurai, what price fettucine? Posted: February 03, 2018 at 04:43 PM (#5618763)
PRD that's great. I'm relieved to hear that.
   41. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: February 03, 2018 at 04:52 PM (#5618765)
And most importantly, he sat straight up in bed with his back off the mattress so he could lean forward, put his arm around my back, and hug me while saying he loved me. A week ago, I didn't know if I'd ever have that again. To get it even one more time is such a tremendous blessing.

This is one of the best things I've read in quite a while. Very glad you're getting good news, PRD.
   42. dlf Posted: February 04, 2018 at 08:56 AM (#5618908)
And most importantly, he sat straight up in bed with his back off the mattress so he could lean forward, put his arm around my back, and hug me while saying he loved me. A week ago, I didn't know if I'd ever have that again. To get it even one more time is such a tremendous blessing.


Damn it, PRD, you shouldn't post something like that when it's dusty in the room. Here's to hoping for many, many more touching moments for you and PRD3.
   43. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: February 04, 2018 at 09:05 AM (#5618914)
Most dust is actually dried flakes of human skin. Hope that makes you feel better, dlf.
   44. Dingbat_Charlie Posted: February 04, 2018 at 03:14 PM (#5619066)
Congrats, and thanks for posting that update.
   45. SoSH U at work Posted: February 04, 2018 at 05:53 PM (#5619120)
That's great to hear PRD.
   46. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: February 13, 2018 at 12:10 PM (#5624223)
One more update here before I un-bookmark the thread. PRD3 was discharged from the hospital and went home yesterday evening. He needs some physical therapy to address his right-side weakness, especially in his shoulder, but he can lift his elbow a couple of inches off the bed now where initially he couldn't at all. He's walking fine with a walker until his strength and balance fully return. Mentally, he seems to have fully recovered with his memory, personality, and sense of humor intact.

It was a harrowing week and a half or so when everyone feared the worst, but since he started waking back up it's all been good news. Doctors still don't know what caused it or why he recovered, but the main thing is we got him back. One of the neurologists said if they can't diagnose a root cause, it's not necessarily bad news because it may never happen again. We'll certainly be on high alert though any time he starts having any nausea.

In short, he is a miracle.
   47. Steve Parris, Je t'aime Posted: February 13, 2018 at 01:53 PM (#5624334)
That's great news, PRD.
   48. . . . . . . Posted: February 13, 2018 at 03:47 PM (#5624482)
Long life and good health to him.
   49. Bourbon Samurai, what price fettucine? Posted: February 13, 2018 at 04:12 PM (#5624509)
So great to hear.

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