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Sunday, January 20, 2019

Kris Bryant dissed St. Louis and Yadier Molina called him a loser

Chicago Cubs third baseman Kris Bryant might get booed more than normal the first time he plays the St. Louis Cardinals in 2019. Bryant drew the ire of the entire Cardinals fanbase, and catcher Yadier Molina, Saturday after calling St. Louis “boring.”

Bryant made those comments while appearing on a show hosted by Ryan Dempster. You can watch the full exchange below.

Bryant mentioned that he met Nelly at a concert during the offseason. He noted that Nelly is a Cardinals fan, which drew boos from the audience. Bryant joined in and encouraged the booing before saying, “Who would want to play in St. Louis? It’s so boring. I always get asked, like, where do you like to play where do you not like to play, and St. Louis is on the places I don’t like to play.”

Mind you, can anyone abuse St. Louis as much as the last 119 years of American history have?

 

QLE Posted: January 20, 2019 at 09:48 AM | 87 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: kris bryant, st. louis, yadier molina

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   1. Leroy Kincaid Posted: January 20, 2019 at 10:42 AM (#5806900)
Wonder if "boring" is another word/phrase that triggers Molina into a violent rage.
   2. The Duke Posted: January 20, 2019 at 11:28 AM (#5806911)
I lived long stretches in both places and they are both great places to live. It is rather stupid for leaders like Bryant to be saying stuff like this. If Addison Russell said this it might make more sense but it’s an odd ad hominem attack from a star player. Speaks to a maturity issue and perhaps better helps to understand the Chili Davis issue
   3. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 20, 2019 at 11:35 AM (#5806914)
Maybe not all that surprising from a kid who grew up in the Douchiest City in the World, but yeah, he comes off as kind of bratty.
   4. cardsfanboy Posted: January 20, 2019 at 11:45 AM (#5806916)
ehh... it's just rivalry talk, nothing to get upset about. He has to play up his fans and knows the audience well.

I agree to an extent that this is not the way a leader on a team should behave, but the Cubs really don't have a leader, it's more about 25 guys and 25 cabs type of thing. (and at least Bryant was at the fan fest thing, Molina never shows up to the Cardinals fan fest thing. I'm going to the bbwaa writers dinner tonight, and I'll bet he won't be there either)
   5. Jose is an Absurd Kahuna Posted: January 20, 2019 at 11:47 AM (#5806918)
I’m with cfb, as a fan gimme the guy who says mean things about your rivalries. This isn’t something to be taken seriously, it’s just what politicians would call an applause line.
   6. Astroenteritis Posted: January 20, 2019 at 12:13 PM (#5806926)
My wife and I were in the St. Louis area in August 2017 for the solar eclipse, and I can say the Missouri Botanical Garden is very nice. Highly recommend, if you're into that kind of thing.
   7. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 20, 2019 at 12:25 PM (#5806927)
Something tells me that's not going to change Bryant's mind.
   8. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: January 20, 2019 at 01:23 PM (#5806943)
This is good beef. I can't see how anyone can get legitimately upset about this. It'd be like a Yankees player calling Boston a small town.
   9. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 20, 2019 at 01:53 PM (#5806947)
It'd be like a Yankees player calling Boston a small town.

That's actually true. I like Boston a lot, but the city itself is tiny.
   10. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: January 20, 2019 at 02:38 PM (#5806952)
Being able to walk across the city is one of the things I like about Boston (going to a baseball game at Fenway and then walking up to the North End on the opposite side of the city for dinner takes roughly an hour)- but I was referring more to things like this. I can see how a New Yorker views pretty much everyone else as being from a small town, but places like Philly and Houston can eat my whole ass if they think they're a more impressive burg.
   11. cardsfanboy Posted: January 20, 2019 at 02:43 PM (#5806954)
That onion article is hilarious... I'm going to have to bookmark that.
   12. SoSH U at work Posted: January 20, 2019 at 02:44 PM (#5806955)
Being able to walk across the city is one of the things I like about Boston (going to a baseball game at Fenway and then walking up to the North End on the opposite side of the city for dinner takes roughly an hour)- but I was referring more to things like this. I can see how a New Yorker views pretty much everyone else as being from a small town, but places like Philly and Houston can eat my whole ass if they think they're a more impressive burg.


As someone who has spent years living in rural communities, where actual small towns are plentiful, I've always hated when people refer to cities of varying sizes as "small towns." If Boston's a small town, then you pretty much run out of ways to describe the 99.99 percent of municipalities that are smaller.

   13. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 20, 2019 at 02:48 PM (#5806956)
I can see how a New Yorker views pretty much everyone else as being from a small town, but places like Philly and Houston can eat my whole ass if they think they're a more impressive burg.

I'm referring to the physical reality. Houston is massive, as is LA. Far bigger geographically than NY. Boston is small.

Also, by population, Boston itself is 600,000 people, Phillie is 1.5 million, Houston 2 million.

Boston is roughly the same size as Baltimore or Milwaukee. It's not a big city. Being rich and nice doesn't make it big.
   14. cardsfanboy Posted: January 20, 2019 at 02:49 PM (#5806957)
Being able to walk across the city is one of the things I like about Boston


trying to do that in St Louis and you'll likely end up in the hospital or robbed. :)

I'm a suburb guy, the city is fine for a few go to places, but it's not somewhere where I'd want to live...and it's not just St Louis, it's pretty much any city. I want a yard, no neighbors that I have to worry about upsetting if I turn the washing machine on at 3am etc.
   15. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 20, 2019 at 03:14 PM (#5806964)
I'm a suburb guy, the city is fine for a few go to places, but it's not somewhere where I'd want to live...and it's not just St Louis, it's pretty much any city. I want a yard, no neighbors that I have to worry about upsetting if I turn the washing machine on at 3am etc.

I could live in the city in a brownstone with a small yard, but, you are correct that apartment living absolutely sucks.
   16. asinwreck Posted: January 20, 2019 at 03:21 PM (#5806965)
I like taking MetroLink when I get in to either the airport or Union Station, as I usually have interesting conversations with commuters. Though work usually take me to University City, I've enjoyed hanging out to see some of the recent developments in the Grand Central area.
   17. Howie Menckel Posted: January 20, 2019 at 03:31 PM (#5806967)
the link in No. 10 is to an amusing Onion article - and I like Boston.
   18. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: January 20, 2019 at 03:47 PM (#5806968)
Boston is the center of the sixth largest csa in the US at 8.2m people. That's larger than Philadelphia and Houston by over a million people.
   19. Lars6788 Posted: January 20, 2019 at 04:06 PM (#5806969)
This will be brushed aside or turned against Molina being too sensitive but for a guy who has been a national superstar like Bryant, he comes off as a dope.
   20. Howie Menckel Posted: January 20, 2019 at 04:56 PM (#5806971)
Boston is the center of the sixth largest csa in the US at 8.2m people. That's larger than Philadelphia and Houston by over a million people.

true, but NY is first at 23.9M and LA is second at 18.8M.

plus the "over a million people" than PHI and HOU doinks the goal post and the crossbar, but just falls through for the extra point.

   21. greenback slays lewks Posted: January 20, 2019 at 04:59 PM (#5806972)
Maybe not all that surprising from a kid who grew up in the Douchiest City in the World, but yeah, he comes off as kind of bratty.

My impression of Vegas was that it is more vulgar than douchy. San Francisco seems to be douchier to me, that they've built an impenetrable barrier to keep 'undesirables' out, and have done so in a way that is socially acceptable (for now). This is completely in conflict with the city's reputation.
   22. Fancy Crazy Town Banana Pants Handle Posted: January 20, 2019 at 05:48 PM (#5806980)
Population matters of course when deciding what is a city, and what is big v small. But so does area and population density. Especially once you get to levels like MSA and CSA. Some of those can contain a whole bunch of suburban sprawl, and essentially rural areas. Using any of those to "add" to how big a city is is nonsensical. Two million people in a relatively condensed area can be a "bigger" city than 5 million people spread out over 5 times the area.

Just eyeballing things, the LA CSA is particularly hilariously big - 34,000 sq. miles. I could expand the "area" of London to include all of south England, and it would still be quite a bit smaller than that (24000 sq. miles), and the population would go to 28 million... But nobody would ever do that, because it's stupid.
   23. I am going to be Frank Posted: January 20, 2019 at 06:28 PM (#5807006)
St. Louis was one of the least impressive cities I've been to. There wasn't much to downtown. You got the arch, Busch Stadium (maybe the most uncomfortable I've ever been in a baseball stadium - hot and muggy) and a lot of vacant buildings advertising loft apartments. I didn't fell all that safe walking around my hotel near Union Station. There are some breweries and that area by Washington U, but nothing special. I did have some great BBQ and it was nice not having to rent a car. Maybe I just didn't go to the "right" places.
   24. Joe Bivens, Slack Rumped Rutabaga Head Posted: January 20, 2019 at 07:00 PM (#5807016)
Boston proper is relatively small, but there are neighborhoods that make up the rest of the city, and you can't walk from the southernmost point in the city, Hyde Park, to the northernmost part of the city, East Boston, in anything close to an hour. It would take 4 or 5 hours.
   25. McCoy Posted: January 20, 2019 at 07:07 PM (#5807020)
Re 23. Head to Baltimore. The original St Louis
   26. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: January 20, 2019 at 07:45 PM (#5807026)
Boston north to south is a lot longer a walk. And NYC, LA, and Chicago are much bigger cities. But Boston is comparable to the rest in the US. And my insistence on this is why studies like that Onion one are written.
   27. McCoy Posted: January 20, 2019 at 07:58 PM (#5807031)
Out of the top 17 cities in America the only one Boston is comparable to is San Francisco and that is only on land size. SF is still 200,000 people larger. DC and Seattle are similar in that they have somewhat the same population size and have similar land size. On the lower end you got Baltimore and Milwaukee
   28. Jacob Posted: January 20, 2019 at 10:19 PM (#5807173)
"More Than a Feeling" is better than anything Chicago ever recorded.

   29. Omineca Greg Posted: January 21, 2019 at 07:52 AM (#5807236)
C'mon Kris! Geez, Yadier! Let's remember the words of one of St Louis' greatest philosophers, Oliver Sain. Solomon Burke called him, "The Quincy Jones of St. Louis."

No. No. That was meant to be a compliment...Anyway, Oliver wants everybody, and I mean everybody, to join together in peace and harmony and do the St. Louis Breakdown.

But what's the first place he names, the first place he wants to join him in doing the St. Louis Breakdown?

Chicago! You know it! Mr. Sain is sending out an olive branch to you.

Let's not quibble about the size of the cities. Size doesn't matter! Not when you're doing the St. Louis Breakdown anyway...

Dedicated listeners will notice that Oliver doesn't list the Omineca as one of the exact regions he wants to do the St. Louis Breakdown. But listen closely, and you'll hear that there's a personal invite to me specifically. Check it out...

Hey babe...

Shush..shush...I think he's talking to me. Yes, Oliver?

...with the hot pants on...

Well, now I'm sure he's talking to me. These started out as boxer shorts, but I've gained a bit of weight recently, so they do look just a little bit like hot pants...

...get up and break it down!

You got it Oliver. You got it.

I want everybody to put down their petty grievances and break it down, right now. But more importantly, Oliver Sain wants you to do the breakdown...

St. Louis Breakdown

Whooh! I was breaking it down so hard, and my hot pants were so tight, now I have a line of sweat forming around my gut crease. I'm glad that wasn't the extended version, or I'd be dehydrated. Time for a shower.
   30. SouthSideRyan Posted: January 21, 2019 at 08:52 AM (#5807239)
I know the topic has veered into the interesting how big are cities conversation, but the 25 cabs for 25 guys line when talking about the Cubs may be the most misinformed thing I've seen on here since politics threads got nuked.
   31. McCoy Posted: January 21, 2019 at 09:02 AM (#5807241)
Well it was CFB. I think most people figured it was a cards fan trolling.
   32. Lassus Posted: January 21, 2019 at 11:01 AM (#5807283)
Props to #28.
   33. Chicago Joe Posted: January 21, 2019 at 11:06 AM (#5807287)
Well, in StL, cabs won’t even stop for half the guys.
   34. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 21, 2019 at 02:47 PM (#5807389)
"More Than a Feeling" is better than anything Chicago ever recorded.


After the first two Chicago albums, I won't argue a bit. But Make Me Smile, Beginnings, 25 or 6 to 4? And since I'm a Man never gets airplay, try I'm a Man (Live). Plenty of cowbell for Christopher Walken, too.
   35. Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington Posted: January 21, 2019 at 03:20 PM (#5807404)
I lived long stretches in both places and they are both great places to live. It is rather stupid for leaders like Bryant to be saying stuff like this. If Addison Russell said this it might make more sense but it’s an odd ad hominem attack from a star player. Speaks to a maturity issue and perhaps better helps to understand the Chili Davis issue

This will be brushed aside or turned against Molina being too sensitive but for a guy who has been a national superstar like Bryant, he comes off as a dope.

These are both dumb. Bryant is about as bland as they come - he's one of those guys who seems to have been created in a lab to be a marketable baseball player - he's still with his HS sweetheart, claims he doesn't drink ever...basically, I'm sure this was a line that was fed to him just to get the reaction it did at both the Cubs convention and with the dense Cards fans. He said the city was boring, I mean, that's not even an insult and people are somehow upset by it. This is a "visitor locker rooms suck at Wrigley" level dig.
   36. Greg Pope Posted: January 21, 2019 at 03:21 PM (#5807405)
I don't get #29 at all, but BBTF is a better place with Omenica Greg here.

   37. Howie Menckel Posted: January 21, 2019 at 04:55 PM (#5807425)
Well, in StL, cabs won’t even stop for half the guys.

this one isn't getting enough love
:)
   38. Infinite Yost (Voxter) Posted: January 21, 2019 at 06:40 PM (#5807454)
Suburbs are gross.

That is all.
   39. cardsfanboy Posted: January 21, 2019 at 07:31 PM (#5807472)
He said the city was boring, I mean, that's not even an insult and people are somehow upset by it. This is a "visitor locker rooms suck at Wrigley" level dig.


Sadly it's actually a repeated refrain about St Louis from players... Brandon Phillips also made that similar comment, and of course most people take pride in their hometown and get a bit upset if you even obliquely insult it. There is some truth to it of course, St Louis isn't a bustling metropolis, it has it's charming spots, and a few things of interest, but being one of the smaller cities in the majors it's missing that night life that players would hope to have.

I could point out a lot of nice things about St Louis, but many of that (see botanical gardens in post 8) is stuff a person isn't going to care about when they are busy during the day and early evening. I don't have a problem with casual people not liking the city, everyone has their thing. Again as I said before this is a nothing comment, that is just a bit of rivalry talk. It feeds the press for a few days and allows the players to have a bit of a back and forth to show their love for the team they are playing for, it's as beneficial to the Cardinals as it is to the Cubs for these type of things to come up every once in a while.
   40. cardsfanboy Posted: January 21, 2019 at 07:33 PM (#5807473)
Suburbs are gross.


Cities are gross... having to actually see your neighbors, not having a yard for your three dogs, having to deal with leash laws etc..... ecch.... give me a front yard, a back yard with a fence, a garage and a basement every day of the week than paying three times that amount to get 1/4th the square feet and having to deal with neighbors. (mind you, suburbs are getting bad in several areas thanks to busy bodies like homeowners association.... I'll never live in one of those areas.....)
   41. I am going to be Frank Posted: January 21, 2019 at 08:26 PM (#5807495)
Re 23. Head to Baltimore. The original St Louis

Baltimore isn't all that great, but it has the Inner Harbor for the tourists, which is a lot better than the area around the Arch. The area around Camden Yards is also nicer than the area around Busch. Fells Point isn't bad if you want to feel slightly less touristy and want to get some food and drinks. There are some other areas that are ok and more places are becoming hipster and gentrified, but yeah, there is still large portion of the city that is made infamous by "The Wire." I am much more likely to want to visit Baltimore again, rather than St. Louis.

This is just the city itself. As for suburbs, that's really all I'm used to, and while it has his plusses I'd rather have the option to walk to places, food options that are open after 9PM and a little more diversity to everything. Also, there are large portions of many cities where it feels like suburbs, especially as you get out of the northeast. There are large swathes of Charlotte, Phoenix, Las Vegas and Dallas (these are cities that I'm more familiar with) which I would consider very suburban
   42. cardsfanboy Posted: January 21, 2019 at 08:59 PM (#5807508)
food options that are open after 9PM


That is a good point, outside of fast food or bars, there really is nothing like that around where I live.

Baltimore isn't all that great, but it has the Inner Harbor for the tourists, which is a lot better than the area around the Arch.


Don't know anything about Baltimore, but there is a lot of work being done at the arch to spruce the place up, and I think the area immediately around Busch is solid, especially with the improvements the last two years on ballpark village. Just don't go more than three blocks away.

   43. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 21, 2019 at 09:02 PM (#5807511)
Well yes, most non coastal cities (not all) especially not in the NE, lack what I would call 'urban density'. (this is 2016 data)

New York, N.Y.: 27,012.4
San Francisco, Calif.: 17,179.2
Jersey City, N.J.: 16,736.6
Boston, Mass.: 12,792.7
Santa Ana, Calif.: 11,900.8
Chicago, Ill.: 11,841.8
Newark, N.J.: 11,458.3
Philadelphia, Pa.: 11,379.5
Miami, Fla.: 11,135.9
Hialeah, Fla.: 10,474.2
(DC would place 8th)

The only large (200,000 or more total pop.) 'flyover' cities even at 5,000 or more people per square mile are: Buffalo, Rochester Milwaukee, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Pittsburgh and St. Louis (barely), though is Sacramento flyover? just over 5,000. Every new south city, or western city isn't really close, many are in the 2,000 to 3,750 sq mile range.

   44. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 21, 2019 at 09:13 PM (#5807516)
Suburbs are gross.


All depends on your demographic, phase of life, etc. It's one of the reasons that I see the only difference in mankind being 'people with kids, and people without kids.' I've lived in both for nearly equal portions of my life. They both have wonderful attributes and painful shortcomings.

I was just planning another Cactus League trip and my trip mates and I talked about having spent 30+ days and nights in the Phoenix area over the years and not once have we set foot in downtown Phoenix.
   45. McCoy Posted: January 21, 2019 at 09:16 PM (#5807518)
The area around Camden yards is largely major roads, three dive bars, two hotels, some gas stations, a fire station and a print shop. You can throw in a casino now if you're willing to walk a good bit.

   46. Howie Menckel Posted: January 21, 2019 at 10:35 PM (#5807548)
not once have we set foot in downtown Phoenix.

spoiler alert: there is no downtown Phoenix - or if there is, it is off-limits to visitors.

that Patriots-Giants I Super Bowl ended around 7:30 pm local time.
by 10:30 pm, the only place still open 'downtown' was the Dan Majerle's sports bar. and it was virtually empty.

I was just in Scottsdale yet again in November. I like it, except for the 'good luck finding a restaurant after 10 pm' as well.
   47. Styles P. Deadball Posted: January 22, 2019 at 09:01 AM (#5807591)
not once have we set foot in downtown Phoenix.


I was there in September for a concert and you haven't missed anything. I made the mistake of going out looking for something to eat at about 2 in the afternoon. After I burst into flames walking around for about 15 minutes, I crawled into a Five Guys and thanked my lucky stars I was someplace away from the sun.
   48. Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington Posted: January 22, 2019 at 11:51 AM (#5807657)
Someone change Yadi's diaper:

Three days after the St. Louis Cardinals catcher called Bryant and former Chicago Cubs pitcher Ryan Dempster "stupid players and losers" on Instagram after they characterized the city of St. Louis as "boring" and undesirable, he added more fuel to the fire in the rivalry between the two clubs.

"Oh, it will. It will carry (into the season)," Molina told MLB.com's Jenifer Langosch on Monday when asked if the beef with Bryant and the Cubs would continue. "I can't wait to get on the field."
   49. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: January 22, 2019 at 11:53 AM (#5807658)
Does Yadier live in St. Louis during the offseason?
   50. jmurph Posted: January 22, 2019 at 11:59 AM (#5807661)
Does Yadier live in St. Louis during the offseason?

Seems even more personal, like he was one of the original settlers or at least a city planner.
   51. bbmck Posted: January 22, 2019 at 12:01 PM (#5807664)
Link: he and his wife, Wanda, make their home in Jupiter, Fla., with their sons, Yanuell Benjamin (10/20/08) and Daniel (2/6/16), and daughter, Adrianna (7/4/10)...name is pronounced Yah-DEE-air
   52. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 22, 2019 at 12:03 PM (#5807665)
OK, yeah, this is getting really dumb. If Yadi were a true statesman, he would volunteer to take Bryant to the strippiest of strip clubs next time the Cubs are in St. Louis.
   53. Howie Menckel Posted: January 22, 2019 at 12:04 PM (#5807667)
Bryant would say Molina splits his year between Jupiter and Uranus
   54. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 22, 2019 at 01:38 PM (#5807708)

Just eyeballing things, the LA CSA is particularly hilariously big - 34,000 sq. miles. I could expand the "area" of London to include all of south England, and it would still be quite a bit smaller than that (24000 sq. miles), and the population would go to 28 million... But nobody would ever do that, because it's stupid.

You could cut out at least 60% of that geographical area from the LA CSA (most of San Bernardino and Riverside Counties), still have a pretty contiguous metropolitan area, and barely lose any people. Can't say the same for South England.

Anyway, in terms of metropolitan areas, Boston is much more akin to SF or Philly (both in terms of population as well as economic power) than it is to Baltimore or especially Milwaukee.
   55. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 22, 2019 at 01:50 PM (#5807714)

Also, I don't think parody articles deserve their own threads, but this from Clickhole should be posted somewhere: "The Saga Continues: J.K. Rowling Has Revealed That Every Now And Then The Sorting Hat Would Arbitrarily Sort A Kid Onto The New York Mets".

   56. Man o' Schwar Posted: January 22, 2019 at 01:57 PM (#5807717)
If Yadi were a true statesman, he would volunteer to take Bryant to the strippiest of strip clubs next time the Cubs are in St. Louis.

I've been to some of those clubs. Bryant might be better off just staying at home.
   57. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 22, 2019 at 01:58 PM (#5807718)
food options that are open after 9PM


That is a good point, outside of fast food or bars, there really is nothing like that around where I live.

You don't have diners?
   58. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: January 22, 2019 at 03:08 PM (#5807748)
Also, I don't think parody articles deserve their own threads, but this from Clickhole should be posted somewhere


I could have sworn I put this in for its own thread. I was delighted by it. I would have wanted to be sorted onto the Mets as a kid!
   59. cardsfanboy Posted: January 22, 2019 at 04:08 PM (#5807768)
You don't have diners?


Not in the immediate area, in the city sure, and you have your Denny's/Ihop/Waffle House and other crap restaurants like that, but not someplace that serves actual food. Or maybe I should have said "outside of chain restaurants and bars, we don't have much choices to eat after 9pm in the suburb area I live in St Louis." Not that the bar food is bad(there are a couple of places that I would say are equal parts bar/restaurant in the area, but I just don't do bars right now.)
   60. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 22, 2019 at 04:13 PM (#5807772)
Not in the immediate area, in the city sure, and you have your Denny's/Ihop/Waffle House and other crap restaurants like that, but not someplace that serves actual food.

Huh. We have a diner in like every suburban town.

Not that most of them are great, but you can get a regular meal at 1 AM, or breakfast at 4 PM.
   61. Nasty Nate Posted: January 22, 2019 at 04:19 PM (#5807776)
The Boston area is also weirdly devoid of diners.
   62. jmurph Posted: January 22, 2019 at 04:23 PM (#5807778)
Huh. We have a diner in like every suburban town.

Not that most of them are great, but you can get a regular meal at 1 AM, or breakfast at 4 PM.

This is not exclusive to NY/NJ, but the diner scene is much, much better there than anywhere else I'm familiar with.
   63. SoSH U at work Posted: January 22, 2019 at 04:34 PM (#5807784)
This is not exclusive to NY/NJ, but the diner scene is much, much better there than anywhere else I'm familiar with.


That's undoubtedly true. Outside the New York area, it's mostly chain breakfast places that are open all night, like the three CFB mentioned. The 24-hour diner run by Greeks isn't very common elsewhere, as far as I can tell.
   64. Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington Posted: January 22, 2019 at 04:38 PM (#5807786)
It might be a big city thing, because there's plenty of those 24 hours diners in Chicago. All of varying quality.
   65. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 22, 2019 at 04:40 PM (#5807787)
there's plenty of those 24 hours diners in Chicago. All of varying quality.
Varying, of course, according to the level of intoxication of the consumer.
   66. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 22, 2019 at 04:48 PM (#5807791)
most people take pride in their hometown


Much like their families. "I can say bad things about my relatives, but you say anything about my mother..."

I grew up in the suburbs and to me they are deathly. I've lived in Brooklyn (2 bedroom apartment, ~900 square feet) for 38 years, raised two kids there, will probably never leave until dementia claims me. On holiday, I like to visit tiny towns, the sort of place that has a small grocer and a couple of pubs just around the corner, but if you walk for 5 minutes you're out in the country. But city=civilization. Which I'm in favor of.

OG, bless your heart, great to see you.
   67. jmurph Posted: January 22, 2019 at 04:58 PM (#5807794)
It might be a big city thing, because there's plenty of those 24 hours diners in Chicago. All of varying quality.

Yeah but the fun part about the NY/NJ area is they're in all the burbs and smaller cities, too.

   68. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 22, 2019 at 05:00 PM (#5807795)

Even growing up in the suburbs of NYC we had diners that were open late (I don't recall if they were 24 hours). But yeah in other major cities I've found late night food options much more limited.

So yeah, I grew up in the suburbs and can understand people who prefer it. But I enjoy living where I can walk to work in 20 minutes, and within a few block radius there are multiple restaurants, a grocery store, a movie theater, a gym, etc. A yard would be nice but I'm less than half a mile from a long jogging/cycling path and network of parks/athletic fields. The downside, as others have said, is that your money doesn't buy you nearly as much space (in Manhattan, at least).
   69. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 22, 2019 at 05:07 PM (#5807796)
But I enjoy living where I can walk to work in 20 minutes, and within a few block radius there are multiple restaurants, a grocery store, a movie theater, a gym, etc.

Those things are great, but don't offset:

1) A next door neighbor who burns his dinner 5 nights a week so your apartment smells like burnt steak, and has a screaming fight with his girlfriend once a week that keeps you up.

or

2) An upstairs neighbor who puts her high heels on at 6 AM and proceeds to walk around her apartment for 30 minutes before leaving for work.

I only live 25 miles from NYC and I can drive to all the amenities you talk about in <10 minutes, and have no problem finding parking.

A yard would be nice but I'm less than half a mile from a long jogging/cycling path and network of parks/athletic fields.

The main purpose of the yard is not for sports, it's to separate your neighbors from you.
   70. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 22, 2019 at 05:13 PM (#5807797)
2) An upstairs neighbor who puts her high heels on at 6 AM and proceeds to walk around her apartment for 30 minutes before leaving for work.
Oh, man, I had that one at my apartment in 2000-01. Unbelievable. It was just, why?? Why do that?? Why not just keep your heels by the door and put them on when you leave?? Every woman says heels are so uncomfortable, and it's bad for the hardwood floors, and obnoxious to your neighbors. Literally nobody wins. Why??
   71. Steve Parris, Je t'aime Posted: January 22, 2019 at 05:32 PM (#5807806)
24 hour diners are slowly losing popularity because of, you guessed it, millennials. A diner in South Philly recently stopped all-night service and blamed it on younger people favoring grubhub and uber eats.
   72. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 22, 2019 at 05:33 PM (#5807807)

Nothing wrong with the suburbs, like I said. I grew up probably one or two towns over from where you live, snapper, and a few of my best friends have moved back there, so it obviously has some appeal.

I guess I'm lucky. My building requires you to have rugs/carpets covering a certain % of your floor, so I've never had that problem with the high heels (I'm also up at 6 am most mornings anyway). For the most part, I've had very limited interaction with my neighbors in apartment buildings, and no negative ones that I can recall. I've heard of a few horror stories but I've also heard of horror stories with shared property lines (or shared walls in townhouses) in the 'burbs.
   73. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: January 22, 2019 at 05:36 PM (#5807808)
Those things are great, but don't offset:

1) A next door neighbor who burns his dinner 5 nights a week so your apartment smells like burnt steak, and has a screaming fight with his girlfriend once a week that keeps you up.

or

2) An upstairs neighbor who puts her high heels on at 6 AM and proceeds to walk around her apartment for 30 minutes before leaving for work.


3) Living upstairs from an Indian family that cooks three meals a day. I worked with and generally liked dozens upon dozens of Indian folk, and enjoy most of the food, but living upstairs from that cuisine, yowsers.
   74. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 22, 2019 at 05:40 PM (#5807812)
a few of my best friends have moved back there
Ugh. Hiding behind the "some of my best friends are suburbanites!" trope, I see.
   75. Man o' Schwar Posted: January 22, 2019 at 06:34 PM (#5807868)
Not much in the way of 24 hour anything in the Bay Area. It's surprising to me that I had an easier time finding an all-night supermarket living in Iowa than I do living in a major metropolitan area.

Aside from Denny's/IHOP, I'm not sure where I would go here if I wanted a burger at 3 AM.

When I was in college, we were about a mile from a 24-hour donut place. If you went after 1 AM, they'd sell you all of their "would otherwise be garbage" day-old donuts - all you can eat for $1.00. I spent a lot of nights there doing Latin homework and eating slightly stale (but still very delicious) cake donuts.
   76. Tom Nawrocki Posted: January 22, 2019 at 06:38 PM (#5807873)
If you don't think St. Louis is boring, you must be from Indianapolis.
   77. McCoy Posted: January 22, 2019 at 07:33 PM (#5807908)
Snapper's vision of the big city hasn't matches my experience with cities. Then throw in that while living in the suburbs I've had several high profile murders happen nearby and city life looks a lot more attractive.
   78. McCoy Posted: January 22, 2019 at 07:38 PM (#5807911)
Philadelphia has a big 24 hours foods situation as well or close to it. Places that deliver pizza until 4 am. 24 hour diners. Cheesesteaks and meatball sandwiches after the bars close and so forth.

Atlanta proper has several places open at all hours and several places open late as well as several suburban places that are open 24 hours. Hell, in 2017 when I accidentally forgot to setup a gas account I had Christmas dinner at a suburban 24 hour place.

DC has a few 24 hour places but I can't recall too many diners in DC and several of the 24 hour places would just do that on the weekends. Duccini's pizza would stay open until 5 am or so on the weekends and they served the best jumbo slices in the city.
   79. I am going to be Frank Posted: January 22, 2019 at 07:51 PM (#5807921)
I'm in northern NJ and a lot of the diners in my immediate area are only open 24 hours on the weekends. Some bigger ones I'm sure are still open 24-7. The local IHOP is not open 24-7.

I do miss a Meijer-type option where you can get groceries late at night.
   80. McCoy Posted: January 22, 2019 at 07:59 PM (#5807930)
Dallas had a lot of 24 hour grocery stores and it was glorious. The downside of course was that the deli was closed but having the entire store to yourself was glorious.
   81. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: January 22, 2019 at 08:01 PM (#5807933)
Milwaukee definitely has a good stable of 24 hr places run by Greeks, but as noted above that's taking a hit to the millenials and gen y crowd. My mce preferred place has cut his 24hr days to Thur to Sun. He specifically said the 20s/30s have vanished. Consistent with bar traffic, nationally, trending downwards. I'm told millenials don't go to corner taverns either.
   82. cardsfanboy Posted: January 22, 2019 at 08:06 PM (#5807937)
I do miss a Meijer-type option where you can get groceries late at night.


I am to the point that I assume all grocery stores are open 24 hours, yet the one closest to my work isn't, but the one closest to my home is... for the most part I think of grocery stores now like I did Walgreens and gas stations, I just assume they are open 24 hours. (even though even near me I know of a few that aren't... but I literally have 5 walgreens within 6 miles of me, and three of them are 24 hours... only 3 grocery stores in that range, all three are 24 hours, and obviously a dozen or so gas stations all 24 hours)
   83. cardsfanboy Posted: January 22, 2019 at 08:18 PM (#5807947)
And I'm not even sure that this is all about cities vs suburbs for the most part, as a kid in the 80's, in the suburbs there was a couple of 24 hour locally owned diners within walking distance (walking distance for a kid is less then 25 minutes, meaning roughly 1.5 miles or so) that we would frequent, along with a Denny's that were 24 hours,... that exact same spot now has none of them other than the Denny's but it's added a 24hour McDonalds which requires you to have a car (along with Burger King, Jack In the Box, Taco Bell and I'm sure I'm missing one, doesn't have a White Castle though)

Even in the city, one of the more famous diners in St Louis, has gone out of business, been bought and re-opened and I think it went out of business again(mind you it was in a crappy part of the city and that was inevitable) in the past couple of years.... non-franchise food really doesn't make enough money to stay open 24 hours anymore in any area where the traffic has dropped too much. (guess that could be said about any business)
   84. Man o' Schwar Posted: January 22, 2019 at 09:46 PM (#5807994)
I do miss a Meijer-type option where you can get groceries late at night.

We had a Safeway near me that was open 24 hours. Unfortunately, this being San Francisco, they had a rash of late-night robberies by some of our fine local criminals who got bored with breaking into cars night after night.

As a result, they now close at midnight. The only thing I know that is open near me 24 hours is a McDonalds, but you can't go inside after 11 PM. Drive thru only (just as well, I'd hate to get out of my car that late in this city).
   85. Man o' Schwar Posted: January 22, 2019 at 09:50 PM (#5807998)
Even in the city, one of the more famous diners in St Louis, has gone out of business, been bought and re-opened and I think it went out of business again(mind you it was in a crappy part of the city and that was inevitable) in the past couple of years.... non-franchise food really doesn't make enough money to stay open 24 hours anymore in any area where the traffic has dropped too much. (guess that could be said about any business)

I can remember when St. Louis had a 24-hour bowling alley.
   86. cardsfanboy Posted: January 22, 2019 at 10:02 PM (#5808000)
I can remember when St. Louis had a 24-hour bowling alley.


Redbird lanes... had some type of connection to Stan Musial, but I don't know what it was. I'm a bowler, but I didn't (and still don't) travel much...more or less a house bowler... I had been to Redbird lanes once in my life... (that I remember, but with my dad, who was on the travelling league, it's possible I was there more than once)
   87. Howie Menckel Posted: January 22, 2019 at 10:14 PM (#5808004)
DC has a few 24 hour places but I can't recall too many diners in DC and several of the 24 hour places would just do that on the weekends.

cue the Steven Wright joke:

"I went down the street to the 24-hour grocery. When I got there, the guy was locking the front door. I said, 'Hey, the sign says you're open 24 hours.' He said, 'Yeah, but NOT IN A ROW!'"

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